VeganCulinaryExperience - Oct 2011

January 6, 2018 | Author: CaptainEON | Category: Animal Feed, Pomegranate, United States Farm Bill, Agriculture, Salad
Share Embed Donate


Short Description

Download VeganCulinaryExperience - Oct 2011...

Description

Table of Contents 

   

Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Features Lentils:  My Favorite, Fast,  Hearty , (and dare I say it?)  Healthy Food 14  By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD   

Jill shows us how to make lentils  the fast and easy way and  provides some tasty recipes, as  well! 

  Studies Show We Love  Quickies 18 

Vegan Cuisine and the Law:   The Farm Bill – Why Big Macs  & McNuggets Outprice  Carrots and Apples 25  By Mindy Kursban, Esq.   

Read about why the Farm Bill is  bad news for vegetable farmers  and what can be done about it.   

The Vegan Traveler:  Atlanta  28 

By LaDiva Dietitian, MS, RD 

By Chef Jason Wyrick 

 

  Recently, Chef Jason Wyrick  checked out the hot spots in  Atlanta and Athens.  Find out  what’s great, and not so great,  about this veg‐friendly icon of the  South..   

Learn about how cooking methods  have changed to adapt to our busy  lifestyles over the last 100 years.   

Raw Foods Made Easy 21  By Chef Angela Elliott   

Angela shatters the myth that raw  foods have to take hours on end  and tons of work to be healthy  and delicious.   

Columns  What’s Cooking?  3 

Marketplace  7   

Get connected and find out about  vegan friendly businesses and  organizations.   

Recipe Index  61   

 

A listing of all the recipes found in  Find out what’s up with the Vegan  this issue, compiled with links.  Culinary Experience this month.      see the following page for  From the Garden:  Year of  interviews and reviews… 

the Pomegranate! 22  By Liz Lonetti   

  Quick & Easy

Find out about the different  cultivars of pomegranates and  learn Liz’ super‐fast method for  deseeding one of these culinary  gems.   

October 2011|1

Table of Contents 2 

 

Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Interviews Author/Instructor Bryanna  Clark‐Grogan 33 

Book Review:  Thrive Foods  53 

 

By  Jason Wyrick 

Bryanna is a long‐time instructor  and author extraordinaire, with a  world cuisine repertoire to match.   

  Thrive Foods is athlete Brendan  Brazier’s followup to Thrive.  Part  cookbook, part nutritional and  environmental guide. 

Activist Lieutenant Colonel  Bob Lucius of the Kairos  Coalition 41   

     

Book Review:  World Vegan  Feast 55 

Lieutenant Colonel Lucius is one of  our outstanding activists, leading  the Kairos Coaltion, an  organization he founded  dedicated to humane education in  Southeast Asia.   

By  Madelyn Pryor 

Painter Trish Grantham 48 

 

 

             

 

Trish has garnered an excellent  reputation in the artistic  community painting colorful, fun  animal‐centered art for the past  thirteen years.   

  Bryanna Clark‐Grogan delights us  with outstanding world flavors  from around the world, with  recipes that are off the beaten  path. 

Book Review:  Vegan for Life   57  By Madelyn Pryor   

Jack Norris, RD, and Ginny  Messina, MPH, RD, provide a  comprehensive, honest set of  guidelines for vegan nutrition and  don’t shy away from making the  Restaurant/Product Review:  point that being vegan is about  Casa de Tamales, Fresno, CA   being compassionate. 

Reviews  50 

By Jason Wyrick   

               

Quick & Easy

 

Product Review:  Flax USA 59 By  Jason Wyrick 

  Casa de Tamales serves some of  the best tamales this chef has ever  Flax USA offers an excellent brand  of flax milk, going beyond the  had!  flavored water most flax milks    taste like.  Book Review:  Quick Fix    Vegan 52  By  Madelyn Pryor 

  Easy vegan solutions for vegan  meals after a hard day’s work.     

October 2011|2

 

The Vegan Culinary Experience                          Quick & Easy!    October 2011                              Publisher    Jason Wyrick                                  Editors     Eleanor Sampson,                                                   Madelyn Pryor             Nutrition Analyst     Eleanor Sampson                         Web Design    Jason Wyrick                            Graphics     Jason Wyrick                                   Reviewers    Madelyn Pryor                                                 Jason Wyrick        Contributing Authors    Jason Wyrick                                                 Madelyn Pryor                                                 Liz Lonetti                                                 Sharon Valencik                                                 Marty Davey                                                 Mindy Kursban                                                 Jill Nussinow                                                 Angela Elliott                                                 Dynise Balcavage                                                                   Photography Credits  

                  Cover Page     Dynise Balcavage                     Recipe Images     Jason Wyrick                                                 Madelyn Pryor                                                 Milan Valencik of                                                  Milan Photography                                                 Dynise Balcavage          Atlanta Photographs   Jason Wyrick              Cornfield,     GNU Free Documentation                                                 License    Atlanta Skyline, Lentils,   Creative Commons  Pomegranate Blossom,  Pomegranate Juicer    Dollar Bill, Lentil Plant     Public Domain    Bryanna Clark‐Grogan &  Courtesy of Bryanna   Associated Images            Clark‐Grogan  Bob Lucius & Associated  Courtesy of Bob Lucius  Images    Trish Grantham &              Courtesy of Trish Grantham  Associated Images                        Casa de Tamales Corn       Jose Aguilar  Mill                                               

Quick & Easy

What’s Cooking? I’ll be honest.  I love food, I love to  cook, but I don’t love to do it all the  time.  After a long day in the  professional kitchen, I often find  myself feeling rather burned out for  my personal kitchen.  That’s when I  head for the containers of hummus or  other quick foods I’ve got sitting  around, or I head to the kitchen to make something fast and easy,  something that doesn’t require a lot of thought, but tastes great  and leaves me satisfied for the rest of the night.  This issue is  dedicated to everyone else who goes through a similar experience.    In this issue, you will find recipes that are simple to put together  and are generally done in 10‐15 minutes with about five minutes of  total work involved.  A few take longer to cook, but even those are  short on the work time.  We’ve also got some great book reviews  and some of the best interviews we’ve ever done. Thanks for  reading and I look forward to being with you for many more issues  in the future.  It’s a great time to be vegan.    Eat healthy, eat compassionately, and eat well!         

October 2011|3

Contributors   Jason Wyrick ‐ Chef Jason Wyrick is the Executive Chef of Devil Spice, Arizona's vegan catering  company, and the publisher of The Vegan Culinary Experience. Chef Wyrick has been regularly  featured on major television networks and in the press.  He has done demos with several  doctors, including Dr. Neal Barnard of the PCRM, Dr. John McDougall, and Dr. Gabriel  Cousens.  Chef Wyrick was also a guest instructor in the Le Cordon Bleu program.  He has  catered for PETA, Farm Sanctuary, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Google. He is also the NY Times  best‐selling co‐author of 21 Day Weightloss Kickstart Visit Chef Jason Wyrick at  www.devilspice.com and www.veganculinaryexperience.com.  

Madelyn Pryor ‐ Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on her blog,  http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has been making her own tasty desserts for over  16 years, and eating dessert for longer than she cares to admit. When she isn’t in the  kitchen creating new wonders of sugary goodness, she is chasing after her bad kitties, or  reviewing products for various websites and publications. She can be contacted at  [email protected] or [email protected]  

Sharon Valencik ‐ Sharon Valencik is the author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan  Desserts. She is raising two vibrant young vegan sons and rescued animals, currently a rabbit  and a dog. She comes from a lineage of artistic chef matriarchs and has been baking since age  five. She is working on her next book, World Utopia: Delicious and Healthy International  Vegan Cuisine. Please visit www.sweetutopia.com for more information, to ask questions, or  to provide feedback.          Milan Valencik ‐ Milan Valencik is the food stylist and photographer of Sweet Utopia: Simply  Stunning Vegan Desserts. His company, Milan Photography, specializes in artistic event  photojournalism, weddings, and other types of photography. Milan is also a fine artist and  musician. Milan is originally from Czech Republic and now lives in NJ. For more information  about Milan, please visit www.milanphotography.com or www.sweetutopia.com.        Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen ‐ Jill is a Registered Dietitian and has a Masters  Degree in Dietetics and Nutrition from Florida International University. After graduating, she  migrated to California and began a private nutrition practice providing individual consultations  and workshops, specializing in nutrition for pregnancy, new mothers, and children.  You can  find out more about The Veggie Queen at www.theveggiequeen.com.         Quick & Easy

October 2011|4

Contributors   Liz Lonetti ‐ As a professional urban designer, Liz Lonetti is passionate about building  community, both physically and socially.  She graduated from the U of MN with a BA in  Architecture in 1998. She also serves as the Executive Director for the Phoenix Permaculture  Guild, a non‐profit organization whose mission is to inspire sustainable living through  education, community building and creative cooperation (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).   A long time advocate for building greener and more inter‐connected communities, Liz  volunteers her time and talent for other local green causes.  In her spare time, Liz enjoys  cooking with the veggies from her gardens, sharing great food with friends and neighbors,  learning from and teaching others.  To contact Liz, please visit her blog site  www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan.      Angela Elliott ‐ Angela Elliott is the author of Alive in Five, Holiday Fare with Angela, The  Simple Gourmet, and more books on the way! Angela is the inventor of Five Minute Gourmet  Meals™, Raw Nut‐Free Cuisine™, Raw Vegan Dog Cuisine™, and The Celestialwich™, and the  owner and operator of She‐Zen Cuisine. www.she‐zencuisine.com    Angela has contributed to various publications, including Vegnews Magazine, Vegetarian  Baby and Child Magazine, and has taught gourmet classes, holistic classes, lectured, and on  occasion toured with Lou Corona, a nationally recognized proponent of living food.      Minday Kursban, Esq. ‐ Mindy Kursban is a practicing attorney who is passionate about  animals, food, and health. She gained her experience and knowledge about vegan cuisine  and the law while working for ten years as general counsel and then executive director of  the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Since leaving PCRM in 2007, Mindy has  been writing and speaking to help others make the switch to a plant‐based diet. Mindy  welcomes feedback, comments, and questions at [email protected]       Dynise Balcavage ‐ The author of The Urban Vegan: 250 Simple, Sumptuous Recipes from  Street Cart Favorites to Haute Cuisine (Globe Pequot, 2009) and the upcoming Vegan  Celebrations: 200 Animal‐Free Recipes for Every Occassion (Globe Pequot, October 2011),  Dynise Balcavage has been writing professionally for the past 20 years. She has also penned  10 books for young readers and her recipes have appeared in VegNews, Vegetarian Times,  and Végétariens magazine (in French). Dynise has been interviewed in the New York Times  and the International Herald Tribune and has done cooking demonstrations across the  globe, from New York to Paris. When she’s not cooking or writing, Dynise enjoys traveling,  running and sewing. She lives in Philadelphia, blogs at http://urbanvegan.net and tweets at  #theurbanvegan.          Quick & Easy

October 2011|5

Contributors LaDiva Dietitian! ‐ Marty Davey is not only LaDiva, Dietitian!, but a Registered Dietitian with  a Masters degree in Food and Nutrition. She became a vegetarian in 1980 when she  discovered that there were more chemicals in cattle then attendants at a Grateful Dead  concert. Her family is all vegan, except the dog who drew the line at vegetarian. She  conducts factual and hilarious presentations and food demos.  While her private practice  includes those transitioning to a plant‐based life, LaDiva's most popular private consulting  topic is "I'm too busy and I don't cook." Her website is www.ladivadietitian.com.      Eleanor Sampson – Eleanor is an editor and nutrition analyst for The Vegan Culinary  Experience, author, and an expert vegan baker with a specialty in delicious vegan sweets  (particularly cinnamon rolls!)  You can reach Eleanor at  [email protected]              

Quick & Easy

October 2011|6

Marketplace Welcome to the Marketplace, our new spot for finding vegetarian friendly companies, chefs, authors,  bloggers, cookbooks, products, and more!  One of the goals of The Vegan Culinary Experience is to connect  our readers with organizations that provide relevant products and services for vegans, so we hope you enjoy  this new feature!      Click on the Ads – Each ad is linked to the appropriate organization’s website.  All you need to do is click on  the ad to take you there.    Become a Marketplace Member – Become connected by joining the Vegan Culinary Experience Marketplace.   Membership is available to those who financially support the magazine, to those who promote the magazine,  and to those who contribute to the magazine.  Contact Chef Jason Wyrick at  [email protected] for details! 

Current Members  Casa Mettá         (www.casametta.com)     Milan Photography      (www.milanphotography.com)  Urban Vegan        (http://urbanvegan.net)                Vegan Outreach      (www.veganoutreach.org)     The Phoenix Permactulture Guild  (www.phoneixpermaculture.org) 

Quick & Easy

           

Tierno Tours        Sweet Utopia      (www.tiernotours.com)     (www.sweetutopia.com)  LaDiva Dietitian!, MS, RD    Jill Nussinow, MS, RD  (www.ladivadietitian.com)    (www.theveggiequeen.com)   Bad Kitty Creations       GoDairyFree.org    (www.badkittybakery.blogspot.com) (www.godairyfree.org) 

     

Non‐profits   

    Rational Animal      (www.rational‐animal.org)    

      Farm Sanctuary  (www.farmsanctuary.com)   

October 2011|7

Marketplace                                                                                          

Quick & Easy

October 2011|8

Marketplace                                          

             

Quick & Easy

October 2011|9

Marketplace  

               

Quick & Easy

October 2011|10

Marketplace

                                       

Quick & Easy

October 2011|11

Marketplace    

                             

Quick & Easy

October 2011|12

Marketplace                                                                    

 

LaDiva Dietitian’s

Click Cook Video &

LaDiva, HELP! Can I make easy, healthy food that will give me hair as great as yours??? Yes!!! Take me into your kitchen via your laptop or iPod or whatever device floats your boat. Every month I’ll send you links to simple, yummy VIDEO recipes. You can print off the PDFs, or follow along with the video to create Quick, LOW FAT, no cholesterol healthy dishes. EVERY MONTH YOU GET: ✓ List of ingredients and equipment needed ✓ 3 recipes of mine and cook with me ✓ 1 recipe made by the Planet Pyramid kids. SO you KNOW you can make it and let the kids have their own kitchen fun ✓ 1 shopping or cooking tip, such as how to buy and store knives, creating a pantry, how to read a nutrition label in less than a minute

Click on the YouTube video links below for a taste of what you will get every month. http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=LaDivaDietitian#grid/uploads All for $5/month or $60 per year. To Order Go to: http://www.ladivadietitian.com/ladivadietitian/Marketplace/Marketplace.html Type VCE in the comments for a $10 discount.

Quick & Easy

October 2011|13

Lentils: My Favorite, Fast, Hearty, and (dare I say it?) Healthy Food By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen™ While cooking lentils requires a greater time  investment than peeling a carrot or a cucumber or  biting into an apple, they certainly provide a huge  variety, depth of flavor and hearty quality that  fresh vegetables and fruits cannot. You likely know  that I am a huge proponent of eating vegetables.  Somehow, though, lentils top my list of fast and  easy foods especially when compared to other  legumes, which include beans and peas.  When you think of lentils, you likely think of the  brown or green ones because they are most often  called for in recipes. Yet lentils come in different  sizes, shapes and colors. Here’s how I classify them:  

 

Small, such as  lentils Du Puy, black beluga,  or French green, or other tiny varieties that  stay firm when you cook them  Hull less lentils such as red or ivory, that  melt into your dish, turning into a puree   Brown or green, the most typical lentil, that  falls between firm and puree with a bit of  texture  

The reason that I like lentils so much, besides their  versatility and variety, is that they don’t require  soaking before cooking. This means that you can  decide at 5 p.m. to have lentil salad, stew, soup or  chili for dinner – tonight, as in before 6 p.m. If you  have a pressure cooker, most lentils take only 6  minutes at pressure to cook (See my new ebook,  and soon to be in print, The New Fast Food™: The  Veggie Queen™ Pressure Cooks Whole Food Meals  in Less than 30 Minutes for more info).  

Quick & Easy

Lentils, like other legumes, need to be sorted and  picked through remove any debris or rocks. Wash  them well before using. The biggest issue with  black lentils is that it is difficult to see small rocks  or pebbles since they resemble one another.  When cooking, I find that adding salt after cooking  improves the quality of the lentils. Sometimes  adding salt can make them tough. I also do not use  a lot of salt, so I’d rather add it to the finished dish.  Most of the small, firm lentils will cook on the  stovetop in about 25 to 30 minutes. Keep in mind  that as legumes get older (as in more than a year  old), they need to cook for a longer time to be  thoroughly cooked. To cook them, cover the lentils  with water, bring to a boil, reduce the heat to  simmer and continue to cook until done. Test them  at 25 minutes to see if they are cooked through. I  always test a few lentils to make sure that they are  all cooked. If they are not cooked, continue  cooking. 

October 2011|14

The hulless lentils need about the same amount of  time and it’s easier to tell when they are done.  They break down into a puree and the lentils are  creamy. This will also take about 25 minutes.  The standard brown‐green lentils are also cooked  by covering with water but they often take 40 to 45  minutes simmering to be cooked through.  Some people find that they have problems  digesting lentils, but this is much less often than  with full sized beans such as black, kidney and  pinto.  

You can buy lentils at your local natural food, or  even grocery, store. I encourage bulk buying for  many reasons but one of the best is that if your  store sells a lot of lentils, you are likely to get a  more recent crop of lentils than if you buy them in  a bag on the grocery store shelf. To purchase some  of the more exotic lentils, I recommend checking  out Timeless Food for their organic lentil  assortment, which includes black beluga, red,  harvest gold and more, and Purcell Mountain  Farms for more lentils than I can list here. Even I  couldn’t buy as many as I wanted to. Next on my  list to purchase is the Autumn Lentil Mix, which  seems perfect for soup.   When I cook a batch of lentils, I almost always cook  extra and stash them in the freezer. They make a  great start for a quick and easy meal at a moment’s  notice. I freeze them in one to two cup bags, or in  freeze in whatever amount you’d likely use. 

lentil plant

I hope to spark your creativity when it comes to  using lentils: little nutrition powerhouses packed  with protein, fiber and many B Vitamins. Now that  you know how to cook lentils, here are some  recipes for how I like to use them.    

To make any legume more digestible, you can  sprout them (although there is a toxin in kidney  beans, so do not do this with them).  To sprout (see  my blog post here), soak the lentils (you cannot do  this with the hulless lentils) overnight, drain the  soaking water. Rinse twice a day, for a couple of  days. When the tail is the same length as the lentil,  they are ready to eat or to cook. They require  much less time to cook if they are sprouted.   If you don’t want to sprout them yourself, you can  purchase sprouted lentils from Tru Roots in a  package and rehydrate them to use them. All  sprouted lentils make wonderful raw salads. 

Quick & Easy

October 2011|15

Lentil Salad Serves 4‐6    You can use brown lentils or black or French green  lentils for this salad, depending upon what is  available. You can serve this on top of salad mix,  sprouts or arugula, or just on its own.    ¼  cup finely chopped shallot  3   tablespoons red wine vinegar  1  cup French green lentils or regular brown or  green lentils  1/2‐ 1 teaspoon salt  1/2  cup minced red or other colored pepper  3   tablespoons finely chopped Italian parsley  3   tablespoons olive oil, preferably extra‐virgin  1/4   cup walnuts, toasted lightly and chopped  fine    In a small bowl, combine shallot and 1 tablespoon  vinegar. In a small saucepan simmer lentils in water  to cover by 2 inches until just tender but not falling  apart, 15 to 20 minutes (if using French lentils BE  SURE to taste them no matter what to see if they  are cooked), and drain well. Add hot lentils to  shallot mixture and season with salt and pepper.  Cool mixture, stirring occasionally.   Add lentils to red pepper, remaining 2 tablespoons  vinegar, oil and walnuts. Add salt and pepper to  taste.  Note: This salad may be made 1 day ahead and  chilled, covered. Bring salad to room temperature  before serving. Taste and adjust seasonings. 

Quick & Easy

Lemony Lentil and Potato Chowder Serves 6‐8    I love lentils and the red ones break down so nicely  but unfortunately lose their red color and turn  yellow. This is comfort food at its best. The lemon  and mint also makes it incredibly refreshing and  fresh tasting, something not always easy to do mid‐ winter.    1  tablespoon olive oil (optional)  1  medium onion, sliced  1  tablespoon minced garlic  ¼  teaspoon cayenne pepper  2  cups red lentils  6  cups water or vegetable broth  3  cups unpeeled diced potatoes, red look nice  but any will work  2  cups chopped greens like kale, mustard,  chard, collards or sorrel  1  teaspoon lemon zest  4  tablespoons lemon juice  ¼  cup chopped mint  ½   teaspoon salt, or more to taste  Freshly ground black pepper, to taste    Heat the oil over medium heat in a large stockpot.  Add the onion and sauté for 3 to 4 minutes until  they begin to soften. Add the garlic and cayenne  and cook for 1 minute more. Add the lentils, broth  and potatoes. Bring the mixture to a boil, then  reduce to a simmer. Simmer, covered, for about 25  minutes or until the lentils and potatoes are  tender.    Puree the mixture with a hand blender. Add the  greens and cook 5 more minutes until they are  wilted. Stir in the lemon zest and juice and the  mint. Add salt and pepper, to taste. Serve hot.    ©2011, Jill Nussinow, MS, RD from The Veggie  Queen: Vegetables Get the Royal Treatment,  http://www.theveggiequeen.com  

October 2011|16

Lentil Tomato Stew Serves 4 to 6    This stew uses spices that are more common in  Africa or the Middle East, but would taste equally  as good with more traditional curry spices or  Mediterranean herbs. If you like smoky flavors, add  some smoked Spanish paprika to the mix. Don’t let  the long list of ingredients scare you. This comes  together so easily in the pressure cooker.  6 minutes high pressure; natural pressure release; 5  minutes stove top cooking    1 tablespoon neutral or olive oil (optional)  1 large yellow onion, diced small  2 carrots, peeled and diced  1 small Yukon gold or Yellow Finn potato, diced  4 cloves garlic, minced  1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger  1 tablespoon ground cumin  2 teaspoons paprika  ¼ teaspoon each ground coriander, cardamom,  allspice, cinnamon, cloves  Pinch of cayenne pepper or crushed red pepper  flakes  2‐3 sprigs fresh thyme or ½ teaspoon dried thyme  1 ½ cups brown lentils  1 ½ cups vegetable stock  1 cup diced tomatoes  ½ cup tomato paste  1 cup frozen green peas  ½ teaspoon salt, or to taste    Heat the oil in the pressure cooker over medium  heat. Add the onions, carrots and potato. Sauté for  a couple of minutes. Add the garlic, ginger and  spices and sauté for another minute. Add the  thyme, lentils and stock and lock the lid on the  cooker. Bring to high pressure over high heat.  Lower the heat to maintain high pressure for 6  minutes. Let the pressure come down naturally.  Remove the lid, tilting it away from you.   Add the tomatoes and tomato paste and simmer  on the stovetop for 5 minutes, adding the peas at  the end of cooking, stirring until they are bright  green. Taste and add salt as desired.    

Quick & Easy

©2011, Jill Nussinow, MS, RD from The New Fast  Food™: The Veggie Queen Pressure Cooks Whole  Food Meals in Less than 30 Minutes    The Author    Jill Nussinow, MS, RD is the  author of The Veggie Queen™:  Vegetables Get the Royal  Treatment cookbook and the  ebook, The New Fast Food: The  Veggie Queen™ Pressure Cooks  Whole Food Meals in Less than  30 Minutes due out in paperback  this fall. You can see and read more about what Jill  does at http://www.theveggiequeen.com. Find Jill  on Facebook at The Veggie Queen or follow Jill on  Twitter.  

