WB Tourism for MoT

December 6, 2017 | Author: rchowdhury_10 | Category: Bengal, Tourism, Kolkata, Sustainability, Public–Private Partnership
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Identification of Tourism Circuits across India

Interim Report West Bengal April – 2012 Submitted to:

Submitted by:

Ministry of Tourism, Government of India 1, Parliament Street, Transport Bhawan, New Delhi - 110001

2nd Floor, Ambience Corporate Tower, Ambience Mall, NH-8, Gurgaon, Haryana – 122 001

Table of Contents 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 4 1.1

Assignment Brief ............................................................................................................... 4

1.2

Objectives of the Study ...................................................................................................... 4

1.3

Approach and Methodology ............................................................................................... 4

Brief on the State ....................................................................................................................... 8 2.1

Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 8

2.2

Brief History ...................................................................................................................... 9

2.3

Administrative Setup, Infrastructure Scenario and other details........................................... 9

2.4

Economic Profile ............................................................................................................. 10

2.5

Overview of the Existing Tourism Scenario...................................................................... 11

2.6

Existing Tourism Infrastructure/ Major Tourism Plans and Schemes ................................ 14

2.7

Tourism Circuits & Destinations in West Bengal .............................................................. 17

Initial Screening of the Circuits ................................................................................................ 21 3.1

Based on Secondary Research .......................................................................................... 21

3.2

Key Parameters ................................................................................................................ 21

3.3

Priority Circuit Details ..................................................................................................... 23

Stakeholders Consultation ........................................................................................................ 25 4.1

State Government, State Tour & Travel Operators and Other Representatives................... 25

4.2

Carrying Capacity Assessment ......................................................................................... 26

Existing Infrastructure Status of the Circuit .............................................................................. 34 5.1

Template to Evaluate Infrastructure Status/Availability between Tourist Destinations ....... 35

5.2

Infrastructure Gaps ........................................................................................................... 36

Project Identification, Block Cost Estimates, Implementation and Funding............................... 38 6.1

Identified Projects ............................................................................................................ 38

6.2

PPP Project Bifurcation – Detail of Public Funds and Private Investments ........................ 45

6.3

Estimated Employment Generation .................................................................................. 46

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List of Tables

Table 2: Projects and Amount Sanctioned for Tourism Projects ....................................................... 17 Table 3: UDPFI Density Limits ....................................................................................................... 29 Table 4: Physical and Ecological Indicators ..................................................................................... 30 Table 5 : Social and Demographic Indicators ................................................................................... 31 Table 6 : Political Economic Indicators ............................................................................................ 31 Table 7 : Evaluation Criterion for Physical and Ecological Indicators .............................................. 31 Table 8: West Bengal Priority Circuit Town Wise Carrying Capacity Assessment ........................... 32 Table 9: West Bengal Priority Circuit Destination Wise Carrying Capacity Assessment ................... 32 Table 10: Template to evaluate Infrastructure status/availability between Tourist Destinations ......... 35 Table 11: Project Identified, Block Cost Estimates, Implementation and Funding ............................ 38 Table 12: PPP Bifurcation – Detail of Public Funds and Private Investments ................................... 45 Table 13: Expected Employment Generation ................................................................................... 46 Table 14: Infrastructure Gap Status/Availability in the Priority Circuit ............................................. 47 List of Figures Figure 1: Study Methodology ............................................................................................................ 5 Figure 2 : Key Demographics Features .............................................................................................. 8 Figure 3: Administrative Map of Bengal .......................................................................................... 10 Figure 4: West Bengal Priority Circuit ............................................................................................. 23 Figure 5 : Methodology for Carrying Capacity Analysis .................................................................. 27 Figure 6: Tourist‘s Perception of Digha ........................................................................................... 34 Figure 7: Visitor‘s Aspirations ......................................................................................................... 34 Figure 8: Various Destinations of Circuit ......................................................................................... 36 Figure 9: Circuit Details at a Glance ................................................................................................ 37

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1. Introduction 1.1

Assignment Brief

IL&FS Infrastructure Development Corporation Ltd (IL&FS IDC) appointed as the National Level Consultant by Ministry of Tourism, is in the process of identifying tourism circuits across all the States and UTs (except North-East). These circuits are proposed to be developed during the 12th Plan, in an integrated manner with Central Financial Assistance and appropriate involvement of State Governments and private sector. For the first phase, the process has been started with the selection of existing/new tourist circuits (4 in each state and 2 in Union Territories). These circuits have been structured considering the length, duration and connectivity. After the identification and prioritisation of these circuits in Phase I, the next step is to identify the basic and tourism related infrastructural and promotional needs of the identified circuits, which are to be implemented on priority basis, along with the tentative cost estimates. These projects should be related to development of basic as well as tourism related infrastructure. Thereafter, Detailed Project Reports (DPRs) will be prepared by the State Level Consultant for the projects identified along with their financial projections. 1.2

Objectives of the Study

The objectives of the present study are: 

To identify the potential tourist circuits/destinations in the State of West Bengal



To analyse the potential and carrying capacity of the identified tourist circuits/destinations and prioritise the same.



Assess the existing infrastructure – basic and tourism related for the circuits/destinations.



To assess the interventions for improving the quantity and quality of basic and tourism infrastructure for prioritized circuits/destinations.



1.3

Identify infrastructural projects to be initiated by Central/State/Private sector

Approach and Methodology

Figure 1 presents a flow diagram of the approach and methodology used for the present study. Based on primary and secondary sources, literature search and discussions with key stake holders (State Govt and local tour & travel industry), the existing tourists‘ flow and orientation were studied. The existing and future potential and connectivity of the destinations were studied for an initial screening of the tourist circuits/destinations.

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Figure 1: Study Methodology

Initial Screening of Tourist Circuits

Secondary Research  Potential  Popularity  Connectivity

Short listing of the Circuits

Discussion with Department of Tourism, representatives of Travel & Tourism Industry and other stakeholders

Carrying Capacity Assessment

Identified Circuits along with Priority Circuit

Detailed Infrastructure Gap Assessment

Identification of Prospective Projects with Block Cost Estimates

Parameters Transport, Roads condition, Access to modes of transportation, Utilities, Accommodation, Way side amenities, Management of tourist attractions

Based on  Stakeholder Consultations  Reconnaissance survey

Final Report

After the initial screening, the circuits identified were discussed with the State Government (Department of Tourism), representatives of Travel & Tourism Industry and other stakeholders. On the basis of these consultations, tourism circuits have been shortlisted. In order to understand existing capacity of the shortlisted circuits as well as destinations, a detailed carrying capacity assessment has been done. This assessment is, primarily, based on the residential and tourist population densities of the town/cities.

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Based on above exercise, four circuits have been identified and prioritized. The circuits have been prioritized after consultations with the stakeholders and based on the popularity, tourists‘ flow pattern and perceived need for improvements/investments to basic and tourism infrastructure. In the present study, the circuit with the highest priority has been taken up for detailed examination. Thereafter, detailed infrastructure assessment of the priority circuit is undertaken. The objective of the said assessment is to understand the significance of the mentioned sites from a tourist perspective and to map the availability of basic and tourism related-infrastructure. Typical infrastructure being demanded includes facilities at entry-exit points, accommodation, way-side amenities, physical & social infrastructure, public utilities as well as health & security. This assessment is based on reconnaissance survey done along the route, wayside and on site of the priority circuit. Following infrastructure has been examined to assess the requirements and deficiencies: 1) Modes of Transport- airways, roadways and railways and access thereto 2) Road network 3) Utilities-power, water facility, etc 4) Accommodation 5) Way side amenities 6) Maintenance and management of built heritage/tourist attractions On the basis of reconnaissance survey, discussions with local community and other stakeholders, gaps have been identified. Based on these gaps as well as site potential, sustainable projects have been proposed along with the indicative block costs. These projects proposed are intended achieve the following two objectives: 

Products and activities proposed will attract the tourist inflow and will hold the tourists in the circuits which will provide socio-economic benefits at a larger level.



Sustainable projects will attract different investors and private players to participate in infrastructure development which will benefit both, Government as well as private sector.

1.4

i.

Key Findings For the State of West Bengal, the following four circuits have been identified for integrated development. Circuit 1- Beach Tourism Circuit in Purba Medinipur: Digha – Shankarpur – Tajpur – Junput – Mandarmani. Circuit 2- Pilgrim Tourism Circuit: Ganga Sagar – Birbhum (Tarapeeth – Bakreshwar – Nalhati – Fullura – Saithia – Kankalitala), Tarakeswar, Furfura Sharif.

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Circuit 3- Nature Tourism Circuit: Dooars and Darjeeling Circuit Circuit 4: Sunderban Circuit: Gadkhali, Jharkhali, Koikhali, Frazerganj

ii.

Based on the carrying capacity assessment, tourism potential and discussion with the stakeholders, Circuit 1 has been proposed as the Priority Circuit for the State of West Bengal.

