tmp5AE6.tmp

December 4, 2017 | Author: Frontiers | Category: Tomato, Pakistan, Domesticated Plants, Agronomy, Botany
Share Embed Donate


Short Description

Download tmp5AE6.tmp...

Description

2 nd I N T E R N A T I O N A L CONFERENCE ON

H rticu tural Scien es Theme:

Production Challenges & Food Security

2 16

February 18-20

Institute of Horticultural Sciences University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan

ABSTRACTS 2ND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON

Horticultural Sciences February 18-20, 2016 Theme Production Challenges & Food Security

Organized by

Institute of Horticultural Sciences University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences Feburary 18-20, 2016 Ph/Fax: +92 41 9201086 Email: [email protected] URL: www.pshs.org.pk/ichs2016

Editors

Dr. Muhammad Jafar Jaskani Dr. Raheel Anwar Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad Dr. Muhammad Azam Institute of Horticultural Sciences University of Agriculture, Faisalabad

Technical Assistants

Mr. Jawad Hassan Mr. Muhammad Fiaz Mr. Muhammad Mahmood-ur-Rehman Mr. Waqar Shafqat Mr. Mubashir Zahid Institute of Horticultural Sciences University of Agriculture, Faisalabad

Publisher

Institute of Horticultural Sciences University of Agriculture, Faisalabad Punjab 38040, Pakistan Ph/Fax: +92-41-9201086 Email: [email protected]

Printer

MAS computers and Printers Office No. 2, First Floor, Sabir Plaza Press Market, Aminpur Bazar, Faisalabad, Pakistan Ph: +92-41-2638382 Email: [email protected]

Publication Date

February, 2016

All right reserved. No part of this abstract book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher.

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

CONTENTS Introduction University of Agriculture Faisalabad Institute of Horticultural Sciences Host City: Faisalabad Sponsors Conference Committees

Oral Presentations 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7. 8.

9. 10. 11.

Status of the U.S. Floriculture Industry and Potential for Development in Pakistan John M. Dole, Iftikhar Ahmad Role of CAB International in Horticulture Research and Development in Pakistan Muhammad Sohail Mazhar, Babar Ehsan Bajwa Effect of calcium carbide based formulations on growth, yield and fruit quality of tomato Muhammad Yaseen, Sumreen Siddiq, Saeed Ahmad, Muhammad Awais Khalid, Sobia Noor, Muhammad Zahir Aziz Assessment of atmospheric pollution of heavy metals with the help of ornamental plants under Faisalabad conditions Tahir Saeed, Muhammad N. Rasheed, Abid Niaz, Atif Mahmoo, Abid Mahmood, Muhammad N. Zouq Potential of horticultural crops to ensure food security in Pakistan Saba Hameed, Muhammad Azher Nawaz, Waqar Ahmed, Fiaz Hussain, Nigarish Munir, Faisal Hayat Evaluation of Moringa olifera leaves extract on the development of citrus nematode, Tylenchulus semipenetrans Nazir Javed, Iqra Naeem, Sajid Aleem Khan, Huma Abbas, Muhammad Kamran The Global Cut Flower Industries and Ideas for Pakistan John M. Dole, Iftikhar Ahmad Effect of different pruning severities on light penetration and incidence of creasing in sweet oranges Zahoor Hussain, Zora Singh, Faheem Khadija, Raheel Anwar Who gets what? Citrus marketing in Bunir district, Pakistan Raza Ullah, Qaisar Shah Safi, Muhammad Asif Kamran Physico-chemical analysis of five selected varieties of apple (Pyrus malus) Muhammad Munir, Muhammad Iqbal, Haroon Rasheed, Mureed Abbass Physico-chemical and molecular diversity in pomegranate germplasm of Pakistan Muhammad Nafees, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Saeed Ahmad, Faisal Saeed Awan, Moazzam Jamil

Abs. ID 106

xxv xxvi xxvii xxix xxix xxx Page 1

107

1

108

2

109

3

115

3

116

4

120

5

121

5

122

6

124

7

125

7

i

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

22.

23.

24.

ii

Estimation of gene effects through generation means analysis in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Muhammad Yussouf Saleem, Qumer Iqbal, Abdul Rehman Khan, Sajjad Akhtar, Muhammad Asghar Germination Capacity and viability of stored pollen of two economically important Prunus L. species of family Rosaceae Anjum Perveen, Shaukat Ali Compatibility evaluation of various scented Rosa species through cross pollination Amjad Farooq, Shi Lei, Shahid Javed Butt, Muhammad Nadeem, David H. Byrne Effect of good agricultural practices versus conventional practices on date palm in Khairpur district Solangi Qamaruddin, Soomro Mushtaque Hussain, Jawad Hassan, Muhammad Fiaz, Raheel Anwar Use of genome editing to characterize gene functions in plant growth, development and fruit quality in tomato Bazgha Zia, Tatsiana U Datsenka, Huiming Zhang, Avtar K. Handa Tree vigor, nutrients uptake efficiency and yield of ‘Flordaking’ peach cultivar as affected by different rootstocks Muhammad Javed Tareen, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Hafeez-ur-Rahman, Muhammad Naveed Tareen Effect of foliar application of gibberellic Acid (GA3) and 2,4dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on yield and fruit quality of low seeded Kinnow mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco) Ehsan Ullah Khan, Liaqat Ali Agroecosystems & Nutrient Quality in Horticultural Produce – Fruit Metabolome Shows Fluidity and is Genotype and Ecosystem Specific Autar K. Mattoo Infestation of plant parasitic nematodes in apple orchards in the Pothowar region of Pakistan Tariq Mukhtar, Muhammad Saeed, H. U. Khan, Muhammad Israr, Shahina Fayyaz Improved fruit set and retention in fruit crops: Role of boron and zinc – A review Habat Asad, Ian S.E. Bally, Paul Gadek, Tony Page Food grade chemicals: a novel approach to preserve freshness of horticultural produce Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Mehdi Maqbool Advances in the epidemiology and management strategy of mango malformation disease in Pakistan Muhammad Tariq Malik, Muhammad Zubair, Rashida Perveen, Faisal Sohail Fateh, Javed Iqbal, Ian S.E. Bally, Mushtaq Ahmad Growth and biochemical responses of okra to phosphorus sources supplemented with humic acid Maqsood Ahmed, Nadeem Fazil

126

8

131

8

133

9

135

9

137

10

138

10

146

11

147

11

152

12

157

13

159

13

161

14

163

15

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

25.

26.

27.

28. 29.

30.

31.

32.

33.

34.

35.

36.

37.

38.

Modelling the effect of storage temperature and cut type on respiration rate of fresh-cut mango Abdul Moiz, Rosnita Binti A. Talib, Muhammad Iqbal1, Muhammad Azam Khan Identification of virulence genes in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation Zhou Zongshan Micropropagation studies of an endangered medicinal plant Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn. Safdar Ali, Bushra Mushtaq, Sjeela Javed Muhammad Rafique Asi, Shaista Jabeen Khan, Nuzat Habib Khan Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) -A Prized Spice F. A. Nehvi, Salwee Yasmin Pesticide health hazards associated with fruit and vegetable production in Pakistan Muhammad Zeeshan Majeed, Muhammad Luqman, Muhammad Afzal Tomato yield, plant and soil nitrogen as affected by high tunnel and field production systems under conventional or organic fertility treatments Rhonda R. Janke, May Elfar Altamimi Genetic studies of some seedling traits of tomato under normal and water deficit conditions Amir Shakeel, Iqra Anwar, Asif Saeed, Muhammad Farrukh Saleem, Khurram Ziaf Sustainable food security in developing countries and the role of World Food Preservation Center® LLC Charles L. Wilson, Aman Ullah Malik Low-cost Cold Storage Technologies and Use of CFD in Optimization of Microclimate Inside Cold Stores: A review Getachew Neme Tolesa, Tilahun Seyoum Workneh An Arabidopsis lipid transfer protein gene At3g22600 is required for resistance against different pathogens Muhammad Amjad Ali, Amjad Abbas, Holger Bohlmann Antagonistic interaction between Potato virus S and Potato virus Y in different genetic backgrounds of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Khalid Naveed, Gaurav Raikhy, Hanu R. Pappu Exploitation of natural products as an alternative strategy to control postharvest anthracnose and maintain quality of fruits and vegetables Asgar Ali Study of spore inhibition of Ascochyta rabiei through variety of chemicals in suspension cultures Hira Nawaz, Amjad Abbas, Muhammad A. Ali, Khalid Naveed, Muhammad Shahzad, Muhammad Shahid, Luqman Amrao Production and preservation challenges of fruits and vegetables in Thal zone Muhammad Ahmad, Muhammad Ishaque, Farhana Nosheen, Niaz Hussain

165

15

166

16

168

16

170

17

173

18

174

19

175

19

176

20

177

21

178

21

186

22

188

23

191

23

195

24

iii

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

39. 40.

41.

42. 43. 44.

45.

46.

47.

48.

49.

50.

51.

52.

iv

Evaluation of lemon varieties on Australian Bigarade rootstock Ghulam Nabi, Abdur Rab, Abdul Samad, Nisar Naeem, Noor ul Amin The effect of potassium application on morpho-agronomic traits of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Dutch) Shujaul Mulk Khan, Shamaila Bibi, Adil Rehman, Inayat Ur Rehman, Habib Ahmad Comparative study of different potting media for tomato production in containers Muhammad Azam Khan, Waqas Khan, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi Food security in Oman: Challenges and opportunities Rashid Abdullah Al-Yahyai Horticulture in Balochistan: Challenges and prospects Muhammad Saeed Developing protocols and standards for epicotyl grafting in mango Ghulam Mustafa, Javed Iqbal, Atif Iqbal, Sidra Kiran, Asif ur Rehman Hafiz, Mushtaq Ahmad, Hameed Ullah Biological control agents of Asian Citrus Psyllid to reduce citrus greening incidence in Punjab, Pakistan Shouket Zaman Khan Effect of sulfur fumigation on quality and sulfur residues in grape berries of Kishmish cultivars stored at 1°C for 60 days Mujahid Iqbal Field evaluation of eight Balochistani date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars under agro-climatic conditions of Khairpur, Sindh Ghulam Sarwar Markhand, Nazir Ahmed Soomro, Adel Ahmed Abul-Soad, Mushtaque Ahmed Jatoi, Najamuddin Solangi Supplementing humic acid with crushed maize grains into growing media enhances growth and nutrient uptake of tomato transplants through vigorous root system Mostafa Mohamed Rady, Hafeez ur Rehman, Shoaib ur Rehman Development of molecular method for sex identification in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) plantlets using Noval Sex-linked Microsatellite Markers Maryam, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Saeed Ahmad, Faisal Saeed Awan The role of physio-morphic characters of eggplant (Solanum Melongena L.) and its correlation with the jassid (Amrasca Biguttula Biguttula (Ishida) population variation Muhammad Ali, Muhammad Ashfaq, Azhar Uddin Bahtti Performance evaluation of exotic peach rootstock “Red Leaf Nemaguard” for nursery raising in deciduous fruits Muhammad Ashraf Sumrah, Attiq Akhtar, Allah Bakhsh, Azhar Hussain Studies on the effect of different spawn types and spawning rates on the growth and yield of oyster mushroom (Pleurotes sapidus) Muhammad Asif Ali, Muhammad Salman, Muhammad Rizwan Liaqat, Muhammad Uzair Asif

196

25

198

25

199

26

200

26

202

27

205

27

207

28

208

29

209

29

216

30

215

31

217

31

219

32

224

32

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

53.

54.

55.

56.

57.

58.

59. 60. 61.

62.

63.

64.

65.

66.

Effect of climate and soil on morphological diversity of Moringa germplasm Umbreen Shahzad, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Mansoor Hameed Validation of DNA markers to determine sex in papaya (Carica papaya L.) plants at seedling stage for enhanced productivity Muzaffar Javed, Armghan Shahzad, Ghulam Muhammad Ali Analysis of genetic diversity as a key to conserve Berberis baluchistanica Ahrendt. An endemic species to Balochistan Shazia Saeed, Muhammad Younas Khan Barozai, Alia Ahmed, Rasool Baksh Tareen Management strategy against rodents infesting date-palm orchards in Nok-Kundi, Balochistan Province, Pakistan Amjad Pervez, Syed Muzaffar Ahmed, Muhammad Anwar Arain Phenolics profile and anthocyanin degradation in Malus crabapple flowers Rana Naveed Ur Rehman, Yaohua You, Zhang Lei, Weifeng Chen, Pengmin Li, Fengwang Ma Enhancing water productivity of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) through drip irrigation system Muhammad Sohail Waqas, Muhammad Jehanzeb Masud Cheema, Ahmad Waqas, Saddam Hussain Prospects of floriculture sector to improve livelihood in Pakistan Noor Alam Khan, Shahid Nadeem Apple value chain: a case study from Baluchistan province Khalid Mushtaq, Sultan Ali Adil, Maqsood Hussain Assessment of harvest and postharvest losses of citrus fruit in Pakistan Muhammad Ather Mahmood, Mazhar Abbas, Arshed Bashir, Sonila Hassan, Sher Baz Khan Phenology of ‘Tupy’ and ‘Xavante’ blackberries grown in subtropical area Ibrar Hussain, Sergio Ruffo Roberto, Ines Cristina Batista Fonseca, Adriane Marinho de Assis, Luis Eduardo Correa Antunes Population dynamics and management of citrus psylla (Diaphorina citri) Faisal Hafeez, Abdul Ghaffar, Muhammad Farooq, Mauhammad Latif, Muneer Abbas, Misbah Ashraf Endeavouring commercial heterosis for yield in indigenous single cross (F1) hybrids in chillies (Capsicum annuum L.) Muhammad Umair, Nausherwan Nobel Nawab, Taj Naseeb Khan, Zakria Farid, Sultan Mehmood Genetics of direct and reciprocal cross combinations in determinate tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Ahsan Javed, Nausherwan Nobel Nawab, Taj Naseeb Khan, Nasir Mehmood Minhas, Asia Ramzan, Tahira Noor, Atif Akram, Muhammad Jawaad Atif. Development of high yielding pea variety ‘PEAS-2009’ Nausherwan Nobel Nawab, Khalid Mahmood Qureshi, Abdul Rashid, Shahid Niaz

228

33

229

34

232

34

233

35

234

36

241

36

245

37

246

37

248

38

249

39

250

39

265

40

266

41

269

41

v

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

67.

68. 69.

70.

71.

72.

73.

74.

75.

76.

77.

78.

vi

Peat and substitutes of peat as growing media for sweet pepper (Capsicum annum L.) nursery production Muhammad Jawaad Atif, Ghulam Jellani, HidayatUllah, Noor Saleem, Ahsan Javed, Atif Akram Challenges and strategies to improve mango value chains in Pakistan Hammad Badar Comparative field study of biochemical and phenolic antioxidants of mint leaves treated with bio-fertlizer and humic acid in the absence and presence of urea fertilizer Maryam Aslam, Bushra Sultana, Farooq Anwar, Hassan Munir Antioxidant and antitumor potential of different extracts of Ricinus communis and Anethum graveolens Faiza Nazir, Raja Adil Sarfraz, Maryam Aslam Diversity of whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) on citrus in Punjab (Pakistan) Muhammad Tayyib, Shahid Majeed Muhammad Jawwad Yousuf Analyzing the biophoton responses of spinach to organic and inorganic growing systems Shaghef Ejaz, Karoline Maria Jezik, Muhammad Akbar Anjum, Werner Stumpf, Heidrun Halbwirth, Karl Stich Standardization of olive curing with Sodium hydroxide at different physiological stages Ghazal Miraj, Riaz Alam, Bibi Haleema Quorum sensing and quorum quenching bacteria from rhizospheric populations associated with gladiolus corms Kashif Riaz, Sahar Jameel, Akhtar Hameed, Raja Qualib Hussain, Yasar Sajjad, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani Impact assessment of extension services for modern carrot husbandry in districts of Faisalabad and Layyah: a farm level analysis Muhammad Tariq, Muhammad Amjad, Tanveer Ahmad, Asmat Batool, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Anam Noor Effect of rootstocks on postharvest quality of peach fruit cv. ‘Flordaking’ Muhammad Javed Tareen, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Muhammad Naveed Tareen, Hafeez-ur-Rahman Impact of environmental components on plant growth in guava cultivars during summer season Muhammad Usman, Muhammad Ahmad Ali, Bilquees Fatima, Samida Qamar, Hafiz Sibtain Ahmad Strengthening horticulture extension system in Punjab: Status, challenges and strategies Basharat Ali Saleem, Aman Ullah Malik, Muhammad Luqman, Muhammad Azher Nawaz, Muhammad Nawaz Khan

270

42

277

42

280

43

281

44

282

44

285

45

289

45

295

46

298

47

300

47

302

48

304

49

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

79.