October 2011|17

     Studies Show We Love Quickies: The abbrv. history of food preparation during the last 100 years By LaDiva Dietitian!, MS, RD Mondays start at 4:30 a.m., 2 hour drive to a  consulting job, 10 hours of work, leave for home,  stop for a visit with the Queen Mother, get home  around 8 p.m.  Dinner is half‐price fajita night at a  local joint with boring guacamole.      Even though the guacamole is tasteless, the idea of  cooking at the end of the day is just beyond me.   And I am not alone.  According to the National  Restaurant Association, 49% of food dollars are  spent in restaurants.  In fact, they see an upturn in  the industry as a whole.i    How did we go from, “Earl, chop Momma up some  fire wood” to “Honey bear, Mommy brought home  edamame and veggie sushi for dinner”?  It just  throws fuel to the fire that when you educate  someone you can’t keep’em down on the farm.    Douglas E. Bowers has written the quintessential  article on this in FoodReview magazine. ii If you  want more insights I suggest it as great reading.   However, in my on‐the‐go life, I’m plucking out the  highlights plus some added info from a couple of  other sources.    No matter what, women spend more time, on  average, cooking and doing domestic chores than  men.iii  Nonworking married women spend the  most amount of time cooking at 70 minutes, while  single gals spend around 15 minutes whether they  work or not.iv    It is this movement from married with kids in the  1900’s to single and loving it gal of 2011 that had  Quick & Easy

the biggest change on eating habits, obesity and  chronic illness in this country.  Thank goodness we  are now smarter, more educated, aware of the  food industry, and returning to looking for nutrition  in our daily meals.    A survey of households around 1900 stated that  women spent 44 hours per week preparing meals  and cleaning.  That is a full week of work with  childcare added on top.    Most employment opportunities, especially for  minority women, were as domestics.  Immigrant  women, such as those in my own family, were  domestics, but also made their living at factories.   Twenty percent of all women over the age of 16  were working at the turn of the 20th century,  however, only a little over five percent of married  women were employed.    From 1900 to 1920, sixty percent of the US lived in  a rural area.  The women there were not  considered part of the workforce, although they  brought in monies from products such as eggs and  poultry.   More than 20 percent of homes had more  than seven members in the household.  So, even  though there was large family to feed canning,  cleaning and gardening had many hands to help.   Less than six percent of the rural farms had a single  dweller.  The average family members were 4.8,  although there is no data or photos of 0.8 people.    With the discovery of vitamins, came nutritionists  and food science.  These experts, mainly women,  taught their sisters to have lighter, simpler meals.   October 2011|18

The immigrant wave in the early 1900’s brought  more unmarried people into one place than ever  before.  Of course, most women did marry and the  percentage of married women in the workforce  stayed stable.  On the other hand, movies brought  us Theda Bara as the silent screen, “It” girl,  glamourizing the single female.    In the 1920’s a lot of things had changed.  Urban  communities had begun to change from wood and  coal stoves to gas and electric.  They had ice boxes  and could buy produce and other perishable foods.   This increased the types of foods canned by food  companies and included meal items instead of just  soups.     With electricity came gadgets – food processors,  toasters, timers and even refrigerators to the  upper class.  The thin, chic image of a female began  to be the vogue.  And women began to change  American society with the development of family  planning and the right to vote.    The 1930’s depression sent many women back into  the home, but didn’t decrease their use of kitchen  gadgets.  In 1935, the Electrification Administration  was set up to get electricity to rural America. The  success of that administration led to increased use  of appliances and taking some of the drudgery out  of cooking.    World War II brought more employment, but a  national conservation of resources to feed troops  abroad.  In 1943, 40% of vegetables consumed  came from home gardens.  Canning got a  resurgence.    Returning soldiers after the war revitalized the idea  of the woman in the home.  Only this time she was  supposed to educated, look like Grace Kelly, keep a  spotless home and cook incredible meals for the  husband and children in heels and a ton of 

Quick & Easy

hairspray.  In a phrase, Homemaker Barbie.    With freezers now available, came frozen foods.   What could be easier?  On the farm, the business  began to change from Mom and Pop’s diverse farm  to specialized agribusiness.    Cutler, Glaeser, and Shapiro illustrate the change in  diet by the change in potato:    “Before World War II, Americans ate massive  amounts of potatoes, largely baked, boiled or  mashed. They were generally consumed at  home. French fries were rare, both at home  and in restaurants, because the preparation  of French fries requires significant peeling,  cutting and cooking.      French fries are now typically peeled, cut and  cooked in a few central locations using  sophisticated new technologies. They are  then frozen at 40 degrees and shipped to the  point of consumption . . . “ v     Women’s magazines stressed these new foods and  ease of preparation.  The new “home cooked”  meals went from 44 hours per week to below 20.    The civil rights Act of 1964 dealt with race as well  as gender inequality.  This led to huge up swings of  women in colleges and in the marketplace.  Men’s  role in the kitchen began to change.  Divorce rates  grew as did one parent households.  Men had  children to feed without a female partner in the  kitchen.    Ray Krock began the era of franchised eateries to  bring the restaurant experience to the middle‐ class.  Julia Child made her debut to get cooks back  in the kitchen, but food preparation, despite her  best efforts dropped to 10 hours a week.  The 60‐

October 2011|19

minute Gourmet, column by Pierre Franey, was  launched in the New York Times in 1975.vi    More than half of all women over age 16 were  employed in the 1980’s.  Fifty‐four percent of  married women were employed.      With more parents in the work world, meals at  home also dropped.  Breakfast was on the bus,  school, day care or desk at work.  Whereas 1950’s  children had come home for lunch from school,  now schools were expected to feed all children of  all grades.  The National School Lunch program  looked to add breakfast for economically  challenged households.  The number of single‐ parent households was now over 20%.  New York  City schools almost never close due to the amount  of lower income children they feed breakfast and  lunch.    In the 1990’s, both parents hit the job market with  70% of all women working.  Household members  decreased as more DINKS [double income no kids]  couples grew.  Most “home cooked” dinners were  actually 50% prepared foods.    With the explosion of obesity, childhood obesity in  particular, heart disease and Type 2 diabetes we  have come back to the notion of wanting nutrition  in our foods.   It is widely known that obesity  declines when family meals increase.  Americans  are still in love with the grab and go mentality, but  there is a growing movement to have healthier,  low fat, high fiber choices.      When Michelle Obama launched her “Let’s Move”  campaign, more and more restaurant chains have  realized that healthy choices sell.  Even WalMart  has launched a campaign to local and organic.    When I send off this article I’m going to run to the  kitchen, chop‐chop some veggies in the frig, throw 

Quick & Easy

them in the pot with H2O, a dash of seasonings and  quick cooking lentils, then set it to boil.  After it  boils, I’ll turn down the heat and let it simmer . . .  until tomorrow.     The Author Marty Davey, RD, MS is not only  LaDiva, Dietitian!, but a  Registered Dietitian with a  Masters degree in Food and  Nutrition. She became a  vegetarian in 1980 when she  discovered that there were more chemicals in cattle  then attendants at a Grateful Dead concert. Her  family is all vegan, except the dog who drew the  line at vegetarian. She conducts factual and  hilarious presentations and food demos. While her  private practice includes those transitioning to a  plant‐based life, LaDiva's most popular private  consulting topic is "I'm too busy and I don't cook."  Her website is www.ladivadietitian.com.   i http://www.restaurant.org/research/facts/ ii Bower D. 2000. Cooking Trends Echo Changing Roles of Women , FoodReview, Volume 23,Issue 1. Retrieved on September 19 2011 from http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/foodrevie w/jan2000/frjan2000d.pdf iii http://www.ers.usda.gov/amberwaves/novemb er05/datafeature/ https://webspace.utexas.edu/hamermes/www/ IsoWork120407.pdf v David M. Cutler, Edward L. Glaeser and Jesse M. Shapiro [2003] Why Have Americans Become More Obese? http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/jesse.shapiro/r esearch/obesity.pdf vi http://culiblog.org/2006/03/an‐improbable‐ history‐meal‐assembly‐centers/

October 2011|20

Raw Foods Made Easy By Angela Elliott    

I am the queen of easy peasy. I love whipping up a  tasty dish with very few ingredients, I find it a fun  and engaging challenge. Imagine this.  It's 5 o'clock  in the afternoon and your family decides to  surprise you, you have a bottle of wine, a few odds  and ends you aren't sure will go together, you've  had no time to run to the store, so you have to use  your imagination to come up with a delicious  enough dish that you can make out of this and that  and do it in the next 30 minutes. You will be happy  to know that you not only made dinner, but you  also made dessert too. Talk about wowing your  family in a flash!    Here's what you made:   

Creme a la Zucchini    1 cup chopped zucchinis  1 ripe avocado  ½ cup chopped celery  ½ cup spring water  1 tablespoon olive oil  1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice  1 teaspoon dried dill weed  1 garlic clove  ¼ teaspoon sea salt    Combine all the ingredients in a blender, and  process until smooth. Serve immediately.   

             

Quick & Easy

Chocolate Pudding    ½ cup pitted dates, soaked for 15 minutes  1 ripe avocado  2 tablespoons raw cacao powder or cocoa powder  1 tablespoon agave  1 teaspoon vanilla flavor or extract  1/8 teaspoon sea salt    Drain the dates but reserve the soak water. Place  the dates in a blender along with the remaining  ingredients, adding just enough of the soak water  to facilitate blending. Process until smooth. Chill  the pudding in the refrigerator for 30 or more  minutes and serve.     You made dinner and dessert in a flash, so now you  have to time to set the table nicely, pick some  flowers from the garden, and put on something  nice.    Wasn't this a fun game? Wanna make it real? Get  the above ingredients, prepare them, and invite  over some friends and enjoy!  The Author    Angela Elliott is the author of Alive in  Five, Holiday Fare with Angela, The  Simple Gourmet, and more books on  the way! Angela is the inventor of Five  Minute Gourmet Meals™, Raw Nut‐ Free Cuisine™, Raw Vegan Dog  Cuisine™, and The Celestialwich™, and  the owner and operator of She‐Zen Cuisine. www.she‐ zencuisine.com.   Angela has contributed to various  publications, including Vegnews Magazine, Vegetarian  Baby and Child Magazine, and has taught gourmet  classes, holistic classes, lectured, and on occasion toured  with Lou Corona, a nationally recognized proponent of  living food. 

October 2011|21

Year of the Pomegranate by Liz Lonnetti The garden looks pretty bad this time of year – the  plants like survivors of a devastating season, which  is pretty accurate.  Temperatures are still high in  September, but they are starting to fall and nights  are cooling off, giving respite to weary trees, vines  and the perennials in the garden.  We’re starting to  plant for the winter crops here in Phoenix and I  always feel like a kid in a candy store when thinking  about all the greens that will start coming in –  delicate lettuce leaves, more robust kale and swiss  chard – YUM!  The Citrus trees have next year’s  crop green and full of promise for the future, but  the star of the show at this time of year?   POMEGRANATES!!    Pomegranates have survived the harsh summer  with their precious fruits nourished through the  heat and made sweeter in our seasonal furnace.   Some cultivars will be ready to harvest now and  some of them will be perfect for picking before  Thanksgiving, making it one of the few fruits that  ripen at this time of year and a must have for the  savvy gardener looking to extend a fruit harvest as  long as possible into the year!  They also store well  kept in a cool place, and compare with apples for  an excellent shelf life.    Pomegranates originated in the northern region of  India to the Himalayas of Iran and some varieties  do quite well with some frost, although  temperatures below 12degrees F can permanently  damage the trees.  Surprisingly they do very well in  our desert home and can be prolific producers in  your garden as they prefer arid conditions.  They  are very drought tolerant once established, but  prefer regular irrigation for best fruit set.  The  pomegranate even makes a good container tree, if  given a large pot.  It is impossible to discuss pomegranates without  referring to the world’s leading authority, Dr.  Quick & Easy

Gregory Levin, author of Pomegranate Roads: A  Soviet Botanist's Exile from Eden.  Dr. Levin spent  over 40 years traveling Central Asia and the Trans‐ Caucasus, collecting and cultivating over 1,100  varieties of pomegranates, eventually sending the  best of the best to be grown out at UC Davis in  California.    The best known variety of pomegranate is the  Wonderful.  It is the oldest commercial cultivar,  typically the kind you get in the grocery store and  it’s name is quite descriptive as it is a large, sweet  fruit on a tree that produces heavily.  The fruit  stores well, keeping a high quality for many weeks  under good conditions.  Other varieties are now  being offered to the home gardener and each has  slightly different characteristics.  Some have earlier  or later harvests, some fruit is sweeter and some  more tart, color is also being selected for with  varieties ranging from white seeds to deepest  purple.  Some other varieties* to consider would include:  

AC Sweet. Sweeter fruit than Wonderful,  more widely adapted (better quality in cool‐ summer climates). Small, glossy‐leafed,  ornamental tree with showy Turkmenistan  (country of origin) orange‐red blossoms in  October 2011|22













Quick & Easy

late spring. Very suitable to espalier and  container growing. Harvest late summer.  Unsplit ripe fruit stores in cool, dry place for  two months or more.   Ambrosia. Medium to large size fruit with  pale pink skin. Large seeds with dark red,  sweet‐tart juice. Good source of  antioxidants. Long‐lived, any soil.   Garnet Sash. Naturally slightly dwarf tree is  extremely precocious, setting profuse  amounts of attractive flowers and fruit in  the first year. Would make an attractive  ornamental. Fruit is small to medium sized,  with yellow skin, blushed pinkish red.  Garnet Sash has large seeds with very  flavorful sweet‐tart juice, a great source of  antioxidants. It would be an excellent  choice for juice blending. Harvest from late  September to mid October.  Grenada. A true grenadine selection. Fruit is  colored a dark, burgundy‐red all over. Seeds  and juice are dark red, with good flavor.  Kashmir. Medium size pomegranate with  light pink‐red exterior. Ruby red seeds have  intense flavor with no overbearing acidic  taste. Plant has a slightly spreading growth  habit and can also be grown as a tree. Keep  any height with summer pruning.   Pink Satin. Medium to large size, medium  pink to dark red fruit with medium to large,  light‐pink edible seeds. Wonderful  refreshing light‐colored juice is non‐staining,  with a sweet, fruit‐punch flavor. Plant is  vigorous and can be grown as a shrub or  tree and kept any height by summer  pruning.  

Sharp Velvet. Large sized pomegranate with  a very appealing, unique mildly acid  refreshing flavor. Fruit has a dark red  exterior and dark seeds, the color of  crushed‐red velvet. Upright growing plant  sets huge crops of highly ornamental fruit  and can be kept any height with summer  pruning.  

  Any of these varieties would do well in our Phoenix  location, as they require only 150 – 200 hours of  chill and we get at least 250 each winter season.   They are also self‐fruitful, meaning that you don’t  need to have more than one tree to get a good  harvest of fruit, unlike some trees that need a mate  to cross‐pollinate.  All have excellent antioxidant  qualities and would do well eaten fresh out of hand,  juiced or used in cooking.    And since the theme of this edition is quick and  easy, I’ll share with you the absolutely fastest way  to remove the seeds from a pomegranate.  Take  your pomegranate and cut it down the center it so  that the stem and blossom ends are at the top of  each half.  Hold your pomegranate half in your  hand, cut side down and over a large bowl.  Then  take a large heavy spoon, or other blunt heavy  object and whack away at the pomegranate.  This  will quickly separate the seeds from the skin.  You  could do this over a large bowl filled with water if  you want the seeds to easily separate from the  membranes, as the membranes float while the  seeds will sink to the bottom.  This whole process  should not take more than a couple minutes once  you practice.  If your intent is to juice the fruit, just  take your cut halves and use a citrus reamer style  juicer and juice it as if it were an orange or  grapefruit.  For those of you interested in learning more, the  AZ Chapter of the California Rare Fruit Growers  annual Festival of Fruit is dedicated to the  Pomegranate and is being held in Phoenix this year.   This event will be held the weekend of November  5th at ASU’s Tempe campus, for more info please  click here.  This year the Valley Permaculture Alliance is  offering classes on fruit tree care as well as 13  October 2011|23

different varieties of pomegranates, some of them  cultivated from the best of the best of Dr. Levin’s  research.  The VPA is very excited to be able to  offer some of those rare varieties for sale to the  public as a part of this years exciting Fruit Tree  Program.  If you love pomegranates, consider  adding this versatile tree to your yard and garden,  you won’t be disappointed.    Now check out my recipe for Iced Pomegranate Tea  on page 164 of this issue.    *Descriptions primarily from Dave Wilson’s Nursery                                                                          Quick & Easy

The Author    As a professional urban designer, Liz  Lonetti is passionate about building  community, both physically and  socially.  She graduated from the U  of MN with a BA in Architecture in  1998. She also serves as the  Executive Director for the Phoenix  Permaculture Guild, a non‐profit  organization whose mission is to  inspire sustainable living through education, community  building and creative cooperation  (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).  A long time advocate  for building greener and more inter‐connected  communities, Liz volunteers her time and talent for  other local green causes.  In her spare time, Liz enjoys  cooking with the veggies from her gardens, sharing  great food with friends and neighbors, learning from  and teaching others.  To contact Liz, please visit her blog  site www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan.  

  Resources  www.urbanfarm.org  www.phoenixpermaculture.org 

 

October 2011|24

Vegan Cuisine and the Law Why Big Macs & Chicken McNuggets Outprice Carrots & Apples  By Mindy Kursban, Esq. For almost 70 years, the “Farm Bill” has been the  most significant piece of legislation affecting what  American farmers grow and American consumers  eat. The next round of Farm Bill revisions are  expected to be taken up by Congress in 2012. This  provides a limited time to push for change toward  agricultural policies that favor healthy and  sustainable plant‐based diets.     Here are my five top things to change in the 2012  Farm Bill:     1. Grow Corn and Soybeans for People to Eat,  not to Reduce the Cost of Meat.  

and wheat.  The vast majority of these crops are  processed into feed for the cows, pigs, and  chickens who ultimately end up in our grocery  stores and fast‐food restaurants at bargain‐ basement prices.  

Commodity Programs that give money to certain  agriculture sectors – what are commonly known as  “subsidies” – are one of the main components of  the Farm Bill.  When Congress  passed the first  Farm Bill in  1933, subsidies  provided an  economic safety  net to millions of  small farmers  facing the loss of  their farms,  while also  ensuring a stable  food supply.  That original laudable intention has been severely  distorted, resulting in unintended, unfortunate,  and unhealthy consequences. 

As much as 98 percent of soybeans grown in the  U.S. are used for animal feed. Less than 10 percent  of the corn grown makes it directly to our dinner  tables. The poultry industry received an average of  $1.25 billion a year in grain subsidies between 1997  and 2005. Even the waste materials from cotton  production and corn milling for ethanol are fed to  animals. According to the Renewable Fuels  Association, “the ethanol industry is expected to  produce more than 39 million metric tons of animal  feed in 2010‐11, enough to produce 50 billion  quarter‐pound hamburgers – or seven patties for  every person on  the planet.”     When people do  consume these  commodity crops,  it is often in the  form of highly‐ processed,  unhealthy  inventions like high  fructose corn syrup  turned into sodas  and hydrogenated  oils found in McDonald’s Big Macs, Chic‐Fil‐A  chicken patties, KFC’s apple turnovers, and most  other fast‐food menu items.  

Ninety‐three percent of subsidies today go to five  “commodity crops”: corn, cotton, rice, soybeans, 

We don’t need easy and cheap access to these  disease‐promoting foods. Taxpayer dollars should 

Quick & Easy

October 2011|25

only be used to produce healthy, whole plant foods  for people, not livestock. Urge lawmakers to end  subsidies for growers of commodity crops.  2. Stop subsidizing the Dairy Industry.     

The dairy industry has co‐opted common sense by  successfully convincing America that cow’s milk is a  necessary part of a healthy diet. Healthier plant‐ based sources of calcium like green leafy  vegetables will not only protect our bones better  than cow’s milk, these calcium sources don’t inflict  untold suffering on the cows used up and  slaughtered as part of the dairy industry’s standard  practices.    Taxpayers provide the dairy industry with  approximately $1 billion in annual subsidies. Farm  Bill programs include the Milk Income Loss  Contract (MILC) program, which pays dairy  producers when milk prices fall, the Dairy Product  Price Support Program (DPSP), which purchases  surplus products from dairy processors, and milk  marketing orders, through which the federal  government artificially controls the price of milk.    The government shouldn’t be doling out billions of  taxpayer dollars to the dairy industry to ensure that  every man, woman, and child “Got Milk”.  Let  market forces determine milk’s price. Demand that  your taxpayer dollars stop subsidizing the dairy  industry.     3. Redirect Commodity Crop and Dairy Subsidies  to Growers of Healthy Plant‐Based Foods.     Government subsidies should be restricted to  foods that are the healthiest for our environment  and for us. The Farm Bill refers to fruits,  vegetables, and nuts as “specialty crops.” Two‐ thirds of American farmers produce “specialty‐ crops.”  None of these crops are subsidized.   Quick & Easy

The 2008 Farm Bill marked a small step forward for  specialty crops. Limited funding for programs that  encourage fruit and vegetable consumption  included the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program  (FFVP) and the Healthy Urban Food Enterprise  Development Center. A new “Organics” title was  also added to the 2008 Farm Bill to promote  specialty crops, grow farmers’ markets, and  transition producers to organic production.     Many of the  programs that  support  healthy eating  only began  with the 2008  Farm Bill.  Despite the  limited  resources  given to these  programs,  they are likely to be targeted for cuts in the 2012  version.     Yet, we need 13 million more acres of land for  growing fruits and vegetables just for everyone to  meet the minimum recommended dietary  guidelines. For Americans to have easy and  affordable access to fresh whole plant‐foods,  revolutionary change in agricultural policy is  needed. Urge lawmakers to redirect subsidies  currently given to prop up the meat and dairy  industries to investments in programs that  incentivize farmers to grow fruits and vegetables.     4. Bring Old McDonald’s Farm Back.     Farm Bill policies contributed to the rise of factory  farms. As explained in bestselling author Michael  Pollan’s groundbreaking book, The Omnivore’s  Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals,      [T]he flood tide of cheap corn made it  profitable to fatten cattle on feedlots  instead of on grass, and to raise chickens in  giant factories rather than in farmyards.  Iowa livestock farmers couldn’t compete  with the factory‐farmed animals their own  October 2011|26

cheap corn had helped spawn, so the  chickens and cattle disappeared from the  farm.    Factory farming meant millions more animals could  be raised in smaller spaces through intensive  confinement. Combined with more cost savings  from the federally‐subsidized animal feed, cheap  and abundant meat, dairy, and eggs became part  of the “Standard American Diet.” One million  animals are slaughtered for food every hour in  America, ten billion every year.     But the Farm Bill does not provide even the most  minimal protections for these animals. Downed  animals routinely enter the food chain. Sows and  calves spend their lives intensely confined to small,  cramped crates. Laying hens are crammed into  battery cages so crowded they can barely move at  all. Chickens receive no humane slaughter  protection. The list of abuses goes on and on.     The only mention of animal welfare in the 2008  Farm Bill was to increase the maximum fine for  each violation of the Animal Welfare Act from  $2,500 to $10,000, which will be of small comfort  to those factory‐farmed chickens and calves: The  Animal Welfare Act does not apply to farm animals.     Urge lawmakers to incorporate meaningful animal  welfare provisions into the Farm Bill.     5. Keep Taxpayer Dollars Out of the Hands of  McDonald’s, Burger King, and KFC.     More than two‐thirds of the $284 billion budgeted  in the 2008 Farm Bill went toward the Food Stamp  Program, now called SNAP – the Supplemental  Nutrition Assistance Program, and other food  assistance programs.    Currently, individual states can decide whether  SNAP benefits can be used in fast food restaurants  and such use is further limited to the elderly,  disabled, and homeless. Currently only California,  Arizona, and Michigan allow this practice  statewide.    