1.5

Structure of the Report

The present report, which covers the priority circuit of West Bengal, has been divided into following sections.  Chapter 1: Introduction: This chapter provides the rationale behind the assignment, aims and key objectives of the study followed by approach and methodology adopted for the same  Chapter 2: Brief on the State: This section of the report focuses on the profile of the state, especially in terms of infrastructure, tourism trends and key spots/sites.  Chapter 3: Initial Screening of the Circuits: This chapter is followed by sections explaining the process of initial screening/short listing of tourism circuits which is largely based on key parameters like tourist profile, carrying capacity, safety and sustainability, respectively.  Chapter 4: Stakeholders Consultations and Selection of Tourist Circuits: This chapter provides information on the Stakeholder consultations done at Centre as well as State level and along with their respective outcome. The latter sections in this chapter also focus on the carrying capacity analysis done for the tourist circuits.  Chapter 5: Existing Infrastructure Status of the Priority Circuit: This chapter analyses current status of circuits (based on site study undertaken) and infrastructure gaps identified during the site visit. Based on this, assessment of the level of adequacy of infrastructure has been undertaken with respect to the existing infrastructure, increasing tourist inflow, destination popularity, types of tourists and seasonality.  Chapter 6: The last chapter of the study report provides information on prospective projects in the circuits that can be taken up for infrastructural upgradation.

Page | 7

2. Brief on the State 2.1

i.

Introduction

West Bengal, now proposed to be renamed as Paschim-Banga is located in the Eastern part of India and is the nation's fourth most populous state. The State lies between 27o13'15" and 21o25'24" North latitudes and 85o48'20" and 89o53'04" East longitudes. It is bounded on the North by Sikkim and Bhutan, on the East by Assam and Bangladesh, on the South by the Bay of Bengal and on the West by Orissa, Bihar and Nepal. The State stretches from the Himalayas in the North to the Bay of Bengal in the South. West Bengal adjoins three international borders viz. Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan.

ii.

The state is spread over an area of 88,752 sq. km. and a population of 80.18 million as per 2001 census. There are 19 districts, 341 blocks and 40782 villages. The State has a population density of 903 per sq. km. (as against the national average of 312). The decadal growth rate of the state is 17.77% (against 21.54% for the country).Salient demographic features in this regard are presented in the following table: Figure 2 : Key Demographics Features

Population

Demographic Features 1991 Total 68077965 Male Female

% Share in Country's Population % share of Urban Population (India) % share of Rural Population (India) % share of major religious communities (India)

Population Density (per Sq. Km) (India) Decadal Growth rate (%) (India)

2001 80176197

Hindus

35510633 32567332 8.12 27.48 (25.73) 72.52 (74.27) 74.72 (82.00)

41465985 38710212 7.79 27.97 (27.82) 72.03 (72.18) 72.47 (80.46)

Muslims

23.61 (12.12)

25.25 (13.43)

767 (274) 24.73 (23.85)

903 (324) 17.77 (21.34)

Page | 8

iii.

The capital and largest city of the State is Kolkata — the third-largest urban agglomeration and the fourth-largest city in India. Siliguri, Asansol and Durgapur are key Metropolitan cities. Other major cities and towns in West Bengal are Howrah, Raniganj, Haldia, Jalpaiguri, Kharagpur, Burdwan, Darjeeling, Midnapore, Tamluk, Malda and Cooch Behar.

2.2

i.

Brief History

Bengal has a rich cultural heritage and a glorious past. The region has played a significant role in the Indian history, both in the ancient and medieval ages. The British first started their colonization through the East India Company. The land has given birth to a large number of well known philosophers, scientists, patriots, etc. such as Sri Aurobindo, Rabindranath Tagore, Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, Swami Vivekananda and many others who played a crucial role in the political as well as spiritual reformation in the nation. It has also produced some of the most valiant and courageous freedom who sacrificed their lives in the course of India‘s Freedom Struggle. The undivided Bengal was part of several kingdoms and dynasties over the course of Indian history.1

ii.

The early history of Bengal dates back to 3rd century BC when it was under the rule of the Mauryans. The Guptas then started their emperorship in the 4 th and 5th century AD. The name Vanga was originally given to it, in the period of Pala Dynasty in 8 th century AD. In the late 11th century the Muslim emperor Qutb-Din-Aibak gained victory to establish his government and it lasted till the death of Aurangzeb in the year 1707. The British East India Company gained control over the region following the Battle of Plassey in 1757, and the city of Calcutta, now Kolkata, served for many years as the capital of British India.2

iii.

A hotbed of the Indian independence movement through the early 20th century, Bengal was divided in 1947 into two separate entities: West Bengal and East Bengal, which initially joined the new nation of Pakistan and later on became Bangladesh in 1971. Later, the state of Cooch Behar, French enclave of Chandanagore and some parts of Bihar were added to West Bengal.3

2.3 i.

Administrative Setup, Infrastructure Scenario and other details West Bengal is divided into nineteen districts. Each District is governed by a District Collector/District Magistrate, appointed either by the Indian Administrative Service or the

1

http://www.westbengalonline.in/About/Profile/History/index.html http://www.banglarpran.com/history/index.php 3 http://www.wbonline.in/ 2

Page | 9

West Bengal Civil Service. Each district is subdivided into Sub-Divisions, governed by a subdivisional magistrate, and again into Blocks. Blocks consist of Panchayats (village councils) and town municipalities.

Figure 3: Administrative Map of Bengal ii.

West Bengal has abundant natural resources of minerals and suitable agro-climatic conditions for agriculture, horticulture and fisheries. It also has a prosperous hinterland of mineral rich states like Jharkhand, Bihar and Orissa. West Bengal offers excellent connectivity to the rest of India in terms of railways, roadways, ports and airports. Major stretches of the Golden Quadrilateral project also pass through the Northern districts of the state.

2.4 i.

Economic Profile At current prices, the Gross State Domestic Product (GSDP) of West Bengal was about US$ 76.9 billion in 2008-09. The average annual GSDP growth rate from 1999-2000 to 2008-09, was about 11.4 per cent.4

4

www.ibef.org

Page | 10

ii.

The natural resources, policy incentives and infrastructure in the state support investments in major sectors such as iron and steel, biotechnology, coal, leather, jute products, tea, IT, gems and jewellery.

iii.

Climatic conditions suitable for cultivation of tea and jute have made West Bengal a major centre for these products and related industries.

iv.

West Bengal occupies a predominant position in the development of micro and small scale enterprises. As of 2007, there were 900,419 small scale enterprises, accounting for 7 per cent of total such units in the country. The index of industrial production (IIP) in the state stood at 216.9 in May 2010, registering a growth of 1.9 per cent over May 2009.

2.5 2.5.1

Overview of the Existing Tourism Scenario Background The state is endowed with all the diversities of nature and is to that extent a tourist‘s dream. The snow capped peaks of the Himalayas, Darjeeling, referred by many as the Queen of Hill Stations, the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway declared as a World Heritage Site, the vast tea estates of the Dooars, the famed Royal Bengal Tiger of Sunderbans, the innumerable historical landmarks of India‘s and Bengal‘s glorious history are all wonders for the prospective tourists.

i.

West Bengal offers the tourists an opportunity to experience long unending beaches with gentle rolling sea lined with Casuarina forests. A number of sea resorts viz Digha, Shankarpur, Junput, Bakkhali, Sagardwip have sprung up on the East coast of Bengal.

ii.

Given the variance of the tourism sites in the State, West Bengal has something to offer throughout the year.

2.5.2 i.

Vision Statement for West Bengal Tourism West Bengal aims to become a preferred tourism and tourism-related investment destination by leveraging its unique geographical setting along with its various tourism-related assets. It will develop necessary infrastructure and promote tourism in an integrated manner which will not only bring in more investment and further the socio-economic goals of the Government, but also ensure that all these are in conformity with the relevant acts, rules and regulations relating to environmental protection.

Page | 11

ii.

The overall aim is to see that the tourism sector contributes towards improving the quality of life of people in general.

2.5.3 i.

Objectives of the Tourism Policy of West Bengal Tourism has been declared as an Industry by the State in 1996. The Government in an effort to promote the same has formulated a number of schemes to encourage Tourism.

ii.

The West Bengal Tourism Policy 2008 lays down the broad policy and plan for the State in the Tourism Sector.

iii.

The basic objectives of the Tourism Policy, 2008 of West Bengal is as follows: 

To improve the market share of West Bengal in the inbound international tourism segment and also to have a dominant share in the domestic tourism market.



To promote responsible and sustainable tourism through the integrated development of the infrastructure and not sporadic, stand alone and fragmented development.



To develop a portfolio of tourism products by utilizing its unique ecological, historical, cultural, religious, wildlife, sports, shopping, health care, educational and human assets.



To facilitate tourism by all segments, particularly the middle and lower income tourists, by making the tourist spots in the State more easily accessible through ―single-window facility‖ at the State capital and at the district headquarters and on the internet.