80.

81.

82. 83.

84.

85.

86.

87.

88.

89.

90.

91.

Export quality Kinnow mandarin production in Punjab: Status, recent advances and future prospects Aman Ullah Malik, Basharat Ali Saleem, Iqrar Ahmad Khan, Abdul Rehman, Muhammad Yasin, Hamid Bashir, Muhammad Ahsan, Saajid Aleem, Asif Ali, Muhammad Nawaz Khan Changes in the physical and biochemical fruit quality characteristics of new indigenous mango germplasm during ripening Asad Ali, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Ishtiaq Ahmad Rajwana, Iqrar Ahmad Khan Influence of seasonal variations and storage on quality of raspberries cultivated in greenhouse, high tunnels and open field Liaqat Ali, Muhammad Sarwar Yaqub,Birgitta Svensson, Beatrix W. Alsanius, Marie E. Olsson Economic analysis of jasmine cut-flower: A case study of Punjab, Pakistan Muhammad Ashfaq, Muhammad Usman Molecular characterization of new variant of Tomato Leaf Curl Palampur Virus from Cucurbita pepo in Pakistan Muhammad Shafiq, Muhammad Saleem Haider, Sehrish Mushtaq Relationship of environmental conditions with PVY disease development in Potatoes for sustainable crop production Muhammad Nasir Subhani, Muhammad Imran, Waseem Abbas Effect of different N, P and K combinations for reproductive growth and malformation physiology of mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Dushari Muhammad Azam, Faqir Muhammad Tahir, Raheel Anwar, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri, Mohammad Shafi Ullah A study of cost-effective and environmentally-friendly postharvest technology of litchi Shreef Mahmood, Mohammad Golap Hossain Geographical variability in biochemical attributes of guava cv. Round leaf extract Umair Raza, Muhammad Usman, Muhammad Shahid, Bilquees Fatima Effect of different edible coatings on fruit quality and storage life of bell pepper Abadullah, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Muhammad Shafique, Sami Ullah, Abdul Ahad Qureshi Emerging international compliance issues: Challenge to fresh fruits and vegetable exports Najma Yousaf Zahid, Nadeem Akthar Abbasi, Tahir Mahmood Inheritance pattern of lycopene, total soluble solids and ascorbic acid contents in Solanum lycopersicum L. under cadmium (Cd) stress Muhammad Mazhar Hussain, Asif Saeed, Asif Ali Khan, Atif Mehmood, Bilquees Fatima Environmental friendly strategies for management of basal rot disease of onion Arshad Javaid, Roma Akhtar

305

50

313

51

315

51

327

52

330

53

331

53

337

54

346

54

350

55

353

55

360

56

361

56

364

57

vii

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

92.

93.

94.

95.

96.

97.

98.

99.

100.

101.

102.

103.

104.

viii

Postharvest losses and storage potential of strawberries packed in conventional plastic baskets Muhammad Fiaz, Raheel Anwar, Aman Ullah Malik, Jawad Hassan Influence of salicylic acid and storage duration on storability of persimmon fruit Muhammad Sajid, Islam Rashid First report on fungi associated with market quality deterioration of Fragaria X annasa (strawberry) in Punjab, Pakistan Salik Nawaz Khan, Shumaila Farooq, Umar Khalid Development of an effective and economical protocol for micropropagation of olive Ishfaq Ahmad Hafiz, Sehrish Ishaq, Tauqeer Ahmad Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Ikram Ali Malik Management of mango diseases anthracnose and blossom blight by ecofriendly methods Shazia Iftikhar, Anam Rasool Morphological identification and characterization of fungal pathogens cause diseases in mandarin varieties of Sargodha orchards Amber Khan, Shazia Iram Effect of foliar application of boron on fruit yield and quality of sweet cherry cultivars Imran Ahmad, Muhammad Sajid Comparative study of high health and conventional mango nurseries in Pakistan Nazim Hussain, Asif Mahmood Arif, Shafqat Saeed, Munawar Raza Kazmi, Faisal Sohail Fateh, Iftikhar Ahmad Geo-statistics and GIS based spatial distribution of various soil boron forms and selected physico-chemical characteristics in apple orchards of Pishin, Baluchistan Tariq Ziad, Muhammad Tariq Siddique, Azeem Khalid, Shahid Mahmood, Humair Ahmad Malik Effect of NPK fertilizers and commercial biofertilizers on southern blight disease and plant growth in chili Nighat Sana, Arshad Javaid, Amna Shoaib Effect of different levels of pruning on ber (Zizyphus mauritiana) cv. Dehli Suffaid at Bahawalpur Muhammad Azhar Bashir, Faheem Altaf, Kashif Shabir, Naseem Sharif, Muhammad Ishfaq Water and nutrient use in peri-urban vegetable production of Faisalabad, Pakistan Shoaib ur Rehman, Zikrullah Safi, Sami Ul Allah, Shafique Maqsood, Hafeez ur Rehman Organic matter and nutrient (NPKC) losses via surface run-off in Urban Agriculture (UA) of Kabul, Afghanistan Zikrullah Safi, Ghulam Muhammad Bahram, Muhammad Alim Alimi, Shoaib ur Rehman

369

58

370

58

371

59

373

60

375

60

377

61

382

61

386

62

388

63

392

64

396

64

406

65

408

66

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

105.

106.

107.

108. 109.

Research and development in mango and citrus: Australia Pakistan Linkage Programme Experience Iftikhar Ahmad, Munawar Raza Kazmi, Shazia Iftikhar, Faisal Sohail Fateh, Aman Ullah Malik, Tahir Khurshid, Ian S.E. Bally Chemometric variations in fruits of mango cvs. ‘Faiz Kareem’, ‘Anwar Ratole‘ and ‘Chaunsa’ during ripening at ambient conditions Ishtiaq Ahmad Rajwana, Aman Ullah Malik, Leon A. Terry, Thiruchelvam Thanaraj Composite chemical treatment reduces loss of quality of button mushroom (A. bisporus) during postharvest storage Zia Ullah Khan, Muhammad Azam, Asad Ali, Basharat Ali, Nasir Mehmood Khan, Noor Ul Haq Optimal harvest stage for cut Polianthes tuberosa L. ‘Single’ spikes Muhammad Asif, Iftikhar Ahmad, Muhammad Qasim, Rashid Ahmad Chemical characterization of wild grown Ganoderma lucidum mushroom through fourier transform infrared spectroscopy Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Muhammad Amjad, Muhammad Azam, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Khurram Ziaf, Mohsin Bashir, Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri

410

67

412

68

413

68

417

69

428

69

101

71

102

71

103

72

104

73

105

73

110

74

111

75

Poster Presentations 110. 111.

112.

113.

114.

115.

116.

Optimizing planting density for cut Helianthus annuus and Zinnia elegans Muhammad Modassar Sharif, Iftikhar Ahmad, Muhammad Qasim Growth and yield response of chili to impregnated phosphatic fertilizer and humate Sobia Noor, Abdul Rauf Tahir, Muhammad Yaseen, Muhammad Awais Khalid, Muhammad Zahir Aziz, Yasir Hamid Performance of tomato in response to foliar feeding of tryptophan for yield Sobia Noor, Noor-ul-Ain, Muhammad Yaseen, Muhammad Naveed, Muhammad Zahir Aziz, Muhammad Awais Khalid Effect of foliar feeding of ascorbic acid on growth and yield of cucumber Sobia Noor, Naveeda Anwar, Muhammad Yaseen, Muhammad Awais Khalid, Muhammad Zahir Aziz, Saeed Ahmad Comparative effect of salicylic acid and calcium carbide on some morphological parameters of sweet peper Muhammad Awais Khalid, Wazir Ahmed, Muhammad Yaseen, Sobia Noor, Saeed Ahmad, Yasir Hamid, Muhammad Zahir Aziz Optimizing planting systems for cut gladiolus and stock production Muhammad Behzad Rafiq, Awais Ahmad, Iftikhar Ahmad, Muhammad Qasim The comparative response of radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Mino Early) regarding growth, yield and quality during first year of transition to organic farming system Muneeb Ahmed Khan, Muhammad Amjad, Naveed Ahmed

ix

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

117.

118.

119.

120.

121.

122.

123.

124.

125.

126.

127. 128. 129.

x

Effect of harvesting time, stage and storage duration on postharvest quality of Gladiolus grandiflorus L. Muhammad Saleem, Iftikhar Ahmad, Muhammad Aslam Khan, Muhammad Akbar Anjum Screening of ornamental plants against salinity Tahir Saeed, Muhammad N. Rasheed, Abdul Majeed, Abid Niaz, Abid Mahmood, Muhammad N. Zouq Foliar application of zinc sulfate improves plant growth and fruit quality of Kinnow mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco) Muhammad Azher Nawaz, Fiaz Hussain, Waqar Ahmed, Saba Hameed, Basharat Ali Saleem Protective and curative impact of bio and synthetic chemicals on the development of meloidogyne incognita Huma Abbas, Nazir Javed, Sajid Aleem Khan, Muhammad Kamran, Hina Safdar Potential of Pasteuria penetrans on Meloidogyne incognita population development and response of tomato growth Muhammad Kamran, Nazir Javed, Sajid Aleem Khan, Huma Abbas, Zafar Iqbal, Yasir Iftikhar, Naila Zeerak Morphological and yield attributes of cut Zinnia elegans Jacq. in response to PGPRs Faria Azhar, Iftikhar Ahmad, Khurram Ziaf, Muhammad Qasim Genetic analysis of different genotypes of Rosa centifolia and Rosa damascena from Pakistan, USA and Iran Gulzar Akhtar, Muhammad Aslam Khan1, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Amjad Farooq, David H. Byrne, Faisal Saeed Awan, Mahnaz Kiani, Ahsan Akram Pre and postharvest treatment of salicylic acid to improve the fruit quality and shelf life of mango (Mangifera indica L.) Saqib Shehzad, Saeed Ahmad, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Saif ud din Taj Morphological and physiochemical characterization of Jamun (Syzygium cumini L. Skeels) germplasm existing in Punjab, Pakistan Naseem Sharif, Malik Mohsin Abbas, Sitwat Riaz, Muhammad Ishfaq Effect of different pruning intensities and times on fruit yield and quality in phalsa (Grewia asiatica L.) Muhammad Maaz Aziz, Naseem Sharif, Muhammad Afzal, Muhammad Ishfaq Influence of pruning on fruit yield and quality of guava cv. Gola Sitwat Riaz, Naseem Sharif, Malik Mohsin Abbas, Muhammad Ishfaq Mechanical drying influences postharvest quality of turmeric rhizomes Naveed Ahmad, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Habib Ahmad Pollen viability and germination in essential oil roses Amjad Farooq, Atif Riaz, Muhammad Nadeem, David H. Byrne

112

75

113

76

114

77

117

78

118

78

119

79

123

79

127

80

128

80

129

81

130

81

132

82

134

82

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

130.

131.

132.

133.

134.

135.

136.

137.

138.

139.

140.

141.

142.

Effects of cobalt sulfate on fruit quality of sweet orange cv. Washington Navel Zahoor Hussain, Faheem Khadija, Yasir Iftikhar, Muhammad Irfan, Rashad Mukhtar Balal, Raheel Anwar Evaluation of five cultivars of Stevia under local environmental conditions Muhammad Munem Khan, Hafeez Ahmad Sadaqat, Muhammad Akram, Farooq Ahmad Khan, Shahid Abbas, Rana Husnain Shabbir Pre-shipment ethylene treatment influences physiological, biochemical and phytochemical attributes of mango cv. ‘Sindhri’ Saif ud din Taj, Aman Ullah Malik, Muhammad Amin, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Saqib Shehzad Guava (Psidium guajava L.) fruit overall quality as influenced by postharvest treatments Muhammad Jahanzeb, Muhammad Atif Randhawa, Muhammad Adil Zubair, Asad Ali, Bilal Younas, Hassam Ishtiaq Genotype × Environment interaction for NaCl tolerance in Solanum lycopersicum L. at seedling stage Fazal Rehman, Asif Saeed, Hassan Munir, Amir Shakeel, Muhammad Farrukh Saleem, Khurram Ziaf, Muhammad Yasin, Muhammad Ahsan Raza Evaluation of tolerance in seedling tomato against NaCl stress Muhammad Ahsan Raza, Asif Saeed, Hassan Munir, Khurram Ziaf, Amir Shakeel, Nadeem Saeed, Adeela Munawar, Fazal Rehman Salicylic acid confers salt tolerance in Potato plants by improving gaseous exchange, water relations, antioxidants activities and osmoregulation Hafiz Nazar Faried, Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub, Muhammad Amjad, Madiha Butt, Mohsin Bashir, Zaid Mustafa, Muhammad Ahmed Waqas Salinity impairs ionic, physiological and biochemical attributes in potato Hafiz Nazar Faried, Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub, Muhammad Amjad, Madiha Butt, Mohsin Bashir, Muhammad Rashid Shaheen, Mubeen Sarwar Safety concerns of minimal processed fruits and vegetables Muhammad Bilal Younas, Allah Rakha, Muhammad Sohail, Hassam Ishtiaq, Ammar Javed Apple industrial waste management Muhammad Umer Younas, Muhammad Jahanzeb, Muhammad Bilal Younas Physiochemical revelation of essential oil of two Jasminum species ‘Grandiflorum’ and ‘Officinale’ Muhammad Saeed, Malik Abid Mahmood, Naveed Ahmad Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) infecting cucumber in the Pothowar region of Pakistan Tariq Mukhtar, Muhammad Zameer Kayani, Muhammad Arshad Hussain Reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita on twelve okra cultivars and effects on yield Muhammad Arshad Hussain, Tariq Mukhtar, Muhammad Zameer Kayani, Muhammad Naveed Aslam

136

83

139

84

140

84

141

85

142

86

143

86

144

87

145

88

148

88

149

89

150

89

151

90

153

91

xi

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

143.

144.

145.

146.

147.

148.

149.

150.

151.

152.

153.

154.

xii

Reaction chili germplasm to bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum Muhammad Naveed Aslam, Tariq Mukhtar, Muhammad Ashfaq, Muhammad Arshad Hussain Virulence variations among different strains of Ralstonia solanacearum associated with chili in Pakistan Muhammad Naveed Aslam, Tariq Mukhtar, Muhammad Ashfaq, Muhammad Arshad Hussain Characterization of root and shoot characters of Black Mission fig cultivar treated with different concentrations of indole 3 butyric acid (IBA) Syeda Anum Masood Bokhari, Muhammad Babar Shahzad Afzal, Muhammad Akbar Anjum, Muhammad Imran Kasana Physico-chemical profiling of promising cultivars of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) fruit grown under agro-climatic conditions of Multan Muhammad Fasih Khalid, Sajjad Hussain, Muhammad Akbar Anjum, Shaghef Ejaz, Farukh Naveed Screening of some polyembryonic varieties of mango against sudden death disease (MSD) through inoculation Muhammad Tariq Malik, Muhammad Ammar, Javed Iqbal, Ian S.E. Bally, Hameedullah, Mushtaq Ahmad Insecticidal effect of some plant extracts on citrus mealybug Planococcus citri (Risso) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) Muhammad Zeeshan Majeed, Muhammad Asam Riaz, Muhammad Irfan Nawaz, Muhammad Afzal Identification of grey mold resistant variety of tomatoes on the basis of disease screening of selected germplasm Imran Ramzan, Muhammad Zunair Latif, Muhammad Amjad Ali, Arslan Sheheroz, Amjad Abbas Effect of different doses of potassium nitrate on flowering and fruiting of mango cv. Anwar Rataul Malik Mohsin Abbas, Naseem Sharif, Saeed Ahmad, Muhammad Ishfaq Effect of rootstock types on leaf mineral composition and physiology in elite citrus scion varieties Waqar Shafqat, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Muhammad Usman, Muhammad Saqib Efficacy of 24-EBL on physiological and biochemical attributes of Jasminum sambac L. under greenhouse conditions Ahsan Akram, William Bill Miller, Adnan younis, Iftikhar Ahmad, Gulzar Akhtar Factors affecting food security situation in rural household of district Faisalabad Robina Kausar, Ashfaq Ahmed Maan Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter with omega element is active in sugar beet cyst nematode induced syncytia in Arabidopsis roots Muhammad Amjad Ali, Amjad Abbas

154

91

155

92

158

93

160

93

162

94

164

95

167

95

169

96

171

96

172

97

181

98

179

98

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

155.