Quick & Easy

Efforts are underway to bust this door wide open.  Yum Brands, the company that brings us KFC, Taco  Bell, and Pizza Hut, is spending millions of dollars to  convince Congress that the 45 million SNAP  participants should be able to spend their food‐ stamp dollars in fast‐food restaurants, effectively  delivering billions of our tax dollars right into the  hands of Big Food.     While ensuring SNAP participants’ access to  healthy foods is a complex matter, efforts to  increase the availability of foods known to make  people fat and sick should be rejected. Urge  lawmakers to revamp the food stamp program to  feature health‐promoting foods and creative  solutions to support participants’ access to these  foods.   To change the direction of agriculture policy in this  country toward healthy, sustainably‐produced,  plant‐based food that protects both human health  and animal well‐being, our voices must become  louder and stronger. If you’d like to weigh in,  contact the House Agriculture Committee at  [email protected] and politely  demand these changes in the 2012 Farm Bill.  The Author     Mindy Kursban is a  practicing attorney who is  passionate about animals,  food, and health. She gained  her experience and  knowledge about vegan  cuisine and the law while  working for ten years as  general counsel and then executive director of the  Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Since  leaving PCRM in 2007, Mindy has been writing and  speaking to help others make the switch to a plant‐ based diet. Mindy welcomes feedback, comments, and  questions at [email protected]  

 

October 2011|27

The Vegan Traveler:

Atlanta, GA By Chef Jason Wyrick  

Greenery, history, and a thriving international and  artistic culture dominate Atlanta, but what isn’t  quite expected, but is quite welcome, is a bustling  realm of vegetarian cuisine.  When I first visited  Atlanta in 2001, I was surprised to hear from so  many people about how veg‐friendly the city was.   Thankfully so, because that was at a time when  most cities were not and I was definitely worried  about being able to find something to eat in the  South, home of fried, fried, and more fried.  I  remember rushing off to a well‐recommended  restaurant called Unicorn Place and being ecstatic  that not only could I find something to eat, the  food was good.  Sadly, it seems as though that  place has closed, but with the explosion of vegan  cuisine in popular culture, the restaurant scene has  followed suit.   

Soul Vegetarian    As soon as I got off  the plane and  hopped into my  rental car, I  headed to Soul  Vegetarian.  This  was my third trip to the restaurant and I had had  generally good experiences there.  My tastes over  the last few years have changed, however, and I  wondered if I would still appreciate the restaurant.   If you hadn’t guessed, Soul Vegetarian specializes  Quick & Easy

in soul food and Southern food, but it also has a  few choices like veggie burgers, some Middle  Eastern cuisine, and smoothies; an eclectic menu  to be sure.  The interior was a bit dingy, but  everyone there had a peaceful vibe and a wide  smile.      Service was a bit  slow, evidently an  issue at both  locations, and one of  my appetizers came  out after my main  dish, but I wasn’t in a  rush, so it wasn’t a  big deal.   I ended up  ordering the kalebone (which were battered and  fried seitan fingers), the eggless salad, and the  “chicken” fried seitan steak, which came with  collard greens and mac ‘n’ cheese.  I remember  having the kalebone many years ago, but sadly it  did not live up to my memory of it.  The seitan was  a bit fluffy, which isn’t really appropriate for seitan  fingers, and was not well flavored.  My tastes had  definitely changed.  The texture on the eggless  salad was also a bit off, being overly dense.  It felt  and tasted more like a ground nut pate, but the  taste was excellent.  I would definitely order this  again.  The “chicken” fried steak had the same  texture problem that the kalebone had, but the  gravy was pure Southern decadence and definitely  October 2011|28

made the dish, especially the way it set into the  batter after a few minutes.  Delicious.  The collard  greens were about average.  They could have used  some extra garlic or green chiles, but the mac ‘n’  cheese was wonderful.  I think they changed their  recipe because the last time I had it, I wasn’t that  impressed.  If you visit Soul Vegetarian, be aware  that a few of their dishes have honey.      After I was done, I headed off to explore the city,  do some shopping at Whole Foods, and finally sit  down to dinner at…   

cake had been  half the size, it  would have  been perfect,  meaning they  served me a  massive slice  of cake.  That  was a meal in itself!  Finally, the pero had a mellow  flavor to it I don’t usually associate with coffee and  I was able to drink it black.  In fact, I wish I would  have thought about pouring some over my cake!   

Café Sunflower 

R Thomas 

  Café Sunflower is  Atlanta’s upscale  vegetarian restaurant,  serving gourmet vegan  and vegetarian menu  items in a fine casual  atmosphere.  This was  by far my favorite  dining experience of  the whole trip.   Everything I had ranged from good to excellent and  I enjoyed it so much, I finished my trip at Café  Sunflower!    On the first night, I had the spinach artichoke dip,  the quiche, the chocolate peanut butter mousse  cake, and a glass of pero (a non‐caffeinated grain  coffee).  With so many options, I enlisted my  waiter’s help in navigating through the menu,  which led me to the quiche.  It seemed like the  sesame “chicken” was the most popular item, but  the staff favorite was the quiche and I have to  agree.  It was filling without being heavy, it had a  deep, rich flavor, but the real star was the super‐ flaky, light crust.  Served over a light roasted  squash sauce, this was the star of the evening,  though it was followed closely by the cake.  If the 

  R Thomas is one of the oddest restaurants I’ve  been to.  The menu focuses on organic and seems  to follow most of the health crazes of recent years,  which means they have a very eclectic selection  and happen to have quite a few vegan items and  two raw foods platters.  The owner of the  restaurant keeps  birds outside  the restaurant  amidst the  resplendent  greenery  adorning the  restaurant,  which  bothered me,  but it was also the only place to get solid vegan  food at odd hours.     Speaking of which, the restaurant is open 24 hours.   Vegan and raw food, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week,  was not something I was used to having available  at a restaurant!  However, I think someone should  have told the staff the restaurant was always open  because they were incredibly slow.  In fact, my  waiter even admitted he had forgotten about me  and I was the only patron in the restaurant.  The 

Quick & Easy

October 2011|29

other two employees I saw were hanging out at a  table next to me, veritably shouting at each other  for conversation.  Ugh.    Fortunately,  once the food  came, all sins  were absolved.   I ordered one of  the raw food  platters, which  came with  some raw falafels, loads of flax crackers, a quartet  of coconut kefir dips, ginger beets, kale, and a  fennel salad, all for just $14.95.  If you’ve ever been  to a raw foods restaurant, you know that the  portions can be skimpy and over‐priced.  At R  Thomas, they served me a heaping platter of  organic raw food and it was all good.  I felt  satisfied, both taste‐wise and nutritionally, and  topping it off with a raw apple pie and several cups  of yerba mate (yes, I needed to stay awake) made  for a wonderful late‐night/early‐morning meal.  If  you’re in Atlanta and you’ve got a 4‐in‐the‐morning  craving, R Thomas is the place to be.   

Dulce Vegan Bakery    Several hours after my late  night R Thomas splurge, I  was set to head off to  Athens, GA, but on the way  out, I planned on stopping  at Dulce Vegan Bakery,  Atlanta’s only vegan bakery.   Unfortunately, this was a  huge mistake, but at least I  can warn you now about this place.    I arrived at 7:30, the opening time for the bakery  and it did open at 7:30…sort of.  At least, they  unlocked the doors.  Aside from having unlocked 

Quick & Easy

doors, the place may as well have been closed.   They had no coffee brewed, no fresh baked goods,  and the only thing the cashier sheepishly offered to  get me were the day old muffins and scones.  I  heard people working in the back and he told me it  would only be a few more minutes, so I decided to  wait.  I wasn’t in a big rush anyway and I really  wanted to try some vegan pastries.      Forty‐five minutes later, they brought out their first  freshly baked items.  All three of them.  Two types  of scones and some muffins.  During the  intervening time, no less than twelve people came  in to place orders, most of which left in disgust or  begrudgingly ordered coffee (which was finally  ready) and sat outside.  Before I got my order of  lemon scones, maple scones, and blueberry lemon  muffins, I saw another person come in and attempt  to order cinnamon rolls an hour after the bakery  opened.  No such luck for them and no cinnamon  rolls forthcoming for at least another hour.  The  owner wasn’t even apologetic to the customers  and acted as though this was business as normal.   By this time, I felt a British accent coming on and  lots of swear words about to erupt from my mouth.   Instead, I staved them off, ordered a mocha and  chocolate biscotti for the road, and left.  As a  business owner myself, I would  have offered my customers free  coffee for making them wait so  long and as a way to make up for  such a long delay.  Instead, I got  charged the full amount for all  the baked goods and a mocha  that tasted watery, grainy, and  bitter.      To make matters worse, the  baked goods tasted lifeless.  Not bad or good, just  lifeless, like they had them frozen from the day  before and were thawing them out in the morning 

October 2011|30

so they could be baked.  Maybe I should have gone  Gordon Ramsay on them after all.   

The Grit 

  Several hours later and a rather pleasant drive  through the forest, I found myself in Athens, GA.   Athens has an incredible live music scene and is  dominated by the University of Georgia.  I would  have loved to have stayed in town for the night,  but I only had a few hours, so I walked around  downtown, headed over to Tyche’s Games, and  then for lunch at The Grit, Athen’s oldest  vegetarian restaurant.    The Grit reminds me of one of those vegetarian  restaurants that opened in the ‘80s or early ‘90s,  the ones where the food resembles a hippy version  of Denny’s.  Not great quality, but at least it’s  vegetarian.  It has that diner look with a huge  chalkboard menu and the food kind of matches.  I  had looked at the menu before I arrived and knew I  wanted the tofu reuben sandwich and that is,  indeed,  what I got.      Maybe  that  wasn’t  such a 

Quick & Easy

great idea, though.  A great tofu reuben has  marinated tofu, tangy Russian dressing, toasty rye  bread, and sauerkraut.  However, The Grit didn’t  have any vegan Russian dressing, so they put  lemon tahini sauce on the sandwich.  Seriously?   And the tofu was chopped into small pieces and stir  fried to crispness.  Hmmmm.  The Creole soup that  came with it was definitely made with canned  tomato sauce which was simmered with a bunch of  dried spices.  At least it made for a good dipping  sauce for the sandwich.  Denny’s style food,  indeed.      The Grit seemed stuck in a place two decades ago  as I expect most vegetarian restaurants now can  easily make vegan versions of most of their meals  and a reuben  should be a piece  of cake.  I left  wishing I had  showed up just a  bit earlier for  brunch, because  the brunch dishes I  saw being finished when I arrived looked quite  tasty!   

Café Sunflower, Once More with Feeling    It was Saturday night and my time in Atlanta was  coming to a close, mere hours away.  There were  so many places I wanted to try still.  Harmony  Vegetarian, Lov’n It Live (a raw foods restaurant),  and World Peace Vegan Café, which I had heard so  many good things about, and a plethora of Chinese  and Indian vegetarian places.  With my plane  leaving in three hours, though, I didn’t want to  chance it and I definitely wanted to end my trip on  a good note, so I headed back to Café Sunflower  for seconds.     

October 2011|31

I can see why the  sesame “chicken”  is a favorite  amongst locals!   Sweet without  being cloying,  pungent, the  texture soft yet  with bite.  I decided to splurge and got two  appetizer, as well.  The fried green tomatoes were  just plain fun with red pepper hummus layered in  between each tomato.  Mmmmm.  I definitely  need to make this at home.  The plantains were  smashed and then salted and fried, creating  delectable plantain chips served with a black bean  dip.  Those were so filling, I could have eaten those  as a main meal!  And to finish it off, a raw  cheesecake with a hint of sourness and a real  cheesecake texture.                          Cutting it close, I raced to the airport, glad I could  end my trip on such an outstanding note.  Café  Sunflower has become one of my favorite eateries  and Atlanta is definitely one of my favorite cities.  I  can’t wait to go back.               

Quick & Easy

The Author     Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The  Vegan Culinary  Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine  with a readership of about 30,000.  In 2001, Chef Jason  reversed his diabetes by switching to a low‐fat, vegan  diet and subsequently left his position as the Director of  Marketing for an IT company to become a chef and  instructor to help others.  Since then, he has been  featured by the NY Times, has been a NY Times  contributor, and has been featured in Edible Phoenix,  and the Arizona Republic, and has had numerous local  television appearances.  He has catered for companies  such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the Scottsdale  Culinary Festival’s premier catering event, and has been  a guest instructor and the first vegan instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program at Scottsdale Culinary Institute.   Recently, Chef Jason wrote a national best‐selling book  with Dr. Neal Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss  Kickstart.  You can find out more about Chef Jason  Wyrick at www.veganculinaryexperience.com. 

           

October 2011|32

An Interview with author and instructor Bryanna Clark-Grogan!    

Please tell us a bit about yourself!    My mother, a talented portrait artist, was a 3rd‐ generation Californian of Scottish, French, English  and Cornish decent, and my father was Peruvian, of  Italian and Spanish descent. He worked in the wine  business, was a gourmet and wine connoisseur,  and spoke 7 languages. I was born in Oakland,  California and lived in the Livermore Valley until I  was 11, then in San Francisco until I was 18.  At  that time, my late husband Wayne Clark and I  emigrated to British Columbia, Canada, where I had  family and where my sister Karin was living. (Just as  an aside, although Karin is not interested in  cooking, she is a long‐time vegan, too.)  I now live  on a tiny, beautiful island off the east coast of  Vancouver Island with my husband Brian Grogan  (who is a baker and photographer) and 2 cats,  Ringo and Sadie.  We live in a small house in the  woods (“Nonna’s little house in the woods”, as my  youngest grandson Logan calls it!), a stone’s throw  from the water.  And we are lucky here‐‐ we are  part of a group of 5 vegan couples right here on the  island who get together for fabulous vegan dinners  every so often.   

Quick & Easy

Besides writing cookbooks, developing recipes and  teaching, I write columns for a couple of local  papers and I manage a small branch of my regional  library system part time.  I have four grown  children (three daughters and one son), two  stepsons, and nine grandchildren, all fairly nearby.   Besides writing and cooking and enjoying my  family, I love reading mystery fiction (especially  historical), bellydancing, and music.  My other  passionate interest is social justice (inherited from  both sides of my family) and I do a lot of reading to  keep up with the news around that, and world  politics, as well as vegan and environmental issues.    Why did you become vegan and what was the  transition like?  What were some of the keys to  your success?    I grew up eating meat, like most of us, and when I  was a young married woman with small children,  my late husband Wayne and I read Diet for a Small  Planet by Francis Moore Lappe.  We did not  become vegetarians, but decided to eat vegetarian  (except when we were invited out) until we could  raise our own meat.  Eventually, we were able to  leave our city life (San Francisco and then 

October 2011|33

Vancouver, BC) and join the “back‐to‐the‐land”  movement, living in Northern BC for 3 years and  eventually moving to a small homestead on  Vancouver Island. There we raised a large garden,  chickens, a milk cow or two, and pigs.  We did  everything ourselves and when we didn’t have our  own eggs, we cooked without eggs; when we ran  out of meat, we ate beans, etc.  We moved to a  small island (Denman Island, where I still live)  where we started building a house and Wayne  worked an oyster lease he had purchased.  Wayne  died tragically 6 months after we moved there and  I was left with 2 teenage girls and a 10‐year‐old son  at home, a barely‐started house, a part‐time job,  and no insurance.  It was difficult, as you can  imagine (though the community was very  supportive), and I had little time to focus on food  issues.  (Actually, it was the only time in my life  that I was disinterested in food.)  Eventually I  realized that we were eating in a way that we had  hoped to leave behind—buying store‐bought meat  and eggs and milk.  I decided that I did not want to  raise animals on my own and the logical thing  seemed to me to become a vegetarian.      At first I ate some seafood, too, but I gave that up  fairly soon, and I began reading more about  vegetarianism.  It seemed to me, eventually, that, if  I wanted to be consistent about animal welfare, I  would have to become a vegan.  (Shortly after I  made this decision, John Robbins’ book Diet for a  New America came out.  I ordered it and devoured  it in one day!  It further helped me to continue on  this journey.) That was about 23 years ago and  there were not many vegan cookbooks (and no  internet).  I had only the old Farm Cookbook and  Ten Talents, a 7th‐Day Adventist cookbook.  I did  have some experience cooking vegetarian, as we  had done without animal products on the farm  when they were not available, so I could bake some  things without eggs, I could make delicious bean  stews and soups, and I was even experienced at 

Quick & Easy

making homemade soy milk, tofu, tempeh and  seitan (thanks to my father’s love of Japanese food,  which sparked an interest in soy foods, and a 7th‐ Day Adventist friend with a pretty good recipe for  seitan).  My parents had always placed a major  emphasis on fresh fruits, vegetables and grains and  seldom used prepared foods, so that also gave me  a good grounding.  I wanted foods that tasted  really interesting, so I used plenty of seasonings  and explored different cuisines.    I think that preparing delicious vegan food and  curiosity about unfamiliar foods, cuisines and  techniques was a big part of helping me stick with  veganism, but concern for animals and the  environment was the real incentive for vegan, even  when it was difficult or objectionable to others.  I  still maintain that these two reasons for being  vegan give one the strongest incentive for not  “straying” from the vegan path.     Just as an aside, I do not believe in proselytizing  about veganism (well, maybe on Facebook!).   Around friends and family, I do “soft” educating  where appropriate, I’m always ready to answer  questions if asked, and I serve delicious vegan food.   As a result, my husband, who was not a vegetarian  when we married, is now a vegan, though I never  asked him to make that commitment.  One of my  grown daughters is now a vegan, one  granddaughter is a vegan, and two others are  vegetarian.  I always hope that more will become  vegan, but at least I know that they realize that it’s  a valid and do‐able alternative.    When did your interest in cooking really take  hold?    I have always loved cooking.  My mother told me  that I pulled up a stool or chair beside her in the  kitchen at a very young age—before I can even  remember.  According to her, I cooked my first 

October 2011|34

dinner at age 6.  She also told me that, as a baby, I  always hummed while I ate!  So, I suppose  appreciation of food itself was the first thing, and  then I must have discovered how fun it was to  create dishes.  I also love researching and  experimenting, which is handy when developing  recipes!  The music, dance and foods of different  cultures always interested me, as well, and those  interests continue unabated. I was in a good  position to observe study and taste most of my life,  growing up in a winery in California, with a family  background of Peruvian, Spanish, Italian, French,  English/Scottish, and old‐fashioned American, and  family friends who were Jewish, Portuguese,  Japanese, Chinese, Russian, Armenian, Italian, and  more. I was also fortunate to have lived in the  cultural melting pots of San Francisco and  Vancouver, BC for many years.  I married very  young and had 3 children by the time I was 21, so  feeding my children delicious, nutritious food  (including homemade bread) was a major concern  for me and led me to experiment with whole grains  and begin baking my own bread.    You’ve been vegan for much longer than it’s been  in the mainstream consciousness.  What was that  like and what are some of the more surprising  changes you’ve seen?    In the late 60’s and 70’s many people adopted  vegetarian diets (not so many went vegan) and  there were several well‐intentioned American   vegetarian cookbooks about , but most were rather  in the “crunchy granola” vein.  We also consulted  7th‐Day Adventist cookbooks, Hare Krishna  cookbooks, macrobiotic cookbooks, and Asian  cookbooks.  There were also British vegetarian  cookbooks, since the movement has a long history  in the UK. When I became a vegan in the 80’s, we  still used these cookbooks, plus classics like Laurel’s  Kitchen, The Vegetarian Epicure 1 & 2, the  Moosewood books, Madhur Jaffrey’s World‐of‐the‐

Quick & Easy

East Vegetarian Cooking, and a few others, but  very few vegan cookbooks.  At the time, I had a few  of the 7th‐day Adventist cookbooks, and the New  Farm Vegetarian Cookbook.  I was fired up about  vegan cooking, but I wanted really full‐bodied  flavors and textures, so I began to develop my own  recipes.  Eventually the Now and Zen Epicure came  out, and Ron Pickarski’s books, which were real  inspirations.    

bryanna at the veg awakenings conference

The other challenge was vegan products!  Soy milk  was not very good and hard to find, the only vegan  margarine I could obtain was Fleischman’s  Unsalted, there were no vegetarian meat  substitutes except the odd tofu hotdog (trust me,  they’ve improved considerably!) or tasteless veggie  burger.  There were no vegan cheeses, silken tofu;  no veggie pates and vegan deli slices the deli case;  no dairy‐free pesto, or soy yogurt. And reading  labels was very time‐consuming, I can tell you!  I  was lucky to be familiar with beans, lentils, tofu  and even tempeh from our semi‐vegetarian days  and homesteading days.      I have to laugh when non‐vegans speculate about  how hard it must be to be a vegan, when now  there seems to be a spectacular new vegan  cookbook published every time you turn around,  the Internet abounds with clever and colorful  vegan cooking blogs, forums, demonstration  videos, and recipe collections.  Never mind, the  plethora of vegan products that can be found even  October 2011|35

in supermarkets or online—vegan (and often  organic) cheeses,  various plant milks and soy,  almond and coconut yogurts, delicious vegan ice  creams, vegan mixes, convenience foods and  frozen dinners, and on and on.    So this is the biggest change I have seen.  But there  are other changes.  “Vegan” is a recognized word in  most places now—we no longer have to constantly  explain what it means.  Characters in TV shows and  movies are vegan (although often characterized as  kooky). Vegan options are available in ordinary  restaurants.  Newspapers run articles on the pros  and cons of vegan diets, on the environmental and  ethical benefits of a vegan diet.  There are vegan  dietitians and doctors.  And I believe that this is  only the beginning!    Your latest book,  World Vegan  Feast, is an  excellent read and  all the recipes  look incredibly  delicious!  As a  prolific author,  however, I’m sure  you have lots of  different topics  you want to write about.  What was it that  inspired you to choose this particular one?    For 5 years I published a subscription vegan  cooking newsletter called the Vegan Feast  Newsletter.  At first I published it every other  month, and later 4 times a year.  It was sometimes  as much as 70 pages long, with 20 to 30 new  recipes in each issue.  It was a great challenge, but  gave me the opportunity to delve into the study of  several regional cuisines, to experiment with many  ingredients and techniques, and to do a fair  amount of research.  It also gave me access to 

Quick & Easy

almost immediate feedback, since readers would  try recipes and then write to me about good results  or problems they might have had.  This experience  left me with a large body of work that had only  been seen by a few hundred people.  Most of the  recipes in World Vegan Feast were developed for  the newsletter.  I wanted to gather my favorites 

into a book and I chose the international theme  because so many of the recipes were either vegan  versions of traditional regional (often regional  holiday) recipes, or were inspired by a particular  cuisine. I also wanted to showcase some of my  vegan Peruvian recipes, as my father was  bryanna’s father, alejandro jaime urbina (on right) in  front of the natural caves used for storing wine. the  doors were designed and carved by her maternal  grandfather, artist gilbert tonge. 

Peruvian—so there is a good selection in the book.         

October 2011|36

If you had to choose one, what is your favorite  recipe from the book (please share, if you can!)  and what makes it your favorite?    That’s a hard one because, obviously, I love them  all!  But it’s getting to be soup time again and one  of my very favorites from the book is my Peruvian‐ Inspired Sweet Potato Chowder, or Chupe, as it is  called in Peru.  My father was Peruvian and  Peruvians love their chupe!  Chupe is most often  made with seafood and yellow potatoes, but I was  inspired to use another common Peruvian  vegetable, the sweet potato, in this vegan version.   I love it of its complex flavors and textures;  because it’s a meal in itself; because it’s familiar  and yet exotic at the same time; and because it  reminds me of my father, Alejandro Jaime Urbina.  

 

PERUVIAN-INSPIRED SWEET POTATO CHOWDER (CHUPE)  Serves 6  From the book World Vegan Feast (Vegan Heritage  Press; 2011)  ©Bryanna Clark Grogan 2011    Chupe is a hearty Peruvian chowder, a favorite of  my father, and a jewel in the crown of Peruvian  cuisine.  It is usually made with yellow potatoes and  seafood, but I was inspired to make a vegan version  with sweet potatoes as well as the usual yellow  potatoes. It is a moderately spicy soup that can be  served as a casual company meal with crusty bread 

Quick & Easy

and salad. It is typically made with aji Amarillo  (Peruvian yellow chile paste).   