To fully tap the direct and indirect economic benefits of tourism by ―broad basing‖ tourism activities. This will be done by creating more employment opportunities and by dispersing tourism into the hinterland which will further the socio-economic goals of the Government.



To proactively develop partnership with the governmental and non-governmental agencies including the private sector (Public-Private-Partnership model)(PPP) to take advantage of complementary capital and intellectual assets to promote tourism



To increase the revenue earnings of the State and the foreign exchange reserves of the country.

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2.5.4 i.

Tourism Data The historic trend of visitors to the State compared to the national data is provided in the following table: Table 1: West Bengal Tourism Data

Foreign Tourists (Lacs)

Total (Lacs)

1996

44.49

1.83

46.32

1401

3.18%

50.03

3.66%

1997

45.77

1.94

47.71

1598

2.86%

55

3.53%

1998

46.45

1.95

48.4

1682

2.76%

55.4

3.52%

1999

47.03

1.99

49.02

1906

2.47%

58.3

3.41%

2000

47.37

1.98

49.35

2201

2.15%

58.9

3.36%

2001

49.43

2.84

52.27

2364

2.09%

54.4

5.22%

2002

88.44

5.29

93.73

2669

3.31%

51.6

10.25%

2003

113.01

7.05

120.06

3090

3.66%

67.1

10.51%

2004

123.80

7.76

131.56

3662

3.38%

83.6

9.28%

2005

135.67

8.96

144.63

3919

3.46%

99.5

9.01%

2006

156.00

8.86

164.86

4623

3.37%

117.5

7.54%

2007

185.80

11.54

197.34

5265

3.53%

132.7

8.70%

2008

193.14

11.33

204.47

5629

3.43%

141.12

8.03%

2009

205.28

11.8

217.08

5630

3.65%

142.12

8.30%

2010

210.72

11.92

222.64

5631

3.74%

143.12

8.33%

Year

ii.

Total Domestic (India)

Total Foreign

Domestic Tourists (Lacs)

WB Share

(India)

WB Share

It may be seen that the State has been receiving around 3-3.7% of the domestic tourist. The position with foreign tourists is a little improved with West Bengal accounting for over 8% of the foreign tourists.

2.5.5

i.

Major Tourism Destinations & Products

The Government of West Bengal is desirous of promoting West Bengal as an ideal tourist. It aims at developing specialized tourism products such as: o

Pilgrimage tourism - Dakshineswar, Furfurasharif, Bandel Church, Tarapeeth, Gutiasharif, Belurmath, Jairambati, Jai Chandipur, Tarakeseshwar, Nalhati, Kali Ghat and other important places.

o

Coastal & Beach Tourism - Digha, Sagar Islands,

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o

Eco tourism and wild life tourism - Sunderbans & Dooar

o

Folk Tourism - Centres of Folk dance and drama across the State

o

Educational Heritage & Culture Tourism - Shantiniketan, Bishnupur (Terracotta Temples)

o

Himalaya Tourism (Darjeeling & surrounding areas) - -Trekking, white water rafting, adventure tourism

2.6 2.6.1

(i)

o

Tea Garden tourism – Darjeeling & Dooars

o

Metropolitan Tourism – In and around Kolkata and other important cities

o

Cruise on the Ganga river

o

Botanical Garden – Shibpur in line with Kew Gardens, London

o

Agri-Horticulture Garden – Alipore

o

National Museum

o

Jorasanko – Home of Rabindra Nath Tagore

o

Netaji Museum – Home of Subhash Chandra Bose

Existing Tourism Infrastructure/ Major Tourism Plans and Schemes Existing Infrastructure5

Air Connections: The Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose Airport in Kolkata is an international airport linking various global destinations by direct flights. There are two domestic terminals i.e. Kolkata and Bagdogra. In addition, the Coochbehar airport has recently been made operational. Kolkata airport is connected with almost all the major cities in the country. Bagdogra airport, located in North Bengal, has direct connections with Kolkata, New Delhi & Guwahati. The Kolkata Airport had international traffic of 1.01 million and domestic traffic of 6.45 million in 2007-08. 6 Currently, the Kolkata International Airport is being modernized with an investment of US$ 30 million, which includes the development of a new integrated cargo complex.

(ii)

Road Connections: The state is well served with a wide network of National and State Highways. All tourist destinations are easily accessible by road. Motor launches and mechanized boats take tourists to the Sunderbans and Sagar Island. The total length of roads in West Bengal is over 92,023 km. West Bengal's road density is 103.69 km per 100 sq km,

5 6

www.pppinindia.com/infrastructure-west-bengal.php pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=41337

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higher than the national average of 74.7 km per 100 sq km. The total length of National Highways passing through the state is 2,393 km. (iii)

Rail Connections: The total length of railway network in West Bengal is 3,681 km. Of this, 1,700 km is an electrified track. Howrah and Sealdah in Kolkata and New Jalpaiguri (near Siliguri in North Bengal) are the major railway hubs of the state. Several important superfast trains connect these stations with almost all the parts of the country including north East. The state has an excellent railway network within the state connecting almost all important tourist destinations.

(iv)

Port Infrastructure: The state of West Bengal has two modern ports – Kolkata and Haldia which together handled 54.22 million tonnes of cargo in 2008-09. During 2008-09, Kolkata Port ranked ‗fifth‘ amongst all Indian major ports in terms of cargo handling. Currently both ports are being modernized and upgraded to cope with the growth in cargo. An outlay of US$ 222.26 million has been projected in the 11th Plan for Kolkata Port Trust. The outlay for Kolkata Dock System is in tune of US$ 45.17 million and that of Haldia Dock Complex is US$ 83.15 million.

(v)

Communication Infrastructure: Kolkata, the state capital, offers more than 580 Mbps of international satellite connectivity through VSNL & 5 STPI Earth Stations at Kolkata, Durgapur, Kharagpur, Haldia and Siliguri. Cable connectivity is provided through leased BSNL lines to Mumbai & onward connectivity through submarine cables. Besides BSNL, private players like Reliance Infocomm, Vodafone & Bharti Airtel also connect Kolkata to the rest of the world. A submarine cable landing station is likely to be set up at Digha.

(vi)

Approved Hotels: The Ministry of Tourism has adopted a system of approving and classifying the hotels on the basis of the facilities and services provided by them. As per the India Tourism Statistics, 2009 released by the Ministry of Tourism Government of India, West Bengal has thirty nine approved hotels with 2796 rooms. However, there has been a multiplying investment in hotel infrastructure and the number is set to increase significantly over the next 2-3 years.

(vii)

In addition to the above, Tourism Lodges are maintained by the West Bengal Tourism Development Ltd at all important areas. These lodges can be booked online and have proved to be very beneficial for ordinary tourists.

(viii) As per the above MOT Report, the State has 5 tour operators and 18 Travel Agencies.

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2.6.2 (i)

Overall Tourism Plans West Bengal is a State rich in resources which can be leveraged for tourism. As per the State Tourism Policy, the State will focus on these assets to proactively develop different tourism products/destinations. The tourism products/destinations to be accorded priority will be as follows: Nature-based Tourism: West Bengal is replete with most of the natural assets that exist in the country, except the desert. Some of these assets are unique (eg. Sunderbans delta, tea plantations, beaches, mountains and wildlife) and give the State a huge competitive advantage. Tourism will be developed around these natural resources, which will include Sunderbans Tourism, Plantation Tourism, Sea and Coastline Tourism, Mountain Tourism, Eco and Forest Tourism, and River Tourism.

Cultural Tourism: West Bengal is the cultural capital of India. It has constantly produced thoughts, ideas and events which have brought forth freshness and rejuvenation in the society both in India and the world. This strength of West Bengal needs to be taken forward with greater vigour from a tourism perspective to give tourism an unmatched strength in the State. The specific components of Cultural Tourism which will be focused upon will include Fairs and Festivals Tourism, Heritage Tourism, Arts and Crafts Tourism, Cuisine Tourism, Film Tourism, Family, Relatives and Friends Tourism, and Village Tourism.

Religious Tourism: India is known for its religious places of worship. Visit to religious destinations has been the biggest reason for travel in India, and West Bengal too has a vital role to play in this area. Tourism products involving religious destinations will be developed.

Contemporary Tourism: To remain competitive, West Bengal will also focus on tourism products which are contemporary and which provide a reason for people to travel. These would include Shopping Tourism, Convention Tourism, Leisure and Amusement Parks Tourism, Medical Tourism, Rail Tourism, Highway Tourism, Sports Tourism, ―Know-YourOwn State Tourism‖, Special Tourism Zones, and other tourism products. The number of projects and amount sanctioned under the Five Year Plan for the State of West Bengal is provided in the following table:

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Table 2: Projects and Amount Sanctioned for Tourism Projects 2008-09 No of Sanctioned Projects (INR Crs) 10 37.94

2009-10 No of Sanctioned Projects (INR Crs) 7 28.37

2010-11 No of Sanctioned Projects (INR Crs) 8 22.02 Source: India Tourism Statistics 2010

2.7 2.7.1

Tourism Circuits & Destinations in West Bengal Tourism Circuits in West Bengal

i.