156.

157.

158.

159.

160.

161.

162.

163.

164.

165.

166.

Analysis of cis regulatory elements in promoters of genes from plants Muhammad Amjad Ali, Farrukh Azeem, Amjad Abbas, Khushbakht Alia, Habibullah Nadeem, Muhammad Hussnain Siddique Carrot Pomace: A compelling vegetable byproduct Hassam Ishtiaq, Muhammad Bilal Younas, Akhtar Ali, Muhammad Umer Younas, Muhammad Jahanzeb Screening of different exotic varieties of potato through adaptability trial for local cultivation Arslan Shehroz, Muhammad Amjad Ali, Amjad Abbas, Imran Ramzan, Muhammad Zunair Latif Enhancement of yield and quality of onion by foliar application of Indole3-butyric acid and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid Muhammad Irfan Ashraf, Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub, Mujahid Ali, Shagufta Kamal Root knot nematodes associated with eggplant in different localities of District Sargodha, and impact of Pasteuria isolates on development of Meloidogyne incognita Naila Zeerak, Zafar Iqbal, Muhammad Kamran, Nazir Javed, S. Bashir, Muhammad I. Nabi, Azher Iqbal, Zeeshan Hassan Jaffery Response of different plum varieties to bud take success and budling growth on peach rootstock under the climatic condition of district Swat Fazal Rabi, Nadia Bostan, Gul Bostan, Sufiyan Qureshi Nutritional management of Tomato leaf curl virus (TLCV) in different tomato germplasm in relation to environmental factors Saneela Arooj, Yasir Iftikhar, Muhammad Kamran, Muhammad Zohaib Anjum, Bilal Jafar Food safety and security: Aflatoxins a concern for human health Qumer Iqbal, Muhammad Amjad, Aamir Nawaz, Tanveer Ahmad, Mazhar Abbas Response of cauliflower (Brassica oleraceae L.) to foliar application of fertilizers Mujahid Ali, Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub, Muhammad Irfan Ashraf Efficacy of different management strategies against root knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) on Solanum melongena L. Anser Farooq, Nazir Javed, Sajid Aleem Khan, Huma Abbas, Muhammad Kamran, Imtiaz Ahmad, Waqar Ul Zaman Integration of nematicides and plant extracts for the management Meloidogyne incognita on eggplant Nadeem Iqbal, Nazir Javed, Sajid Aleem Khan, Muhammad Kamran, Mohsin Raza, Muhammad Jahan Zaib, Sumaira Saeed Economic impact of furrow and flood irrigation systems in mango cv. White Chaunsa Ghulam Mustafa, Javed Iqbal, Atif Iqbal, Sidra Kiran, Asif ur Rehman Hafiz, Mushtaq Ahmad, Hameed Ullah

180

99

182

100

184

100

185

101

187

101

190

102

194

103

197

103

201

104

203

104

204

105

206

106

xiii

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

167.

168.

169.

170.

171.

172.

173.

174. 175.

176.

177.

178.

179.

xiv

Molecular characterization of indigenous Zizyphus germplasm from Pakistan through inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers Riaz Ahmad, Waqas Malik, Makiya Rafiq, Muhammad Akbar Anjum Economic feasibility and prospects of strawberry spread in central Punjab Irfan Mehmood, Arshed Bashir, Sonila Hassan, Muhammad Qasim, Ather Mahmood An investigation into the factors behind the development of carrot production pocket in Punjab Irfan Mehmood, Arshed Bashir, Sonila Hassan, Mazhar Abbas, Rashid Saeed Impact of different growth retardants on growth behavior of young peach plants Muhammad Ashraf Sumrah, Attiq Akhtar, Allah Bakhsh, Muhammad Afzal Standardization of optimum time of budding peach nursery under Soon valley conditions Muhammad Ashraf Sumrah, Attiq Akhtar, Allah Bakhsh, Malik Mohsin Abbas Comparative evaluation of various agricultural wastes on yield performance and quality of blue oyster mushroom (Pleurotus columbinus) Hasan Sardar, Muhammad Asif Ali, Rizwan Liaqat, Abdul Manan, Kashif Razzaq, Fahim Nawaz Performance of different peach (Prunus Persica) varieties in nontraditional growing region of Murree hills Sana Asghar, Naseem Sharif, Zaghum Nawaz, Sitwat Riaz, Muhammad Ishfaq Establishment of spawn production facility in private sector Muhammad Uzair Asif, Muhammad Asif Ali, Muhammad Rizwan Liaqat Effect of substrate on growth and yield of Shiitake mushroom Naeem ur Rehman, Najma Yousaf Zahid, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Ishfaq Ahmad Hafiz, Tariq Mukhtar Growth and yield response of ginger (Zingiber officinale) to different growing media Saniya Mehk Qammer, Najma Yousaf Zahid, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Muhammad Akmal DNA markers based authentication of indigenously developed hybrids in chillies (Capsicum annuum L.) Tahira Noor, Armghan Shahzad, Nausherwan Nobel Nawab, Ghulam Muhammad Ali PCR-RFLP of betasatallite component of begomovirus in Hibiscus rosasinensis L. Shahab Habib, Amna Fayyaz, Muhammad Rizwan Tufail, Hafiz Muhammad Usman Aslam, Muhammad Zeshan Ahmed, Luqman Amrao Comparison of sugar recovery of sugar beet and sugar cane Saddam Hussain, Muhammad Jehanzeb Masud Cheema, Ahmad Waqas, Muhammad Sohail Waqas

211

106

213

107

214

108

218

108

220

109

221

109

223

110

225

110

226

111

227

112

230

112

235

113

236

113

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

180.

181.

182. 183.

184.

185.

186. 187.

188.

189.

190.

191. 192.

Effect of potash application on growth and yield of onion crop with drip system Saddam Hussain, Muhammad Jehanzeb Masud Cheema, Muhammad Sohail Waqas, Ahmad Waqas Effect of different chemicals on vase life of Oriental lily Cv. ‘Crystal Blanca’ Muhammad Tariq, Naveed Ahmad, Muhammad Saleem Akhtar Khan, Osama Bin Abdul Hafeez, Muhammad Amjad , Mubashir Zahid, Muhammad Awais Ghani Phyto-pathogens the threat for environment Sundus Akhtar, Amna Shoaib, Muhammad Jarrar Ahmed Effect of deficit irrigation on potato physical and chemical characteristics under different planting patterns Muhammad Sohail Waqas, Muhammad Jehanzeb Masud Cheema, Saddam Hussain, Ahmad Waqas Investigating mad and fertigation effects on tomato under drip irrigation system in greenhouse Furqan Aslam, Gul Nawaz, Saddam Hussain, Shahzad Ahmed Assessment of harvest and postharvest losses of mango in Pakistan Mazhar Abbas, Muhammad Qasim, Arshed Bashir, Rashed Saeed, Sher Baz Khan, Irfan Mehmood Multiplication of olive cultivar under different grafting time Ibrar Hussain, Nisar Naeem, Saqib Ali, Azmat Ali Awan Effect of different environmental condition on different types of sweet lime cutting Ibrar Hussain, Ghulam Nabi, Ayub Jan, Hafeez ur Rehman, Kamran shah Effect of seed priming and foliar application of plant growth regulators on growth and yield of three okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench) cultivars Muhammad Tayyab Tahir, Muhammad Akbar Anjum, Syed Bilal Hussain, Sajjad Hussain, Shaghef Ejaz Response of guava (Psidium guajava L.) softwood cuttings in different rooting mediums by using different growth regulators Muhammad Tahir Akram, Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri, Muhammad Azam, Muhammad Mumtaz Khan Antioxidant activity and physico-chemical properties of ten pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cultivars Abdul Hasib Viyar, Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri, Muhammad Tahir Akram, Muhammad Azam, Muhammad Saad Qureshi, Izzatullah Sherzad Grafting methods influences graft success and vegetative growth of loquat Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Ihtisham Wahid, Sami Ullah, Muhammad Shafique Bio-stimulants improves fruit size at harvest and maintain quality of mango fruit during storage Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Sami Ullah, Muhammad Hamid Mumtaz Qureshi, Abdul Ghaffar, Muhammad Shafique

237

114

238

115

239

115

242

116

243

116

247

117

251

118

252

118

253

119

254

119

255

120

256

121

257

121

xv

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

193.

194.

195.

196.

197.

198.

199.

200.

201.

202.

203.

xvi

Enzymatic profile of bell pepper influenced by edible coatings during cold storage Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Usman Ajmal, Muhammad Shafique, Abdul Ahad Qureshi, Sami Ullah Impact of endophytic fungus against thermal and drought tolerance in tomato plants Anum Intisar, Shahbaz Talib Sahi, Safdar Ali, Muhammad Kamran, Waqas Ashraf, Aamna Riasat, Muhammad Usman Arshad Impact of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria (PSB) coated urea and DAP on growth and quality on onion Ashifa Rafiq, Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri, Summar Abbas Naqvi, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Muhammad Tahir Akram, Muhammad Ahsan Khatana, Abdul Hasib Viyar, Muhammad Aqeel Feroze ELISA-based monitoring of resistance levels against potato virus X (PVX) and potato virus Y (PVY) in potato germplasm Misbah Iqbal Qamar, Ata-ul-Haq, Yasir Iftikhar, Ganesan Vadamalai, Muhammad Kamran Assessment and distribution of citrus scab disease (Elsinoe fawcettii) in different localities of Sargodha Zeeshan Hassan Jaffery, Zafar Iqbal, Muhammad Kamran, Naila Zeerak, Waqar Asghar, Abdul Rehman, Ehsan A. Qadir Characterization of olive oil obtained from olive trees (Olea europaea) in Potohar region (Salt Range) of Pakistan Muhammad Saad Qureshi, Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Rashid Ahmad Effect of drought stress on growth and flowering of perennial verbena Muhammad Ahsan Khatana, Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Muhammad Azam, Mohsin Bashir, Muhammad Tahir Akram Correlation for major contributing yield traits in chillies (Capsicum annuum L.) Muhammad Umair, Nausherwan Nobel Nawab, Taj Naseeb Khan, Zakria Farid, Sultan Mehmood, Humayun Khan, Ghulam Jellani, Uzair Qasim, Khalid Mahmood Quershi Genetic variability and correlations for yield and yield-related traits in green chillies (Capsicum annuum L.) Zahoor Elahi, Uzair Qasim, Nausherwan Nobel Nawab, Tahira Noor, Asia Ramzan, Taj Naseeb Khan, Muhammad Sudheer Tariq, Muhammad Farooq Identification of PVY and resistant germplasm in potato through protein based methods Muhammad Jahan Zaib, Shamim Akhtar, Nazir Javed, Sajid Aleem Khan, Huma Abbas, Babar Khan Effect of different casing soils on quantitative indices of Agaricus bitorquis (strain AS-56) Muhammad Rizwan Liaqat, Muhammad Uzair Asif, Hasan Sardar, Muhammad Asif Ali

258

122

259

122

260

123

261

124

262

124

263

125

264

125

267

126

268

127

271

127

272

128

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

204.

205. 206.

207.

208.

209.

210.

211. 212.

213.

214.

215.

216.

217.

Establishment of mushroom cultivation unit for demonstration and growth trials of wild and exotic mushrooms Muhammad Asif Ali, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Muhammad Rizwan Liaqat Evaluation of low cost irrigation methods for enhanced onion productivity Osama Bin Abdul Hafeez, Mariam Munir Salicylic acid induced morpho-physiological changes in okra under water stress conditions Mariam Munir, Osama Bin Abdul Hafeez Effect of foliar application of GA3 and macronutrients on growth and flowering of rose species Sabir Aziz, Muhammad Qasim, Azma Iqbal, Adnan younis, Atif Riaz Enhancement of germination and seedling vigor of Zinnia elegans through physical and physiological seed enhancement techniques Azma Iqbal, Muhammad Qasim, Sabir Aziz, Adnan younis, Atif Riaz Variation caused by gamma rays and ethyl methane sulfonate on the morphological characters, lycopene and vitamin C contents of tomato Qurat-ul-Ain, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Ali Aslam Variability caused by ethyl methane sulphonate in tomato fruit and its nutrient profile in M1 generation Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Qurat-ul- Ain, Ishfaq Ahmad Hafiz, Ali Aslam Economic analysis of chrysanthemum cut-flower in Punjab, Pakistan Muhammad Usman, Muhammad Ashfaq, Asghar Ali Optimization of the growth conditions for the development of Colletotrichum capsici causing anthracnose of chilies Aleena Mushtaq, Muhammad Mohsin Raza, Muhammad Atiq, Shahbaz Talib Sahi Integrated management of blossom end rot of tomatoes Aleena Mushtaq, Shahbaz Talib Sahi, Muhammad Mohsin Raza, Muhammad Atiq Score as an effective fungicide for in vitro management of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causing anthracnose of mango Raja Qualib Hussain, Akhtar Hameed, Muhammad Waqar Alam, Nadia Liaqat, Kashif Riaz Marigold extracts could effectively control Root Knot Nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) on eggplant Nadia Liaqat, Sahar Jameel, Asad Ullah, Akhtar Hameed, Raja Qualib Hussain, Kashif Riaz An improved method for planting gladiolus corms for increased flower and corm production Sahar Jameel, Kashif Riaz, Akhtar Hameed, Raja Qualib Hussain, Yasar Sajjad, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani Score as an effective fungicide for in vitro the management of the most prevalent pumpkin seed associated fungal pathogen A. alternata Kaneez Fatima, Akhtar Hameed, Sobia Samreen, Raja Qualib Hussain, Sahar Jameel, Kashif Riaz

273

128

274

129

275

129

278

130

279

130

283

131

284

131

286

132

287

133

288

133

290

134

291

134

292

135

293

135

xvii

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

218.

219.

220.

221.

222.

223.

224.

225.

226.

227. 228.

229.

230.

xviii

Quorum quenching bacterial consortia for controlling gladiolus corm rot caused by Burkholderia gladioli Kashif Riaz, Sahar Jameel, Akhtar Hameed, Raja Qualib Hussain, Yasar Sajjad, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani NAHL degrading bacterial consortia from potato rhizosphere as biocontrol agents for controlling potato black leg disease Kashif Riaz, Sohaib Sarfraz, Sahar Jameel, Akhtar Hameed, Raja Qualib Hussain, Sultan Habibullah Khan Effect of seed treatments with different levels of nitrogen on plant growth and seed yield of pea (Pisum sativum) Asmat Batool, Muhammad Amjad, Tanveer Ahmad, Khurram Ziaf, Asad Ullah, Muhammad Awais Ghani Effect of halo-priming on cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) seed vigor under various salinity levels Asmat Batool, Tanveer Ahmad, Muhammad Amjad, Khurram Ziaf, Anam Noor, Muhammad Mahmood ur Rehman Effect of different levels of nitrogen on growth, yield and quality of Kinnow mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco.) grown under high planting densities Anam Noor, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Muhammad Amjad, Saeed Ahmad, Asmat Batool Influence of pollen resources on fruit size and quality in inter-varietal crosses in mango Muhammad Usman, Shirjeel Zawar, Bilquees Fatima, Saeed Ahmad Effect of cold storage on physico-chemical attributes, bioactive compounds and anti-oxidative defensive enzymes of litchi fruit Sahar Rashid, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Sajid Ali, Hafiz Muhammad Shoaib Shah, Aman Ullah Malik, Abdul Rehman Controlled atmosphere storage delayed pericarp browning and maintained antioxidant status of litchi fruit Sajid Ali, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Hafiz Muhammad Shoaib Shah, Aman Ullah Malik, Muhammad Shahid Fungicide application influences tree vigour, nutrient level and fruit quality of blood red sweet orange Ahmad Sattar Khan, Raheel Anwar, Saeed Ahmad, Tayyaba Shaheen Fruit softening and oxidative phenomenon during mango ripening Kashif Razzaq, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Ishtiaq Ahmad Rajwana Different levels of potash and pruning intensities influence ‘Kinnow’ mandarin fruit quality grown under high planting densities Nida Mahren, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Shahzad Maqsood Ahmad Basra, Muhammad Farrukh Saleem Pre and postharvest management of mango fruit fly: An overview Muhammad Naeem Abbas, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Raheel Anwar, Aman Ullah Malik, Muhammad Ahsan Khan Extension in the harvest window of mango fruit through indigenous accessions Abdul Rehman, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Ishtiaq Ahmad Rajwana

294

136

296

136

297

137

299

137

301

138

303

139

306

139

307

140

308

140

309

141

310

142

311

142

312

143

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

231.