Main Ingredients 2 tablespoons olive oil   2 cups minced onion  2 large cloves of garlic, minced   ½ cup good tomato salsa (no sugar)   1 to 2 tablespoon ají Amarillo (Peruvian yellow  chile) paste (available from amazon.com) or  substitute Vietnamese red chile and garlic sauce  (Sriracha) to taste  freshly‐ground black pepper  8 cups vegan broth   ½ tablespoon fresh, chopped  oregano or ½  teaspoon   3 cups cooked, peeled sweet potato, cut into 1‐inch  dice  2 teaspoon sugar  1 teaspoon turmeric  1 ¼ pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, steamed, peeled  and cut into 1‐inch dice   2 cups fresh sweet corn kernels or 2 cups frozen  (thawed) sweet corn  1 ½ cups cooked brown basmati rice   1 cup frozen baby peas (petit pois), thawed  8 ounces medium‐firm tofu or extra‐firm silken  tofu, drained and crumbled  ½ cup dry white wine   1 ½ teaspoons salt   

Garnish  cooked corn on the cob, cut into 2‐inch chunks  minced fresh parsley   

Additional Optional Garnishes  6 green garlic tops (also called scapes), tied into  knots  12 Chinese vegan "shrimp" or “prawns”    

October 2011|37

Heat the oil in a large heavy pot over medium  heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté in the oil  until the onion begins to soften‐‐ do not brown it at  all. Microwave Option: In a covered microwave‐ safe 2‐quart casserole, cook the onions and garlic  in the oil on 100% power (default setting) for about  8 minutes or until the onion has softened.    

Transfer the broth, salsa, chile paste or sauce  oregano, bell pepper, sweet potato, sugar and  turmeric (and microwaved onions and garlic, if you  cooked them that way) to the pot. Bring the  mixture to a boil, then turn down to low heat and  simmer for 10 minutes.   

Puree the soup right in the pot with an  immersion/stick blender. (Alternatively, blend in  batches in a blender or food processor. Make sure  that air can escape from the lid of either machine,  covering the air‐hole with a folded clean kitchen  towel. This will eliminate the danger of exploding  hot soup). Transfer the pureed soup back into the  pot.   

You are also a well‐known instructor and you’ve  reached quite a few people.  Is there one  particularly moving story that stands out from  your classes?    Yes, and that is when I was doing a workshop at the  Vegetarian Awakening vegan chefs’ conference in  Grand Rapids, Michigan in 2007 (organized by Chef  Kevin Dunn).  We had volunteer students from  Chef Dunn’s culinary program at Grand Rapids  Community College to help us with preparing our  dishes for sampling, and prep for the classes.  It  was wonderful, because they were happy to follow  directions and they were well‐trained.  I don’t think  that any of the students who assisted me were  vegetarians, but a few were very curious and keen.   One young man, perfectly ordinary, a little  awkward and gawky, became particularly inspired  as we went along, and eventually declared  passionately that he wanted to learn everything he  could about vegan cooking from Chef Dunn.  That  was very satisfying to hear. 

Add the cooked potato chunks, cooked rice, peas  and corn. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes.   

In a blender, blend the tofu, wine and salt until  very smooth. Stir this into the soup and heat  gently. Taste for seasoning.   

Serve the soup hot in wide soup plates, with any  or all of the garnishes decorating the top.             

Quick & Easy

bryanna working with a young chef

 

What is your philosophy on how to reach die‐hard  meat eaters and how do you make soy appealing  for those people who are “afraid” of it?    I’m cautious when cooking for meat‐eaters  because, #1) I want to please me guests and put  them at ease, and #2) I want 1st impressions to be  good, so that these folks will have a positive idea of 

October 2011|38

vegan cuisine.  Even though many vegans enjoy  meat analogues (and these products  are getting  better and better), many non‐vegetarians are wary  of them, so I usually avoid serving seitan, tempeh,  and commercial meat substitutes to omnivores  unless I know that they are adventurous, non‐ judgmental, open‐minded eaters, or if I have prior  knowledge that  they enjoy these foods.   Instead, I  usually serve more traditional vegetarian dishes  from a particular cuisine that I enjoy, utilizing  vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts and seeds, pasta,  grains.  I often serve a vegan Italian meal of several  courses, a sumptuous Middle Eastern buffet, or a  Chinese or Vietnamese feast, and I’ve never had  any complaints!  Although these types of meals can  be made with no soy products at all, the use of soy  milk in recipes usually goes unnoticed, and I have  had success using tofu in several ways—for  instance, silken tofu in creamy sauces, puddings or  pie fillings (sometimes in conjunction with cashews  or tahini), or my Crispy Marinated Tofu slices (also  known as “Breast of Tofu” in previous books) in  place of chicken. Oven‐fried tofu cubes or triangles,  or grilled firm tofu with assertively‐flavored BBQ  sauces or glazes are often acceptable to and  enjoyed by omnivores in the context of Asian  meals. Another soy product that I have used  successfully when serving omnivores is Butler Soy  Curls®, which, when reconstituted in a tasty broth,  resemble chicken strips.  In stir‐fried dishes, salads  and soups guests of all types have enjoyed them.     Do you have any advice you can give to someone  who has just jumped into the vegan world?    Be aware that, even with all animal products  eliminated from your diet, you have a whole world  of exciting and healthful flavors, textures and  combinations out there waiting to be discovered.  You will ever have enough years in your lifetime to  explore all of the possibilities, but you'll have a  great time trying and no excuse to be bored!  All 

Quick & Easy

the vegans I know really love to eat and they love  good food.  Check out the plethora of vegan food  blogs on the ‘Net and the many new vegan  cookbooks on the market. Try a new and unfamiliar  food every week, utilizing the expertise of a  favorite blogger or cookbook author to guide you.   Follow tried and true recipes at first and then,  when you are familiar with the new foods and  techniques, you can start developing your own  versions or your own recipes.     What new projects do you have coming up that  you can talk about?    For a long time I have wanted to put together a  collection of my seitan recipes, and also recipes  that are not made solely from wheat gluten, but  make excellent vegan “meats”, such as my vegan  “neatballs”. It might also include some of my  homemade cheese and seafood alternatives.  If my  present publisher is interested, it may be my next  book.  Otherwise I will work on it as an e‐book.  I’ve  also been working on a project with David Lee of  Field Roast for a few years and hope that we can  finish it sometime soon.    Thanks Bryanna!    Bio    Author of 8 vegan cookbooks, Bryanna has devoted  over 40 years to tasty, healthful cooking, 23 as a  vegan. She was a frequent contributor and reviewer  for Vegetarian Times magazine for 5 years, and,  more recently, wrote and published a subscription  cooking zine, “Vegan Feast”, for 5 years. She is  moderator of the Vegsource “New Vegetarian”  forum.     Bryanna has conducted cooking workshops and  classes locally (including a 5‐day Vegan Cooking  Vacation on beautiful Denman Is.), and at 

October 2011|39

numerous vegetarian gatherings in North America,  including several NAVS Summerfests;  EarthSave’s  Taste of Health in Vancouver, BC; the International  Scientific Conference on Chinese Plant Based  Nutrition and Cuisine in Philadelphia; at Seattle  VegFest and Portland, OR's VegFest; at the  McDougall Celebrity Chef Weekend in Santa Rosa,  CA, and the 1st vegan blogger’s conference, Vida  Vegan Con, in Portland in August of 2011. In 2006  and 2007, Bryanna was the only Canadian chef  presenting, alongside many renowned vegan chefs  and restaurateurs, at the Vegetarian Awakening  vegan chefs' conference in Grand Rapids, MI.      Bryanna’s recipes appear in the The Veg‐Feasting  Cookbook (Seattle Vegetarian Association); on Dr.  Andrew Weil's websites; in No More Bull! by  Howard Lyman; and in Cooking with PETA. Bryanna  also developed the recipes for the ground‐breaking  book, Dr. Neal Barnard's Program for Reversing  Diabetes.                                           

Quick & Easy

Contact info    Email via this page:  http://www.bryannaclarkgrogan.com/page/page/2 643700.htm   Website:  http://www.bryannaclarkgrogan.com/page/page/5 79094.htm   Blog: http://veganfeastkitchen.blogspot.com   http://www.twitter.com/VeganFeaster   http://www.facebook.com/people/Bryanna‐Clark‐ Grogan/100001332474362        

October 2011|40

Featured Activist: Lieutenant Colonel Bob Lucius of the Kairos Coalition!    

What led you to become vegan and what was the  transition like for you?    It’s a long story, but the gist of it is that one day I  saw something I didn’t expect and it caused me to  re‐evaluate my beliefs and actions and whether  they were really in accord with each other.  Essentially, I saw a dog who was being taken off to  be slaughtered for food and I didn’t stop it when I  should have. You can read the full story here:  http://animalbeat.org/manonamission.html      That one moment radically changed my life and my  view of animals and food. I immediately gave up  meat and eventually went vegan when I learned  about the horrors of the dairy and egg industries.  I  was living in Vietnam at the time and almost  everybody to whom I tell the story thinks that  going Veg in a place like Vietnam should be a  breeze, but it really isn’t as easy as you’d think.   Surprisingly, it’s not that easy to find many vegan  dishes in Vietnam!  Even in meatless dishes, nuoc  mam (fish sauce) is fairly common as a seasoning.   If I had a dime for every time someone told me a 

Quick & Easy

dish was vegetarian and then added…”with just a  little pork for flavor”….well, I’d have a lot of dimes!      The lack of knowledge and alternatives is the main  reason why the Kairos Coalition has been working  with some of our Vietnamese partners to develop a  “Go Veg” guide and cookbook in Vietnamese for  Vietnamese.  Not only do Vietnamese need to be  made aware of the compelling environmental,  health and animal‐related benefits of transitioning  to a plant‐based diet, but they also need some  great recipes to get them started.  Unfortunately,  we couldn’t just translate a “Go Veg” guide from  the United States because Vietnamese have their  own particular style of cuisine.  Another issue is the  ingredients: although tofu and soy milk are quite  common, other ingredients that we take for  granted, such as beans, seitan and tempeh, just  aren’t that commonly used in traditional  Vietnamese fare and can be hard to find at the  local market. Consequently, we’ve had to start  from scratch and develop a guide that reflected the  particular culinary environment as it is in Vietnam.  It is an exciting project and I’m very grateful to A 

October 2011|41

Well Fed World for supporting this project with a  grant.    Thankfully, being vegan is so easy if you live in the  United States.  There are so many alternatives in  our supermarkets and more are added every day. I  also now have a bookshelf full of inspiring vegan  cookbooks and I love to try recipes from the Vegan  Culinary Experience magazine. My family never  runs of out tasty food to try.  It is amazing how  quickly the market has responded to the increasing  demand.  I see it just getter better and better and  easier and easier for vegans in the years ahead.    The military doesn’t always have the most vegan  friendly reputation.  What is it like  for vegans in the military and how  have you handled that personally?    I think a lot of people have some  misperceptions about what the  military is actually like!  People I  talk to ask me questions about my  lifestyle as if the only conception of  the military life comes from Hollywood and films  like “Full Metal Jacket” and “Jarhead”.  The first  few years of military life can be tough…with basic  training, initial specialty training and getting  accustomed to military life, but for most people in  uniform life after that phase is surprisingly not too  different from everybody else! Other than in those  relatively infrequent periods when we are  deployed overseas or on training missions, most of  us live in regular households, either on‐base or out  in the local community. And we go to work and  come home everyday just like everyone else. As a  result, most of us have a choice about what we  choose to eat. Even when we have to eat a mess  hall on base, there is usually a vegetarian choice  available, though admittedly vegan options are  much more rare.  Probably the most problematic  times are when we are away from eating facilities 

Quick & Easy

and we have to subsist on field rations, the famous  Meals‐Ready‐to‐Eat (MREs), but there are currently  four vegetarian meal choices among the 24 MREs  we take to the field….so two out of every twelve  meals is vegetarian.   It is not optimal, but it is  better than nothing!  Tell us about the Kairos Coalition and how you  started it.  What does kairos mean?    When I returned to the United States following my  three‐year assignment in Vietnam, I realized I  didn’t want to waste the extensive constellation of  friends and colleagues I had developed during that  experience.  I felt that I could really leverage that  network, as well as my extensive experience and  knowledge about how to be effective in  the various political and cultural  environments of SE Asia, so I decided to  set up a non‐profit that would serve as  a vehicle for moving the humane  agenda forward in places where not  much is happening yet.      Kairos (καιρός) is an ancient Greek  word meaning “the right or opportune moment”, a  convergence of both time and destiny that  produces a window in time for something truly  special to happen. People ask me all the time what  such an esoteric word has to do with veganism and  animal rights, and I always answer with two  words…“time travel”.  That response always gets a  pretty funny look, but if you think about it what I’m  really talking about is very much like the plot of  that 1985 movie “Back to the Future” with Michael  J. Fox and the Christopher Lloyd. Let me explain  what I mean…    In the last decade or so, Americans have really just  begun to wake up to the realization that public  policy and individual consumer choices over the  last fifty years have had horrendous consequences  for public health, the environment and the social 

October 2011|42

fabric of our communities and families.    We are now paying a terrible price for our  unchecked consumer appetites and an  unwillingness to look ahead to where the road we  have chosen will inevitably take us; towards a  poisoned environment, crumbling communities,  economic malaise and a public health crisis. But  what if you could go back in time, and, like Marty  McFly, intervene and alter the course of history?    Vietnam today stands at the same developmental  crossroads where the United States stood a half‐ century ago. They will soon similarly face  challenges and decisions about the nature of  development and modernization …and the course  they inevitably choose will have consequences that  will remain with them for generations, for good  and ill. Our hope is that by introducing a culturally‐ relevant Humane Education program, we can help  Vietnam’s next generations re‐imagine the range of  possible solutions to the most pressing challenges  of industrialization in ways that could prevent  decades of unnecessary and destructive abuse in  the name of uniformed and rampant commercial  consumption and misguided public policies.    The Spanish Poet George Santayana once  remarked, “Those who cannot remember the past  are condemned to repeat it." By examining our  present situation, Vietnamese youth can learn from  our experiences and  then work towards a  brighter, healthier and  more compassionate  tomorrow. Humane  Education is an  investment in Vietnam’s  future.    Imagine what the United  States would look like  now if we could go back fifty years and  Quick & Easy

retroactively apply the lessons of the last half‐ century’s struggles for social justice, animal welfare  and the “green” movement. What would today’s  generations think about the exploitation of the  environment and animals for food, for  entertainment or for clothing if they had only  learned a different set of ethical possibilities from  the very start, knew the ultimate price they would  have to pay for their appetites and thus chose an  entirely different path? Imagine that altered  reality. That possibility still lays ahead for Vietnam.  Doc Brown once told Marty “The future is  whatever you make it, so make it a good one.” I say  time travel is very possible and I aim to make it  happen!    The Kairos Coalition’s mission is to bring together  stakeholders from the public, private and non‐ profit sectors in order to advance Humane  Education and Humane Advocacy skills‐building in  developing nations where effective grassroots  advocacy has the potential to markedly impact the  evolution of consumer choice and public policy in  ways that advance the Humane Agenda.  The Kairos Coalition’s mission is to collaborate with  a broad array of domestic and international public,  private and non‐profit stakeholders in order to  deliver innovative and culturally‐normed Humane  Education programs in developing countries. The  Kairos Coalition leverages traditional creative arts  and experimental theatre as vehicles for promoting  reverence and respect for the  dignity of all life, while  seeking to foster through  deep transformative learning  a deeper understanding of  the power of compassion and  mercy in the exercise of  personal responsibility.  This  work is deeply informed by  Augusto Boal’s “Theatre of  the Oppressed” and Jacob 

October 2011|43

Moreno’s notion of “Sociodrama”.  It is an  approach that I call “Humane Edutainment” and I  think it is the future of humane education because  it not only is aesthetically interesting, but it also  applies the most current research in sociology,  psychology, communication theory and  organizational studies.  We also work with youth  volunteers to develop their “soft‐skills”…things like  management, leadership, critical‐thinking,  divergent problem solving, team building and  conflict resolution…in order to make them more  effective activists and advocates.  We are training  warriors for a very long fight and in my view, these  are the skills that will make them truly powerful  voices for the animals.    Essentially, what we are working to do is to create  human vectors to deliver a “humane vaccine”...in a  metaphorical sense of course…taking average  youth in developing countries like Vietnam…giving  them new ideas…new ways of seeing the world and  all its creatures…a new vision for what is possible…  a clearer sense of how they themselves can bring  that vision to fruition and the advocacy tools to  implement that vision. They will be the vectors that  then carry the therapeutic vaccine of compassion,  mercy and kindness into the body of Vietnamese  society…or Indonesia…or Cambodia, and every  place else we go.    What challenges have you faced achieving your  goals with the Kairos Coalition and how have you  overcome them?    Running the Kairos Coalition and it multiple  projects abroad is not my full‐time job! It is a labor  of love that I do with the time that I can carve out  of my professional life and my family time, but it  truly means the world to me.  I believe with all my  heart that with a little investment and time, we can  help the Vietnamese youth make a significant  difference for the animals in their own country.  

Quick & Easy

When I see their successes, it makes me realize  that all the sacrifices are so completely worth it.   But I have an advantage…I worked and lived there  for several years, so I know what the situation is  and when positive change happens, I can see and  feel the results.  Most Americans only know about  Vietnam from the war, so I find it hard sometimes  to energize them about someplace so very far  away.  Vietnam is so distant that to many people it  can seem kind of abstract, but the effect that even  a modest investment can have in a place where the  average per capita annual income is about $1,200.  Fortunately, we have been lucky to have people  who share our vision and help us out from time to  time.   Our supporters know that every dime goes  to support operations abroad and that we never  solicit funds unless we have a very specific project  in mind. When someone sends us a check or makes  a donation online, they know it is directly going to  get something done on the ground in Vietnam and  won’t just be sitting in our bank account earning  interest!    How does veganism work into the efforts of the  Kairos Coalition?    First, the Kairos Coalition’s primary mission is to  advance what I call the “humane agenda”, and in  my view you have to embrace the vegan lifestyle  and especially a plant‐based diet if you truly care  about not just animals, but the environment, public  and personal health and issues like social justice  and human rights.  All these issues are tightly  interconnected and you can’t simply divorce one  from the rest, so our work has to acknowledge that  they have to be addressed in tandem.  Now I’d be  lying if I said that all out partners in Vietnam clearly  see the connection between veganism and their  work on behalf of animals, but we are making  headway and I’ve been pretty impressed at how  open‐minded most of them are about at least  exploring the issue.  Again, we are overcoming 

October 2011|44

huge obstacles standing in the way of sustained  changes in behavior. Research tells us that three  variables need to be accounted for when you want  to change someone’s behavior. 1) You need to  provide alternative options…that is, access to tasty,  affordable and nutritious plant‐based alternatives;  2) You need to elevate their sense of control…that  is, can I reasonably procure this kind of food and  prepare it myself; and finally, 3)     If you have to pick one, what is the most moving  story you have about your work with Kairos?    We have done a lot of different projects over the  last year, but I think perhaps the story of Moon and  Happy really hit me the hardest.  Moon and Happy  were two cats that were injured and left disabled  and without mobility.  We worked with our  partners in Ho Chi Minh City to outfit them with  wheelchairs through a supplier in the United  States. The goal was not only to demonstrate that  these cats had lives that were valuable and that  compassion has no borders.  Since no animal  wheelchairs are available for sale in Vietnam…or  anywhere in SE Asia, it was also a chance for our  partners to re‐engineer these contraptions so that  they could be locally produced far more  inexpensively and made available to other animals  in need.  I am giving you the abridged version of  the story here, but if you want to read the full story  of Moon and Happy (and see the videos of their  first steps), check out this link:  Quick & Easy

http://www.examiner.com/animal‐policy‐in‐ national/abused‐disabled‐cats‐get‐wheelchairs‐ and‐new‐homes‐through‐international‐effort      What are the keys to staying a motivated activist?   Who have been your role models?    I have read all the books I can find on the history of  Veganism and the Animal protection  movement…books like  “For the Prevention of  Cruelty” by Diane L. Beers, “For the Love of  Animals” by Kathryn Shevelow, “The Heretic’s  Feast” by Colin Spencer  and “The Bloodless  Revolution” by Tristram Stuart, and if I had to pick  some personal heroes from the vast pantheon of  luminaries in the movement, I would probably say  that I am most inspired by folks from the earliest  years of the movement in the United States, folks  like Henry Bergh, George Angell, Caroline Earle  White, Anna Harris Smith, Flora Kibbe, Amy  Freeman Lee and Henry Spira.  Where would we be  today if not for their voices? I am also awed today  by what a young guy like Nathan Runkle has  already accomplished in his 26 years, or someone  like Erica Meier of Compassion over Killing, Dawn  Moncrieff of A Well Fed World, Michael Weber at  Farm Animal Rights Movement and Paul Shapiro at  HSUS.  These folks are all relatively young and have  achieved amazing things in their lives not just for  animals, but also for the noble goals of preserving  our planet, protecting the environment and for  advancing the cause of compassion, mercy and  justice.  As a Marine, I see these young men and  women as fellow warriors and I’m truly proud to  stand alongside them. As far as I’m concerned, I  couldn’t be in better or more courageous and  honorable company.     I am also deeply inspired and motivated by my son,  who just turned 22 months old. When I look at him,  abstract notions about social justice,  environmental sustainability, the personal and 

October 2011|45

economic impacts of a decline in public health and  the ethics of animal rights no longer seem like  abstract arguments but instead become very  concrete and urgent.  When I look in his eyes, I see  the kind of world I want for him and it makes the  fight just that much more personal for me.    You’ve worked quite a bit in Vietnam.  What is  your favorite vegan Vietnamese dish?  Do you  have a favorite recipe you can share?    I have to say that I really don’t have many favorite  Vietnamese vegan recipes, though it is hard to go  wrong with a good Nem Rán (friend spring roll) or  Gỏi cuốn (fresh spring roll).  I’m afraid I haven’t  been very successful in my efforts to make a vegan  version of Bún chả because it relies on grilled  patties of minced pork and it’s hard to replicate  that texture.  Before I went to Vietnam, I spent a  tour living and working in Indonesia, so perhaps my  very favorite dish from all of South East Asia is  Rendang.  Before I went veg, I used to eat Rendang  Daging (beef) all the time and my friend’s wife  would deliver it to my apartment every week so I’d  have some on hand. Since then, I have thrown out  the beef and replaced it with seitan, which I think  stands in better than tofu or tempeh.  The recipe I  like to use is from a blog called “Tofu for Two”:    http://tofufortwo.net/2008/01/19/seitan‐rendang/      For an activist that wants to take the next step  and start an organization of their own, what is the  best advice you can give them?    I won’t lie, founding and running a non‐profit is not  easy, unless you have an accountant and a lawyer  as friends!  It takes a lot of time, patience and  commitment, and frankly, it is not always  necessary. It really depends on what you want to  do. The tax‐exempt non‐profit route is often  necessary if you want to pursue grants, but if you  just want to get things done, there is a lot to be 

Quick & Easy

done for something more informal.  One of the  groups we've partnered with in Vietnam is a group  called Yeu Dong Vat (Animal Lovers), a group of  more than 150 members who love animals so  much they spent their free time doing what they  can to rescue animals and find them homes.  These  kids are amazing and powerfully effective.  Once  you’ve entered the non‐profit world, a lot you time  is going to be spent on routine administrative  matters that the law requires, so be sure before  you pull the trigger! That being said, I’m glad I went  that route with the Kairos Coalition because it does  seem to have opened doors and given us the clout  to sit at the table with bigger players.  The paper  from the IRS and the transparency it requires from  you is a clear signal to the other players that you're  a serious partner…at least it should!  The best  advice I can give is to take it slow, figure out what  you want to achieve and what resources you need  to get it done.  Once you figure that out, then you  go from there by building the kind of organization  that is tailored to your specific vision.      What’s on the horizon for you?  Any exciting new  projects coming up?      We have a lot of ongoing projects and some great  plans in the works.  Out Humane Edutainment  project is still underway in Hanoi with thousands of  kids already having experienced it.  I plan on  heading back soon to conduct a follow‐on training  workshop for our volunteers and to kick‐off a  second pilot in Ho Chi Minh City in the south.  We  have also been carrying out a spay‐and‐neuter  voucher program in Ho Chi Minh City as a service  learning project for a youth volunteer group there  and we have just launched a national Animal Rights  Propaganda Poster contest.   This is a particularly  exciting project because “Propaganda Art” is a  quintessentially Communist art form that has been  used for generations in Vietnam to educate the  masses and we are essentially co‐opting it for the 

October 2011|46

animals.  Probably our biggest project in the works  in the establishment of a “half‐way house” in Ho  Chi Minh for animals rescued from the street and  from the meat trade. This will serve as a place  where a handful of dogs and cats can be nursed  back to health and socialized before moving on to  adoptive homes. We think the message that this  kind of activity sends is really important….every  animal deserve love, kindness and a second  chance.  This will be a first of its kind in Vietnam  because at present there is not a single other  organization, domestic or international, working to  improve the lives of domestic or companion  animals. It is a hug gap that we are working to fill.   We are also working on a series of bilingual  language guides to help activists and advocates  working across language barriers…so far we have  twelve different languages nearing completion and  more on the way. These will be provided free of  charge on a non‐commercial basis to any  organization or individual who might want to use  them in their own work.    On a personal note, I plan to commence my  doctoral studies in January.  I will be pursuing a  PhD in Human and Organizational Development  from Fielding Graduate University.  This is  something I have been considering for quite some  time because I think it can really enhance my work  as a Humane Educator and Animal Rights activist  and advocate.     Thanks Bob!    Contact Info    I can be reached at  [email protected] or through  www.kairoscoalition.org.  I would love to hear from  anyone who’d like to hear more about our  activities abroad or who might like to get involved!   