Some of the ongoing/proposed tourism circuits in the State are as listed below: i.

Islampur-Lalbagh-Jiagunj

ii.

Western Dooars tourism circuit

iii.

Ganga Heritage River Circuit

iv.

Gar Mandaran - Kamarpukur - Joyrambati Circuit

v.

Digha - Bakkhali - Mandarmani Circuit

vi.

Tea Tourism Circuit at Dooar

vii.

Beach Tourism Circuit in Purba Medinipur: Digha – Shankarpur – Tajpur – Junput – Mandarmani.

viii.

Religious & Pilgrim Tourism: Ganga Sagar – Birbhum (Tarapeeth – Bakreshwar – Nalhati – Fullura – Saithia – Kankalitala), Tarakeswar, Pathar Chapri - Furfura Sharif.

ix.

Eco Adventure and Wild Life Tourism in North Bengal: Dooars and Darjeeling Circuit.

x.

Sundarban Circuit: Gad Khali, Dhamakhali, Diamond Harbour, Henry Island, Bakkhali, Jharkhali, Lothian Island.

xi.

Heritage tourism along River Ganga: Chandannagar – Serampore – Bandel – Bansberia – Nabadwip - Murshidabad.

xii.

Rural Tourism: Kalna- Samudragrah – Phulia – Clusters in Purulia, Bankura, Coochbehar, Jalpaiguri.

xiii.

Kolkata Circuit

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2.7.2

Tourist Destinations in West Bengal7

Santiniketan: 136km from Kolkata, Santinikatan is the brainchild of India‘s most illustrious poet, philosopher, painter, and philanthropist, Rabindranath Tagore. Only 3km away from Santiniketan is Sriniketan, the rural reconstruction center, founded by the poet. Fine batik prints on textiles and leather bags are famous products of Sriniketan.

Murshidabad: Situated 209 km North of Kolkata, Murshidabad has a tradition of handicrafts in silk, ivory carvings and bell metal-ware. Standing right beside Bhagirathi is Nizamatkila-an Italian style palace built by the British. Across the river among places to visit are Khusbag, the garden where Nawabs were buried. Opposite to it is the Moti Jhil or Pearl Lake. The Hazarduari-the mansion of thousand doors is now a museum of the Nawab dynasty‘s belongings. Great Imambara, Moti Jhil (pearl lake) and the impressive ruins of Katra Mosque, built in 1723, and Medina mosque are other attractions. A Jain Parasnath Temple is located at Kathgola. Another interesting palace is Wasif Manzil with its unique collection of curios, paintings, arms and costumes.

Around Murshidabad: The Char Bangla Temple in Baranagar is quite famous. The Bhavaniswar Temple, too, is one of the finest examples of terracotta sculpture in West Bengal. Besides the crumbling mansions and cemeteries of the English and Dutch settlements, Behrampore is famous for raw silk (tussar) production.

Sunderbans: Sunderbans is a marshy mangrove jungle south of Bengal and is the largest estuarine forest in the world. This dense tropical forest, inhabited by wild animals, is the home of the legendary Royal Bengal Tiger. The wildlife in the Sunderbans includes boars, spotted deer, and rhesus monkeys, fishing cats, otters, civets, Salvador lizards, estuarine crocodiles and olive ridley turtles.

Nadia: Connected by bus service form Krishnanagar and Kolkata and a ferry ride across the Bhagirathi river from Nabadwip, Mayapur is the headquarters of ISKCON. The Chandroday Temple, set amidst a garden, is a picturesque sight. There are quite a few big and small temples also.

Nabadwip: 19km from Krishnanagar and 120km north from Kolkata, Nabadwip stands on the banks of the Bhagirathi River. Sonargouranga, the temple with the golden statue of Sri Chaitanya, is the most important shrine here.

7

www.westbengal.gov.in

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Krishnanagar: 118km north from Kolkata, Krishnanagar on the banks of Jalangi River was the residence of Maharaja Krishnachandra, a great patron of art and culture. Places worth visiting are the Rajbari (Royal Palace) with a beautiful Durga temple in the courtyard. The Roman Catholic Church is famous for its architectural and sculptural splendor. Others include the College Bhavan (1846), The Public Library (1856), the Krishnanagar Academy and the Protestant Church.

Bardhaman: Scattered in and around Bardhaman are quite a few places of interest. The majestic Curzon Gate, now know as Vijay Toran, was erected in 1903 in Lord Curzon‘s honour. One km from the Gate is the Royal Palace. The tomb of Sher Afghan, the last of the Afghan jagirdars in Bardhaman, is located at Pir Beharam in Kanchannagar.

Kalna: The temples at Kalna are built of bricks with intricate terracotta designs. Unique among the temples are the ornate Palki Krishna Chanraji Temple and the Pratapeswar Temple, a 108-temple complex dedicated to Lord Shiva.

Digha: 187km southeast of Kolkata on the coast of the Bay of Bengal, Digha is a popular beach resort with a 6km long and hard beach. It is the only seaside resort supported by a wide variety of hotels and private lodges. Chandaneswar, an old Shiva temple, 8km. Dariapur, 45km, famous for an ancient temple associated with Bankimchandra‘s novel Kapal Kundala. A fish farm located 40km away at Junput is worth visiting.

Ganga Sagar: This is the place where Gangasagar Mela, the largest fair in West Bengal, is held on the occasion of Makar Sankranti (mid January). The fair draws lakhs of pilgrims from all over India.

Darjeeling: Facing the towering Himalayas and surrounded by high green hills covered with coniferous forests, Darjeeling is perched, literally, on the roof of the world. The mini train, which chugs off from New Jalpaiguri provides an exciting journey through deep jungles, rice fields, tea gardens and pine forests. The view of the Kanchenjunga from Observatory Hill or the sun‘s play on the highest mountain of the world, Everest can be seen from nearby Tiger Hill. Around Darjeeling: Kalimpong: Kalimpong (51km) is a quiet hill resort. Another retreat is Kurseong (36km); a newly developed hill resort with a lake is Mirik. Sandakphu (58km) and nearly Phalut for high altitude treks are places worth visiting.

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Sandakphu: Sandakphu is 59 km from Darjeeling. With 8 hours walk a day, it can be reached in 2 days from Manaybhanjang. Another spot is Phalut, 3600 mts. The view from Phalut is similar to that from Sandakphu. Jaldapara: Jaldapara comprises 65 km of lush panorama of mighty trees interspersed in a sea of tall grasslands. Located 121 km from Siliguri, Jaldapara is the permanent abode of wildlife and the onehorned Indian rhino. The sanctuaries at Gorumara and Chapramari also have forest bungalows. Malda: 340 km from Kolkata, Malda formerly called English Bazaar, a foreign settlement dating from 1680 is known for its delectable mangoes and the museum which houses the archaeological finds at Gour and Pandua. Gaur: Gaur, capital to three dynasties of ancient Bengal—the Buddhists Palas, the Hindu Senas and the Muslim Nawabs has seen three distinct eras of glory. Historical relics of the 14th and 15th century Bengal particularly worth seeing are the Bara Sona Mosque, Dakhil Darwajah, Qadam Rasul Mosque, Lattan Mosque and the ruins of the extensive fortification. Pandua: Pandua, 18 km from Malda is known for the third largest concentration of Muslim monuments of Bengal. Adina Masjid, built in 1369 by Sikandar Shah is one of the largest mosques in India. Nearby is the Eklakhi Mausoleum, built at a princely cost of Rs one lakh.

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3. Initial Screening of the Circuits 3.1

Based on Secondary Research i. Based on discussions with the Principal Secretary, Tourism Department Government of West Bengal, Director Tourism, Government of West Bengal, the following projects have been identified as priority projects; A. Beach Tourism Circuit in Purba Medinipur: Digha – Shankarpur – Tajpur – Junput – Mandarmani. B. Religious & Pilgrim Tourism: Ganga Sagar – Birbhum (Tarapeeth – Bakreshwar – Nalhati – Fullura – Saithia – Kankalitala), Tarakeswar, Pathar Chapri - Furfura Sharif. C. Eco Adventure and Wild Life Tourism in North Bengal : Dooars and Darjeeling Circuit. D. Sundarban Circuit: Gad Khali, Dhamakhali, Diamond Harbour, Henry Island, Bakkhali, Jharkhali, Lothian Island. E. Heritage tourism along River Ganga : Chandannagar – Serampore – Bandel – Bansberia – Nabadwip - Murshidabad. F. Kolkata Circuit ii. Based on the letter no. DO.416-L/PS/ (2)/12 dated 06 March, 2012 by the Principal Secretary to Tourism Department, Government of West Bengal, the following projects have been identified as priority projects. 

Circuit 1- Beach Tourism Circuit in Purba Medinipur: Digha – Shankarpur – Tajpur – Junput – Mandarmani.