232.

233.

234.

235.

236.

237.

238.

239.

240.

241.

242.

Nutritional and pomological diversification in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivars of Chitral and Gilgit valley (Pakistan) Muhammad Waseem, Summar Abbas Naqvi, Muhammad Salman Haider, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Muhammad Shahid, Mansoor Hameed, Iqrar Ahmad Khan Protoplast fusion technology: A perspective for citrus scion and rootstock improvement Sadaf Altaf, Iqrar Ahmad Khan, Bushra Sadia, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani1Ali Khan Mushrooms as a source of umami constituents Muhammad Ahsan Khatana, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Muhammad Azam, Mohsin Bashir, Muhammad Zeshan Rafique The good about Oyster mushrooms Adil Khan, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Khurram Ziaf, Waqar Karim, Asif Ali Khan, Mohsin Bashir, Anam Zahid, Fozia, Muhammad Asif Ali Nutritional and medicinal profiles of Shiitake mushrooms Adil Khan, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Asif Ali Khan, Waqar Karim, Muhammad Asif Ali, Muhammad Azam, Syed Ahmad Raza Gillani, Ayesha Rasheed The therapeutic potential of Wild Chaga (Innotus obliquus) mushrooms Muhammad Zeshan Rafique, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Muhammad Asif Ali, Mohsin Bashir, Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri, Khurram Ziaf, Muhammad Ahsan Khatana Performance of radish as affected by different plant spacing under agroclimatic conditions of Swabi Adil Khan, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Asif Ali Khan, Waqar Karim, Ibad Ullah Jan, Muhammad Ali, Muhammad Awais Ghani Mushrooms as a source of selenium Waqar Karim, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Adil Khan, Asif Ali Khan, Muhammad Asif Ali, Syed Ahmad Raza Gillani, Anam Zahid Selection of chilli varieties on the basis of production Waqar Karim, Ibad Ullah Jan, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Adil Khan, Asif Ali Khan, Muhammad Awais Ghani Salt tolerance induction in chilli plants with exogenous application of proline by improving ionic dynamics and antioxidant activities Madiha Butt, Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub, Muhammad Amjad, Hafiz Nazar Faried, Mohsin Bashir, Waqar Abdus Sammad, Zaid Mustafa Different irrigation levels testing on cucumber in tissue tunnel Furqan Aslam, Saddam Hussain, Gul Nawaz, Shahzad Ahmed, Ahmad Waqas Influence of bulb size and phosphorus on the performance of tuberose under the agro-climatic conditions of Swabi Sana Khan, Ibad Ullah Jan, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Asif Ali Khan, Sadeed Iqbal, Adil Khan, Waqar Karim, Mohsin Bashir

314

143

316

144

317

145

318

145

319

146

320

146

321

147

322

147

323

148

324

148

325

149

326

149

xix

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

243.

244.

245.

246.

247.

248.

249.

250.

251.

252.

253.

254.

xx

Effect of planting pattern and sowing time on growth, yield and seed quality of two Pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars Muhammad Waleed Abdullah, Muhammad Amjad, Khurram Ziaf, Asmat Batool Effect of different plant spacing on growth and yield characteristics of radish Asif Ali Khan, Ibadullah Jan, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Waqar Karim, Adil Khan, Sadeed Iqbal, Sana Khan Edible mushrooms as a source of trace elements Asif Ali Khan, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Waqar Karim, Adil Khan, Muhammad Asif Ali, Muhammad Zeshan Rafique, Fozia Morel mushrooms: nature’s super food Asif Ali Khan, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Adil Khan, Waqar Karim, Muhammad Asif Ali, Ayesha Rasheed, Waseem Iqbal, Fozia Performance of some exotic tomato varieties grown under Faisalabad conditions Mubashir Zahid, Muhammad Amjad, Khurram Ziaf, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Mazhar Abbas Effect of plant growth regulators and different salinity level on germination of coriander and mustard seeds Tehreem Jabbar, Tayyaba, Turab Ul Hasan, Umar Iftikhar Khan, Muhammad Azam, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir Effect of pre-sowing salicylic acid and ascorbic acid on seed growth and salt tolerance in cucumber plants Khawaja Muhammad Saim, Mohammad Hanif, Muhammad Azam, Mazhar Abbas, Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri Studies on different N, P and K combinations for vegetative growth of mango (Mangifera Indica L.) cv. Dushari Muhammad Azam, Faqir Muhammad Tahir, Raheel Anwar, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Mohammad Hanif Studies on yield and physiochemical properties with effect of different N, P and K combinations on mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Dushari Muhammad Azam, Faqir Muhammad Tahir, Raheel Anwar, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Laraib Hameed Morphological and physico-chemical characterization of tomato genotypes Maryam Azhar, Muhammad Amjad, Khurram Ziaf, Anam Noor, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Asmat Batool Influence of gamma irradiation on seed germination and biochemical attributes in fenugreek Anam Noor, Khurram Ziaf, Muhammad Amjad, Asmat Batool Effect of scion on grafting success and other characteristics of apple plant Javed Iqbal, Inayat Ur Rahman, Ibadullah Jan, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Asif Ali Khan, Sadeed Iqbal, Sana Khan, Adil Khan, Waqar Karim

329

150

332

150

333

151

334

151

335

152

338

152

339

153

341

153

342

154

343

154

344

155

345

156

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

255.

256.

257.

258.

259. 260. 261.

262.

263.

264.

265.

266.

267.

Impact of different plant growth regulators on tomato seed germination under different salinity levels Rabia Saleem, Irfa Sohail, Khizra Narmeen, Madiha Liaquat, Hassan Raza, Muhammad Azam Hormonal priming improves germination and seedling vigour in early carrot under high temperature conditions Muhammad Mahmood ur Rehman, Khurram Ziaf, Muhammad Amjad, Riaz Ahmad, Osama Bin Abdul Hafeez, Awais Ghani Characterization and morphological identification of Pseudomonas species associated with wilt disease of tomato crop Muhammad Ashfaq, Amna Ali, Anum Nawaz, Muhammad Saleem Haider, Muhammad Ali Evaluation of the sensory qualities of ready to serve blends of Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis Mill.) Mirza Arslan Abid Effect of salinity on growth and production of tomato cultivar (Rio Grande) Ummad Hussain Effect of altitude variations on summer pea crop in Poonch, AJK Sheeraz Qamar, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Muhammad Shafique, Sami Ullah Effect of seed priming on germination and seeding growth of cock’s comb (Colosia cristata L.) under different salinity levels Muhammad Fiaz, Muhammad Amjad, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Muhammad Azam, Osama Bin Abdul Hafeez, Laraib Hameed Invigoration of cabbage seeds through magnetic field treatment Sobia Saleem, Muhammad Amjad, Khurram Ziaf, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Muhammad Azam, Syeda Anum Masood Bokhari Role of plant growth regulators in morphological traits and seed production of sponge gourd (Luffa cylindrical R.) Ghulam Abbas, Muhammad Amjad, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Muhammad Azam, Ayesha Sameen Seedling growth and crop yield of onion in response to transplants age and fertilizer application in nursery Mahwish Rashid, Muhammad Amjad, Khurram Ziaf, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Muhammad Azam, Ayesha Sameen Turnip seed production in relation to spacing and potash Imtiaz Ahmad, Muhammad Amjad, Khurram Ziaf, Muhammad Awais Ghani, Muhammad Azam, Laraib Hameed Improve the salinity stresses by using acetic acid, salicylic acid and GA3 on seed germination in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) Syed Muhammad Zia-ul-Hassan, Rashid Hussain Determination of phenolics profile from different cultivars of grapefruit cultivated in Pakistan Laraib Hameed, Muhammad Azam, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani

347

156

348

157

349

157

351

158

352

158

354

159

355

159

356

160

357

161

358

161

359

162

362

162

363

163

xxi

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

268.

269.

270.

271.

272.

273.

274.

275.

276.

277. 278.

279.

280.

xxii

Effect of urea spray on deblossoming of summer guava (Psidium guajava) crop Kashif Shabir, Muhammad Azhar Bashir, Faheem Altaf, Naheed Akhtar, Muhammad Ishfaq Combating fruit cracking of pomegranate (Punica granatum) by spraying different chemicals Faheem Altaf, Muhammad Azhar Bashir, Kashif Shabir, Malik Mohsin Abbas, Muhammad Ishfaq Effect of different time of panicle pruning on mango (Mangifera indica) malformation Naheed Akhtar, Muhammad Azhar Bashir, Faheem Altaf, Kashif Shabir, Mushtaq Ahmad Current status of mango pre and post-harvest diseases with respect to environmental factors Anam Rasool, Shazia Iftikhar Analysis of protein and bio control agents of stem end rot causing fungi of Mangifera indica L. Anam Rasool, Shazia Iftikhar Nutritional and chemical composition of truffles Anam Zahid, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Fozia, Ayesha Rasheed, Muhammad Asif Ali, Asif Ali Khan, Waqar Karim, Adil Khan, Muhammad Azam Nutritional and medicinal importance of Maitake mushrooms Fozia, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Anam Zahid, Ayesha Rasheed, Asif Ali Khan, Adil Khan, Waqar Karim, Muhammad Zeshan Rafique Nutritional and biochemical profiles of milky mushrooms Ayesha Rasheed, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir, Adil Khan, Sufyan Ahmad, Asif Ali Khan, Muhammad Zeshan Rafique, Waqar Karim Plant growth enhancement using nitrogenous fertilizers in guava cv. Round Trees Adnan Munawar, Bilquees Fatima, Muhammad Usman Evolution and diversity of tomato leaf curl disease complex in Pakistan Ahtisham Arshad Histopathological studies on die back affected mango trees in Pakistan Asif Mahmood Arif, Munawar Raza Kazmi, Faisal Sohail Fateh, Nazim Hussain, Iftikhar Ahmad Soil born fertilization enhances apple fruit yield and quality in calcareous elevated plains of Baluchistan Tariq Ziad, Muhammad Tariq Siddique, Azeem Khalid, Shahid Mahmood, Humair Ahmad Malik Effects of pre-storage treatmensts of gamma radiation on storage life of of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) cv. “Mosambi” during cold storage Sakeena Tul-Ain Haider, Saeed Ahmad, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Shahzad Maqsood Ahmad Basra, Naseem Akhter

366

163

367

164

368

165

374

165

376

166

380

166

381

167

385

167

383

167

384

168

387

168

389

169

390

169

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

281.

282.

283.

284.

285.

286.

287.

288.

289. 290.

291.

292.

293. 294.

Foliar application of growth promoters affecting tree growth and fruit quality of ‘Kinnow’ mandarin Maryam Nair, Ahmad Sattar Khan, Shahzad Maqsood Ahmad Basra, Aman Ullah Malik Molecular characterization of Asian citrus psyllid using full length mtCO1 gene sequence from Pakistan Barrira Meryum, Muhammad Shafiq, Muhammad Saleem Haider Growth and yield attributes of indeterminate hybrid tomato as affected by foliar application of micronutrients under greenhouse conditions Muhammad Bilal Chattha, Malik Fiaz Hussain Ferdosi, Muhammad Nasir Subhani, Muhammad Umer Chattha, Muhammad Usman Chattha Effect of low level pruning on different ber (Zizyphus mauritiana) varieties Muhammad Azhar Bashir, Kashif Shabir, Faheem Altaf, Naheed Akhtar, Mushtaq Ahmad Role of different chemicals in prolonging vase life of gladiolus (Gladiolus grandiflorus) cv. White Prosperity and study of different physical factors Shagufta Umar Response of exotic tomato (cv. Pomodoro) to soil and foliar applied zinc and boron Elaf Anjum, Aijaz Hussain Soomro Effect of different concentrations of IBA on air layering of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) Malik Mohsin Abbas, Muhammad Kashif Raza, Muhammad Ishfaq, Naseem Sharif, Saeed Ahmad Role of pectin-esterase to improve the storage life of Kinnow fruit during cold storage Ayesha Maryam, Saeed Ahmad Impact of foliar application of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) under NaCl stress Abdul Razzaq, Zahoor Ahmad Sajid Influence of salicylic acid on salinity stress tolerance by seed priming and foliar application Zahoor Ahmad Sajid, Muhammad Aamir Incidences, damage patterns and seasonal variations of gall midges associated with mango in Pakistan Hafiz Mahmood Ur Rehman, Riaz Mahmood, Muhammad Razaq, Muhammad Waqar Hassan Matter fluxes in urban and peri-urban crop production of Faisalabad, Pakistan Shoaib ur Rehman, Zikrullah Safi, Sami Ul Allah, Shafique Maqsood, Hafeez ur Rehman Heavy metal pollutant as a stress for tomato plant Muhammad Jarrar Ahmed, Amna Shoaib, Sundus Akhtar Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) cultivation in southern Punjab Ishtiaq Ahmad Rajwana, Kashif Razzaq, Syed Bilal Hussain

391

170

393

171

394

171

397

172

398

172

399

173

401

173

402

174

403

174

404

175

405

175

407

176

409

177

411

177

xxiii

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

295.

296.

297.

298.

299.

300.

301.

302.

303. 304.

305. 306.

xxiv

Effect of various doses of Imidacloprid and exposure times on growth and flowering of Narcissus salome (daffodils) cv. Salome Muhammad Haroon, Usman Shaukat Quershi, Imran Hassan, Muhammad Asif Aziz ELISA- based evaluation of potato germplasm for resistant source against PLRV under natural field conditions Aamir Sajjad, Waseem Waris, Muhammad Asif, Atif Shehzad, Suleman Azmat, Muhammad Aslam Khan DAS ELISA based evaluation of sponge gourd against CMV to find resistant source under natural field conditions Waseem Waris, Aamir Sajjad, Muhammad Asif, Atif Shehzad, Suleman Azmat, Muhammad Aslam Khan Standardization of a technique of walnuts harvesting for quality produce Malik Mohsin Abbas, Zeshan Niaz, Raheel Anwar, Muhammad Ashfaq, Muhammad Ashraf Sumrah Validation of molecular markers and detection of resistant genotypes against tomato mosaic virus Muhammad Younas, Sundas Shahzad, Sajid ur Rahaman, Muhammad Zaffar Iqbal Comparative Analysis of virus-specific small RNA profiles of three biologically distinct strains of potato virus Y in infected potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Russet Burbank Khalid Naveed, Neena Mitter, Artemus Harper, Amit Dhingra, Hanu R. Pappu Optimization of Protocol for in vitro regeneration of selected cultivars of banana to combat food security issues in Pakistan Arslan Bashir, Shazia Erum, Aish Muhammad, Mustafa Sajid Propagation of avocado through vegetative techniques under Islamabad condition (Cv. fuerte) Jawad Hassan, Muhammad Imran Kasana,Muhammad Noman, Muhammad Bilal Qadri, Muhammad Fiaz, Naima Razzaq Fruit plant certification scheme, Pakistan Muhammad Naeem, Iftikhar Haider, Ilhammudin Management of tomato mosaic virus through Allium cepa, Calotropis procera and Azadirachta indica in relation to epidemiological conditions Tariq Farooq, Muhammad Aslam Khan, Muhammad Dilshad Hussain, Aamir Sajjad Gucchi - a precious mushroom of Pakistan Sheikh Muhammad Iqbal Impact of Acetamaprid, Imidacloprid and Diafenthiuron on Bemisia tabaci and tomato leaf curl virus disease incidence Muhammad Dilshad Hussain, Muhammad Aslam Khan, Tariq Farooq, Aamir Sajjad