Quick & Easy

Bio    Lieutenant Colonel Robert Lucius, USMC (Ret.) was  commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U.S.  Marine Corps in 1989 and served 22 years on active  duty in a wide variety of command, staff and  diplomatic assignments before retiring on July 31,  2011.  He is a specialist in Asian foreign languages  and cultures and was most recently assigned as the  Assistant Provost, Dean of Educational Support  Services and Dean of Students for the Directorate of  Continuing Education at the Defense Language  Institute Foreign Language Center in Monterey, CA.   Lt. Col. Lucius graduated from Norwich University in  1989, receiving a Bachelor of Arts in History.  He  also holds a Master of Forensic Science degree from  National University, a Master of Arts degree in  National Security Studies from Naval Postgraduate  School and a Graduate Certificate in Community  Advocacy from George Washington University.  In  2009, Lt. Col. Lucius founded the Kairos Coalition to  pilot experimental humane education initiatives in  developing economies. He is also the founder of  VegHeads of Monterey Bay, an advocacy group for  the environmental, health and animal welfare  benefits of a plant‐based diet. 

October 2011|47

Featured Artist: Painter Trish Grantham!    

Please tell us a bit about yourself!    I grew up in the Southwest United States: Phoenix,  Tucson, El Paso, Austin.  I lived in Chapel Hill, NC for  a while, too.  Then found my way to Portland  Oregon 13 years ago. I love it, the weather is  perfect for me.  It is beautiful here.  I have a  chihuahua named Pablo and two Kitties named  Arlo and Georgia.    What motivated you to become vegan and what  was that transition like for you?    I changed my life about 3 years ago and realized to  be a complete and happy person I also needed to  look deeper into everything I do. I love all creatures  great and small.  I believe whole heartedly that  animals should not have their life and spirit taken  for our short lived pleasures.  I hope more people  take the step to educate themselves on what is  really going on in the meat and dairy industry.   Terms like "free range" and "grass fed" paint a very  different picture then reality.  I believe that  humanity as a whole would be devastated if they  took a deeper look into things.  It was a super easy  step for me, it makes me feel good to do what I  can. When you know the truth you cannot turn 

Quick & Easy

back.  I look forward to being able to do more to  help in the future.    How long have you been an artist?  What inspired  you to make that a career?    I started painting around 1998, the career found  me.  The dominoes fell right into place.  It was an  amazing gift I was given.  It is now part of me and I  can't imagine ever doing anything else.  I look  forward to watching it unfold even more.    Being involved in the arts is not always easy.   What challenges have you faced getting your work  out to the public and how have you overcome  them?    I think I started doing art at the perfect time.  I had  a website by 2000 and my paintings took off.  It  was rare to have a website back then you could  buy art from.  With the fate of the site, I got my  name out there.  Because of that I am where I am  today.  The web is super saturated with artist and I  find myself getting a bit lost there now. I live off  commissions, gallery shows, and online sales.  I  have been lucky in this economy and seem to be  doing well. 

October 2011|48

  What are some of the key aspects of your art and  how did they develop?      My paintings have changed a great deal over the  last 13 years.  I was learning to paint as I went.  I  had my first show within a few months of painting  my first piece.  After that I had 8‐12 shows a  month.  Because of this I painted all the time and  wanted to get better and better.  I have always  loved things from the past and incorporated old  paper and books into my work from the beginning.    I am a self‐taught artist and am always changing  and learning.    How do you incorporate compassion and  veganism into your work?      I never thought of that before.  But I have always  painted animals as thoughtful emotional creatures.   I feel I identify with them, I have always been  sentimental when it comes to them.  As for my  work I speak through them, their feelings are mine.    What are some of your favorite pieces that you’ve  created?    I have painted thousands of pieces but yes I do  have a few favorites.  "The Creators" is my newest  favorite.  The animals in this piece are creating the  world all over again communicating with one  another to make sure they are one. All at Peace.    Now for some food questions!  What do you like  to eat at home?  (please share the recipe!)      Being from the Southwest I live on Mexican food!  I  make all things Mexican, even my pasta always  comes out with a southwest flair and the spice of  roasted chiles.  I don't use recipes but would love  to tell you what I put into what I love to make.   Yesterday I made a big pot of Barracho Beans, well 

Quick & Easy

my take on it!  Rinse and soak pintos overnight.   Sautee onion, roasted green chile, and garlic in  coconut oil. Add a large can of fire roasted  tomatoes and a can of beer of your choice. Then  add beans and water.  Add and don't be shy:  cumin, chili powder, smoked paprika, maple syrup  and a bay leaf. This may not be described well  enough for others to make!    Portland is a vegan mecca.  Do you have a favorite  place to eat out?    Portobello, Prasad, Blossoming Lotus, Sweet  Hereafter, Sweet Pea Bakery, and Kitchen Dances  Food Cart.    What advice can you give new artists wanting to  make a career out of it?    I use to say "get a website ASAP!" But now I am not  sure.  I think just paint all the time. You get better  and better.  Quality is where it is at.  Passion will  take you everywhere. To know, truly Know that  you can make it, will take you everywhere you  want to go. Never give up and always believe in  yourself you can do it.    What is on the horizon for you?    I am working on a December show at the Augen  Gallery in Portland Oregon right now.  I have a t‐ shirt line coming out at Forever 21 and cards  coming out for American Greetings. And big  surprises right around the corner.    Thanks Trish!    Contact Info    You can reach Trish at www.trishgrantham.com.  

October 2011|49

Restaurant/Product Review: Casa de Tamales Reviewer: Jason Wyrick    Casa de Tamales  http://www.casadetamales.com/  3747 W. Shaw Ave.  Fresno, CA  93711  559‐275‐9300  Can be purchased at: the  restaurant or by ordering online  Price: $2.69‐3.29 per tamale or  $23.99‐$26.99 per dozen   

  I was fortunate enough to find this gem of a  restaurant while I was in Fresno waiting to teach a  vegan kids class.  There was a dearth of vegan  places to eat, but local reviews kept talking about  how great Casa de Tamales was, so naturally I had  to try it.  Plus, who can resist vegan tamales?  If  anyone can, they have no soul.      I should note that Casa de Tamales is not vegan.  In  fact, most of their products have meat or cheese.   However, as a Mexican restaurant and a tamale  house, I was particularly impressed that they went  out of their way to have several vegan options on  their menu, that they didn’t make their rice and  beans using animal products, and that the  ingredients they used were top‐notch.  They  already stood out because of this, and then I tried  the tamales.  I’ll just say I went back the next day  for more.    I was hard‐pressed to choose which of the two I  tried I liked better, but ultimately the chorizo con  papas won out.  It had just the right flavor and  texture, lush without being mushy, rich without  being overbearing, and a slight amount of heat to  give the tamales a zing.  The other tamale I tried  was the portobello and asparagus.  There was just  enough asparagus added to give it flavor, but not  so much that it became the predominant flavor.   The best part of the tamale, however, was the   Quick & Easy

  guajillo sauce.  I could have eaten just guajillo  sauce and corn tortillas.  Both of these tamales can  be found in the gourmet section of their menu.   They also have a sweet corn and raisin tamale in  the dessert section, which is vegan without the  caramel sauce.    No matter how excellent a  tamale filling is, however,  the true test of a quality  tamale is the masa.  Casa  de Tamales had, hands  down, the best masa I’ve  had.  I discovered that the  restaurant mills its own  corn, which not only  maximizes the flavor of the  corn, but it keeps the masa  light and fluffy since the  corn isn’t reduced to  something approximating corn flour.  It had a lush,  full mouth feel without being mushy.  It was the  first time I had purchased a commercial tamale  where I enjoyed the masa as much as the filling.    Finally, there were a few side items I had, each of  which was outstanding.  The fresh guacamole  brought to life with a strong dose of lime and salt,  the way real guacamole should be made, the  roasted corn salsa that could be eaten as a side,  October 2011|50

and the rice and beans, both of which were  flavorful without being heavy.    It should be  obvious at this  point that I  loved Casa de  Tamales and I  sincerely hope  they expand  their vegan  options  because I can’t wait to order more [they are, in  fact, expanding their vegan line according to Jose  Aguilar, the general manager].  Speaking of which,  they ship their tamales across the continental  United States, so even if you live on the East Coast,  you can still experience these Mexican delights  yourself.  I hope you have the same experience I  did.                                                            Quick & Easy

The Reviewer     Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The  Vegan Culinary  Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine  with a readership of  about 30,000.  In  2001, Chef Jason  reversed his diabetes by switching to a low‐fat, vegan  diet and subsequently left his position as the Director of  Marketing for an IT company to become a chef and  instructor to help others.  Since then, he has been  featured by the NY Times, has been a NY Times  contributor, and has been featured in Edible Phoenix,  and the Arizona Republic, and has had numerous local  television appearances.  He has catered for companies  such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the Scottsdale  Culinary Festival’s premier event, and has been a guest  instructor and the first vegan instructor in the Le Cordon  Bleu program at Scottsdale Culinary Institute.  Recently,  Chef Jason wrote a national best‐selling book with Dr.  Neal Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss Kickstart.  You  can find out more about Chef Jason Wyrick at  www.veganculinaryexperience.com. 

 

October 2011|51

 

Book Review: Quick Fix Vegan Author: Robin Robertson Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor    

Robin Robertson has done it again. She has  delivered a cookbook filled with delicious food.  This time, all of these recipes can be made in 30  minutes for less. This is a wonderful thing for those  of us who still need to eat but have little time on  our hands. Instead of just making up pasta and  dumping jarred spaghetti sauce on it, these dishes  are full of life, flavor and nutrition, and can be  made in about the same time as the afore  mentioned spaghetti.     Robertson begins the book by offering a list of  pantry essentials that make preparing this food on  demand much easier. She also mentions the idea of  having weekly cooking sessions if you can get a free  evening or afternoon. I can attest that strategy  works, having used it to get me through graduate  school. After the pantry list is a set of essentials to  prepare and have on hand, such as pizza dough and  seitan. After that come chapter with snacks, soups,  salads, sandwiches, desserts and even more.  Dishes like Korean Hot Pot and Black Bean  Sunburgers will make you think that you spent  hours on each dish and did you know you could  even have chocolate cheesecake squares in 30?     This book would be great for just about anyone,  but especially people with young families, students,  and people who think they’re too busy to cook or  Quick & Easy

Author:  Robin Robertson  Publisher:  Andrews McMeel  Publishing  Copyright:  2011  ISBN:  978‐1‐4494‐0785‐8  Price:  $16.99    eat well. Grab a copy, a few minutes, and you’ll be  enjoying a delicious vegan dinner in no time, or less  than 30 minutes. Highly recommended to  everyone.       The Reviewer    Madelyn is a lover of  dessert, which she  celebrates on her blog,  http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has been  making her own tasty desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer than she cares to  admit. When she isn’t in the kitchen creating new  wonders of sugary goodness, she is chasing after  her bad kitties, or reviewing products for various  websites and publications. She can be contacted at  [email protected] or  [email protected]    

October 2011|52

 

Book Review: Thrive Foods Author: Brendan Brazier Reviewer: Jason Wyrick    

Brendan Brazier is probably the most talked‐about  vegan athlete, at least in the context of being  vegan and being an athlete.  With his precursor  book, Thrive, Brazier created a comprehensive  nutritional guide for athletes who are looking to  optimize performance through diet.  With Thrive  Foods, Brazier takes a completely different tact.      Thrive Foods is part environmental study and part  cookbook.  The former half of the book covers  some already treaded ground, such as the amount  of grain and land it takes to raise livestock and the  inefficiency of doing so from an environmental  standpoint.  It’s not a bad idea covering this,  though, since many of his readers will be new to  veganism and may not be aware of exactly how  detrimental meat and dairy production can be.   What I liked most, however, was the strong focus  on comparing the economics of the nutritional  content of different foods.  For example, if an  organic apple costs $2.00 and yields five units of  nutrition, that’s $0.40 per unit of nutrition.  If a fast  food burger costs $2.00 and yields one unit of  nutrition (doubtful, at best!), that’s $2.00 per unit  of nutrition.  Clearly, the apple is the more  inexpensive route to take to meet our nutritional  requirements, even though it may not look like that  at first glance.  The same method is used to  compare the carbon costs of food and I like the  strong environmental approach the book takes.  

Quick & Easy

Author:  Brendan Brazier  Publisher:  Da Capo Lifelong  Books  Copyright:  2011  ISBN:  978‐0‐7382‐1511‐2  Price:  $20.00    Of course, there is quite a bit of talk about  nutrition and a few easy guides and visuals to help  the reader along the way and I thought the  nutrition icons were a nice touch.    The latter half of the book is comprised of recipes.   I saw a lot of good ideas in this section, but some of  the recipes seemed like they belonged in a  different cookbook, usually the ones created by the  “celebrity” chefs.  When I’m looking at the  cookbook follow up to Thrive, I’m looking for  recipes that are specifically geared towards putting  a Thrive diet into place.  I’m guessing that’s why  some of those recipes felt out of place.   Fortunately, the majority of the recipes do actually  feel like they are part of the Thrive mentality and  there was a host of great ideas in there.  I can’t  wait to try some of them!   The Reviewer     Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The  Vegan Culinary  Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine  with a readership of about 30,000.  In 2001, Chef  Jason reversed his diabetes by switching to a low‐

October 2011|53

fat, vegan diet and subsequently left his position as  the Director of Marketing for an IT company to  become a chef and instructor to help others.  Since  then, he has been featured by the NY Times, has  been a NY Times contributor, and has been  featured in Edible Phoenix, and the Arizona  Republic, and has had numerous local television  appearances.  He has catered for companies such  as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the  Scottsdale Culinary Festival’s premier catering  event, and has been a guest instructor and the first  vegan instructor in the Le Cordon Bleu program at  Scottsdale Culinary Institute.  Recently, Chef Jason  wrote a national best‐selling book with Dr. Neal  Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss Kickstart.  You  can find out more about Chef Jason Wyrick at  www.veganculinaryexperience.com.   

Quick & Easy

October 2011|54

 

Book Review: World Vegan Feast Author: Bryanna Clark-Grogan Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor     It is very hard to impress me with a cookbook. I  know that sounds harsh, but I own over 300 (is it  over 400 now? I don’t remember) and I am a very  good cook. But there were several times when I  was looking at World Vegan Feast that my mouth  dropped open, in a very good way. Bryanna Clark  Grogran totally impressed me with this epic  volume. She did this in several ways.     First, she has veganized all the things that I always  say I will, and never do. Vegan Haggis anyone?  Seitan Wellington? It’s in here! There are many  dishes in here that omnivores (and other vegans)  will say, “there is a vegan version of that?”  including ‘salmon’ and Coq au Vin. I personally love  having vegan recipes for all dishes so when  someone tells me “I can’t go vegan because I can’t  give up X”, I can say “here is a vegan version of X”.  This book helps me do that more often.     Also, this is a vegan trip around the world. All  cuisines are represented here. If you have a friend  coming from just about any country, you can make  something from there, and you can try food from  all over the globe without having to leave home.  Isn’t that one of the great things about being vegan  is trying new foods? This book helps you do that.    

Quick & Easy

Author:  Bryanna Clark‐Grogan Publisher:  Vegan Heritage  Press  Copyright:  2011  ISBN:   978‐0980013146  Price:  $19.95   

If you are just looking for something new, the  chapters and index are also nicely organized. I  know that sounds like something odd to mention,  but I hate when you are looking for just a soup, and  cannot easily find the chapter, or when you are  looking for a specific dish and cannot do so. She  makes it easy. But there is much more than that.  The cooking tips which she weaves throughout the  book makes you want to read it like a novel,  and  with chapters from soups to baking, you will learn  something new.     Over all, this is a great present to any new or more  experienced vegan. It has lots of good recipes to  try, with lots of fun food to make you smile and  expand your pallet. Highly recommended.       The Reviewer    Madelyn is a lover of  dessert, which she  celebrates on her blog,  http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has been  making her own tasty desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer than she cares to  admit. When she isn’t in the kitchen creating new  wonders of sugary goodness, she is chasing after  her bad kitties, or reviewing products for various  October 2011|55

websites and publications. She can be contacted at  [email protected] or  [email protected]    

Quick & Easy

October 2011|56

 

Book Review: Vegan for Life Authors: Jack Norris, RD & Ginny Messina, MPH, RD Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor

Author:  Jack Norris, Ginny  Messina  Publisher:  Da Capo Lifelong  Books  Copyright:  2011  ISBN:  978‐0‐7382‐1493‐1   Price:  $17.00   

    I should start out with a few scary facts. I have  been vegan for 5 years, and I have read a lot of  books on cooking an nutrition. Never before have I  ever come across such an excellent, factual book.  Jack Norris, RD, and Virginia Messina, MPH, RD  break down everything you wanted to know about  vegan nutrition but didn’t even know to ask. With  16 chapters, breaking down everything from how  much protein your average vegan needs to how to  have a healthy vegan pregnancy, to vegan nutrition  after 50, you will find your own needs addressed.     In each chapter, you will find charts and formulas  to explain how many nutrients you need, and  where to find them. Think you can’t get enough  tryptophan on a vegan diet? Think again and turn  to page 24 to find which vegan foods have the  most. Confused about plant sources of iron versus  meat sources of the same? Check out page 63 to  have all your questions addressed. I learned  something new on each and every page.     Better yet, this book also addressed many myths  surrounding veganism. You do NOT need to have  an oil free diet to be healthy. This is one I come  across often in my work. The authors tell you  where the myth came from and why it is just that –  a myth. Also, other myths are also busted like raw 

Quick & Easy

isn’t always better, and whole foods only all the  time isn’t necessary and can also be harmful.     This book would be great for anyone. I think it  would be wonderful for new vegans to start them  on the right path. It would also be a great gift to  any family members of a vegan who have  questions (I know my mother did when I started). It  should also be required reading for any longtime  vegan, like myself, to make sure that you are  getting the most of our diet.     Get this book. Seriously. If you are reading this  magazine, this book will answer any questions you  have, and remind you of what you should be doing.  Thank you Jack and Ginny for writing this book to  remind me of why I started, and what I should be  eating while I am here.     5 Stars    The Reviewer    Madelyn is a lover of  dessert, which she  celebrates on her blog,  http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has been  making her own tasty desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer than she cares to 

October 2011|57

admit. When she isn’t in the kitchen creating new  wonders of sugary goodness, she is chasing after  her bad kitties, or reviewing products for various  websites and publications. She can be contacted at  [email protected] or  [email protected]    

Quick & Easy

October 2011|58

Product Review: Flax USA Flax Milk Reviewer: Jason Wyrick     Flax USA  http://www.flaxusa.com/  1671 7th St. NE  Goodrich, ND 58444  866‐352‐9872  Price: $2.98   



  I have had flax milk several times over the past few  years, but it was always with hope that the next  time would be better.  The flavor was never right,  or it simply tasted too heavily of flax to be used in  any way other than a healthy drink.  I have plenty  of other foods I can consume to be healthy that  simply tasted better, so I never added flax milk to  my diet.  Flax oil, on the other hand, was a staple  addition to many of my salads.  Flax milk was a  staple addition to my local grocer’s non‐dairy milk  section and that’s where it stayed.  Fortunately, the  Flax USA brand hits the mark.    I’ll start off by saying that the milk still tastes like  flax.  There’s no way around it and if you can’t  stand that taste, you won’t like this product.   However, I didn’t find it overpowering.  In fact, I  thought that lighter flax taste hit the right flavor  spot, so if you think you might like something a  little milder than what has been commercially  available, this is definitely worth a try.      My favorite was the vanilla.  It was properly  sweetened and well balanced, with a full mouth  feel.  My least favorite was the plain, which was a  bit watery, but that’s simply the way it goes with  plain flax milk and not a knock on the product.  If     Quick & Easy

  you already liked flax milk, the plain is an excellent  option.  If not, go with the vanilla.    I should point out that because of the flax flavor,  flax milks are not something I would use in coffee  or tea, but I did end up trying them in cereal and  they were even better than I expected!  The mild  flax flavor complemented the nutty, grain flavor of  the cereal and both served to accentuate each  other with complex notes.  Yum!    All in all, these made for an excellent product and  encouraged me to give flax milk another shot.  I’m  looking forward to getting home and having  another glass of the vanilla!    The Reviewer     Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The Vegan  Culinary Experience, an  educational vegan culinary  magazine with a readership  of about 30,000.  In 2001,  Chef Jason reversed his  diabetes by switching to a low‐fat, vegan diet and  subsequently left his position as the Director of  Marketing for an IT company to become a chef and 

October 2011|59

instructor to help others.  Since then, he has been  featured by the NY Times, has been a NY Times  contributor, and has been featured in Edible Phoenix,  and the Arizona Republic, and has had numerous local  television appearances.  He has catered for companies  such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the Scottsdale  Culinary Festival’s premier catering event, and has been  a guest instructor and the first vegan instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program at Scottsdale Culinary Institute.   Recently, Chef Jason wrote a national best‐selling book  with Dr. Neal Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss  Kickstart.  You can find out more about Chef Jason  Wyrick at www.veganculinaryexperience.com. 

.    

Quick & Easy

October 2011|60

 

Recipe Index 

 

    Click on any of the recipes in the index to take you to the relevant recipe.  Some recipes will  have large white sections after the instructional portion of them.  This is so you need only print  out the ingredient and instructional sections for ease of kitchen use.   