Circuit 2- Pilgrim Tourism Circuit: Ganga Sagar – Birbhum (Tarapeeth – Bakreshwar – Nalhati – Fullura – Saithia – Kankalitala), Tarakeswar, Furfura Sharif.

3.2



Circuit 3- Nature Tourism Circuit: Duars and Darjeeling Circuit



Circuit 4: Sunderban Circuit: Gad Khali, Jharkhali, Kohikhali, Frazer Island

Key Parameters

In line with the above discussion, further research has been done to identify and prioritise the circuits. Realising the need, the study narrowed down to derive few key parameters on the basis of which circuits have been put on priority basis. These key parameters have been listed below:

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a. Tourist Profile i.

Type of tourists visiting a destination depends on the nature of destination. They can be broadly categorized into Domestic and International tourists. This further affects the physical and socio-economic development of a destination as spending patterns determines the related multiplier effects. It also governs the type and scale of infrastructure required.

ii.

Generally, the tourists coming to the circuits listed above are both domestic and foreigner but domestic arrival are high due to religious place i.e. Puri, Bhubaneswar. In a primary survey commissioned by the Ministry of Tourism in 2008-09, it was observed that in West Bengal, the spending pattern of the tourists constitutes nearly 60% percent (66%- foreigner & 59% domestic) expenses on accommodation and travel/sightseeing followed by food and shopping. According to local people, an average spending of a tourist in these sites is approximately Rs.1000-1500/day by domestic to 2000-3000/day by foreigner.

b. Capacity & Sustainability The carrying capacity8 assessment and sustainability of tourism in the circuits identified is an important component of the study as it will form the basis for resource allocation and future development. The carrying capacity assessment has been done separately for the circuits, based on city population (resident), population density and tourist population and density (floating population). The estimation has been done by comparing the total density with the city density norms for small, medium and large town / cities set by Urban Development Plan Formulation and Implementation Guidelines (UDPFI). Only such places have been considered that can offer a sustainable value proposition to the tourists such that when tourism products are offered in those places, they can be maintained as well. c. Travel and Tour Generally, tour operators organize trips in such a way that only popular sites can be covered in a given period of time. This practice creates more pressure on such destinations; therefore, while selecting the circuits, attempts have been made to promote the sites situated around these popular/saturated destinations which are relatively less developed. d. Safety Tourist safety has been considered and attempts have been made not to incorporate any such destination which is already adversely affected in terms of law and order.

8

Carrying capacity is defined as maximum number of individuals than a given environment can support without any adverse impact on it.

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3.3

Priority Circuit Details

Figure 4: West Bengal Priority Circuit Digha: Digha is West Bengal's most popular sea resort and tourist spot located south west of Calcutta. It is 187 km from Calcutta and Described as the 'Brighton of the East, Digha has a low gradient with a shallow sand beach with gentle waves extends 7 kms in length. The beach is girdled with casuarinas plantations along the coast enhancing the beauty of this place. The sea at Digha is calm and shallow for about a mile from the beach making it quite safe for swimming.

9

Shankarpur: Also known for its beautiful beach, only 14 km east of Digha Shankarpur is also a regular fishing harbor. The morning sun reflecting on the sea waves in the east, and the local fishboats on the coast offer excellent photographic opportunities. Shankarpur is also being developed as a sea resort with hotels, tourist lodges and other facilities

Junput: Junput is 40 km from Digha by bus, with a change at Contai. The place offers beautiful seaview and lines of trees. The beach is unspoiled. Brackish water fish cultivation and research are done here by the State Government Fisheries Department.

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www.westbengaltourism.gov.in/

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Tajpur: Tajpur is the latest addition in tourist map of Bengal. The prime attraction of Tajpur is its pristine sea beach fringed with a dense forest of tamarisk trees. The beach is infested with infinite number of red crabs whose presence makes the beach look crimson.

Mandarmani: Mandarmani is a small virgin beach on Bay of Bengal, only few km from Digha. It is also a small fishing harbor and a fast developing tourist resort.

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4. Stakeholders Consultation 4.1

State Government, State Tour & Travel Operators and Other Representatives

Based on the letter no. DO.416-L/PS/ (2)/12 dated 06 March, 2012 by the Principal Secretary to Tourism Department, Government of West Bengal, the following circuits/projects have been identified: a) Circuit 1- Beach Tourism Circuit in Purba Medinipur: Digha – Shankarpur – Tajpur – Junput – Mandarmani b) Circuit 2- Pilgrim Tourism Circuit: Ganga Sagar – Birbhum (Tarapeeth – Bakreshwar – Nalhati – Fullura – Saithia – Kankalitala), Tarakeswar, Furfura Sharif c) Circuit 3- Nature Tourism Circuit: Duars and Darjeeling Circuit d) Circuit 4: Sunderban Circuit: Gad Khali, Jharkhali, Kohikhali, Frazer Island

Mega Tourism Park It is proposed that the Tourism Park shall be developed at Gajoldoba (Jalpaigudi) 

Gajaldoba is just 25 km south-east from Siliguri, the busy business hub and within the District of Jalpaiguri. The area is located on the important corridor of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and other NE states. Bagdogra airport and New Jalpaiguri Railhead are just outskirt of the town and very well connected to almost all major cities of India.



The place is very close to the existing popular tourist destinations of the state – Chapramari Wildlife Sanctuary and Gorumara National Park.



It is a beautiful site providing grand view of Teesta River, Himalayan Peaks and adjoining Baikuntapur Forest. The site has already become very popular among the local tourist and birdwatchers for migratory birds including Brahmini ducks, bar headed goose, Poachards, Pintails, Shovlers, mallards, black Ibis, and many species of storks, cormorants and ducks. The water body is surrounded by dense forests of Baikunthapur. A large collection of water birds migrate from

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Ladakh and Central Asia and spend few months here. Stay here for few hours and watch the eternal beauty of the nature. Main strength of this site is as follows:  Unparalleled natural beauty by the side of the barrage and the forest  Vast water reservoir of Teesta Barrage.  Availability of vast stretches of government land  Resting place for the seasonal migratory birds  Absence of any comparable product in the district 

The site has tremendous potential for developing as a Mega Project site for national as well as international tourists. The project includes development of 3 to 5 star Resorts for high budget tourists, Lodges for mid budget tourists. There may be a Golf Course, River Sports, and Trekking Tracks etc.

Rural Tourism a.

Purulia Rural Cluster

b.

Nadia Music Cluster

4.2

Carrying Capacity Assessment

Since the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India aims to promote sustainable tourism development it was deemed essential to establish the sustainable carrying capacity of the priority Tourist circuit. To evaluate the carrying capacity of the circuits and destinations the following methodology as explained below was adopted. Tourism carrying capacity is defined as ‗the maximum number of people that may visit the tourist destination without causing destruction of the physical, economic and socio cultural environment and an unacceptable decrease in the quality of visitors‘ satisfaction.‘ (Alvin Chandy, 2009) Assessment of TCC is based on three major indicators: Physical-Ecological, Socio-Demographic and Political- Economic. Physical and Ecological Indicators are based on fixed components (ecological capacity, assimilative capacity) and flexible components (infrastructure systems like water supply, electricity, transportation, etc). Socio-demographic Indicators refer to social and demographic issues and importance to local communities, as they relate to the presence and growth of tourism. Some of these can be expressed in quantitative terms but most require suitable socio- psychological research.

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Political-economic Indicators refer to the impacts of tourism on local economic structures, activities, etc. including competition to other sectors. The objective of the interventions intended by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India is to improve the quality and quantity of tourism infrastructure at tourist destinations/circuits in a sustainable manner. Hence, for the purposes of this report the primary focus would be on the Physical and Ecological Indicators. It is expected that improvement in physical infrastructure at destinations/circuits would translate into improvements in the socio-demographic and politicaleconomic conditions of these places. Resident Population Density

Domestic Tourist Density

Foreign Tourist Density

UDPFI Density

Normalizing Density

Aggregate Peak Density

Carrying Capacity Density

Existing Load

Carrying Capacity

Available Capacity = Carrying Capacity – Existing Load Figure 5 : Methodology for Carrying Capacity Analysis The methodology for evaluating the available carrying capacity for the tourist destinations of the circuit is illustrated in Figure 4 and is described below: I. Calculation of Existing Load (LEXISTING) This is done by calculating the following: a) Resident Population Density (βRP): This was derived by dividing the existing resident population of the tourist town by its area in hectares (ha.) b) Domestic Tourist Density (βDT ): This was derived as follows: Step 1.

Domestic Tourist Arrival (TD): Domestic tourist arrivals during

peak season (days) was determined. Step 2.

Domestic Tourist stay days in peak seasons (T DSP): Domestic

tourist arrival was multiplied by average number of days of tourist stay at that tourist town.

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TDSP = TD * Stay Average Days Step 3.