414

178

415

178

416

179

418

179

419

180

420

180

421

181

422

182

423

182

424

183

425

183

427

184

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

INTRODUCTION In agriculture enterprises, horticulture offers the best alternative for increasing food selfdependency, improve diet and ensure the generation of higher earnings and employments. Global horticulture industry has seen unprecedented growth during the past three decades. Adaption of the scientific knowledge in improving production technologies, supply chain systems and postharvest management has greatly enhanced produce quantity and quality. But, there is still need to find answers to several other important issues. Biotic and abiotic stresses hamper food yield. Similarly, economic production of healthier foods, efficient energy and water use, reduction in postharvest losses and food security are few of the major challenges to world horticultural industry. Meeting these challenges in developing countries is even harder due to lack of resources, infrastructure and awareness in local growers. Pakistan is bestowed with diverse climatic and soil conditions, which are suitable for the cultivation of many fruits, vegetables, ornamentals and medicinal plants. Fruit and vegetable production in Pakistan is 6.52 and 3.09 million tonnes, respectively, but their export is meager. Tropical fruits are cultivated around the costal belt of Sindh and Baluchistan provinces. The uplands of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Gilgit Baltistan and Northern areas are suitable for the production of temperate fruits. Major fruits of Pakistan are citrus, mango, dates, guava, apple and banana. However, other 38 fruits are also being produced such as grapes, peaches, almond, apricot, pear, plum, olive, fig, pomegranates, etc. Potato, tomato, chilies, okra and onion are the major vegetable crops while roses, gladioli, narcissi, tuberoses, chrysanthemum, tropical palms and other ornamental foliage plants are extensively produced in different regions of Pakistan. The mountainous Northern areas are also enriched with mushrooms and medicinal plant resources. However, like other developing countries, Pakistan is also facing challenges in production and postharvest management of fruits, vegetables, ornamentals and medicinal crops. University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (UAF) is the top ranking university of Pakistan with high national and international recognition. It ranks 85th in Agriculture and Forestry as per QS World Universities Rankings; 97th in the world and 20th in Asia Pacific Region in Agricultural Sciences by NTU Ranking; and 25th best Green University as per UI Green Metric World University Ranking. UAF offers an array of more than 160 academic and professional programs at doctoral, masters, undergraduate and higher secondary levels in agricultural and allied sciences. Institute of Horticultural Science (IHS) is also a premier and top ranking horticultural institute in the country which is offering under and postgraduate degrees in pomology, olericulture, floriculture & landscape, biotechnology, medicinal plants, and postharvest horticulture. The UAF is transforming the community through real impact of its programs of teaching, research, technology development and outreach activities, which are essential for agricultural and rural development and producing manpower to meet future challenges of food security. This international conference will provide a platform to the researchers, scientists, growers, processors, exporters and other stakeholders to share their novel ideas for food safety and security issues in horticulture production and postharvest management. Outcomes of the conference will certainly help to meet the future challenges of food security in the region in particular and globally in general. Specifically, this conference will also provide an opportunity to horticulture industry of Pakistan for improving the productivity and exports in addition to providing the nutritional security to rapidly increasing population of the world.

xxv

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE FAISALABAD The University of Agriculture is a Residential Academic Institution which has its rooting back to the Punjab Agriculture College which was founded in 1906. Since November 1st 1961 when the college was upgraded to University, this institute has carried the responsibilities of teaching, research, extension and short courses as major areas of its academics. Today in the era of advanced technology for improving agriculture and related areas the University has groomed the width of its research activities according to the requirements of the modern world. Being a premier central University with several faculties and constituent institutions it draws students from all over the world. The beautiful University campus over an area of 1,950 acres on both angles represents history and the present era. The lush green new campus which is conglomeration of monolithic blocks built in modern style. The old campus a reminiscent of traditional Muslim architecture reminds of the Agriculture College, it now houses the Faculty of Sciences. The University campus is located in the centre of the city at a distance of 12km. North-East of the Faisalabad International Airport, about 2km. South-West of the Faisalabad General Bus Stand and about 2km. North-West of the Faisalabad Railway Station and Government Transport Bus Stand. The city of Faisalabad with a population of 20 lac is situated at 145km. to the West of Lahore at 184 meters elevation, 31 N latitude and 73 longitude.

xxvi

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

INSTITUTE OF HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES The Department of Horticulture was established in 1925 in the Punjab Agricultural College, Lyallpur now University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. Research in the department is organized into three disciplines of horticulture; Fruits, Vegetables, Floriculture and Landscape. In 1990, Plant tissue Culture Cell was created in the department. In 2003, department was upgraded as Institute of Horticultural Sciences with four sections. A new section of medicinal and aromatic plants was added. The institute is a leading center in Pakistan for teaching and research with 20 permanent academic staff. Institute offers undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the relevant disciplines. It is equipped with the complete range of resources needed to meet the modern demands for education and research. Institute has well established experimental orchards, Sq. No.9 which is among the oldest orchard established during 1912 to boost up horticultural production in the Punjab area. Today a good collection of tropical and subtropical fruit plants is maintained and research facilities on nutrition, physiology, rootstocks, unfruitfulness and production of fruits like citrus, mango, date, guava, jujuba and grapes etc. are provided. Another garden of 120 acres is also established recently at Post-graduate Agriculture Research Station (PARS) to cope with the increasing needs of student research. A germplasm bank of date palm, citrus and mango is established to provide genetic diversities for research. Further a fully established landscape studio is established to meet the needs for advanced landscape designing techniques. Facilities for scanning, digitizing, printing and CAD software are provided. A Science and technology project entitled “Export Quality Cut Flower Production And Extraction Of Essential Oil of Rosa” is being run by institute and three Ph.D and many M.Sc. students are working on various aspects in this project. Recently a Citrus Sanitation laboratory is established in the institute to establish a modern Citrus Nursery of Certified Plants through sanitation by microbudding and micrografting techniques in vitro. Department has laboratories for graduate research where extensive range of modern apparatus is available. A well established tissue culture laboratory is there to demonstrate propagation and other operations related to all sort of plants in vitro cultures. Under Olericulture section research is being carried out on nutritional trials in different vegetables, hybrid seed production of vegetables, effect of dates of planting and spacing on growth and yield of vegetables and Tunnel production of vegetables (Cucumber, Tomato, Chillies). A mushroom laboratory was established to facilitate the following aspects: development of spawn production technology, substrate preparation and improved method of composting for button mushroom, cultivation technology of summer white button mushroom, standardization of cultivation technology of Oyster and Chinese mushrooms and Post- harvest handling of mushrooms. Medicinal and aromatic plants section was added in institute with the objectives: Exploration, exploitation and conservation of potential indigenous medicinal and aromatic plants, Development of production and post harvest management technology of medicinal and aromatic plants, Development of protocols for preservation of plant parts, identification/isolation of active ingredients, Providing education, training to the growers and consultancy services to the medicinal and aromatic plant industry. In addition institute has a well established Vegetable Research Area, Floriculture and landscape area for ornamental plants and a fruit plant nursery.

xxvii

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

Vision and Mission    

Institute of Horticulture is the primer and first of its kind in Pakistan with the vision. To impart horticultural education and problem oriented operational as well as basic research for the benefit of the farmers and horticultural development in the country. The trained personals vested with the responsibility of providing technology know how to the farmers and other horticultural industries personnel to increase production and export. To help improve the quality of environment, general public health and living standards.

Strategic Thrust     

To operate in an integrated network that enhances cooperation between academics, research, industry and the consumer. To provide appropriate cost effective technology packages for production, handling, processing and storage of Horticultural produce. To collaborate with national and international organizations concerned with Horticulture Science and Technology. To impart skills development to the middle level manpower (Field Assistant and Technicians) for improving horticultural crop production. To provide on-job training program for the Horticulturists

xxviii

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

HOST CITY: FAISALABAD Faisalabad is a city of textiles and is also called “Manchester” of Pakistan. It was formerly known as Lyallpur and is situated 150km to the South-West of the provincial capital of Punjab, Lahore. Other than the University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, numerous agricultural research institutes are also situated in this city. Faisalabad is well connected to all the major cities of Pakistan by rail and road. Although, the city of Faisalabad is connected with a national air port but the international participants will be received at nearest airport and land route destinations.

SPONSORS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Higher Education Commission Pakistan (HEC) Endowement Fund Secretariate, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (EFS) Pakistan Science Foundatin (PSF) Pakistan Society of Horticultural Sciences (PSHS) Australian AID (Aus AID)

xxix

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

CONFERENCE COMMITTEES A. Advisory Committee 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

16.

xxx

Prof. Dr. Iqrar Ahmad Khan (Sitara-e-Imtiaz, Ordre des Palmes Académiques) Vice Chancellor, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan Prof. Dr. Mukhtar Ahmed Chairperson, Higher Education Commission (HEC), Islamabad, Pakistan Prof. Dr. Abdus Salam Khan Dean, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan Prof. Dr. Muhammad Amjad Director, Institute of Horticulture Sciences (IHS), University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan Dr. Saeed Ahmed Chairman, Pakistan Horticulture Foundation (HFP), Islamabad, Pakistan Dr. Nadeem Amjad Chairman, Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC), Islamabad, Pakistan Prof. Dr. Muhammad Ashraf Chairman, Pakistan Science Foundation (PSF), Islamabad, Pakistan Dr. Noor-ul-Islam Chief Executive, Pakistan Agricultural Research Board (PARB), Lahore, Pakistan Dr. Abid Mahmood Director General Agriculture (Research), Ayub Agricultural Research Institute (AARI), Faisalabad, Pakistan Dr. Muhammad Anjum Ali Director General Agriculture Extension & A.R., Agriculture House, Lahore Dr. Muhammad Javed Tareen Director General Agriculture Research, Quetta, Balochistan Dr. Atta Hussain Soomro Director General Agriculture Research, Tando Jam, Sindh Dr. Nazeer Hussain Shah Director General Agriculture Research, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Dr. Muhammad Bashir Butt Director General Agriculture, Muzzafarabad, Azad Jammu and Kashmir Prof. Dr. Muhammad Aslam Mirza Director, Office of Research, Innovation and Commercialization (ORIC), University of Agriculture, Faisalabad Prof. Dr. Zahir Ahmad Zahir Executive Director, Endowment Fund Secretariat (EFS), University of Agriculture, Faisalabad

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

B. Organizing Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Dr. Muhammad Amjad, Professor/Director, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Professor, IHS, UAF (Secretary) Dr. Muhammad Qasim, Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Professor/Chairman, Department of Horticulture, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi Dr. Muhammad Akbar Anjum, Professor/Chairman, Department of Food and Horticultural Sciences, University College of Agriculture, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan Dr. Muhammad Saleem Jilani, Professor/Chairman Department of Horticulture, Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan Dr. Moazzam Jamil, Principal, University College of Agriculture & Environmental Sciences, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur Dr. Noor-ul-Amin, Professor/Chairman, Department of Horticulture, University of Agriculture, Peshawar Mr. Muhammad Ayub Baloch, Chairman, Department of Horticulture, Sindh Agriculture University, Tando Jam, Sindh Mr. Syed Zulfiqar Ali Shah, Chairman Horticulture, University of Poonch, Rawlakot, AJK Mr. Muhammad Ishfaq, Director, Horticultural Research Institute, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute (AARI), Faisalabad Dr. Ishtiaq Ahmad Rajwana, Professor/Chairman, Department of Horticulture, Muhammad Nawaz Sharif Agriculture University, Multan Dr. Zafar Iqbal, Principal, University College of Agriculture, University of Sargodha, Sargodha Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad, Assistant Professor, Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad Dr. Raheel Anwar, Assistant Professor, Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad Dr. Muhammad Azam, Assistant Professor, Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad

C. Registration Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Dr. Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub, Associate Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Bilquees Fatima, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Mr. Muhammad Fiaz, member, PSHS Mr. Muhammad Mahmood-ur-Rehman, President, PSHS Ms. Shaista Karim, member, PSHS

xxxi

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

D. Fund Raising Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Dr. Muhammad Amjad, Professor/Director, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Abid Mahmood, Director General Agriculture (Research), Ayub Agricultural Research Institute (AARI), Faisalabad, Pakistan Dr. Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Professor/Chairman, Department of Horticulture, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi Mr. Akhtar Mahmood, Director Horticulture, Parks and Horticulture Authority (PHA), Lahore Dr. Malik Abid Mahmood, Director Floriculture (T&R), Government of the Punjab, Lahore Dr. M. Asif Ali, Professor(RTD), IHS, UAF Dr. Muhammad Usman, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Mazhar Abbas, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Shoaib-ur-Rehman, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Dr. Basharat A. Saleem, Horticulture Officer, Punjab Agriculture Department, Sargodha Mr. Ghulam Ishaq, Horticulture Specialist, USAID Punjab Enabling Environment Project/ Chemonics International Inc., Lahore Mr. Muhammad Mahmood-ur-Rehman, President, Pakistan Society of Horticultural Sciences

E. Refreshment Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Dr. Muhammad Qasim, Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Muhammad Muzamil Jahangir, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Mr. Mohsin Bashir, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Mr. Muhammad Amin, member, PSHS Mr. Shakeel Ahmad, Office Assistant, IHS, UAF

F. Hall Management Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Mr. Muhammad Asif, Lecturer, IHS, UAF (Convener) Mr. Mohsin Bashir, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Mr. Mahmood-ur-Rehman, member, PSHS Ms. Munazza Hafeez, member PSHS Mr. Qasim Munir, Daftri, IHS, UAF Mr. Usman Ahmad, Rose Project, IHS, UAF

G. Reception, Protocol and Transport Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

xxxii

Dr. Saeed Ahmad, Associate Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Muhammad Azam Khan, Motor Pool In-charge, UAF Dr. Bilquees Fatima, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Shoaib-ur-Rehman, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Dr. Summar Abbas Naqvi, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Mr. Sawal John, member, PSHS

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

H. Security Arrangement Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Dr. Haroon Zaman Khan, Principal Officer Estate, UAF (Convener) Mr. Shahzad Mahmood, Estate Officer, Estate Management Department, UAF Mr. Muhammad Hassan, Research Officer, Office of the Registrar, UAF Mr. Abdul Hafeez, Deputy Registrar (G), Office of the Registrar, UAF Dr. Ahmad Sattar Khan, Associate Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Rashid Waseem Khan, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Mr. Karim Yar Abbasi, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Mr. Mubariz Abbas, member, PSHS

I. Advertisement Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Dr. Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Professor,IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Muhammad Jalal Arif, Professor/Principal Officer, Department of Public Relations and Publications (PRP), UAF Mr. Farjeel Javed, Assistant Professor/Director, Department of IT Resource Center and Data Bank, UAF Mr. Karim Yar Abbasi, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Mr. Syed Qamar Bukhari, Deputy Registrar/PRO, Department of Public Relations and Publications (PRP), UAF Mr. Syed Alay Haider, FM Radio 100.4, UAF Mr. Yasir Shahzad, Draftsman, IHS, UAF Mr. Mubashar Zahid, photographer/member, PSHS

J. Banner Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Dr. Muhammad Usman, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Rashid Waseem Khan, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. M. Muzzamil Jahangir, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Mr. Waqas Masood, member, PSHS Mr. Waqas Hussain Naeem, member, PSHS

K. Scientific Committee 1. 2. 3. 4.

Dr. Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Raheel Anwar, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Muhammad Azam, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF

L. Review Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Dr. Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Ahmad Sattar Khan, Associate Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Khurram Ziaf, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Raheel Anwar, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Muhammad Muzamil Jahangir, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Mazhar Abbas, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Muhammad Azam, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF xxxiii

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

9.