Recipe 

Quick & Easy

Breakfasts  Almond Butter Apple Boats  Morels & Peppadews  Oats & Dates  Peanut Butter Amaranth Porridge  Roasted Red Pepper Scramble    Main Dishes  Baked Beans & Kale  Black Bean Chorizo Soup  Chickpea & Olive Couscous  Eggplant Apricot Sandwich  Lucky Soba Noodles  Quick & Dirty Veggie Dog  Quinoa Verde  Red Curry Soup  Seared Oyster Mushroom Tacos  Seared Tofu Miso Noodles  Seitan Diablo  Shiitakes in Creamy Garlic Sauce  Spinach & Peanuts over Bread  Stuffed Portabellas  Sundried Tomato Hummus Wraps  Tempeh in Tangy Tomato Sauce  Squash Pasta with Sundried  Tomato Sauce  White Bean Soup  Lemony Lentil and Potato Chowder  Lentil Tomato Stew  Raw Crème a la Zucchini   Peruvian Inspired Sweet Potato  Chowder  Borrachos Beans             

Page

 

Recipe 

  62  65  68  71  74      77  80  83  86  89  92  95  98  101  104  107  110  113  116  119  122  125    128  16  17  21  37    49   

 

Appetizers/Sides  Basil Cashews Stuffed Tomatoes  Broccoli Slaw  Chili Garlic Marinated Veggies  Fragrant Potatoes & Peanuts  Lemony Cornflour Cakes  Mushrooms in Garlicky Sangria  Shaved Fennel Chickpea Salad  Simmered Cauliflower in Sweet &  Spicy Tahini Sauce  Sweet & Sour Calabacitas  Lentil Salad    Desserts  Chocolate Merlot Mousse  Raspberry Almond Parfait  Raw Chocolate Pudding    Drinks  Iced Pomegranate Tea                 

Page   131  134  137  140  143  146  149  152    155  16      158  161  21      164           

October 2011|61

Almond Butter Apple Boats Type:   Quick Meal ‐ Dessert    Time to Prepare: 5 minutes

Serves: 2 

Ingredients  1 green apple  2 tbsp. of almond butter  2 tsp. toasted coconut  6‐8 rains    Instructions Cut the apple in half lengthways.  Cut a small wedge into the bottom of the apple, removing the rough part.  Scoop  out the core of the apple using a small knife or spoon, creating a boat.  Place 3‐4 raisins in each boat.  Fill each half with 1 tbsp. of almond butter.  Sprinkle 1 tsp. of toasted coconut on top of each apple boat.                                                    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|62

Kitchen Equipment    Cutting Board  Knife  Spoon  Measuring Spoons    Presentation    These look nice set on a platter with some raisins and  coconut sprinkled on the platter.  You can also sprinkle  the platter with chopped mint.  Make sure you place  them on a light colored platter to accentuate the springy  feel of the dish.  In all honesty, though, they’re meant to  be made quickly and eaten quickly, so I eat them straight  off the cutting board.    Time Management    Make these just before serving.  Otherwise, they will brown.  If you have to make them earlier, dip  the apple in a half‐and‐half water/lemon juice solution before putting the raisins and almond butter  in the boat.  Then store it in the refrigerator.    Complementary Food and Drinks    These go really with some sparkling cider and are a great summer treat.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are incredibly easy to find.  However, Trader Joe’s has a great price on almond  butter.  I usually get the raw version.  Also, you want crisp apples for this recipe, so make sure there  are no brown spots.      How It Works    The slight tartness of the apples makes a nice contrast with the sweetness of the raisins.  Almond  butter is also just a bit sweet and the creamy texture plays off of the crisp apple.  The raisins are also  a nice sweet treasure to be found when the apple is bit into.  Finally, the coconut puts one more  flavor in the dish, rounding it out with another type of sweetness.    Chef’s Notes     These little gems are deceptively filling and I’ve served them in quite a few of my classes to vegans  and non‐vegetarians.  The typical accompaniment usually ends up being a sigh of surprised delight.    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|63

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 162       Calories from Fat 90  Fat 10 g  Total Carbohydrates 16 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 11 g  Protein 2 g  Salt 10 mg    Interesting Facts    Almond butter and almond milk were used in many Elizabethan era desserts.    California is now the largest producer of almonds in the world.    Wild apples use to be bitter, but the Romans discovered they could cultivate a sweet apple, resulting  in what we have today.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|64

Morels & Peppadews Type:   Breakfast    Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  8 fresh morels, sliced  1 tsp. of garlic‐infused olive oil  16 oz. of firm tofu, crumbled  ½ tsp. of turmeric  ¼ tsp. of salt (choose Indian black salt for a very egg‐like flavor)  8‐12 peppadews  4 slices of toasted sourdough bread    Instructions  Slice the morels into thin pieces.  Sauté them in the oil over a medium heat for about 2 minutes.  Crumble the tofu into the pan.  Add the turmeric and salt and stir until everything is combined.  Sauté until the tofu is warmed through.  Add the peppadews and stir.  Serve over sourdough toast.                                   

            The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|65

Low‐fat Version    Omit the oil and simmer the morels in a very thin layer of white wine.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Make sure some of the peppadews are showing through the  scramble, though that shouldn’t be hard.    Time Management    The key to this recipe is to not overcook the morels, which  have an earthy flavor, but can be delicate, especially when  sliced so thinly.  If they are starting to brown, add the tofu  immediately.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with a pomegranate mimosa.    Where to Shop    Fresh morels are usually only found at gourmet stores.  Dry ones don’t quite work for this recipe.   Trader Joe’s has a good price on peppadews and most of the other ingredients, especially vegan  sourdough bread.  Approximate cost per serving is $1.50.    How It Works    A light sauté on the morels softens them, helps bring out their earthy flavor, and infuses the oil with  this flavor, which then permeates the entire scramble.  Peppadews are added for crunch and  tanginess and all this is served over toasted sourdough bread for a classy finish.    Chef’s Notes     Fresh morels aren’t always easy to come by and look expensive, but you need so few of them, don’t  let the expense turn you off from making the recipe!    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|66

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 522       Calories from Fat 198  Fat 22 g  Total Carbohydrates 42 g  Dietary Fiber 10 g  Sugars 11 g  Protein 39 g  Salt 473 mg    Interesting Facts    Morels can be classified as gray, black, or yellow, though they are all shades of brown.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|67

Oats & Dates Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 15 minutes    Ingredients  4 pitted dates, chopped  Zest of 1 orange  ¾ cup of rolled oats  ½ cup of water  Pinch of cloves    Instructions  Chop the dates into small pieces.  Zest the orange.  Bring the water to a boil.  Add all the ingredients and cook until the oats are barely softened, about 7‐8 minutes.  Option:  Allow the oats to cool and form the mix into several bite‐size balls as a tasty, filling snack.                                   

                    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|68

Kitchen Equipment    Small Pot  Measuring Cup  Stirring Spoon  Knife   Cutting Board    Presentation    Even though this doesn’t make a lot of food, it’s deceptively filling.   Because it is not a large amount of food, however, it should be  served in a small bowl so it doesn’t look like you’re skimping on the  portion size.    Time Management    Make sure you get the dates chopped and the orange zested before  you start cooking the oats.  It’s important that those ingredients simmer with the oats so they can  flavor the oats.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this on its own.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are relatively common.  Approximate cost per serving is $1.00.    How It Works    The dates add an obvious shot of sweetness to the oats without drenching them with refined sugars  and the cloves and orange zest bring the oats to life, giving them a popping, aromatic quality.    Chef’s Notes     This simply combines some Middle Eastern flavors (dates, cloves, and orange) with oats.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 460       Calories from Fat 36  Fat 4 g  Total Carbohydrates 74 g  Dietary Fiber 10 g  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|69

Sugars 32 g  Protein 11 g  Salt    

Interesting Facts    Rolled oats are typically pressed flat, steamed, and then toasted before being packaged.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|70

Peanut Butter Amaranth Porridge     Type:   Breakfast    Serves:  1   Time to Prepare: 30 minutes     Ingredients  ¼ cup of amaranth  1 cup of almond milk   ½ teaspoon of cinnamon   1‐2 tablespoons of peanut butter   1‐2 teaspoons of agave nectar (optional)     Instructions  Place ¼ cup of amaranth in a small wok or pot and place over medium heat.   Allow to cook for about 5 minutes.   The amaranth should toast and may even ‘pop’ much like popcorn.   Reduce the heat of the pot or wok to medium low.   Add the almond milk, cinnamon, and peanut butter.   Stir until thoroughly combined.   Cook at this heat for 20‐30 minutes.   Remove from heat before adding the agave.                                   

            The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Quick & Easy

October 2011|71

Low‐fat Version    Omit the peanut butter, simply making amaranth porridge.     Kitchen Equipment    Pot or Wok  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons  Stirring Spoon    Presentation    Serve as is or garnish with chopped peanuts.    Time Management     Since this needs time to simmer, use that 30 minutes cooking time  to get ready in the morning or prepare a healthy lunch for work or  school.     Complementary Food and Drinks    This is wonderful with a warm cup of chai on a cold morning.     Where to Shop    These ingredients can be bought in any health food store. Amaranth is a gluten free grain, and can be  found in most health food stores.     How It Works    Toasting the amaranth brings out the flavor of the grain by developing the volatile compounds and  oils. It makes the grain taste like peanut butter.     Chef’s Notes     This is a warm and hearty dish, perfect for cold mornings. Because of the grain and peanut butter, it is  very filling, so save it for the days where you need the extra caloric push.     Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 319       Calories from Fat 99  Fat 11 g  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Quick & Easy

October 2011|72

Total Carbohydrates 43 g  Dietary Fiber 5 g  Sugars 9 g  Protein 12 g  Salt 153 mg    Interesting Facts    Amaranth is a seed, and it is completely gluten free. It was a staple food of the Incans and Aztecs, and  is also a popular health food today.    

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Quick & Easy

October 2011|73

Roasted Red Pepper Scramble Type: Breakfast      Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  The Sauce  1 roasted red pepper  1 small clove of garlic  ¼ tsp. of salt  ¼ cup of water  The Scramble  16 oz. of firm tofu, crumbled  4 cups of tightly packed baby spinach leaves  3 tbsp. of capers    Instructions  Puree the roasted red pepper, garlic, salt, and water.  Crumble the tofu with a whisk or by hand.  Bring a pan up to a medium heat.  Add the spinach and cook it until it wilts.  Press the spinach to the side of the pan and then drain the pan of any excess water.  Add the sauce and stir in the spinach, then add the tofu and capers and stir again.  Stir and cook for about 3 minutes.                                     

      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|74

Kitchen Equipment    Blender  Pan  Stirring Spoon  Mixing Bowl  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup    Presentation    Make sure that the spinach is not clumped in the scramble.      Time Management    This recipe only takes a few minutes, so there isn’t much to add here.    Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with garlic hashbrowns and sourdough toast.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are incredibly common.  Approximate cost per serving is $1.50.    How It Works    This is a very simple recipe.  The spinach provides some color and also goes quite well with the  roasted red pepper.  The sauce should lightly coat the tofu and make the scramble slightly sweet and  give it some liveliness while the capers create a shot of saltiness.    Chef’s Notes     This recipe is based strongly on a breakfast I had at Jam in Portland, Oregon.  It was so good, I went  back the next day and had it again!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 396       Calories from Fat 180  Fat 20 g  Total Carbohydrates 15 g  Dietary Fiber 7 g  Sugars 3 g  Protein 39 g  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|75

Salt 692 mg   

Interesting Facts    Gypsum is the most common coagulant used in making tofu.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|76

Baked Beans & Kale Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes of work + 30 minutes to bake    Ingredients  1 bunch of kale, chopped (about 1 cup)  ½ of an onion, diced  4 cloves of garlic, minced  1 chipotle in adobo, minced  1 cup of cooked, rinsed red beans  3 tbsp. of maple syrup  1 tsp. of tamari  Juice of 1 lime or orange*    Instructions  Chop the kale into small pieces.  Dice the onion.  Mince the garlic and chipotle.  Combine the maple syrup, tamari, and lime juice or orange juice*.  Toss all the ingredients together in a small baking dish.  Cover the baking dish and bake this for 30 minutes on 350 degrees.  * Choose lime if you want a flavor that pops, choose orange if you want to accentuate sweetness.                                

            The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|77

Raw Version    You can make this dish using sprouted lentils and a ripe, red jalapeno instead of a chipotle.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Baking Dish & Foil  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Small Mixing Bowl  Stirring Spoon     Presentation    If you bake this in a terra cotta baking dish, you can serve the beans  in that on the table.  It has a wonderful rustic feel.    Time Management    This is one of those dishes that gets even better as it sits, so make  extra for the next day!     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with rice or a side of salted watermelon.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common, though you should get the curly leaf kale as it softens  faster in the oven than the dino kale.  Approximate cost per serving is $1.50.    How It Works    The maple syrup obviously sweetens everything, but goes further and binds the beans and kale in a  thick sauce.  Kale is used for color and to add an incredibly healthy component to the dish.  The citrus  brightens the entire dish, keeping it from being overly heavy.  The chipotle adds smoky heat, perfect  for a bean dish, and provides counterpoint to the sweetness of the maple syrup.  Baking this at a  relatively low temperature allows the ingredients to set and meld their flavors without burning.    Chef’s Notes     I could eat this dish all day.  Sometimes I add in sliced vegan sausage to it, too!    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|78

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 277       Calories from Fat 9  Fat 1 g  Total Carbohydrates 56 g  Dietary Fiber 8 g  Sugars 25 g  Protein 11 g  Salt 368 mg    Interesting Facts    Kale was one of the most widely cultivated greens throughout the ancient world up through the  Medieval period.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|79

Black Bean Chorizo Soup Type:   Soup    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 15 minutes    Ingredients  1 sweet onion, chopped  2 green bell peppers, chopped  6 cloves of garlic, chopped  2 tsp. of olive oil  3 cups of black beans, cooked   3 cups of water  2 tbsp. of white wine vinegar  2 tsp. of dried oregano  1 tbsp. of paprika  1 ½ tsp. of cumin  ½ tsp. of salt  1 package of soy chorizo    Instructions  Chop the onion, bell peppers, and garlic.  Over a medium high heat, sauté these veggies in the oil until they are lightly browned.  Add the black beans, water, vinegar, spices, and salt, and reduce the heat to medium.  Puree this mix using an immersion blender (stick blender).  Add the soy chorizo and simmer for 6‐8 minutes.                                     

    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|80

Low‐fat Version    Sauté the veggies in a dry pan until they brown, then add the beans, water, etc.  Omit the soy chorizo  and use 1 ½ cups of tvp and 1 tbsp. of chile powder.    Kitchen Equipment    Cutting Board  Knife  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Stirring Spoon  Pot  Immersion Blender    Presentation    Serve in a festive bowl and garnish with a spoonful of pico de  gallo.    Time Management    You can let this soup simmer longer if you’ve got the time.  Just  turn the heat down to medium low and replenish the water as  necessary.  The longer it simmers, the better it gets.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side of toasted sourdough bread.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common except the soy chorizo, which you can find at Trader Joe’s  and Whole Foods.  Approximate cost per serving is $1.25.    How It Works    The onion, bell pepper, and garlic create a sofrito, a sweet, pungent combination that permeates the  entire soup and complements the nature of the black beans.  Both the cumin and oregano add depth  and the paprika gives a red chile note without becoming the predominant flavor of the soup.  Soy  chorizo is added for texture as well as flavor, which will also lightly infuse the soup.        The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|81

 

Chef’s Notes     This is based on my favorite Cuban black bean soup recipe, but modified to use dried oregano instead  of fresh for speed, with added soy chorizo to give it some kick.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 333       Calories from Fat 81  Fat 9 g  Total Carbohydrates 44 g  Dietary Fiber 14 g  Sugars 3 g  Protein 19 g  Salt 645 mg    Interesting Facts    Black beans are incredibly high in iron, moreso than other beans, which are already high.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|82

Chickpea & Olive Couscous Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  3 small, dried red chiles  ¼ cup of raisins  2 cups of water  1 ½ cups of couscous  1 ½ cups of cooked, rinsed chickpeas  6 tbsp. of pitted kalamata olives  1 tbsp. of chopped fresh mint    Instructions  Bring the water, chiles, and raisins to a boil.  Pour the water, chiles, and raisins over the couscous and quickly fluff with a fork.  Fluff this slowly for about 5 minutes.  Chop the mint.  Combine the couscous with the chickpeas and olives and garnish with mint.                                     

              The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|83

Kitchen Equipment    Mixing Bowl  Small Pot  Fork  Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon     Presentation    Serve in a colorful bowl to add to the presentation and top with a  sprig of mint surrounded by a few extra olives.    Time Management    If you let the couscous sit without fluffing it, it will get lumpy.     Complementary Food and Drinks    A glass of crisp red wine and a side of fresh peaches and nuts make for an excellent meal.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are common.  Look in the Mexican aisle of your local grocery store for the  chiles.  Also, check the olives to make sure they are all truly pitted.  Approximate cost per serving is  $0.75.    How It Works    Couscous is actually very tiny pasta, so it needs to be treated delicately.  That’s why it is best to pour  the hot water over the couscous and let it slowly absorb the water rather than abusing it by cooking it  to death in boiling water.  To infuse the couscous with flavor, raisins and chiles are added to the  water to create a hot, sweet, cooking liquid.  Chickpeas make this a hearty dish and olives make it  burst with flavor.    Chef’s Notes     You can also make this with quinoa for a gluten free version, though you need to fully cook the  quinoa first.  Simply cook it with the raisins and chiles added into the water.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 390  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|84

     Calories from Fat 54  Fat 6 g  Total Carbohydrates 71 g  Dietary Fiber 7 g  Sugars 7 g  Protein 13 g  Salt 281 mg    Interesting Facts    The words olive and oil look very similar for good reason.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|85

Eggplant Apricot Sandwich Type: Sandwich      Serves: 3‐4  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  1 eggplant, sliced into ¾” thick slabs  1 tbsp. of oil  ¼ tsp. of salt  ¼ tsp. of crushed red chile flakes  12‐16 dried apricots  4 roasted red peppers from a jar (save the juice)  1 cup of baby arugula  3‐4 sandwich rolls    Instructions  Slice the eggplant into ¾” thick slabs.  Over a medium high heat, sauté the eggplant until it softens and just starts to brown.  Add the salt and crushed red chile flakes.  Toss and remove from the heat.  Slice the buns in half.   Dip each in the roasted red pepper juice.  Slice the peppers in half.  Place an eggplant slab, then 4 apricots, and then the baby arugula, and then the roasted red peppers  on each bun and serve.                                     

    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|86

Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Spatula  Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup    Presentation    Slice this in half with a serrated knife or a very sharp, heavy knife to  make a clean cut.  The sandwich can get messy with the roasted red  peppers and eggplant and cutting it in half helps.    Time Management    This makes a great room temperature sandwich, too, so you can  always make some extra eggplant and then have it again later in the  week.    Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with a glass of refreshing mint green tea.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common.  I usually get my roasted red peppers and baby arugula at  Trader Joe’s.  Approximate cost per serving is $2.00.    How It Works    This recipe showcases a simplified way to use a few classic Moroccan flavors, namely eggplant,  apricot, and hot peppers.  The eggplant is sautéed to the point where it just browns, so that it  becomes soft, but doesn’t get to the point where it’s falling apart.  The salt and crushed red chiles are  then added and stay in the pan long enough to enhance the chile flavor without burning it.  Arugula  gives a peppery note and apricots balance out the heat of the chiles.  The juice from a roasted red  pepper jar is a bit vinegary, giving a tang to the sandwich and the roasted red peppers add color and  lushness.    Chef’s Notes     I’m a big fan of a well‐done sandwich, especially when they can be done quickly!  If I’m in the mood  for a sandwich, I am usually not in the mood to wait for it.    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|87

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 350       Calories from Fat 54  Fat 6 g  Total Carbohydrates 63 g  Dietary Fiber 14 g  Sugars 33 g  Protein 11 g  Salt 330 mg    Interesting Facts    Large, purple eggplants tend to not be that bitter and so do not need to be salted and left to sit to  remove their bitterness.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|88

Lucky Soba Noodles with Dipping Sauce Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes + time for condiments    Ingredients  The Noodles  1 14‐ounce package (approximately) soba noodles, cooked according to package directions  and drained   The Dipping Sauce  3 tablespoons soy sauce  2 cups vegetable, mushroom, or miso broth  Toppings (mix and match any of these)  1 sheet nori, snipped into tiny shreds with kitchen scissors  Sesame seeds or gomasio   Shredded carrots  Julienned cucumber  Tofu cubes   Seitan or pre‐steamed tempeh  Mung bean sprouts  Cooked, sliced mushrooms  Finely shredded cabbage  Finely shredded spinach  Cooked, shelled edamame  Srichacha sauce    Instructions  Divide well‐drained noodles into four bowls.   Mix together soy sauce and broth to make the dipping sauce. (Sauce should be served at room  temperature.)  Top with just enough sauce to cover and allow diners to choose their favorite toppings.                                 The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Dynise Balcavage, author of Celebrate Vegan http://urbanvegan.net

Quick & Easy

October 2011|89

Kitchen Equipment    Pot  Colander  Mixing Bowl  Stirring Spoon or Whisk  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Serve each person a bowl of noodles and sauce  and then serve the condiments family style,  allowing each diner to pick and choose what they  like.    Time Management    These only take a few moments to make with most of the time being spent on condiments.   Obviously, the more condiments you make, the longer the dish will take.      Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with tofu skewers, tea, and sake!    Where to Shop    Soba noodles have become incredibly popular, so you can find them at just about any store, but you’ll  get the best price on them at an Asian market.  That’s also very true of the miso.  While you’re there,  check out some of the pickled condiments available.  Approximate cost depends on which, and how  many, condiments you serve.    How It Works    Soba has a rich, full‐bodied taste, particularly for a noodle and this allows it to handle the full flavor of  miso broth, if you decide to use that.  The soy sauce also imparts a saltiness and umami quality which  perfectly complements the buckwheat noodles.  After that, it’s just serving condiments on top, which  can range from pickled to spicy to fresh.      Chef’s Notes     On New Year’s Day, the Japanese eat long noodles to ensure a long life. The only catch is that you  need to eat the entire noodle without breaking it. That said, slurping helps and is, in fact, encouraged.  Kids especially love this dish because they can add whatever toppings they like (and they’re allowed  to slurp). And adults love it because it is a breeze to throw together.   The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Dynise Balcavage, author of Celebrate Vegan http://urbanvegan.net

Quick & Easy

October 2011|90

  The Japanese usually eat seasonally, so you can eat these noodles warm or cool. During hot summer  months, simply chill the noodles by running them under very cold water, and this dish is a refreshing  respite from the heat and humidity.     Nutrition Facts (per serving, only noodles and sauce included)    Calories 341       Calories from Fat 9  Fat 1 g  Total Carbohydrates 69 g  Dietary Fiber 6 g  Sugars 2 g  Protein 14 g  Salt 772 mg    Interesting Facts    Soba noodles are made from buckwheat and were made popular in Tokyo in the 1700s.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Dynise Balcavage, author of Celebrate Vegan http://urbanvegan.net

Quick & Easy

October 2011|91

Quick & Dirty Veggie Dog Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10 ‐ 15 minutes    Ingredients  4 Tofurky beer brats or Italian sausages  ½ bottle of dark beer  4 hot dog buns, toasted  ½ of an onion, sliced  1 red bell pepper, sliced  1 tsp. of olive oil  ¼ cup of yellow mustard  ½ cup of sauerkraut  Option:  ¼ cup of Vegenaise    Instructions  Simmer the veggie dogs in the beer over a medium heat for about 5 minutes (make sure to rotate the  dogs every minute or so).  While they are simmering, slice the onion and red bell pepper.  Over a medium high heat, sauté the onion and bell pepper until the onion browns.  Add the remainder of the simmering beer to the onions and let it cook away.  Serve each veggie dog with peppers and onions, about 1 tbsp. of yellow mustard, and 2 tbsp. of  sauerkraut, and an optional 1 tbsp. of Vegenaise.                                   

        The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|92

Kitchen Equipment    2 Sauté Pans  Stirring Spoon  Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cup    Presentation    Slathered in condiments is the only way to present this veggie  dog!    Time Management    Ideally, you should have two sauté pans going.  One for the veggie  dogs and one for the peppers and onions.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side salad with spicy peppers.    Where to Shop    Trader Joe’s has a good price on Tofurky Italian sausages while Sunflower Market has the same price  on both the Italian sausages and beer brats.  Look for a dark beer, like Samuel Smith Nutbrown Ale.   Approximate cost per serving is $2.00.    How It Works    Simmering the veggie dogs in beer not only softens the veggie dogs, but infuses them with a full‐ bodied, slightly sweet flavor as the sugars in the beer develop.  The peppers and onions add more  sweetness, which is counteracted by the acidity of both the mustard and sauerkraut.      Chef’s Notes     I served this veggie dog at a picnic to a host of meat eaters and the majority came back for seconds.   Some came back for thirds.  I had to make sure I set some aside for myself!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 444       Calories from Fat 126  Fat 14 g  Total Carbohydrates 44 g  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|93

Alcohol 2 g  Dietary Fiber 14 g  Sugars 7 g  Protein 32 g  Salt 870 mg   

Interesting Facts    Turtle Island Foods, the company that produces Tofurky, started out as a company that made tempeh  products.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|94

Quinoa Verde Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 25 minutes    Ingredients  1 white sweet potato, diced  1 cup of water  2 cups of salsa verde  1 ½ cups of red quinoa  Salt to taste    Instructions  Dice the sweet potato.  Bring the water and salsa to a simmer.  Add the sweet potato, quinoa, and salt.  Cover the quinoa, reduce the heat to low, and cook for 20 minutes.  Option:  It’s ok to use regular quinoa if red is not available.                                   