Average number of tourist staying per day during peak season

(αDSP): This was evaluated by dividing the number of tourist stay days per season by the number of days comprising the peak season αDSP = Stay Average Days / Days Peak Season Step 4.

Domestic Tourist Density (βDT): This was evaluated by dividing

Average number of tourist staying per day during peak season by area of tourist town in hectares. βDT = αPS / Area c) Foreign Tourist Density (βFT ): This was derived as follows: Step 1.

Foreign Tourist Arrival (TF): Foreign tourist arrivals during peak season

(days) was determined Step 2.

Tourist stay days in peak seasons (TFSP):

Foreign tourist arrival was

multiplied by average number of day of stay for tourist at that tourist town. TFSP = TF * Stay Average Days Step 3.

Average number of tourist staying per day during peak season (αFSP):

This was evaluated by dividing the number of tourist stay days per season by the number of days comprising the peak season. αFSP = Stay Average Days / Days Peak Season Step 4.

Foreign Tourist Density: This was evaluated by diving Average number of

tourist staying per day during peak season by area of tourist town in hectares. ΒFT = αPS / Area Aggregate Peak Density (APD) = Resident Population Density + Domestic Tourist Density +Foreign Tourist Density APD

= βRP + βDT + βFT

Existing Load (LEXISTING) = Aggregate Peak Density * Area of the town LEXISTING = APD * Area II. Estimation of Carrying Capacity (CC)

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a) UDPFI Density (DUDPFI): The Urban Development Plan Formulation and Implementation Guidelines (UDPFI, 1996) guidelines classifies the towns on the basis of population as mentioned in Table below: Table 3: UDPFI Density Limits Towns

Population

Upper Limit Density (PPH)

Small Town

Less than 50000

125

Medium Town

50000 - 500000

150

Large City

More than 500000

150

Metro Cities

175

Small Hill Town

20000

75

Medium Hill Town

20000-80000

90

Large Hill Town

More than 80000

90

Source: UDPFI Guidelines, 1996 The densities suggested by the UDPFI guidelines as shown in Table 4 are for the standard cases. Tourist towns which vary from highly eco-sensitive sanctuaries to highly dense pilgrimage places have specific characteristics and carrying capacities. Thus, UDPFI densities need to be adjusted to account for these factors, which is done with the help of Normalizing Density (№) Normalizing Density (№) Normalizing density is evaluated as follows: i. Sites were evaluated on a normalizing index (Ni) of range -10 to +10

Negative Indices were adopted for sites where densities were to be allowed on a conservative scale (i.e. for example places which are ecologically sensitive). Positive Indices were adopted for sites where densities were to be allowed at higher values than prevailing such as pilgrimage towns etc. ii. The values of the indices were evaluated based on a qualitative assessment with respect to the Physical – Ecological indicators. The indicators which were assessed for the category wise tourist places are summarized in Table below:

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Table 4: Physical and Ecological Indicators Physical Ecological Indicators



Biodiversity

Thematic Areas Coastal Area 

Islands 

Protected Areas 

Air Quality



Noise Pollution

 

Rural Areas 

Mountain Resorts 

Urban, Historic

Pilgrimage Place



























Availability of Power Water





Waste Management





Cultural heritage















Tourist infrastructure















Land Availability















Quality of Transport Infrastructure



Source: Countries, E.(Dec,2001),Defining, Measuring and Evaluating Carrying Capacity in European Tourism Destinations, Athens. Normalizing Density (№) is calculated by multiplying a factor of 10pph by the Normalizing index. Normalizing Density (№) = 10* Ni (The value of 10pph was derived by establishing the boundary conditions of lower and upper sustainable densities for tourist towns of the relevant categories. To establish the lower limit, reference was made to the capacity norms cited by World Tourism Organization WTO (Inskeep, 1991). The upper limit was established by determining the densities for saturated tourist towns.) The Normalizing index (Ni) was evaluated as follows: Each of the applicable indicators for the corresponding thematic area (to which the tourist destination/circuits belong) was ranked on a scale of 0-10. The average of the indicators would give the value of the Normalizing index (Ni). Carrying Capacity Density (CCD) was calculated by summing up the Upper Limit of the relevant UDPFI density with the Normalizing Density. Carrying Capacity Density (CCD) = DUDPFI + № Carrying Capacity (CC) is calculated by multiplying the carrying capacity density with the Area of the respective town in hectares. Carrying Capacity (CC) = CCD * Area of Town Available Capacity is finally evaluated by finding the difference between the Carrying Capacity of the tourist town and the Existing Load in the town.

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Available Capacity = Carrying Capacity (CC) - Existing Load (LEXISTING)

Table 5 : Social and Demographic Indicators Social Demographic Indicators

Thematic Areas Coastal Area

Demography 

Tourist Flows

Islands 

Protected Areas 





Rural Areas 



Social & Behavioral Aspects Health & Hygiene



Safety





 







Mountain Resorts 

Urban & Historic





Pilgrimage Place  





 







Source: Countries, E. (Dec, 2001), Defining, Measuring and Evaluating Carrying Capacity in European Tourism Destinations, Athens. Table 6 : Political Economic Indicators Political -Economic Indicators Tourism Earnings and Investment Employment Public Expenditure and Revenue

Thematic Areas Coastal Area 

Islands

 

 



Protected Rural Areas Areas   

Mountain Resorts 

Urban & Pilgrimage Historic Place  

 



 

Source: Countries, E. (Dec, 2001), Defining, Measuring and Evaluating Carrying Capacity in European Tourism Destination, Athens. Table 7 : Evaluation Criterion for Physical and Ecological Indicators Physical – Ecological Indicators

Evaluation Criterion

Biodiversity

Threatened species, Protected areas as a % of territory and type of ecosystem

Air Quality

Population exposure to air pollution - Sox & Nox emission intensities

Noise Pollution

Sensitivity to noise pollutions. Allowable decibels limit if specified.

Availability of Power

Hours of regular power supply from all energy sources.

Water

Intensity of Use of water resources. Drinking water availability @135lpcd.

Waste Management

Generation of waste, Movement of hazardous waste, Availability of waste management system

Cultural & Heritage

Listed Buildings and scheduled ancient monuments at risk. No. of community heritage groups active. Cultural traditions and communities which are at a risk of getting extinct.

Tourist infrastructure

Availability of tourist infrastructure such as on site accommodation, wayside amenities, signages, restaurants, public convenience, petrol pumps etc.

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Physical – Ecological Indicators

Evaluation Criterion

Land Availability Area of Land available for tourism development. Quality of Transport Inter and Intra city transport connectivity in tourist towns. Availability of Last Mile Infrastructure connectivity.

Source: White V., M. G. (2006). Indicators of Sustainability and Sustainable Tourism: Some Example Sets. Aberdeen: The Macaulay Institute. 4.2.1

Town wise Carrying Capacity Assessment Table 8: West Bengal Priority Circuit Town Wise Carrying Capacity Assessment

Tourist Town

Existing Load

Carrying Capacity

Available Capacity

Estimated Load

2010

Available Capacity

2020

New Digha

11917

14480

2563

29862

-15382

Shankarpur

7942

26480

18538

18164

8316

Tajpur

7654

9680

2026

9632

48

Mandarmani

7450

31200

23750

10739

20461

Junput

89499

114400

24901

103425

10975

4.2.2

Destination wise Carrying Capacity Assessment Table 9: West Bengal Priority Circuit Destination Wise Carrying Capacity Assessment

Destination

Existing Daily Load 2010

Carrying Capacity

Available Daily capacity 2010

Estimated Daily Load 2020

Available Daily capacity 2020

Measure

Enhanced Capacity

1036

Digha Beach

8250

3000

-750

26506

-12164

Setting up of Amusement Park, Art and Culture Village and Water Sports etc will enhance the carrying capcity of Digha by 13200 persons

Shankarpur Beach

1111

4000

8889

3570

4115

-

4115

Tajpur Beach

417

2500

5833

1339

3143

-

3143

Manadarmani Beach

1021

3500

7729

3280

3501

-

3501

Junput Beach

111

2500

6139

357

3772

-

3772

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There is available capacity to hold the tourists at the destinations of priority circuit of West Bengal till 2020 apart from Digha Beach which does not have capacity to hold the tourist even in 2010. Thus, to take away the excess load from Digha Beach to avoid undue stress and degradation some measures have been proposed. Proposals of an Amusement Park, Art and Culture, water sports activity etc can carry a load of 13,200 persons per day thereby reducing such load from Digha. To reduce the load on Digha, beaches located nearby in the circuit should also be promoted as each of them has sufficient available carrying capacities.

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5. Existing Infrastructure Status of the Circuit i.