Dr. Muhammad Akbar Anjum, Professor/Chairman, Department of Food and Horticultural Sciences, University College of Agriculture, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 10. Dr. Basharat A. Saleem, Horticulture Officer, Punjab Agriculture Department, Sargodha

M. Accommodation Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Dr. Shahbaz Talib Sahi, Professor/Associate Hall Warden, Department of Plant Pathology, UAF (Convener) Dr. Muhammad Ashfaq Wahid, Assistant Professor Agronomy/Superintendent, Faisal Hall and Kashmir Hall, UAF Dr. Muhammad Arshad, Assistant Professor Entomology/Superintendent, Qazzafi Hall, UAF Mr. Muhammad Asif, Lecturer/Assistant Superintendent Ayub Hall, Department of Forestry, UAF Dr. Shoaib-ur-Rahman, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Ms. Asmat, Assistant Superintendent, Fatima Hall/Research Fellow, IHS, UAF Ms. Tahira Naseem, member, PSHS

N. Recreation and Social Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Syed Ashar Mahfooz, Deputy Senior Tutor, Senior Tutor Office, UAF Dr. Raheel Anwar, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Mr. Behzad Rafiq, Ex-President, PSHS Cabinet, PSHS Ms. Saba Shakeel, member, PSHS

O. Purchase and Treasury Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Dr. Muhammad Amjad, Professor/Director, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Ahmad Sattar Khan, Associate Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Khurram Ziaf, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Mr. Shakeel Ahmad, Office Assistant, IHS, UAF Treasurer’s Representative, UAF Auditor’s Representative, UAF

P. Exhibition/Expo Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Dr. Ahmad Sattar Khan, Associate Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Muhammad Usman, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Muhammad Muzamil Jahangir, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Mazhar Abbas, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. M. Irfan Ashraf, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Mr. Karim Yar Abbasi, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Dr. Basharat A. Saleem, Horticulture Officer, Punjab Agriculture Department, Sargodha Dr. Naveed Akhtar, Director Horticulture, Agricultural Research Institute, Tarnab, Peshawar Mr. Altaf-ur-Rehman Khan, Director, Citrus Research Institute, Sargodha Mr. Muhammad Ishfaq, Director, Horticultural Research Institute, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute (AARI), Faisalabad 11. Mr. Ghulam Ishaq, Horticulture Specialist, USAID PEEP/Chemonics International Inc., Lahore 12. Mr. Muhammad Abdul Salam Khan, member, PSHS xxxiv

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

Q. Poster Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Dr. Bilquees Fatima, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Raheel Anwar, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Khurram Ziaf, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Mazhar Abbas, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Summar Abbas Naqvi, Lecturer, IHS, UAF Mr. Muhammad Abdul Salam Khan, member, PSHS

R. Tour Committee 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Dr. Muhammad Muzamil Jahangir, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF (Convener) Mr. Altaf-ur-Rehman Khan, Director, Citrus Research Institute, Sargodha Dr. Muhammad Azam Khan, Motor Pool In-charge, UAF Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF Dr. Muhammad Azam, Assistant Professor, IHS, UAF

xxxv

Oral Presentations

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_106 Status of the U.S. Floriculture Industry and Potential for Development in Pakistan John M. Dole1 and Iftikhar Ahmad2 Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, United States of America 2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (J.M.D), [email protected] (I.A)

1

The United States floriculture industry is composed of bedding plants (intended for outdoor use), potted flowering plants (intended for temporary indoor use), foliage plants (intended for long term indoor use), cut flowers, and young plants (which producers use to grow crops). The industry is also categorized by market segmentation including producers, wholesalers/retails and suppliers. Cut flowers offer the highest potential for development in Pakistan, not only for the local market but also for export. In the U.S. the cut flower industry grows and markets an incredible diversity of species including flowers, foliage, branches, and fruits. These cuts may be marketed fresh, dried, or preserved. Successful field-grown cut flowers are characterized by a number of characteristics including high productivity, long stems, first or second year flowering, attractive flowers, fruit or foliage, reliability, long harvest period, minimal insects and diseases, few or no thorns or spiny leaves, attractive foliage, and long postharvest life. Each year dozens of new cultivars and species are released commercially that appear to have potential as cut flowers, but most have not been evaluated. To assist producers with the selection of new cut flower species and cultivars, the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers in cooperation with North Carolina State University, commercial cut flower producers, and plant suppliers conduct national trial programs to evaluate new cut flower species and cultivars. Most promising cut flowers for Pakistan that can be grown outdoors or under protection, including annuals, perennials, woody species, will be presented for promotion of Pakistan floriculture industry.

ICHS2016/AB_107 Role of CAB International in Horticulture Research and Development in Pakistan Muhammad Sohail Mazhar and Babar Ehsan Bajwa CAB International, Satellite Town, Rawalpindi, Punjab, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.S.M), [email protected] (B.E.B) Horticulture is an important pillar of agriculture sector of Pakistan. Continuous research and development efforts of the relevant organizations are finding solutions to the production and postharvest issues of the horticultural supply chains. These efforts have resulted in more food of better quality available for local consumption as well as 1:2.3 fold increase in horticultural exports from Pakistan in last ~10 years. CAB International (CABI) is an international not-for-profit organization that improves people’s lives by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment. CABI has contributed in the research and development of horticulture industry of Pakistan by doing world class research in collaboration with leading national and international organizations. Plantwise, for example, is a global success of CABI. This program offers online diagnosis of plant pests and their respective control measures. This program has trained ~3500 plant doctors and has reached ~2 million farmers of fresh produce. Other areas of CABI’s 1

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

research and development include trade and market access, knowledge management and technology transfer, IPM and plant health, management of biodiversity and ecosystem service, climate smart agriculture, and cross cutting capacity building. CABI is implementing ongoing research and development projects on biocontrol and postharvest mitigation of pests of quarantine concern to comply the Sanitary and Phytosanitary requirements of importing countries of fresh produce from Pakistan and connecting small-scale fresh produce farmers to the domestic and export markets. In recent years, CABI has particularly included fresh produce quality and safety in its core working areas. People at CABI believe that complex problems of fresh produce supply chains cannot be managed in isolation and thus it is following the whole of the supply chain approach to identify sustainable solutions of the problems. CABI offers global expertise for on-going collaboration to the potential research and development organizations.

ICHS2016/AB_108 Effect of calcium carbide based formulations on growth, yield and fruit quality of tomato Muhammad Yaseen1, Sumreen Siddiq2, Saeed Ahmad3, Muhammad Awais Khalid1, Sobia Noor1 and Muhammad Zahir Aziz1 1 Institute of Soil and Environmental Sciences University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab 38850, Pakistan 3 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.Y), [email protected] (S.S), [email protected] (S.A), [email protected] (M.A.K), [email protected] (S.N), [email protected] (M.Z.Z) Calcium carbide (CaC2) is potent source of acetylene and ethylene gases which inhibits nitrification and regulate plant growth, respectively. However, these gases should be released in controlled fashion, therefore CaC2 based formulations are prepared for these purposes. These formulations were tested under series of experiment from incubation to field studies. Results obtained from all experiments indicated that tomato crop responded well to soil applied calcium carbide for seed germination, early root growth, early flowering and fruiting and quality parameters. Early root growth stimulation by ethylene released from CaC2 fetched more nutrients from soil which in turn resulted in early flowering, plant expansion and healthy fruit formation and improved nitrogen use efficiency. All these factors contributed directly or indirectly to increase the yield obtained. In a nutshell, application of CaC2 effectively improved the fruit yield of tomato as well as its quality parameters. In the light of results on morphological parameters (more number of flowering clusters, total biomass, total fruit yield), physical and compositional parameters (color, firmness, pH, TSS, ascorbic acid and lycopene) of all trials suggest the application of polyethylene coated CaC2 formulation at the rate of 200 mg plant1 , after two weeks of transplanting was found relatively better formulation. Overall results suggest that addition of calcium carbide along with recommended doses of fertilizers improved fruit yield more than 40% by improving yield contributing parameters and N use efficiency. Furthermore, quality parameters related to physical appearance and chemical composition of tomato fruits were also improved by the application of CaC2. These parameters are very much required for improvement in shelf life and processing of tomato products. In conclusion, results confirm the growth regulator role of CaC2 in improving the growth, yield and quality of tomato. 2

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_109 Assessment of atmospheric pollution of heavy metals with the help of ornamental plants under Faisalabad conditions Tahir Saeed1, Muhammad N. Rasheed1, Abid Niaz2, Atif Mahmood2, Abid Mahmood3 and Muhammad N. Zouq4 1 Horticultural Research Sub-station for Floriculture and Landscaping, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab 38850, Pakistan 2 Institute of Soil Chemistry and Environmental Sciences Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab 38850, Pakistan 3 Director General Parks and Horticulture Authority Rawalpindi, Punjab, Pakistan 4 Directorate of Floriculture (Training and Research) Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (T.S) A study was carried out to evaluate different ornamental plants for the assessment of environmental pollution at different roads of Faisalabad having high traffic rush. The recently mature leaf samples of three ornamental plants namely Ficus benjamina, Bougainvillea glabra and Conocarpous erectus were collected from different locations of Jhang road, Jail road, Mall road and AARI campus (control) and were analyzed for the presence of heavy metals. The analysis depicted that maximum concentration of Manganese (Mn) 91.17 ppm was found in leaves of Bougainvillea at Jhang road followed by conocarpous at AARI campus 55.7 ppm and the minimum at AARI campus 8.34 ppm by bougainvillea. Maximum Iron (Fe) was found in the leaf samples of conocarpous 678 ppm at AARI campus while 647 ppm in bougainvillea at Jhang road and the minimum values were found in bougainvillea 217 ppm at mall road. Maximum Zinc (Zn) 22.01 ppm was found at Jhang road in leaf samples of conocarpous while minimum values 1.33 ppm were observed in Ficus at Jhang road also. Similarly Cadmium (Cd) Chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu) were also analyzed. The Lead (Pb) remained undetectable being very minute.

ICHS2016/AB_115 Potential of horticultural crops to ensure food security in Pakistan Saba Hameed1, Muhammad Azher Nawaz1,2, Waqar Ahmed3, Fiaz Hussain2, Nigarish Munir4 and Faisal Hayat5 1 College of Horticulture and Forestry Sciences, Huazhong Agricultural University/Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Biology, Ministry of Education, Wuhan, 430070, People's Republic of China 2 Department of Horticulture, University College of Agriculture, University College of Agriculture, University of Sargodha, 40100, Sargodha, Pakistan 3 Sector Advisor Horticulture, USAID, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan 4 College of Horticulture, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, People's Republic of China 5 Department of Pomology, College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agriculture University, Bejing, People's Republic of China Emails: [email protected] (S.H), [email protected] (M.A.N), [email protected] (W.A), [email protected] (F.H), [email protected] (N.M), [email protected] (F.H) Food security exists when all people, at all times have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe 3

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for healthy and active life. In developing countries like Pakistan food security is an important concern to feed the ever increasing population. The current population of the country is more than 180 million, with an annual growth rate of 3 percent, so the food requirement is ever increasing. Food security analysis (FSA) of Pakistan shows an alarming situation that the residents of 56 districts have extremely low access to food. The staple food in the country comes from cereals, especially wheat; but at the same time the importance of horticultural crops like fruits and particularly vegetables cannot be denied to ensure food security and to overcome malnutrition problems. Currently only 6 percent of the total cultivated area (22 million ha) is under horticultural crops, and it need to be increased. Horticultural crops like vegetables are considered a cheaper source of natural supplementary food. Moreover, fruits and vegetables are rich source of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins (A, C, E, K), minerals (Ca, Mg, K, Na, Fe), fats, dietary fiber and water, so they can be used to ensure daily dietary needs, food security and to overcome malnutrition issues. The nutritional importance, high yield potential, short duration crop cycle, diversity in crops and varieties, suitability to protected cultivation system, home gardening, urban agriculture and vertical farming makes the vegetables cultivation a powerful tool to ensure food security, to improve the environmental conditions and at the same time these can also be exploited to uplift the economic status of small farmers.

ICHS2016/AB_116 Evaluation of Moringa olifera leaves extract on the development of citrus nematode, Tylenchulus semipenetrans Nazir Javed1, Iqra Naeem1, Sajid Aleem Khan1, Huma Abbas1 and Muhammad Kamran2 Department of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Plant Pathology, University College of Agriculture, University of Sargodha, 40100, Sargodha, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (N.J), [email protected] (I.N), [email protected] (S.A.K), [email protected] (H.A), [email protected] (M.K). 1

The efficacy of different concentrations of moringa leaves extract (methanolic extracts, ethanolic extracts, water extracts) was evaluated on development of citrus nematode. In mortality experiment 5ml of different concentrations of moringa leaves extract was placed in plastic plate. Then 1ml nematode suspension carrying 25 freshly hatched J2 was added. Maximum J2 mortality (100%) was observed in methanolic extracts concentration. Invasion and development of citrus nematode were evaluated in citrus plants. Data was recorded after 1, 6 and 12 weeks to observe the penetration and development stages including vermiform, Swollen, Sausage stage, immature females and mature females of T. semipenetrans. Maximum reduction of T. semipenetrans was observed when soil was treated with methanolic extract of moringa leaves. Most effective concentration of moringa leaves extract determined by above experiments was used to assess its effect as protective and curative. The freshly hatched 1000 J2 per plant were used as inoculum. Moringa leaves extract was applied before inoculation as protective and after inoculation as curative effect. The plant growth parameters including plant height, root lenght and number of leaves and nematodes parameters including number of females/root system, no. of juveniles/root system and no of juveniles/100 ml 3 soil were recorded after 60 days of growth. Results showed that population of citrus nematode was reduced when methanolic extracts of moringa leaves was applied as protective application. So, methanolic extracts were found to be more effective in protecting citrus plants from nematode infection. 4

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_120 The Global Cut Flower Industries and Ideas for Pakistan John M. Dole1 and Iftikhar Ahmad2 Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, United States of America 2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (J.M.D)

1

Cut flower production has spread around the world in response to increased demand for flowers both for domestic markets and for export markets. The major cut flower producing countries for export include the Netherlands, Colombia, Ecuador, and Kenya. However, cut flowers are grown commercially in many countries around the world. Producers range from highly mechanized facilities in the Netherlands, Canada, and the United States to small local producers around the world. Production facilities vary from fully enclosed greenhouses with highly controlled environments to high (plastic) tunnels that protect the flowers from wind, rain and dust, but provide only modest environmental control. Field production is the least intensive, but is limited by climate. The world’s most popular flowers, such as roses, carnations, chrysanthemums, alstroemeria, and lilies, are produced in greenhouses in temperature zones or in high tunnels in areas with ideal environmental conditions such as high altitude areas of Colombia, Ecuador, and Kenya. Hundreds of annual, perennial and woody species are field grown. The field production season for peonies, one of the most popular field-grown flowers, moves around the world as the climates and seasons change: starting in Israel, Italy and France (late January – April), moving to northern Europe and the United States (late April – June), Alaska (June – August), and finally Chile and New Zealand (late October – December). A diverse array of production techniques and equipment have been developed around the world that could be adapted to Pakistan.

ICHS2016/AB_121 Effect of different pruning severities on light penetration and incidence of creasing in sweet oranges Zahoor Hussain1, Zora Singh2, Faheem Khadija3, Raheel Anwar4 University College of Agriculture, University of Sargodha, 40100, Sargodha, Pakistan 2 Curtin University, Perth, 6845, WA, Australia 3 Citrus research station, Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan 4 University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (Z.H.), [email protected] (R.A.)

1

Creasing (albedo breakdown) is a physiological disorder with cracks on albedo tissues and groves on the surface of flavedo causes considerable economic losses to oranges growers in the world. We investigated the role of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) by using pruning severities on incidence of creasing and fruit quality in Navelina, Washington Navel and Lane Late sweet oranges. The pruning’s treatments including control (no pruning), light pruning (25% branches) and sever pruning (50% branches) were applied after fruit harvest on 20th September, 2010 at Gingin, Western Australia. The experiment was laid down following a split plot design, with four replications where a single tree was 5

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

considered as an experimental unit. Thirty five ripe fruit per tree were harvested randomly around the tree canopy to determine the incidence of creasing and fruit quality. Results showed that severe pruning (43.57%) was more effective in reducing creasing in all cultivars than light pruning (48.75%) and control (55.95 %) due to higher level of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Over all severe pruning was more effective in improving rind textural properties (fruit compression force, rind hardiness and rind tensile strength), physical properties (fruit weight, diameter, rind, albedo and flavedo thickness) and chemical properties such as soluble solids concentration (SSC) and titratable acidity (TA), ascorbic acid, total antioxidants, sugars and organic acids. It is concluded that severe pruning is the best pruning practice to improve the light penetration inside tree canopy to a substantial reduction increasing and to improve the fruit quality in sweet oranges.

ICHS2016/AB_122 Who gets what? Citrus marketing in Bunir district, Pakistan Raza Ullah1, Qaisar Shah Safi1 and Muhammad Asif Kamran2 1 University of Agriculture Peshawar, Pakistan 2 Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB), Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (R.U), [email protected] (Q.S.S), [email protected] (M.A.K) Citrus is a perishable fruit and require good marketing practices, proper time and methods of harvesting, packaging, storage and processing. There are various middlemen (market intermediaries) involved in the marketing of citrus. This study is an attempt to examine the marketing margins of the intermediaries involve in the value chain of citrus. Three villages in Bunir district are randomly selected and a total of 120 sampled respondents are selected using proportional allocation method. The findings revealed that majority of the farmers sold their orchards to the pre-harvest contractors and as such the most widely used marketing channel was producer-pre-harvest contractor-commission agent-wholesaler-retailer-consumers. It was also observed that considerable marketing margins were taken by the marketing intermediaries in the citrus value chain. Main cost items in citrus production are market charges (commission), transportation cost and packaging cost. The pre harvest contractors’ share was the highest in terms of percent gross margins followed by the wholesalers. Marketing cost and margin indicated that the producers may pocket the share of the pre-harvest contractor by eliminating the pre-harvest contractor through initiation of self-marketing. It is recommended that the post-harvest management/marketing skills and market intelligence of the citrus growers should be developed to enable them practice self-marketing whereby they can easily pocket the market share of the pre-harvest contractors by eliminating him from the marketing chain. The study has policy ramifications for improving growers’ profit and consumers’ welfare.