                    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|95

Raw Version    Combine 3 cups of sprouted quinoa with 1 ½ cups of raw salsa verde.  Let this sit for about 30  minutes, then add 1 chopped chayote squash to it.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cup  Pot with Lid  Stirring Spoon     Presentation    Garnish with crushed red chiles on top of the plated quinoa.  I  like to use crushed ancho.    Time Management     This will keep up to a week in the refrigerator.    Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a cooling glass of coconut water.    Where to Shop    Red quinoa is available at Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Sprouts, and other markets of their type.  My  favorite salsa verde is by Frontera, which can be found in most markets.  Approximate cost per  serving is $1.00.    How It Works    Generally, I cook quinoa at about a 1 ½ parts liquid to 1 part quinoa ratio.  However, the salsa verde is  not all liquid, so the proportion needs to be higher.  The sweet potato is used not only for the obvious  sweetness, which balances the heat of the salsa, but it’s also used for some texture.  Red quinoa is  used for presentation.    Chef’s Notes     I used to make this with just salsa, regular quinoa, and water, but I love the presentation of the red  quinoa and the texture of the sweet potato adds that dimension it was lacking.    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|96

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 361       Calories from Fat 45  Fat 5 g  Total Carbohydrates 65 g  Dietary Fiber 9 g  Sugars 4 g  Protein 14 g  Salt 661 mg    Interesting Facts    Quinoa is a seed, not a grain, even though it is treated as such in the culinary world.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|97

Quick Red Curry Soup Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  2 tbsp. of Thai red curry paste  2 cups of coconut milk  2 cups of water  ¼ tsp. of salt  16 oz. of extra firm tofu, cubed  2 cups of straw mushrooms    Instructions  Bring a pot to a medium heat.  Add the Thai curry paste and 3 tbsp. of coconut milk.  Sauté the curry paste in the coconut milk for about 2 minutes.  Slowly stir the remainder of the coconut milk into the pot so that the curry paste melts into the  coconut milk.  Add the water and salt and keep this on a medium heat so the soup can simmer.  Cube the tofu into small bite‐size pieces.  Add the tofu and mushrooms and simmer for 5 more minutes.                                     

          The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|98

Low‐fat Version    Use reduced fat coconut milk, which is still not low fat, but still less than regular coconut milk.    Kitchen Equipment    Pot  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Knife  Cutting Board    Presentation    Garnish with fresh cilantro or a stalk of lemongrass.    Time Management    The longer this soup simmers, the better, but it should be fine to  eat after just ten minutes.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with a green papaya salad and spring rolls.    Where to Shop    If I use a store‐bought curry paste, I use the one from Thai Kitchen.  This curry paste is vegan,  whereas most other ones have shrimp paste and fish sauce added to them.  Cost per serving is $2.00.    How It Works    You can use the coconut milk to fry the curry paste, which caramelizes the paste and activates a lot of  the volatile compounds in the spices used in it, giving it a richer, more complex flavor.  The coconut  milk should then slowly be stirred into the pot so that the paste can evenly distribute throughout it.   Otherwise it would clump.  After that, it’s just a matter of simmering the tofu for a few minutes so it  can absorb some of the flavor of the broth.    Chef’s Notes     This is a quick simplified version of a soup that usually has galangal, lemongrass, and lime leaves  added to it, but which requires at least an extra twenty to thirty minutes to cook.    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|99

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 480       Calories from Fat 288  Fat 32 g  Total Carbohydrates 16 g  Dietary Fiber 4 g  Sugars 4 g  Protein 32 g  Salt 705 mg    Interesting Facts    Coconut milk can be left to ferment with a bit of sugar and yeast to make coconut rum.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|100

Seared Oyster Mushroom Tacos Type:   Main Dish ‐ Mexican    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10‐15 minutes    Ingredients  2 cups of oyster mushrooms, roughly chopped into large pieces  1 tbsp. of olive oil  1/8 tsp. of coarse sea salt  Juice of 1 lime (about 1 tbsp.)  ½ cup of cooked, rinsed black beans  1 large vine‐ripe tomato, chopped  1 avocado, chopped  1 jalapeno, diced  ¼ of a red onion, diced  ¼ cup of chopped cilantro  4 corn* or flour tortillas    Instructions  Chop the oyster mushrooms into large pieces.  Over a high heat, sear the oyster mushrooms in the oil and salt until they are heavily browned.  Remove them from the heat and immediately dress them with the lime juice.  Chop the tomato and avocado.  Dice the jalapeno, removing the seeds if you wish.  Dice the red onion.  Chop the cilantro.  Add the oyster mushrooms and beans to the taco first, then the tomato, avocado, jalapeno, onion,  and cilantro.  *If you use corn tortillas, you will need to steam them for about a minute.                                 

  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|101

Raw Version    Marinate the mushrooms in the lime juice, olive oil, and salt.  Chop them into smaller pieces, about  1” long.  Omit the beans and use a butter lettuce leaf instead of a tortilla.  If you want, you can use  chopped cashews instead of beans.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Sauté Pan  Spatula  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Colander    Presentation    Don’t try to close these when you serve them.  They just want  to flop open, so let them, allowing all the beautiful fresh  ingredients to dazzle the eyes.    Time Management    You can leave the mushrooms alone for a couple minutes,  especially during the beginning of the cooking process.  That’s a  great time to start chopping the other ingredients.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a salad of corn and nopalitos (cactus) or simply serve it with fresh black grapes.     Where to Shop    Asian markets tend to have the best price on oyster mushrooms.  All the other ingredients are fairly  common, though if you can get your hand on fresh tortillas, you should definitely do so!  Approximate  cost per serving is $1.25.    How It Works    This taco is all about the contrast between fresh, bright ingredients and the richness of the seared  oyster mushrooms.  I chose oyster mushrooms because even when they are heavily browned, they  have a light texture which complements the overall theme of the taco.  Cooking them on a high heat  ensures that they will brown without reducing overly much.  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|102

 

Chef’s Notes     I discovered the joy of seared oyster mushrooms after experimenting in the kitchen one day.  They  looked like they would cook up super fast because of their light texture, and they did.  What I didn’t  expect was the slight bacon flavor searing them created.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 364       Calories from Fat 108  Fat 12 g  Total Carbohydrates 53 g  Dietary Fiber 11 g  Sugars 4 g  Protein 11 g  Salt 175 mg    Interesting Facts    Tacos are incredibly diverse, but they always refer to food wrapped in a small tortilla.  Traditionally,  those were corn tortillas, but wheat ones have also become very popular in Mexico.  Some people  will claim that it is always filled with meat, but that is definitely not the way the word is used.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|103

Seared Tofu Miso Noodles Type:   Main Dish ‐ Wrap    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  The Noodles  6 oz. of fettuccine‐sized rice noodles  Water  The Stir Fry  12 oz. of super firm tofu, cubed  1 cup of bean sprouts  ¼ tsp. of crushed red pepper  ¼ cup of roasted cashews  2 tsp. of toasted sesame oil  The Sauce  3 tbsp. of yellow miso  2 tsp. of agave  3 tbsp. of water    Instructions  Bring the water to a boil and then take it off the heat.  Immediately add the rice noodles and let them rehydrate.  Drain the noodles.  Cube the tofu.  Heat a wok or pan up to a high heat.  Add the sesame oil and then immediately add the tofu and sauté it until it browns.  Add the bean sprouts, crushed red pepper, and cashews and cook for about 15 seconds, then remove  the wok from the heat.  Combine the miso, agave, and water.  Toss the noodles with the sauce and then top with the stir fry.                                The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|104

Kitchen Equipment    Work or Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  Knife  Cutting Board  Pot  Colander  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Mixing Bowl    Presentation    Top with whole chives or chopped green onions and make sure the  stir fry is piled in the middle of the noodles instead of splayed out.    Time Management    The stir fry cooks very quickly, within just two or three minutes, so  pay close attention to it.  Ideally, you should start the noodles and  chop the tofu and make the sauce while the noodle rehydrate.   Then you can complete the stir fry in just a couple minutes and be  ready to eat.     Complementary Food and Drinks    This is a fairly filling meal, so it’s meant to be eaten by itself.    Where to Shop    Fettuccine‐sized rice noodles can be found at most Asian markets and even at many convention  grocery stores.  They may be called Pad Thai noodles.  Super firm tofu can be found at Trader Joe’s,  Whole Foods, Sprouts, and Sunflower market.  You can also substitute baked tofu for super firm.   Approximate cost per serving is $1.00.    How It Works    Stir frying on a high heat rapidly cooks the tofu, allowing the outside to crisp without overdoing the  inside.  It also allows the bean sprouts to quickly warm without destroying much of their freshness.   Using super firm tofu makes the dish more substantial.  Cashews are added for texture and rice  noodles bulk out the dish.  The sweet miso sauce adds saltiness and the sweetness balances out the  crushed red pepper.    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|105

 

Chef’s Notes     This is one of those in‐a‐hurry recipes where the finished product looks more complex than it actually  is.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 402       Calories from Fat 126  Fat 14 g  Total Carbohydrates 60 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 9 g  Protein 22 g  Salt 82 mg    Interesting Facts    Miso is typically made with soy, but it can also be made with barley, rice, or other ingredients.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|106

Seitan Diablo Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 10‐12 minutes    Ingredients  ½ of an onion, chopped  1 green bell pepper, chopped  1 yellow bell pepper, chopped  4 cloves of garlic, minced  1 cup of seitan (about 1 package)  1 tbsp. of olive oil  1 tbsp. of hot sauce  Juice of 1 lime    Instructions  Chop the onion and bell peppers.  Mince the garlic.  Heat the oil to a medium‐high heat.  Add the onion and bell peppers and sauté until the onion browns.  Reduce the heat to medium.  Add the garlic and seitan and sauté 2 more minutes.  Remove from the heat and immediately add the hot sauce and lime juice and toss.                                     

        The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|107

Low‐fat Version    Omit the oil and follow the recipe as is, sautéing in a dry pan.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Sauté Pan  Spatula    Presentation    I like to garnish this with a few cuts of cilantro and fresh  chiles or roasted garlic, if I’ve got them handy.    Time Management    Don’t add the hot sauce while the pan is going or you may  release a bunch of capsaicin into the air and choke yourself  out of the kitchen, depending on how spicy your hot sauce  is.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with toasted cumin rice.    Where to Shop    Seitan can be found at most markets.  You can also use any sort of mock meat product that comes in  bite‐size chunks or strips.  I prefer Tabasco or Cholula hot sauce.  Approximate cost per serving is  $1.75.    How It Works    The onion and bell pepper work together to make a flavorful sweet sauce, which mingles with the oil  and hot sauce to make the finished sweet, spicy, and tangy sauce.  These need to sauté before the  seitan and garlic, both of which will stick if they sauté too long.  The garlic will also burn and become  bitter, which is why it goes in after the onion has browned.  The seitan gives the dish a substantive  quality and it also absorbs quite a bit of the sauce, further flavoring the dish.      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|108

 

Chef’s Notes     I love how fast this dish is, yet its flavor profile is massive.  The hot sauce makes it zing and the lime  juice brings everything to life.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 195       Calories from Fat 63  Fat 7 g  Total Carbohydrates 16 g  Dietary Fiber 4 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 26 g  Salt 552 mg    Interesting Facts    Tabasco isn’t just a hot sauce, it’s a state in southern Mexico.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|109

Shiitakes in Creamy Garlic Sauce Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 12‐15 minutes    Ingredients  The Noodles    4 oz. of whole wheat penne pasta    Water  The Sauce  12 oz. of soft silken tofu              2 cloves of garlic  1 tsp. of onion powder              ½ tsp. of salt  ½ tsp. of freshly ground pepper    The Shiitakes  12‐15 fresh shiitakes, sliced  1 tbsp. of minced fresh parsley    Instructions  Bring the water to a boil.  Add the noodles and stir for about 1 minute.  Puree all the ingredients for the sauce.  Slice the shiitakes.  Mince the parsley.  Add the sauce and shiitakes to a pan and simmer them over a medium heat for about 5 minutes.  Once the noodles are done, drain them and plate them.  Top with the sauce and shiitakes, finishing the dish off with fresh parsley.                                      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|110

Raw Version    You can make the sauce using cashew cream instead of tofu.  Once you’ve got that done, lightly salt  the shiitakes and then place a weight over them.  Let them sit for about 20 minutes, then add them  to the sauce.  Serve over shaved carrots.    Kitchen Equipment    Pot  Colander  Knife  Cutting Board  Pan  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Rub the parsley between thumb and forefinger while you  drape it across the plate to keep the fresh parsley from  clumping.    Time Management    By starting the noodles before you get anything else done,  you can work on the sauce and shiitakes while the noodles  boil, saving quite a bit of time.  By the time you are done with those two sections, the noodles should  be ready to go.     Complementary Food and Drinks    A glass of light white wine and a brothy veggie soup.    Where to Shop    Fresh shiitakes can be found at a good price at most Asian markets.  Trader Joe’s also has fresh  shiitakes.  If you use dried, you have to rehydrate them first, and keep in mind that they will have a  much earthier flavor than fresh ones.  Approximate cost per serving is $2.00.    How It Works    The tofu, when blended, becomes quite creamy.  Make sure you are using silken tofu however, or you  will quickly find out why!  Crumbly and grainy sauce is no good.  Fresh shiitakes are used for their  delicate flavor, so the sauce can still stand out.    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|111

 

Chef’s Notes     I served this in a class recently and it was a huge hit.  The sauce really makes the dish.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 376       Calories from Fat 36  Fat 4 g  Total Carbohydrates 63 g  Dietary Fiber 8 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 22 g  Salt 728 mg    Interesting Facts    Shiitakes are known to have excellent cancer‐fighting compounds, including lentinan and AHCC.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|112

Spinach & Peanuts over Bread Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  ½ of an onion, minced  3 cloves of garlic, minced  2 tsp. of olive oil  8 cups of loosely packed baby spinach leaves  3‐4 tbsp. of diced, roasted green chiles  ¼ tsp. of ground cumin  1/8 tsp. of salt  6 tbsp. of roasted peanuts  2 pieces of pita or naan bread     Instructions  Mince the onion and garlic or simply place it in a food processor and pulse it a few times until it is  finely chopped.  Over a medium heat, sauté the onion and garlic until the onion completely softens.  Add the spinach, green chiles, cumin, salt, and peanuts and cook until the spinach is completely  wilted.  Serve over pita or naan.                                     

        The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|113

Low‐fat Version    Omit the olive oil, sautéing in a dry pan.  Use chickpeas instead of peanuts.   

Raw Version    Use half of the onion and garlic called for in the recipe.  Toss everything together and place a weight  over it, allowing it to sit for at least an hour.  Serve over raw crackers.    Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Knife  Cutting Board    Presentation    There isn’t much to speak of.  This is meant to be made quickly and  eaten even faster!    Time Management    If you want toasted bread, preheat the oven before you start  chopping and place the bread in the oven just before you add the  spinach and peanuts.  It should be well toasted by the time the  spinach fully wilts.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Mango tea is one of my favorite accompaniments to this dish.    Where to Shop    All these ingredients should be fairly common, except for the naan.  Check the ingredients in the naan  as it is sometimes made with milk.  Approximate cost per serving is $1.00.    How It Works    The onion gives sweetness to the dish and helps bulk it up.  It’s only softened so that its flavor  remains as mellow as possible.  Peanuts are used for texture and to add calories to what would  otherwise be a low‐calorie dish.  Cumin gives the dish some depth and the chiles give a full bodied  flavor with heat!  The bread makes the finished dish very substantial.  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|114

 

Chef’s Notes     This recipe is a very simplified version of saag paneer, with peanuts instead of cheese.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 306       Calories from Fat 126  Fat 14 g  Total Carbohydrates 31 g  Dietary Fiber 7 g  Sugars 3 g  Protein 14 g  Salt 346 mg    Interesting Facts    The iron in spinach is not as bio‐available as the iron in other leafy greens.  However, its bio‐ availability can be increased by vitamin C intake.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|115

Stuffed Portabellas Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  4 portabella caps, stems removed  1 tbsp. of chopped fresh sage  1 tbsp. of olive oil  ¼ tsp. of coarse sea salt  1 large roasted red pepper, sliced  1 clove of garlic, minced   1 ½ cups of cooked, rinsed white beans  ¼ tsp. of salt    Instructions  Over a medium heat, cook the caps in the oil, sage, and salt until just barely done (both sides should  have sweated).  Slice the roasted red pepper.  Mince the garlic.  Mash the garlic, beans, and salt together.  Stuff the mushrooms with the bean mash and top with roasted red pepper slices, drizzling with any  remaining oil and sage in the pan.                                     

        The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|116

Low‐fat Version    You can simmer the mushrooms in a thin layer of water, still utilizing the salt and sage.   

Raw Version    Use smashed walnuts instead of beans.  Salt the portabella caps and let them sit for about 2 hours.   Use fresh bell pepper.    Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Spatula  Knife  Cutting Board  Mixing Bowl  Smasher    Presentation    I like to save some fresh sage with which to garnish the plate.    Time Management    You can make the bean mash and slice the red pepper while the  portabellas cook, shaving a few minutes more off the recipe.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side of fresh tomatoes, chopped and dressed with a tough of sea salt and cracked  pepper.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients can be found just about anywhere.  Approximate cost per serving is $1.75.    How It Works    Sautéing the portabellas and sage at the same time infuses the oil with the sage flavor, which then  infuses the outside of the portabella caps.  The beans are smashed instead of whipped so they retain  an interesting texture.  They’re also added to make the dish substantial and to give the roasted red  pepper strips something to cling on to.       The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|117

 

Chef’s Notes     This dish looks fancy, even though it only takes a few minutes to put together.  By spending some  more time, you could add other ingredients to the beans like roasted garlic and fresh thyme to  increase the flavor profile!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 155       Calories from Fat 27  Fat 3 g  Total Carbohydrates 24 g  Dietary Fiber 7 g  Sugars 4 g  Protein 8 g  Salt 310 mg    Interesting Facts    Sage is closely related to mint (which is probably why it’s prone to overrun a garden!)   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|118

Sundried Tomato Hummus Wraps Type:   Main Dish ‐ Wrap  Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  1 cup of hummus  1 cup of spicy sprouts  ¼ cup of sundried tomatoes  ½ tsp. of black pepper  4 whole wheat tortillas    Instructions  Spread the hummus on one side of the tortillas.  Top with the sprouts, then the sundried tomatoes, then the pepper.  Fold and eat!                                     

                    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|119

Low‐fat Version    Use low‐fat hummus, but be warned that it is not that tasty.    Kitchen Equipment    Butter Knife or Spatula  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Slice in half diagonally for extra portability.    Time Management    These will keep the entire day, making them great for  wrapping up and taking on a road trip.     Complementary Food and Drinks    None needed.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are very common.  Approximate cost per serving is $1.00.    How It Works    The hummus provides creaminess and keeps the sprouts embedded in the wrap.  It also makes the  wrap very hearty.  Sundried tomatoes give a shot of flavor and spicy sprouts give a zing and full‐ mouth feel to the wrap.  It also makes it feel bulkier.    Chef’s Notes     This is an incredibly simple, but powerful recipe.  Each ingredient serves a very clear purpose and is  full of flavor, yet the wrap only takes a moment to put together.  It’s great for showcasing easy,  simple vegan food to non‐vegans.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 206       Calories from Fat 45  Fat 5 g  Total Carbohydrates 32 g  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|120

Dietary Fiber 6 g  Sugars 4 g  Protein 9 g  Salt 455 mg   

Interesting Facts    Hummus really just means chickpea in Arabic.    Chickpeas are one of the oldest cultivated foods.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|121

Tempeh in Tangy Tomato Sauce Type:   Main Dish    Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 10 – 12 minutes    Ingredients  1 block of tempeh (about 16 oz.), chopped into bite‐size pieces  4 Roma tomatoes, chopped  2 cloves of garlic, sliced  4 green onions, sliced  ½ cup of water  2 tbsp. of hot sauce  1/8 tsp. of salt  2 cups of chopped kale    Instructions  Chop the tempeh and tomatoes.  Slice the garlic and green onions.  Bring the water to a simmer over a medium heat and add the tomatoes, garlic, green onions, hot  sauce, salt, and tempeh.  Allow this to reduce to a rough sauce.  While it is reducing, chop the kale.  Once the tomatoes have reduced, add the kale and simmer for 3 more minutes.                                       

      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|122

Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Small Pot or Wok  Stirring Spoon    Presentation    Serve in a small bowl.  If you serve it on a plate, the sauce  tends to run over the plate.    Time Management    Make sure that the tomatoes reduce to a rough sauce  before adding the kale or else the tomatoes will tend to  clump around the kale.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve over rice or with a thick flatbread, like naan.    Where to Shop    Trader Joe’s has a good price on tempeh.  I usually use Tabasco for this recipe.  Kale is one of those  ingredients that are particularly important to get organic, so try to find that when possible.   Approximate cost per serving is $2.50.    How It Works    This is a simple tomato reduction, but the addition of the green onions and garlic gives it a powerful  pungency and the hot sauce adds the tanginess and heat that completely changes the nature of the  sauce.  The tempeh simmers in it while it reduces so it can soften and absorb as much flavor as  possible.  Kale is added for color and for its health benefits.    Chef’s Notes     Feel free to modify the amount of hot sauce used to adjust the heat, but make sure you get a very  vinegary one to impart a large amount of acidity.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 292  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|123

     Calories from Fat 108  Fat 12 g  Total Carbohydrates 23 g  Dietary Fiber 6 g  Sugars 2 g  Protein 23 g  Salt 275 mg    Interesting Facts    Tempeh is made from partially cooked soybeans that are allowed to ferment for just over a day.  The  temperature should be fairly warm, but not hot, to facilitate proper fermentation.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|124

Squash Pasta with Sundried Tomato Sauce Type: Main Dish ‐ Raw  Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 8‐10 minutes    Ingredients  1 zucchini, shaved with a vegetable peeler  1 yellow summer squash, shaved with a vegetable peeler  1 Roma tomato  ¼ cup of sundried tomatoes  1 very small clove of garlic  1 tbsp. of balsamic vinegar  1 tbsp. of olive oil  1/8 tsp. of salt  2‐3 basil leaves, sliced into ribbions  2 tbsp. of pine nuts    Instructions  Shave the zucchini  and yellow squash with a vegetable peeler, rotating it slightly between each  shaving.  Puree the tomato, sundried tomatoes, garlic, vinegar, oil, and salt.  Toss the zucchini in the sauce.  Stack the basil leaves, roll them closed, and slice the basil into ribbons.  Garnish with pine nuts and basil.                                     

      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|125

  Low‐fat Version    Omit the olive oil.   