A survey has been conducted by the Government of West Bengal to understand the perception of the tourist. The findings of the same has been summarised in the following graphs: Figure 6: Tourist‘s Perception of Digha

Figure 7: Visitor‘s Aspirations

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A detailed assessment of tourism infrastructure between major points has been discussed below in order to ascertain the existing infrastructure available at the locations and enroute to these destinations. Each of the destinations presented below has been rated on a scale of A, B, C, D and E wherein, A denotes ‗Very Good‘, B denotes ‗Good‘, C denotes ‗Fair‘, D denotes ‗Poor‘ and E ‗very poor‘. 5.1

Template to Evaluate Infrastructure Status/Availability between Tourist Destinations Table 10: Template to evaluate Infrastructure status/availability between Tourist Destinations

Route Destination Enroute/Onsite Enroute

Parameters

Components

Rating

Remarks

Distance in km Approach Road

Quality (A-E) Type of Road (metalled, unmetalled) Typology (NH/SH/ MDR) Lanes Riding Quality (A-E)

Transport

Modes Used by tourists

(more specific to transport access to tourist destinations from various parts of city) Wayside Amenities

Availability (A-E)

Restaurants availability Petrol Pump/ Service Centre availability Public Convenience availability

On Site

Direction Signages (Inside the city to directing the tourist destinations)

Sufficiency (A-E) Languages

Land ownership of the Site

N.A

City/Town Accommodation

Type Capacity Bed Occupancy Sufficiency (A-E)

Drinking Water facility

Availability (A-E) Quality(A-E)

Solid Waste Management

A-E

Electricity Parking

Supply (AC, Gen) Sufficiency (A-E) Availability of Land for future parking Area of this land (approx)

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Route Destination Enroute/Onsite

Parameters Tourist Centers

Information

Components

Rating

Remarks

Available(Y/N) Quality (A-E)

Trained Guides Information Signages

Availability (A-E) Sufficiency (A-E) Languages

Seating/ Resting

Sufficiency (A-E) Quality (A-E)

Public Convenience

Availability (A-E)

Shops/ Kiosks

Sufficiency (A-E) Quality (A-E)

Street Lighting

Sufficiency (A-E) Quality (A-E)

Site Specific Comments

5.2

Infrastructure Gaps

Brief description of infrastructure gaps on various destinations are discussed below, while details are annexed in Annexure-I.

Figure 8: Various Destinations of Circuit

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Figure 9: Circuit Details at a Glance

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6. Project Identification, Block Cost Estimates, Implementation and Funding 6.1

Identified Projects

Below mentioned are the projects identified in the priority circuit along with the respective block cost estimates, implementation agency and source of funding in West Bengal. Table 11: Project Identified, Block Cost Estimates, Implementation and Funding Destination

Digha

Proposed Project

Indicative Cost (Rs. Cr.)

Implementing Agency

Mode of Funding

Existing Schemes

Area Lighting

1.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

Product/infrastructure Development for Destinations and Circuits (PIDDC), MoT, GoI

Information signages at beach

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Tourist Information Center (2 Nos)

0.2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Jetty Development (2 Nos)

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Improvement Bus Terminal

5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Amusement Park

30

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

Scheme of Assistance for Large Revenue Generating Project (LRG), MoT, GoI

Art & Village

10

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

LRG

Tourism Resorts

30

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP/

LRG

Tented Accommodation

5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

LRG

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

of

Culture

Life-guards Watch Tower and security cabin on beach (2 nos.)

PIDDC

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Destination

Proposed Project

Indicative Cost (Rs. Cr.)

Implementing Agency

Mode of Funding

Existing Schemes

Drinking water facilities (5 nos.)

0.25

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Public convenience & changing room

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Solid Waste Management

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Budget Hotel (70 Rooms)

11

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

LRG scheme)

Ropeway for 4/5 Kms

25

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

LRG

Water Treatment Plant and Distribution (3 MLD)

3

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Sewerage Treatment Plant (2 MLD) with distribution

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

0.6

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Water/ Adventure Sports

3

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

PIDDC

Landscaping and Beautification

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Development Health Center

of

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Development of Parking Facilities

1

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Upgradation

5

Govt. Of West

Public

PIDDC

Improvement Internal Roads

of

Helipad at Digha

of

(revised

Page | 39

Destination

Proposed Project

Indicative Cost (Rs. Cr.)

Fishing Infrastructure Hospitality Management Institute

Shankarpur

Implementing Agency

Mode of Funding

Existing Schemes

Bengal

Beach Cleaning Equipment

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Way Amenities

Side

0.1

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Budget Resort(70 Rooms)

11

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

LRG scheme)

Tourist Information Center (2 Nos)

0.2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Public convenience & changing room

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Theme Based Fishing Restaurant

5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Jetty Development (2 Nos)

10

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Water Treatment Plant and Distribution (3 MLD)

3

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Sewerage Treatment Plant (2 MLD) with distribution

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Solid Waste Management

0.2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Information signages at beach

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Bus Terminal about 5 Acres

10

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

(revised

Page | 40

Destination

Proposed Project

Indicative Cost (Rs. Cr.)

Implementing Agency

Mode of Funding

Existing Schemes

Approach Road development for 6 Kms

3

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Tourism Promotional Programmes and training of guides

5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

Scheme for organizing fair & festival and tourism related event, MoT, GoI

Landscaping and Beautification

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Shopping Kiosks

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

PIDDC

Beach Cleaning Equipment

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Way Amenities

0.1

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Side

Internal Road Development

5

Tajpur

Water Treatment Plant and Distribution (3 MLD)

3

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Sewerage Treatment Plant (2 MLD) with distribution

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Solid Waste Management

0.2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Police Out Post

0.1

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Page | 41

Destination

Junput

Proposed Project

Indicative Cost (Rs. Cr.)

Implementing Agency

Mode of Funding

Existing Schemes

Landscaping and Beautification

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Development Health Center

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Tourist Information Center (2 Nos)

0.2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

High End Resort (40 Rooms)

12

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

LRG scheme)

Eco Tourism Park

20

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

PIDDC

Parking Facilities

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

Yoga Center

5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

PIDDC

Information signages at beach

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Shopping Kiosks

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

PIDDC

Beach Cleaning Equipment

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Public convenience & changing room

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Way Amenities

0.1

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Approach Road development for 6 Kms

3

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Luxury Resort (20 rooms)

6

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

of

Therapy

Side

(revised

UIDSSMT

LRG scheme)

(revised

Page | 42

Destination

Proposed Project

Implementing Agency

Mode of Funding

Existing Schemes

Water Treatment Plant and Distribution (3 MLD)

3

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Sewerage Treatment Plant (2 MLD) with distribution

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Solid Waste Management

0.2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Tourist Information Center (2 Nos)

0.2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Landscaping and Beautification

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Shopping Kiosks

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

PIDDC

Bio Diversity Park

10

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Beach Cleaning Equipment

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Public convenience & changing room

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC / UIDSSMT

Way Amenities

0.1

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

PIDDC

Water Treatment Plant and Distribution (3 MLD)

3

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Sewerage Treatment Plant (2 MLD) with distribution

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Side

Shopping Kiosks

Mandarmoni

Indicative Cost (Rs. Cr.)

Page | 43

Destination

Proposed Project

Indicative Cost (Rs. Cr.)

Implementing Agency

Mode of Funding

Existing Schemes

Solid Waste Management

0.2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Tourist Information Center (2 Nos)

0.2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Landscaping and Beautification

2

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

2 Lane Approach Road from Chalkhola around 15 Kms

2.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

UIDSSMT

Beach Cleaning Equipment

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

Public convenience & changing room at Ramchandi temple (2 nos.)

0.4

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

PIDDC

4

Govt. Of West Bengal

PPP

0.1

Govt. Of West Bengal

Public

Water Activity Way Amenities

Sports

Side

Total

LRG

PIDDC

INR 297.75 Crores

Total Project Cost is INR 297.75 crores out of which Project to be undertaken under the PPP mode is INR 174 Crores and through Public funds is INR 123.75 crores.

Page | 44

6.2

PPP Project Bifurcation – Detail of Public Funds and Private Investments

The Table below shows the PPP bifurcations of the projects identified in the priority circuit. Table 12: PPP Bifurcation – Detail of Public Funds and Private Investments

Destination

Digha

Shankarpu r

Proposed Project

Indicativ e Cost (Rs. Cr.)

Implementin g Agency

Existing Schemes

Public Funds (INR Crores)

Private Investmen ts (INR Crores)

7.5

22.5

Amusement Park

30

Govt. Of West Bengal

Scheme of Assistance for Large Revenue Generating Project (LRG), MoT, GoI

Art & Culture Village

10

Govt. Of West Bengal

LRG

2.5

7.5

Tourism Resorts

30

Govt. Of West Bengal

LRG

7.5

22.5

Tented Accommodation

5

Govt. Of West Bengal

LRG

1.25

3.75

Budget Hotel (70 Rooms)

11

Govt. Of West Bengal

LRG

2.75

8.25

Ropeway for 4/5 Kms

25

Govt. Of West Bengal

LRG

6.25

18.75

Water/ Adventure Sports

3

Govt. Of West Bengal

PIDDC

0.75

2.25

Budget Resort(70 Rooms)

11

Govt. Of West Bengal

LRG

2.75

8.25

Shopping Kiosks

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PIDDC

0.125

0.375

High End Resort (40 Rooms)

12

Govt. Of West Bengal

LRG

3

9

Eco Tourism Park

20

Govt. Of West Bengal

PIDDC

5

15

Yoga Therapy Center

5

Govt. Of West Bengal

LRG

1.25

3.75

Shopping Kiosks

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PIDDC

0.125

0.375

Tajpur

Page | 45

Destination

Existing Schemes

Public Funds (INR Crores)

Private Investmen ts (INR Crores)

Govt. Of West Bengal

LRG

1.5

4.5

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PIDDC

0.125

0.375

Shopping Kiosks

0.5

Govt. Of West Bengal

PIDDC

0.125

0.375

Water Sports Activity

4

Govt. Of West Bengal

PIDDC

1

3

43.5

130.5

Proposed Project

Indicativ e Cost (Rs. Cr.)