6

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_124 Physico-chemical analysis of five selected varieties of apple (Pyrus malus) Muhammad Munir2, Muhammad Iqbal1, Haroon Rasheed1 and Mureed Abbass1 1 Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Gomal University Dera Ismail Khan, Pakistan 2 Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Gomal University Dera Ismail Khan, Pakistan Email: [email protected] Five cultivars of Apple viz Golden Delicious, Red Delicious, Mashadi, Kulu, and Amri were collected from local fruits and vegetables market of Dera Ismail Khan and analyzed for organoleptic, physical and chemical characteristics during harvesting season 2014. From the results it is revealed that significant variation existed among the cultivars regarding all the physical and chemical characteristics. Amongst cultivars Red Delicious surpassed all other cultivars with respect to taste, maximum fruit weight (185.33g), size (89.04 x 73.91cm), moisture 85.41%, highest total sugars (7.75%) and wider sugar/ acid ratio (21.01). While the highest pH of 4.21 and acidity of 0.44% were recorded in cv. Kulu. Highest ascorbic acid content (11.51mg/100gm) were observed in Amri. From ongoing results it is concluded that Red Delicious was superior with respect to taste and overall acceptability, attractive colour and shape, heaviest fruits, more moisture content, highest sugars and sugar acid ratio is recommended for consumption. However, all the cultivars were found to be suitable for export except Mashadi, which possess inferior taste as compared to others, can be best utilized for preparation of squashes and food concentrates.

ICHS2016/AB_125 Physico-chemical and molecular diversity in pomegranate germplasm of Pakistan Muhammad Nafees1, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani2, Saeed Ahmad2, Faisal Saeed Awan3 and Moazzam Jamil1 1 University College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan 2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Centre of Agricultural Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.N). Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.), a native minor fruit in Pakistan, is successfully grown in warm tropical to subtropical, arid to semiarid regions and desert zones of the world. India is the largest produce (828 thousand tons) followed by Iran with annual production of 670 thousand tons; however, Spain is the biggest exporter of pomegranates followed by Iran and India, respectively. Agro-climatic conditions of Pakistan are ideal for commercial pomegranate production, however, it was neglected minor fruit with least attention of researchers for its germplasm characterization and conservation before this milestone research activity. Morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization of collected germplasm was done to estimate genetic diversity by following the pomegranate plant descriptor (UPOV, 2011). Wild and cultivated pomegranate fruits of 115 land races were collected from a wide range of elevation (243 to 5411 meter). Qualitative fruit traits (shape, color, stalked end, styler end, cross section, aril color, fruit taste and seed hardness) among and between cultivated and 7

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

wild pomegranates were proved significantly high. Fruit weight, dimension, crown height, skin weight, 100 aril and seed weight, aril and seed dimensions and aril woody portion index was found significantly different. Significant difference was recorded for TSS, titratable acidity, total sugars and ascorbic acid contents. Tree structure of germplasm was established based on morphological and molecular studies to know the impact of these characters on various commercial traits and flow of genetic material from wild to cultivated land races.

ICHS2016/AB_126 Estimation of gene effects through generation means analysis in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Muhammad Yussouf Saleem, Qumer Iqbal, Abdul Rehman Khan, Sajjad Akhtar and Muhammad Asghar Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB), Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.Y.S), [email protected] (Q.I), [email protected] (A.R.K), [email protected] (S.A), [email protected] (M.A) The study was conducted to determine gene effects and mode of inheritance controlling inter-nodal length stem thickness, pedicel length, fruit length, fruit diameter, fruit weight, number of fruits per plant, plant height and yield per plant in tomato through generation mean analysis. Duplicate epistasis influenced the expression of inter-nodal length, pedicel length, number of fruits and yield per plant suggesting heterosis breeding followed by further selection to improve these traits. Nevertheless, plant height could be improved through bulk method by delaying selection in succeeding generations.

ICHS2016/AB_131 Germination Capacity and viability of stored pollen of two economically important Prunus L. species of family Rosaceae Anjum Perveen and Shaukat Ali Center for Plant Conservation, University of Karachi,Sindh, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (A.P) Two Prunus species, including P. domestica L. and P. persica (L.) Seib & Zuce were observed for their pollen germination capacity up to 48 weeks. For in vitro germination, the pollen grains were stored at room temperature. The pollen stored at different conditions 4°C, -20°C, -30°C and -60°C. Fresh pollen of P. domestica showed 75.0% and 70.0% germination was recorded in P. persica respectively. Among stored conditions 32.6% and 42.5% of germination was noted at 4°C, 29.4% and 39.0% on -20°C, 42.7% and 40.0% on -30°C and finally freeze dried condition (-60°C) showed 43.4% and 50.0% of pollen germination after 48 weeks of storage. Freeze drying treatment method seems to be better for long term pollen storage.

8

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_133 Compatibility evaluation of various scented Rosa species through cross pollination Amjad Farooq1, Shi Lei1, Shahid Javed Butt2, Muhammad Nadeem3 and David H. Byrne4 Institute of Botany-Beijing Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), 20 Nanxincun Xiangshan, Beijing, 100093, People's Republic of China 2 Department of Horticulture, Pir Mehr Ali Shah Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Pakistan 3 Institute of Agricultural Sciences, University of Punjab, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan 4 Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-2133, USA Email: [email protected] (A.F.) 1

Rosa damascena, Rosa gallica L., Rosa centifolia L., Rosa bourboniana and Gruss an Teplitz are important species which are being used in the production of rose oil. The improvement of existing rose germplasm is necessary to sustain the public demand globally. In the present study, five genotypes including Rosa damascena, Rosa gallica L., Rosa centifolia L., Rosa bourboniana, Rosa indica and Gruss an Teplitz were crossed to check genotypic compatibility and seed setting potential under climatic conditions of Faisalabad, Pakistan. Results indicated that maximum fruit set percentage (83%) was exhibited by Gruss an Teplitz followed by Rosa indica (70.33%) and Rosa damascena (53.33%). Significant variations were recorded for time to maturity of hips, number off seeds per hip, and weight of hips in all crosses. Overall, Gruss an Teplitz and Rosa indica were proved as a better female parents yielding high values of number of hips per plant and fruit set percentage. The results are directly helpful for the future hybridization program among essential oil roses.

ICHS2016/AB_135 Effect of good agricultural practices versus conventional practices on date palm in Khairpur district Solangi Qamaruddin1, Soomro Mushtaque Hussain1, Jawad Hassan2, Muhammad Fiaz2 and Raheel Anwar2 1 Agriculture Extension, Khairpur, Sindh, Pakistan 2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (S.M.H.), [email protected] (J.H.), [email protected] (M.F) The present research was conducted on Phoenix dactylifera L. cv. Aseel and cv. Karbalain during 20142015 in district Khairpur to compare the effect of different fertilizer doses of Conventional Agricultural Practices (CAP) and Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) on fruit quality. Three plants were selected from each variety at three different locations i.e., Village Therhi, Village Gagri and Village Loung Fakir. Treatments were Good Agricultural Practices (1 kg DAP, 1 Kg Urea, 1 Kg MOP, 250 gm. Zinc Sulphate and 100 gm. Boron)/tree and (2 Kg Nitro-Phos, 1 kg CAN, 1 Kg MOP, 250 gm. Zinc Sulphate, and 100 gm. Boron)/tree applied in three split doses i.e., September, late December and first week of May, compared with Conventional Agricultural Practices (1 bag Dap and 1 bag Urea)/ Acre with intercropping. Data was collected from 24 fruits of each variety, while parameters were selected weight of fruit, weight of seed, pulp weight, pulp/seed ratio, length of fruit and breadth of fruit. The results of this study showed that Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) treatments increased quality and yield of fruits at all locations.

9

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_137 Use of genome editing to characterize gene functions in plant growth, development and fruit quality in tomato Bazgha Zia, Tatsiana U Datsenka, Huiming Zhang and Avtar K. Handa Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University. 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47906. Email: [email protected] (B.Z), [email protected] (A.K.H), [email protected] (T.U.D), [email protected] (H.Z) Tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, is the most widely consumed vegetables crop. It has been extensively used as a model system to investigate physiological, genetic and molecular mechanisms regulating fruit quality including nutrition enhancement in fleshy fruits. Genome editing, the CRISPR/CAS system, is being hailed as a novel tools to improve quality of crop plants. We have used this method to knockout Auxin-responsive protein IAA9, a short lived transcription factor and the cytosine DNA methyltransferase gene MET1 that regulates DNA methylation to understand their role in tomato plant development including fruit quality. AUX/IAA9 gene family has been found to be involved in a number of plant growth and developmental processes whereas Met1 is implicated in epigenetic changes during plant growth and development. Characterization of transgenic plants with IAA9 knockout exhibited multiple phenotypes including a change in the leaf shape from compound leaves to simple leaves, increased plant height, higher number of fruits per plant, lower number of seeds in the fruit and altered lycopene and ethylene contents with increased color contents in the ripe tomatoes. We are presently evaluating effects of knocking out the MET1 on tomato plant growth and development including epigenetic changes specifically the fruit quality. These results will be discussed in relation to improvement of fruit quality attributes including fruit nutritional and shelf-life.

ICHS2016/AB_138 Tree vigor, nutrients uptake efficiency and yield of ‘Flordaking’ peach cultivar as affected by different rootstocks Muhammad Javed Tareen1, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi2, Hafeez-ur-Rahman3, and Muhammad Naveed Tareen1 1 Directorate General, Agriculture Research Institute, Quetta, Pakistan 2 PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan 3 National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.J.T.), [email protected] (N.A.A.), [email protected] (M.N.T.) Peach is the second most important stone fruit crop in Pakistan. Rootstock is of prime importance for yield and quality parameters in peach fruit industry. Current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three different rootstocks, GF-677, Peshawar Local (PL) and Swat Local (SL), on peach fruit cv. ‘Flordaking’. These rootstocks were evaluated regarding trunk cross sectional area (TCSA), date of flowering, fruit growth curve, number of fruit per tree, yield, yield efficiency and fruit size. Soil nutrient status, and the nutrients uptake efficiency of rootstocks for N, P, K, Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu was assessed 10

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

by tissue analysis. GF-677 rootstock induced largest TCSA, higher number of fruit per tree whereas, GF-677 and PL rootstocks remained at par in yield per tree but higher than that of SL rootstock. However, fruit size was achieved significantly higher by SL rootstock. Regarding nutrients uptake efficiency, GF-677 rootstock showed significantly higher leaf content of N, P, Zn and Mn than PL and SL rootstocks. PL rootstock translocated or captured significantly higher content of K and Cu than rest of the rootstocks. Nevertheless, no significant differences were found for yield efficiency and Fe uptake efficiency by different rootstocks.

ICHS2016/AB_146 Effect of foliar application of gibberellic Acid (GA3) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on yield and fruit quality of low seeded Kinnow mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco) Ehsan Ullah Khan and Liaqat Ali Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB), Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (E.K) Citrus particularly Kinnow mandarin occupies a prominent position in fruit industry all over the world. Despite a significant increase in Kinnow growing area in Punjab, improvement in fruit quality and yield is still negligible. In order to improve productivity and fruit quality, an experiment was conducted during two successive growing seasons (2012-13 and 2013-14) to investigate the effect of foliar application of the growth regulators (GA3, 2,4-D) at pea- sized fruit stage of low seeded Kinnow mandarin plants. The efficacy of GA3 and 2,4-D were evaluated either in single application or in combinations. The experiment was laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design having eleven treatments and a control, and each treatment was replicated three times. Results revealed that both the growth regulators significantly decreased preharvest fruit drop %, leading to improvement in yield and fruit quality in both the seasons. Foliar spray containing 50 mg/L GA 3 + 10 mg/L 2,4-D led to marked increase in fruit weight, diameter, height, volume, shape index, Juice %, TSS%, total sugars, and Vitamin C. contents compared to control narrowly followed by plants treated with 40 mg/L GA 3. In addition, significant decrease was observed in pre-mature and mature fruit drop % in the treated plants compared to control. These growth regulators in the current concentration can be applied to enhance production and improve fruit quality of Citrus without compromising on the food safety standards.

ICHS2016/AB_147 Agroecosystems & Nutrient Quality in Horticultural Produce – Fruit Metabolome Shows Fluidity and is Genotype and Ecosystem Specific Autar K. Mattoo USDA-ARS’s Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Sustainable Agricultural Systems Laboratory, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. Email: [email protected] (A.K.M). Conventional horticultural crop production is heavily dependent upon high off-farm inputs of polyethylene (plastic) mulch, nitrogen fertilizer and pesticides, which potentially contribute to the 11

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

unintended environmental chemical pollution as well as water runoff and soil erosion. This raises concerns for human and animal health. The integration of on-farm biological inputs into vegetable production system is one alternative agriculture practice that can reduce dependence on off-farm inputs. Further, there is paucity of data on the impact of agroecosystem environment on nutritional attributes of genotypes cultivated in the fields. Previously, we have demonstrated that mulch from legume cover crops such as hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) as a source of on-farm biological inputs increased biomass, maintained fruit yield, reduced defoliation and increased tolerance to disease compared to plastic mulch-grown tomato plants, while reducing both erosion and agrochemicals use (Mattoo & Baki, 2006). Molecular studies demonstrated that hairy vetch-grown tomato plants had increased accumulation of transcripts for genes and proteins that impart longevity and natural disease tolerance to tomato (Kumar et al., 2004, 2005). Subsequently, we demonstrated that these attributes of V. villosa mulch are independent of the N form availability, and that other signaling molecules are likely involved in such an eco-friendly cultivation system (Fatima et al., 2012). One of the cellular signaling molecules present in V. Villosa mulch that potentially contributes to the enhanced and healthy attributes in tomato is a class of compounds called polyamines spermidine and spermine (Neelam et al., 2008). In this talk, we will present an analysis of changes in metabolomes of seven tomato genotypes as a function of four distinct agroecosystem environments. The data suggest that tomato fruit metabolome is dynamic rather than static, and is modulated based on specific genetic events as well as agroecosystem environment used to grow tomato plants. Implications of these studies on growing healthier horticultural crops with impact on human nutrition and sustainable agriculture will be discussed.

ICHS2016/AB_152 Infestation of plant parasitic nematodes in apple orchards in the Pothowar region of Pakistan Tariq Mukhtar1, Muhammad Saeed1, H. U. Khan2, Muhammad Israr2 and Shahina Fayyaz3 Department of Plant Pathology, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan 2 Pakistan Science Foundation, Islamabad, Pakistan 3 National Nematological Research Center, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan. Email: [email protected] (T.M).

1

Apple, an important tropical fruit, is being grown in the Pothowar region of Pakistan. In the present studies infestation of plant parasitic nematodes were seen on this fruit. A total of six nematodes were recorded infecting apple with varying populations. The overall prevalence of Pratylenchus spp. and Tylencorhynchus spp. was found to be 69% followed by Meloidogyne spp. High populations of Pratylenchus spp. and Tylencorhynchus spp. were recorded in apple orchards. The prevalence and populations of other nematodes were low. In case of Helicotylenchus spp. prevalence of 29% was observed for Golden while it was 20% in King Amri. As regards Hoplolaimus spp. maximum prevalence of 60% was recorded for King Amri while it was only 14% for Golden. Similarly, the prevalence of Xiphinema spp. was 29 and 20% for Golden and King Amri respectively. The prevalence of these three nematodes on Star King was not observed. High prevalence of Pratylenchus spp., Tylenchorhynchus spp. and Meloidogyne spp. was observed on all the three varieties of apple. Variations have also been observed in population ranges of these nematodes. Highest population ranges of Pratylenchus spp., Tylenchorhynchus spp. and Meloidogyne spp. were observed on all the three varieties of apple. In all 12

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

the Apple orchards the simultaneous infestation of two nematode species was 46%, that of three nematode species was 39% and the rest of 15% orchards were found to be infested with four nematode species.

ICHS2016/AB_157 Improved fruit set and retention in fruit crops: Role of boron and zinc – A review Habat Asad1, Ian S.E. Bally3, Paul Gadek1, and Tony Page2 1 College of Marine and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Queensland, Australia 2 Tropical Forests and People Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia 3 Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Mareeba, Queensland, Australia Email: [email protected] (H.A). Low fruit set and retention significantly affect mango breeding efficiency and contribute to low yield of commercial mango orchards. Fruit setting and retention are multidimensional processes which are directly or indirectly governed by nutritional factors. However there is fewer literature available on effects of micronutrients on fruit set and retention in fruit crops particularly. This review paper discusses the importance of micronutrients (boron and zinc) and their possible roles in fruit set and retention in fruit crops.