Kitchen Equipment    Vegetable Peeler  Mixing Bowl  Blender  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Tongs or Stirring Spoon  Knife  Cutting Board     Presentation    Use the pine nuts and basil as a garnish.  Do not mix them into  the pasta.    Time Management    Fresh is best with this pasta, so eat it as soon as you make it.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a salad with sorel.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common, but because of the expense of pine nuts, you would do  best by purchasing them from a bulk bin.  Approximate cost per serving is $3.00.    How It Works    Sundried tomatoes are used in the sauce for two reasons.  One, they intensify the flavor of the sauce  greatly, which is important if you are making a raw dish.  Second, they are thick, which causes the  sauce to stick to the pasta.  The garlic clove should be very small because raw garlic can quickly  overwhelm a dish.  The two different squash are used for color contrast.    Chef’s Notes     This is one of my older recipes, created during the first few months of my tenure as a chef.    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|126

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 160       Calories from Fat 72  Fat 8 g  Total Carbohydrates 17 g  Dietary Fiber 5 g  Sugars 10 g  Protein 5 g  Salt 165 mg    Interesting Facts    Yellow summer squash is very similar to crookneck squash, but straighter with a smooth skin.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|127

White Bean Soup Type:   Soup, Main Dish     Serves:  4   Time to Prepare: About 20‐30 minutes     Ingredients  2 15 oz. cans of white beans such as cannellini   2 vegan sausages, such as Tofurky Italian Sausages   ½ of a large onion   6‐8 cloves of garlic   Water  1 blub of fennel, fronds included   1 bunch of kale   1 oz. package of sundried tomatoes   1 tablespoon of garlic infused olive oil (optional)  Salt to taste  Pepper to taste    Instructions  Heat a heavy soup pot over medium heat.   Rinse and drain the beans.   Dice the onion and sausages.   Add these to the pot and cook until the sausages are slightly crisp and the onions are caramelized.  Dice and add the garlic, cook for 30 seconds, then add about 8 cups of water.   Dice the fennel bulb, and set the fronds to the side.   Add the bulb and cook the soup at a boil for about 15 minutes.   Slice the fronds, slice the kale into ribbons, and add those and the beans.   Add salt and pepper to taste, then cook an additional 5 minutes.   Add the sundried tomatoes.   Add the olive oil if using.   Turn off heat, stir and serve.                                 The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|128

Low‐fat Version    Omit the optional olive oil.     Kitchen Equipment    Heavy Soup Pot  Knife  Cutting Board  Non‐heat‐reactive Spoon    Presentation    Make sure everything is well tossed so you don’t have  clumps of beans and fennel.    Time Management    This will last for days in the refrigerator, though it is best  if it is eaten fresh.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with warm Tuscan bread and olive oil.    Where to Shop    Trader Joe’s has a good price on Tofurky Italian Sausages and cannellini beans while you may need to  go to a more standard market for the other ingredients.  Make sure the fennel is fresh and crisp  without any wilting.    How It Works    The fennel provides a strong high note to the dish and complements the sausage very well (fennel is  often a flavor found in sausage).  The beans provide substantiveness, the kale adds a deep green  flavor while being able to hold its own, texture‐wise, against the sausage, and the onion gives lots of  sweetness.    Chef’s Notes     This is a great dish for a chilly winter day and is easy to make in large quantities for lots of people.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 422  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|129

     Calories from Fat 54  Fat 6 g  Total Carbohydrates 60 g  Dietary Fiber 18 g  Sugars 9 g  Protein 32 g  Salt 510 mg    Interesting Facts    Fennel and hemlock look very similar!   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|130

Basil Cashew Stuffed Tomatoes Type:   Appetizer    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  4 crisp Vineripe tomatoes  4 basil leaves, minced  ¼ cup of cashew butter  Juice of 1 lemon  ¼ tsp. of flaky Celtic sea salt    Instructions  Cut the tops of the tomatoes off and scoop out the middle seeded areas.  Mince the basil.  Combine the basil, cashes butter, lemon juice, and salt.  Stuff each tomato with the cashew basil mix.                                     

                    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|131

Low‐fat Version    You can use mashed white beans instead of cashew butter.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Small Mixing Bowl  Stirring Spoon   Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Cut an extra basil leaf into ribbons and garnish the tomatoes with  that.    Time Management    This is best fresh, so plan on eating them right away.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Garlic bruschetta with a white bean spread is perfect with this recipe.    Where to Shop    Check out Trader Joe’s for a good price on the cashew butter and basil.  Approximate cost per serving  is $1.25.    How It Works    Raw cashew butter with lemon juice has a taste reminiscent of some light cheeses.  Mixed with basil,  this makes a delicious, refreshing Mediterranean snack.    Chef’s Notes     I used to love mozzarella, tomatoes, and basil and this is a wonderful alternative to that.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 144       Calories from Fat 72  Fat 8 g  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|132

Total Carbohydrates 13 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 5 g  Salt 145 mg    Interesting Facts    Cashews feature prominently in Indian cuisine, but because they are native to South America, they  didn’t show up in India until the late 1500s.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|133

Broccoli Slaw Type:   Side, Salad       Serves: 4   Time to Prepare: About 10 minutes      Ingredients  1 bag prepared broccoli slaw (about 12‐16 oz)         2 tablespoons sweet chili sauce (I got mine at Trader Joes)  1 teaspoon orange zest (about 1 large orange)         3 tablespoons fresh orange juice   1 clove garlic, minced                1 tablespoon rice vinegar    Instructions    Mix together the chili sauce, orange zest, orange juice, rice vinegar, and minced garlic in a bowl and  whisk together.    Toss over the broccoli slaw.   Serve.                                     

                The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Quick & Easy

October 2011|134

Raw Version    Make your own sweet chili sauce by mixing 2 tablespoons of agave with 1 teaspoon of chopped fresh  chilies.     Kitchen Equipment    Zester  Knife  Cutting Board  Bowl  Measuring Cups  Spoons    Presentation    Serve with a couple orange wedges dressed with smoked sea salt.    Time Management     No special time management should be needed.     Complementary Food and Drinks    A nice cold green tea would be very nice with this, and try serving  this as a side for some nice portabella burgers.     Where to Shop    These should be available at any major supermarket. I do get the premade sweet chili sauce at Trader  Joe’s.     How It Works    The sweet heat of the orange and chili sauce complement the musty flavor of the broccoli and the  sweetness of the orange and heat of the chili balance each other out. Using fresh orange juice also  creates a light, bright note.    Chef’s Notes     This is a quick little side dish that makes a huge impact. It is also great as a topping for a nice black  bean burger.       The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Quick & Easy

October 2011|135

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 88       Calories from Fat 0  Fat 0 g  Total Carbohydrates 18 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 10 g  Protein 4 g  Salt 121 mg    Interesting Facts    Broccoli slaw is often made by shredding the stalks of broccoli after the crowns have been removed.    

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Quick & Easy

October 2011|136

Chili Garlic Marinated Veggies Type:   Snack    Serves: Makes about 4 cups including the veggies  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes + 30 minutes to marinate    Ingredients  ½ cup of rice wine vinegar (I use Trader Joes’ Seasoned)   At least ½ teaspoon of chili flakes or chipotle flakes   6‐8 cloves of garlic, peeled and minced   Veggie Ideas:  1 sliced cucumber, edamame, sliced zucchini, button mushrooms    Instructions  Combine all the ingredients for the marinade, then add the veggies.  Allow this to sit for at least 30 minutes.                                        

                      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Quick & Easy

October 2011|137

Kitchen Equipment    Mixing Bowl  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup    Presentation    In the pictures, I added cucumbers to one batch and steamed  edamame to another. In the past, I have also marinated baby  carrots and bell pepper with great results. You can reuse the  marinade, just keep it covered and in the refrigerator.     Time Management    Generally, the longer you let something marinate, the better.   However, if you have a fairly soft veggie, like a cucumber, letting it  marinate too long may make it too soft for your taste.  It all depends  on how crunchy you like them.  Generally, 30 minutes should do for  everything except the hardest veggies.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Not applicable.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are very common.  Cost is determined by what veggies you use.    How It Works    The acidity of the vinegar breaks down the cellular structure of the veggie, allowing the flavor of the  garlic and chile to infuse the veggie.  It also gives it a pleasant tanginess, but keep in mind that the  quality of your vinegar will determine the quality of your dish!    Chef’s Notes     Though this recipe is very simple easy to throw together, the flavors are very complex and it looks  very complex. If you don’t give the recipe away, everyone will think you are a culinary genius that  slaved away over this dish.        The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Quick & Easy

October 2011|138

Nutrition Facts (per serving, cucumber used in this example)    Calories 113       Calories from Fat 9  Fat 1 g  Total Carbohydrates 20 g  Dietary Fiber 4 g  Sugars 6 g  Protein 4 g  Salt     Interesting Facts    Seasoned rice vinegar has sake, sugar, and salt added to it.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Quick & Easy

October 2011|139

Fragrant Potatoes & Peanuts Type:   Side    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  4 red potatoes, chopped into bite‐size pieces  3 cloves of garlic, minced  2 tsp. of olive oil  1/8 tsp. of cinnamon  1/8 tsp. of cardamom  1/8 tsp. of cayenne pepper  ¼ tsp. of black pepper  1/8 tsp. of salt  ¼ cup of roasted, salted peanuts    Instructions  Chop the potatoes into bite‐size pieces.  Mince the garlic.  Over a medium heat, sauté the potatoes until they lightly brown and are cooked all the way through.  Add the garlic and cook 1 more minute.  Add the cinnamon, cardamom, cayenne pepper, black pepper, salt, and peanuts and toss for a few  seconds.  Remove from the heat and serve.                                     

      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|140

Low‐fat Version    Sauté the potatoes in a very thin layer of water until they are cooked all the way through.  Drain the  water, then add the garlic to the pan and sauté one more minute.  Add all the spices and ¼ cup of  chopped celery, toss, and serve.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Sauté Pan  Spatula  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup    Presentation    Garnish with a few chives for a splash of color and form.    Time Management    The key is to get the potatoes done before you add the garlic.   Otherwise, the garlic will be overdone by the time you get the  potatoes right.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with coconut rice and sautéed mushrooms.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common.  However, you will get the best price if you purchase the  spices from a bulk spice jar, especially with the cardamom.  Approximate cost per serving is $0.50.    How It Works    The potatoes lightly fry in the oil, just enough to cook them through and brown them.  This will crisp  the outside and leave the inside tender.  Make sure they are not chopped very big, no more than ½”,  or else they will not properly cook in the middle.  The garlic is added at the end, so that it does not  burn.  However, the spices are even more delicate than the garlic, so they are added last.  The  peanuts do not need to cook and they lose some of their unique flavor if they get sautéed with  everything else, so that’s why they are added at the very end.   

  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|141

Chef’s Notes     This dish can serve either as a side, or as a main dish, depending on how big you want your portions!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories        Calories from Fat   Fat 7 g  Total Carbohydrates 15 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 3 g  Salt 146 mg    Interesting Facts    Potatoes are the fourth largest crop in the world!   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|142

Lemony Cornflour Cakes Type:   Side    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes of work + 30 minutes to bake    Ingredients  1 cup of corn flour  ½ tsp. of baking powder  ¼ tsp. of salt  1 tbsp. of poppy seeds  ¼ cup of soy milk  Juice of 1 lemon  Oil for ramekins  2 tbsp. of pine nuts    Instructions  Combine the corn flour, baking powder, salt, and poppy seeds.  Slowly stir the soy milk and lemon juice into this, making a thick batter.  Oil 4 ramekins, approximately 4” in diameter.  Add the batter to the ramekins, then top with pine nuts.  Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.                                     

            The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|143

Low‐fat Version    Omit the pine nuts.   

Kitchen Equipment    4 4”‐diameter Ramekins  Mixing Bowl  Whisk  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup    Presentation    Serve with a lemon wedge.    Time Management    Make sure you start heating your oven before you start working with  these.  Also, don’t pop open the oven door too often, or you may  alter the cook time.      Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with a cup of Earl Grey tea.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common, and the corn flour should be located near the corn meal,  though don’t mistake the two!  Approximate cost per serving is $0.50.    How It Works    Corn flour has a delicate texture and flavor which goes well with poppy seeds and pine nuts, both of  which add flavor and crunch.  They also go well with lemon, so all the ingredients are a natural  pairing.      Chef’s Notes     By using grits instead of corn flour, you can easily turn this recipe into lemony pine nut and poppy  seed polenta.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 155  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|144

     Calories from Fat 27  Fat 3 g  Total Carbohydrates 28 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 4 g  Protein 4 g  Salt 155 mg    Interesting Facts    There is an Italian variation of this recipe called brustengolo, which basically means corn flour cakes.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|145

Mushrooms in Garlicky Sangria Type:   Side    Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  10‐12 cremini mushrooms, halved  6 cloves of garlic, minced  1 tbsp. of minced fresh parsley  2 tsp. of Earth Balance margarine  3‐4 tbsp. of sangria  ¼ tsp. of black pepper    Instructions  Halve the mushrooms.  Mince the garlic and set it aside.  Mince the parsley and set it aside.  Over a medium high heat, sear the mushrooms in the margarine.  Once they are browned, reduce the heat to medium.  Add the garlic, sautéing for 2 minutes.  Add the sangria and black pepper, simmering for 3 more minutes.                                     

            The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|146

Low‐fat Version    Omit the margarine and sear the mushrooms in a dry, non‐stick pan.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    I use these as a condiment to grilled foods, so there isn’t much  presentation to speak of.    Time Management    The longer the wine simmers, the more garlicky it gets, but three  minutes should be just fine to properly infuse it.  Just make sure get  the sear on the mushrooms done before anything else goes in the  pan or the mushrooms will have an odd texture.     Complementary Food and Drinks    I love these with just about any sort of grilled food, but especially grilled seitan.    Where to Shop    The adage that the best quality wine will produce the best quality sauce isn’t necessarily true as the  intense heat will alter the flavor profile of the sangria itself.  Just don’t choose something overly  tannic, or your sauce will be very astringent.  Approximate cost varies on the wine used.    How It Works    Searing the mushrooms defines their texture before the sangria has a chance to turn them rubbery  during simmering.  It also deepens their flavor, making them more robust.  The margarine adds  creaminess that straight oil wouldn’t add and the garlic, is, well, garlic.  It wouldn’t be garlicky sangria  mushrooms without it!    Chef’s Notes     My parents used to make a variation of this when I was growing up, but they omitted the garlic and  added dried parsley.  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|147

 

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 82       Calories from Fat 36  Fat 4 g  Total Carbohydrates 6 g  Alcohol 2 g  Dietary Fiber 1 g  Sugars 1 g  Protein 2 g  Salt 85 mg    Interesting Facts    Tannins are thought to be a way plants protect themselves from predators.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|148

Shaved Fennel & Chickpea Salad Type:   Salad    Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes    Ingredients  1 small bulb of fennel, shaved (about ½ cup)  1 cup of cooked, rinsed chickpeas  ¼ cup of sundried tomatoes  1 tbsp. of olive oil  Juice of 1 lemon  1/8 tsp. of salt  ¼ tsp. of cracked black pepper    Instructions  Using a vegetable peeler or paring knife, shave the bulb of fennel until you have about ½ cup of  fennel shavings.  Toss all the ingredients together.                                     

                  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|149

Low‐fat Version    Omit the olive oil and replace it with the juice from a jar of roasted red peppers.  You’ll need the  sweetness of it to mellow out the lemon juice.   

Raw Version    Use half walnuts and half chickpea sprouts instead of cooked chickpeas.    Kitchen Equipment    Vegetable Peeler or Paring Knife  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Mixing Bowl  Tongs or Spoon  Colander    Presentation    Save some of the fennel fronds to add to the top of the salad.    Time Management    If you want to meld the flavors, allow this to sit for about 30  minutes before serving.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with rustic Italian bread to sop up the left over dressing.    Where to Shop    Look for sundried tomatoes that are not packed in oil, which can usually be found in the produce  section of the store.  Approximate cost per serving is $2.00.    How It Works    Chickpeas form the heart of the salad.  The fennel gives it crispness, both in flavor and texture.   Sundried tomatoes give a shot of tanginess and the lemon dressing makes the salad creamy and light  at the same time.        The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|150

 

Chef’s Notes     This salad is based on a Tuscan dish of baked penne with fennel, sundried tomatoes, and lemon, but  it subs out the pasta for chickpeas and turns it into a salad.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 290       Calories from Fat 72  Fat 8 g  Total Carbohydrates 45 g  Dietary Fiber 13 g  Sugars 12 g  Protein 12 g  Salt 165 mg    Interesting Facts    Marathon means “place of fennel.”   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|151

Simmered Cauliflower in Sweet & Spicy Tahini Sauce Type:   Appetizer or Main Dish if you use the option   Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  1 head of cauliflower, chopped into bite‐size pieces  Pinch of salt  Water  Option:  ½ cup of cooked, rinsed chickpeas  2 tbsp. of tahini  1 ½ tsp. of agave nectar  1 tsp. of sriracha sauce  2 tbsp. of water  Pinch of salt    Instructions  Chop the cauliflower.  Add a thin layer of water (about ¼”) and a pinch of salt to a pan.  Bring it to a simmer and add the cauliflower, simmering it until it is soft and replenishing the water as  necessary.  Whisk the tahini, agave, sriracha, water, and salt together.  Once the cauliflower is done, drain the excess water.  Add the cauliflower and optional chickpeas to the sauce and toss.                                     

      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|152

Raw Version    You can make a raw version of this by using raw tahini and adding 1 minced birds eye chile to the  sauce instead of the sriracha.    Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Knife  Cutting Board  Spoon  Small Mixing Bowl  Whisk  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Sprinkle with minced fresh parsley for a splash of green and plate this  in a bowl so that the sauce does not run.    Time Management    This sauce will last for several days in the refrigerator, but it will solidify  as it sits.  To reconstitute it, add in about 1 tbsp. of water and warm it  in a small pot.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with some garlic naan for a delicious, filling meal.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common.  Approximate cost per serving is $2.00.    How It Works    The tahini is the base flavor in the sauce, but it’s given a sweet, sour, and hot note all from the tangy  spiciness of the sriracha and agave.  However, both of those ingredients are not added in force so  that they don’t overwhelm the sauce.  Water is used to thin out the sauce, which should barely cling  to the cauliflower.  It’s a potent sauce, so if it’s too thick, its flavor kills the cauliflower flavor.    Chef’s Notes     I got this idea when I was out at one of my favorite restaurants.  I had ordered sautéed cauliflower  and they brought this out instead, which proved to be exceptionally delicious.  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|153

Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 202       Calories from Fat 54  Fat 6 g  Total Carbohydrates 28 g  Dietary Fiber 8 g  Sugars 13 g  Protein 9 g  Salt 410 mg    Interesting Facts    Sesame seeds, and therefore tahini, are incredibly high in calcium.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|154

Tequila-laced Sweet & Sour Calabacitas Type:   Side    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  ½ of an onion, sliced  1 zucchini, chopped  1 yellow squash, chopped  1 Vineripe tomato, chopped  1 tsp. of oil  1/8 tsp. of salt  Juice of 2 limes  2 tsp. of agave syrup  1 tbsp. of tequila    Instructions  Slice the onion.  Chop the zucchini, yellow squash, and tomato.  Over a medium heat, sauté the onion until it browns.  Add the squash, tomato, and salt and sauté for about 3 more minutes (just enough for the squash to  start to brown).  Add the lime juice, agave, and tequila and quickly stir, then remove from the heat.  Option:  Add 2 cups of cooked pinto beans to this to turn it into a full meal.                                     

      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|155

Low‐fat Version    Omit the oil and sauté everything in a dry pan.   

Raw Version    Omit the tequila and use orange juice instead of agave.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Sauté Pan  Spatula  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    If you’ve got squash blossoms available, you can serve this  inside a large squash blossom.    Time Management    Make sure the onion browns before you add the squash.   Otherwise, the squash will get overcooked.       Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with a side of pinto beans and rice cooked with chipotle powder.    Where to Shop    Jose Cuervo tequila is vegan, so that’s my go to choice for this recipe.  Approximate cost per serving is  $1.00.    How It Works    This is fairly simple.  The onion is cooked first so it can caramelize and then the squash and tomato is  added.  This allows the squash to soften and the tomato to reduce.  The sweet and sour portion of  this recipe comes from the mix of lime and agave, but that shouldn’t really cook or else it will lose its  fresh quality.          The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|156

 

Chef’s Notes     I love Mexican food, but I was always ambivalent about calabacitas until I added the sweet and sour  note.  The splash of tequila was just a fun addition!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 79       Calories from Fat 9  Fat 1 g  Total Carbohydrates 12 g  Alcohol 2 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 2 g  Protein 2 g  Salt 155 mg    Interesting Facts    Tequila is made from the blue agave plant through a rather lengthy and involved fermentation  process, including firing the plant.     

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Quick & Easy

October 2011|157

Chocolate Merlot Mousse Type:   Dessert    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes of work, at least 4 hours to set    Ingredients  5 ounces bittersweet chocolate, melted   1 ½ cups silken tofu, drained and at room temperature  2/3 cup granulated sugar  1/3 cup merlot  1 ½ teaspoons pure vanilla extract  1‐2 tablespoons chocolate shavings and berries, for garnish    Instructions  Melt the chocolate.  Process all of the ingredients in a food processor or blender until creamy.   Spoon into 4 ramekins or fancy glasses.   Cover and refrigerate several hours or overnight before serving.   Just before serving, sprinkle the chocolate shavings and berries over each serving of mousse.                                     

              The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com

Recipe by Sharon Valencik, author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts www.sweetutopia.com Quick & Easy

October 2011|158

  Kitchen Equipment    Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Food Processor or Blender  Spatula  Ramekins  Small Pot    Presentation    Place the berries off to the side and garnish the remainder of the top with  chocolate shavings.    Time Management    This needs to set for at least four hours to achieve a mousse texture.   Otherwise, it will be a very tasty pudding.    Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a vanilla biscotti and coffee.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients should be very easy to find.  Approximate cost per serving heavily depends on  the price of your merlot.    How It Works    Silken tofu becomes creamy when it’s whipped, but then re‐solidifies when chilled.  Because  whipping introduces air into the tofu, when it firms, it has a light and fluffy texture.    Chef’s Notes     This is such a simple and quick dessert, yet it is insanely rich and sophisticated. It’s also as beautiful as  you can dress it up to be, and never fails to impress.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 459       Calories from Fat 171  Fat 19 g  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com

Recipe by Sharon Valencik, author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts www.sweetutopia.com Quick & Easy

October 2011|159

Total Carbohydrates 52 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 43 g  Protein 13 g  Alcohol 4 g  Salt 64 mg    Interesting Facts    A mousse does not necessarily have to be a dessert, though it frequently is.  The word actually refers  to the light and airy texture of the dish.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com

Recipe by Sharon Valencik, author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts www.sweetutopia.com Quick & Easy

October 2011|160

Raspberry Almond Parfaits Type:   Dessert    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes    Ingredients  Cream  2 cups frozen raspberries  1 cup vegan cream cheese  ½ cup agave nectar  ¼ teaspoon pure almond extract  Layers  12 wafer cookies or graham cracker sections  Slivered or sliced almonds  Garnish  Shaved chocolate  Raspberries    Instructions  Process the cream ingredients in a blender or food processor.  In 4 small decorative glasses, layer the cream, cookies and almonds as you wish.  Garnish with the shaved chocolate and raspberries.  Serve immediately.                                       

      The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com

Recipe by Sharon Valencik, author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts www.sweetutopia.com Quick & Easy

October 2011|161

Kitchen Equipment    Blender  Spatula  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoons  Parfait Glasses    Presentation    This looks best when you can do at least three layers of cream, with  crackers and almonds alternating between them.    Time Management    This sets up best when served fresh.     Complementary Food and Drinks    A cup of almond flavored mocha coffee.    Where to Shop    All of these products are easy to find except the vegan cream cheese, which can be found at Whole  Foods, Sprouts, and Sunflower market.  Approximate cost per serving is $1.50.    How It Works    The cream cheese is what sets up this dessert, providing the structure for the cream layer.  The  graham crackers or wafers provide the rest of the structure and add contrasting textures.    Chef’s Notes     This is a fancy, yet very simple, quick and special dessert you can whip up in a few minutes. These  mini‐trifles are very impressive and delicious!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 422       Calories from Fat 198  Fat 22 g  Total Carbohydrates 53 g  Dietary Fiber 5 g  Sugars 14 g  Protein 3 g  The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com

Recipe by Sharon Valencik, author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts www.sweetutopia.com Quick & Easy

October 2011|162

Salt 427 mg   

Interesting Facts    Graham crackers were originally incredibly bland, made simply with graham flour and no other  agents.  They were created by a Presbyterian minister who though flavorful foods led to sexual  behavior, so he made a cracker as bland as possible.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com

Recipe by Sharon Valencik, author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts www.sweetutopia.com Quick & Easy

October 2011|163

Pomegranate Iced Tea Type:   Beverage      Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 5 min    Ingredients  1 large ripe pomegranate (you could sub one cup store bought pomegranate juice)  8 oz. of your choice of tea (green gunpowder tea works very well)  Agave nectar to taste  Lemon or orange wedge for garnish and citrus tang    Instructions  Cut your pomegranate in half and squeeze on a citrus reamer as you would an orange or grapefruit.    Add juice to your favorite tea, sweeten to taste and pour over ice.   

Kitchen Equipment  Knife  Cutting Board  Citrus Reamer  Teapot  2 Glasses    Presentation  For a really special treat, add frozen pomegranate seeds!   

Time Management  Make sure to pay attention to the brewing time of your tea.  The pomegranate will already be  astringent and over brewing your tea will simply add more astringency.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 36       Calories from Fat 0  Fat 0 g  Total Carbohydrates 8 g  Dietary Fiber 2 g  Sugars 6 g  Protein 1 g  Salt 4 mg    Interesting Facts    The word grenade is closely related to pomegranate.    The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Liz Lonnetti

Quick & Easy

October 2011|164

View more...

Comments

Copyright ©2017 KUPDF Inc.
SUPPORT KUPDF