Implementin g Agency

Luxury Resort (20 rooms)

6

Shopping Kiosks

Junput

Mandorma ni

Total 6.3

Estimated Employment Generation

The proposed investments at tourist destinations and circuit are expected to generate employment. These employment figures have been estimated because of the direct and indirect nature of employment generation from these investments. To estimate the number of employment generated an investment multiplier of 76 jobs per million investments is taken. Table 13: Expected Employment Generation Expected Employment Generation 113763 Digha 41574 Shankarpur 43212 Tajpur 21762 Junput 11934 Mandormani 232245 Total

Page | 46

Annexure 1 Table 14: Infrastructure Gap Status/Availability in the Priority Circuit

Enroute /Onsite

Route

SH 4

SH 4

SH 4

Destination/Site

Digha

Shankarpur

Tajpur

Parameters

Enroute

Distance in km from Kolkata

Enroute

Approach Road

Components

Rating 195

Quality (A-E)

C

Type of Road (metalled, unmetalled)

The main approach is fairly SH connecting to Digha which is also well connected from Kolkata.

Rating

Remarks

Rating

190

170

C

D

Remarks

Village Road

SH

Village Road

Village Road

2 Lane State Highway connecting to the location

2 Lane State Highway connecting to the location

1 Lane road

Riding Quality (AE)

C

C

C

Transport

Modes Used by tourists

C

(more specific to transport access to tourist destinations from various parts of city)

Availability (A-E)

B

Typology (NH/SH/ MDR) Lanes

Enroute

Remarks

Local bus is available upto Digha from Kolkata

C

B

Local bus is available upto Digha from Kolkata

Taxi & Auto rickshaws, Buses

Local bus is available upto Digha from Kolkata

C

Page | 47

Enroute /Onsite Enroute

Enroute

Route

SH 4

SH 4

SH 4

Destination/Site

Digha

Shankarpur

Tajpur

Parameters

Wayside Amenities

Direction Signages (Inside the city to directing the tourist destinations)

On Site

Land ownership of the Site

City/Town

Accommodation

Components

Rating

Remarks

Rating

Remarks

Rating

Remarks

Way Side amenities needs to be developped

Not available

Need for way side amenities

Restaurants availability Petrol Pump/ Service Centre availability

C

C

B

B

Public Convenience availability

D

C

Sufficiency (A-E)

B

B

C

English and Bengali

English and Bengali

English and Bengali

Govt. Land

Govt. Land

Govt. Land

Tourism Dept & U D Dept. is having accommodation facilities. Large number of Private Hotels are available

Private accommodation is available

Very few accommodation facilities available

Languages

Type Capacity Bed Occupancy Sufficiency (A-E)

Page | 48

Enroute /Onsite On Site

Route

SH 4

SH 4

SH 4

Destination/Site

Digha

Shankarpur

Tajpur

Parameters

Drinking Water facility

Components

Availability (A-E)

Rating

Remarks

B

Rating

Remarks

B

Rating

Remarks

C

Need additional drinking water facilities

No solid waste management

World Bank Assistance project is being under consideration

Quality(A-E)

No solid waste management

World Bank Assistance project is being under consideration

No solid waste management

On Site

Solid Waste Management

A-E

On Site

Electricity

Supply (AC, Gen)

B

On Site

Parking

Sufficiency (A-E)

C

Parking need to be developed

C

Available (Y/N)

Y

Available at Digha

N

Quality (A-E)

B

Availability of Land for future parking Area of this land (approx) On Site/or in City

Tourist Information Centers

World Bank Assistance project is being under consideration

B

B

Page | 49

E Parking need to be developed

No Parking near site

N

small Parking near museum

need of equipped information centre

Enroute /Onsite

On Site

Route

SH 4

SH 4

SH 4

Destination/Site

Digha

Shankarpur

Tajpur

Parameters

Components

Remarks

Rating

Remarks

Rating

Trained Guides

Availability (A-E)

C

C

no guide

Information Signages

Sufficiency (A-E)

B

B

D

English & Bengali

English & Bengali

English & Bengali

Sufficiency (A-E)

B

D

Quality (A-E)

D

D

Languages On Site

Rating

Seating/ Resting

Seating arrangements needs to be developped

D

Seating arrangements needs to be developed

Need for Public Convenience facility

D

Need for Public Convenience facility

On Site

Public Convenience

Availability (A-E)

B

Need for Public Convenience facility

D

On Site

Shops/ Kiosks

Sufficiency (A-E)

A

Site is under process of development

B

D

Quality (A-E)

B

C

D

Sufficiency (A-E)

B

On Site

Street Lighting

Requirement for more street lighting

B

Page | 50

Remarks

Requirement for more street lighting

C

Required to develop street lighting in all areas

Enroute /Onsite

Route

SH 4

SH 4

SH 4

Destination/Site

Digha

Shankarpur

Tajpur

Parameters

Components Quality (A-E)

Rating B

Remarks

Rating B

Page | 51

Remarks

Rating B

Remarks

Enroute /Onsite

Route

SH 4

SH 4

Destination/Site

Junput

Mandarmoni

Parameters

Enroute

Distance in km from Kolkata

Enroute

Approach Road

Components

Enroute

Remarks

Rating

145

166

B

C

Type of Road (metalled, unmetalled)

Village Road

Village Road

Typology (NH/SH/ MDR)

Village Road

Village Road

Lanes

1 Lane road

single lane

B

C

Taxi & Auto rickshaws, Buses

Taxi & Auto rickshaws, Buses

B

B

Not available

Not available

Quality (A-E)

Riding Quality (A-E) Enroute

Rating

Transport

Modes Used by tourists

(more specific to transport access to tourist destinations from various parts of city)

Availability (A-E)

Wayside Amenities

Restaurants availability Petrol Pump/ Service Centre availability

Page | 52

Remarks

Enroute /Onsite

Route

SH 4

SH 4

Destination/Site

Junput

Mandarmoni

Parameters

Components

Rating

Remarks

Rating

Remarks

Public Convenience availability

Enroute

Direction Signages

Sufficiency (A-E)

(Inside the city to directing the tourist destinations)

Languages

On Site

Land ownership of the Site

City/Town

Accommodation

Type Capacity

D

D

English and Bengali

English and Bengali

Govt. Land

Govt. Land

Very few accommodation facilities available

Very few accommodation facilities available

Bed Occupancy Sufficiency (A-E)

On Site

Drinking Water facility

Availability (A-E)

C

Need additional drinking water facilities

Quality(A-E)

Page | 53

C

Need additional drinking water facilities

Enroute /Onsite

Route

SH 4

SH 4

Destination/Site

Junput

Mandarmoni

Parameters

Components

Rating

Remarks

Rating

Remarks

No solid waste management

World Bank Assistance project is being under consideration

No solid waste management

World Bank Assistance project is being under consideration

On Site

Solid Waste Management

A-E

On Site

Electricity

Supply (AC, Gen)

E

On Site

Parking

Sufficiency (A-E)

No organized parking

Availability of Land for future parking

Land is available with temple

E Need for proper parking

D

Need for proper parking

need of equipped information centre

N

need of equipped information centre

Area of this land (approx) On Site/or in City

Tourist Information Centers

Available (Y/N)

N

Quality (A-E)

On Site

Trained Guides

Availability (A-E)

no guide

no guide

Information Signages

Sufficiency (A-E)

D

D

English & Bengali

English & Bengali

Languages

Page | 54

Enroute /Onsite On Site

Route

SH 4

SH 4

Destination/Site

Junput

Mandarmoni

Parameters Seating/ Resting

Components Sufficiency (A-E)

Rating D

Quality (A-E)

Remarks Seating arrangements needs to be developped

Rating

Remarks

D

Seating arrangements needs to be developped

Need for improved Public Convenience facility

On Site

Public Convenience

Availability (A-E)

D

D

On Site

Shops/ Kiosks

Sufficiency (A-E)

D

D

Quality (A-E)

D

D

Sufficiency (A-E)

C

C

Quality (A-E)

B

B

On Site

Street Lighting

Page | 55

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