ICHS2016/AB_159 Food grade chemicals: a novel approach to preserve freshness of horticultural produce Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi and Mehdi Maqbool Department of Horticulture, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (N.A.A) Fresh fruits and vegetables have relatively short postharvest life. Their storage life is limited by several factors including transpiration, postharvest diseases, increased ripening and senescence. Many storage techniques including low temperature, controlled atmosphere and modified atmosphere storage have been used for retention of freshness of fruits and vegetables. But these processes are capital intensive and costly to run. Chemical-based fungicides have also been used for controlling postharvest diseases. However, persistent use of these fungicides has resulted in the emergence of resistant strains and also posed more risks to human beings and environment. Therefore, more emphasis has been given to discover sustainable, non-chemical alternative techniques. A new and safe approach is to exploit the potential of natural compounds obtained from waste materials which are biodegradable and environmentally friendly in nature. These can generate a modified atmosphere around the fruit by providing a semi-permeable barrier to gaseous exchange, reduce respiration rate, water loss, and the most importantly are approved as food grade chemicals to be used on fresh fruits and vegetables. Calcium chloride is the ionic compound of calcium and chlorine and it is commonly used in canned vegetables. As an ingredient, it is listed as a permitted food additive in the EU for use as sequestrate and firming agent. Chitosan is another polysaccharide obtained from the exoskeleton 13

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

of crustaceans, such as shrimps and crabs. It has become a potent alternative treatment for extending storage life and to control decay of fruits and vegetables due to its natural antimicrobial effects and elicitation activities in plant tissues. Similarly, salicylic acid is a colourless crystalline organic acid which is widely used in organic synthesis and functions as a plant hormone. Therefore, a comprehensive study was designed to exploit the potential of these natural compounds which could be a simple, inexpensive and effective alternative approach for controlling postharvest diseases, enhancing quality and maintaining shelf-life of fresh fruits and vegetables, particularly during storage.

ICHS2016/AB_161 Advances in the epidemiology and management strategy of mango malformation disease in Pakistan Muhammad Tariq Malik1, Muhammad Zubair2, Rashida Perveen2, Faisal Sohail Fateh3, Javed Iqbal1, Ian S.E. Bally4 and Mushtaq Ahmad1 1 Mango Research Institute, Multan, Pakistan. 2 Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Punjab 60800, Pakistan 3 National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan 4 Queen’s Land Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia Email: [email protected] (M.T.M). Mango malformation is economically important disease of Mangifera indica globally and expresses itself with the production of deformed shoots and panicles on the trees. Fusarium mangiferae proved to be the dominant fungus hosted by the majority of the malformed tissues but epidemiological studies on this disease are still very limited. Inoculum load of the fungus F.mangiferae was monitored through installing to passive poles spore trapping methods i.e. direct plating and glass slide extended with suspension techniques using Fusarium specific medium (Nash-Snyder) installed on bamboo pole in Traditional Management Block (TMB) and Improved Management Block (IMB) comprising of different commercial varieties of mango during their vegetative, dormant, flowering and fruit development phases. Traps were placed at six spatial levels viz. 0 (the centre), 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150m at the north side of the block border at 02 meter height weekly/month during each phenological phase. Spore liberation trend was low in IMB as compared with TMB and resultantly, disease incidence noted during the next flowering phase was 11.30% and 69.80% in IMB and TMB, respectively with 33.33% yield increase in IMB. Further, direct plating method and spores trapped from the center of each block showed maximum fungus colonies in contrast to slide method and 150m spatial level, respectively. Similarly, fruit development phase contaminated the air with maximum number of spores followed by vegetative phase with 55% and 70% RH, respectively. Minimum spore liberation was noted during flowering phase which might be due to the high content of mangiferin during this phase but with almost same RH level 70%, reflecting less chances of primary infection. The study elucidates that spores of the fungus may probably harbor the emerging buds during fruit development and vegetative phases. Hence, this infection may be prevented with prophylactic spraying of effective fungicides especially during these two phases. Surely, it will be new addition in the existing management protocols of mango malformation disease (MMD) in Pakistan.

14

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_163 Growth and biochemical responses of okra to phosphorus sources supplemented with humic acid Maqsood Ahmed and Nadeem Fazil Mirpur University of Science and technology, Department of Biotechnology, Mirpur-Azad Jammu & Kashmir, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.A) Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for plant growth and is often the limiting nutrient in agricultural ecosystems owing to its low availability in soils. The present work investigates the stimulating effect of organic P sources; compost and poultry manure(PM) and rock phosphate (RP) supplemented with humic acid (HA) on the growth, yield, nutrient uptake and antioxidant activity of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) under greenhouse conditions. The experiment was laid out under Complete Randomized Design and replicated thrice; the treatments include: T1 = control; T2 = RP equivalent to 90 kg P2O5 ha1 ; T3 = PM equivalent to 90 kg P2O5 ha-1; T4 = compost equivalent to 90 kg P2O5 ha-1; T5 = RP + PM equivalent to 90 kg P2O5 ha-1 (50:50 ratio); T6 = RP + compost equivalent to 90 kg P2O5 ha-1(50:50 ratio); T7 = RP + PM + HA (RP + PM in 50:50 ratio equivalent to 90 kg P2O5 ha-1 and HA @ 100 mg kg-1 soil) ; and T8 = RP + compost + HA (RP + compost in 50:50 ratio that is equivalent to 90 kg P2O5 ha-1 and HA @ 100 mg kg-1 soil). The results indicated that the plant height, shoot dry weight, leaf chlorophyll and pod yield were highest where RP and PM were supplemented with HA. Plant P uptake was maximum in treatments receiving compost either with or without HA application. Biochemical data regarding DPPH radical scavenging showed superiority of RP while the phenolic content showed dominance of RP + compost with the highest phenolic content (1.22 mg GAE/g). Maximum hemolysis was observed in PM treatment followed by compost and the least was recorded in RP + PM. The study reflects that the application of HA and integration of RP with organic P sources increased the okra yield and improved biochemical quality of pods.

ICHS2016/AB_165 Modelling the effect of storage temperature and cut type on respiration rate of fresh-cut mango Abdul Moiz1, Rosnita Binti A. Talib2, Muhammad Iqbal1 and Muhammad Azam Khan1 Department of Food Engineering, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Process and Food Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia Email: [email protected] (A.M)

1

Rising consumer demand of fresh-cut fruits has come with greater awareness of food safety issues such as increase in the respiration rate, browning, water loss and degradation which shorten the shelflife of the product. Therefore, modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) possibly can serve as an alternative in food-shelf life extension with increasing food safety. Modelling of respiration rate can predict the evolution of gaseous O2 and CO2 concentrations inside packages and this helps to apply MAP successfully. Respiration rate of fresh-cut cantaloupes in term of CO2 for both type of cut was the highest on the 1st day, and decrease to an equilibrium value towards end of 7 days storage. The high initial rate was due to wounding and stress caused by cutting, which promotes the cellular repair mechanism. The subsequent reduction was due to self-regulation of the tissue respiratory activity because of respiratory substrates stop reacting with the enzymes of the cells present in the cut 15

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

surface. Cubes suffered a higher weight loss compared to slices in every storage temperature. The maximum percentage weight loss recorded was 21.15% at 30°C for cubes. Combination of high storage temperature, skin removal, and cutting styles that exposes interior tissues enhances the water evaporation rate and resulting in higher weight loss and product degradation during the storage period. Temperature has significant effect on respiration rate, weight loss, total soluble solid and color of fresh-cut cantaloupe especially cube shape, as it has more wounding /cutting injury on the surface. This leads to cellular degradation and hence, shorten the shelf-life of the product. In addition, nonexponential equation, similar to Peleg’s model can be used to estimate the evolution of O 2 and CO2 gas in a container (R2 > 0.9983) for fresh-cut cantaloupe. By knowing Q10 value, refrigeration requirement for fresh-cut cantaloupe can be estimated, and it is best to keep both fresh-cut cantaloupe slices and cubes at temperature below 10°C as it can retain quite good appearance, aroma, and texture within 7 storage days.

ICHS2016/AB_166 Identification of virulence genes in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides by Agrobacterium tumefaciensmediated transformation Zhou Zongshan Institute of Pomolgy, Chinese Academy of Agriculture Sciences, Xinghai Nanjie 98, Xingcheng, Laionning Province, People's Republic of China Email: [email protected] Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is a ubiquitous pathogenic fungus that causes anthracnose in fruits and vegetables globally. Here we developed and optimized an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) system of C. gloeosporioides for insertional mutagenesis. The transformation efficiency reached more than 400-600 transformants per 106 conidia. Using this protocol, we obtain a large number of T-DNA insertional mutant’s population within a short experimental period. The mutants displayed mitotic stability. Some pathogenicity-related mutants were obtained through the in vitro experiments. Integrated DNA (T-DNA) flanking sequences were cloned by hiTAIL PCR (TAILPCR), and some pathogenicity-related genes were identified by the gene knock-out and complementation experiments. These studies may provide a firm basis for an in-depth study of pathogenicity mechanism in C. gloeosporioides.

ICHS2016/AB_168 Micropropagation studies of an endangered medicinal plant Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn. Safdar Ali1, Bushra Mushtaq1, Sjeela Javed1 ,Muhammad Rafique Asi2, Shaista Jabeen Khan3 and Nuzat Habib Khan3 1 Department of Botany, GC University, Lahore, Pakistan 2 Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB), Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan 3 PCSIR Laboratories, Lahore Email: [email protected] (S.A) Silybum marianum is an ethnobotanically very important wild plant, but is being endangered due to 16

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

increasing harvest pressure. Conditions were optimized for in vitro germination of dormant seeds of S. marianum. Hundred percent seed germination was achieved with alternating cold and warm temperature cycle of 17 vs. 7 h on moist cotton pad in Petri-plates and in MS culture medium added with 2 mg/L GA3. Plantlets thus obtained were used for the subsequent in vitro culture experiments. Callus formation from seed, leaf, cotyledon, hypocotyl and root explants was achieved in culture medium (MS) containing different combinations of cytokinins and auxins. Various plant growth regulators used for callus induction were BAP (0.5 to 2.5 mg/L), 2,4-D (1 to 3 mg/L), IBA (0.5 to 2.5 mg/L) and NAA (0.5 to 2.5 mg/L). The most suitable combinations of auxins and cytokinins for different explants were NAA with BAP (2.5 + 1.0 mg/L) for seed, NAA with Kin (1.5 + 2 mg/L) for hypocotyl and leaf, 2,4-D with BAP (2.5 +1.17 mg/L) and NAA with Kin (1.0 + 1.5 mg/L) for root. Shoot induction became visible in 15±1.5 to 45±4 d on callus cultures from different explant sources like hypocotyl, cotyledon and seed calli, however, maximum shoot induction per callus was 6±1 with 100% shoot induction frequency on cotyledon callus under NAA with Kin (1.0 +1.5 mg/L). These in vitro shoots elongated and developed roots on MS medium without plant growth regulators and with 2,4-D 1.0 mg/L where the maximum no. of roots per shoot was recorded (6±0.5 ) in in vitro shoots induced from hypocotyl callus. The plantlets were acclimatized using peat moss filled plastic cups. The regeneration protocol established for S. marianum is efficient and reproducible.

ICHS2016/AB_170 Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) -A Prized Spice F. A. Nehvi and Salwee Yasmin Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences & Technology of Kashmir, Shalimar Srinagar India. Email: [email protected] (F.A.N) Saffron or golden condiment is most expensive and prized spice and is regarded as pivotal economy regulating factor for the development. With Iran as leader, producing about 89% of global saffron followed by India, the industry is still short of global demand thus offers an ample opportunity for other potential countries to produce more saffron besides the horizontal expansion in traditional saffron areas. Iran, India, Greece, Morocco, Spain, Turkey and Italy are contributing 312 Metric Tons of saffron at the global level. Whereas United Kingdom, Ireland, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Spain, Saudi Arabia, France and Italy are the major importer countries. In Europe Saffron area has shifted to other farming systems favouring mechanization. Whereas, availability of cheap labour in Iran and India has given sustainability to saffron farming system and huge market demand at international level has widened its base in some other countries like Afghanistan and Pakistan. Sourthern Khorasan province in Iran, Castilla-La-Mancha region in Spain, Aquila submaountaneous region in Italy, Baku region in Azerbaijan, Saffron Bolu in Turkey and Crocus Kozani region in Greece produce Grade I saffron. In India Kashmir FAO Heritage site of Pampore contributes 16 M.T to the global production from over more than 4000 ha benefiting 16000 farm families directly or indirectly. Financial assistance by Govt of India to the saffron farmers and availability of farmers friendly production and post-harvest technologies has given stability and sustainability to the farming system which was under distress before 2007.At present saffron industry is on rise with future target to produce 60 M.T from about 12000 ha by 2020 by way of extending saffron farming system to some other non-productive areas of Jammu & Kashmir state of India. The exchequer is expected to increase from 375 thousand $ to 900 thousand $. Saffron a triploid perennial herbaceous plant attains a height of 25-40cm with subhysteranthous behavior 17

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

with corm, foliar structure and floral organs as its main parts. Plant with four distinct plant developmental stages comes to bloom around October. For vernalization saffron requires a chilling period like other temperate fruits and thus restricts its cultivation in such areas only that observe subzero temperatures during December to February. Saffron farming system has been manipulated till date through agronomic practices without any major breakthrough on account of genetic manipulations. However, research efforts are being made to induce mutations to break the barrier of triploidy for genetic gains together with exploiting available genetic variability through clonal selection. For mass production of quality corms protocol for in vitro micropropogation have been developed. Research for better quality product has given birth to a number of post-harvest technologies from picking to storage. High B:C ratio of saffron farming system offers a great promise for marginal farmers dealing with cereal based farming system provided favourable climatic conditios during sprouting and shoot elongation (August & September),flowering (October) ,vegetative phase (December to February) & dormancy (May to July). Afghanistan’s & Pakistan’s climate, soil, and labor conditions make it a suitable place for the production of saffron, and may even give it a competitive advantage over other saffron producers. In Afganistan & Pakistan such requirements are met by Herat, Helmand, Ghazani, Paktia, Loghar, Nangarhar, Kabul, Vardak, Laghman, Kunar,Kapisa, Parwan, Baghlan, Balkh, Samangan, Daykundi, Takhar,Khost, Bhadakhshan, Jowzjan and Faryab (Afganistan) and Gilgit, Diamer, Ghizer, Ghanche Skard,and temperate areas of Azad Kashmir (Pakistan)

ICHS2016/AB_173 Pesticide health hazards associated with fruit and vegetable production in Pakistan Muhammad Zeeshan Majeed, Muhammad Luqman and Muhammad Afzal University College of Agriculture, University of Sargodha, 40100, Sargodha, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.Z.M), [email protected] (M.L), [email protected] (M.A) Fruits and vegetables constitute an important element of human nutrition. Pakistan, being an agricultural country, produces a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. These crops are highly vulnerable to be attacked by various insect pests and pathogenic diseases against which farmers use different types of pesticides including insecticides, fungicides and herbicides. On one hand, these pesticides help farmers in controlling pests, thereby increasing their produce at farm level. On the other hand, however, residues of these chemicals could pose several environmental and health problems by entering into terrestrial and aquatic food chain. Once sprayed, most of pesticides become decomposed in the environment by different ways. However, many environmentally resistant pesticide residues either become adsorbed in sprayed crop including fruits and vegetables or get drained off into canal water via irrigation and ultimately reach our body. Being lipophilic, these pesticidal residues accumulate in our fat system and potentially cause many health hazards ranging from immunodeficiency to mental disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer diseases, to carcinogenic effects and birth defects. Therefore, creating awareness among fruit and vegetable growers, marketers, and consumers' communities about these non-target effects of pesticides is the need of the time. We should be aware how to reduce these pesticide associated risks in fruit and vegetable sector. For instance, awareness about safety measures for pesticide application, more environment-friendly and safer pesticide options with minimum pre-harvest interval (PHI) at farmers' end and better processing of fruits and vegetables at consumers' end. 18

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_174 Tomato yield, plant and soil nitrogen as affected by high tunnel and field production systems under conventional or organic fertility treatments Rhonda Rae Janke1, May Elfar Altamimi2 Sultan Qaboos University, Sultanate of Oman 2 Kansas State University, United States of America Email: [email protected] 1

Organic production involves dynamic and complex interactions of crops, soil, microbes, the environment and other factors. In 2002, we established replicated organic and conventional high tunnel and open field plots in Kansas State University Horticulture Research and Extension Center at Olathe, Kansas . The high tunnel project supported considerable research, education and extension activities during its lifetime. The goal of this three year project was to improve the understanding of the influence of organic sources on crop health, yield and quality of vegetable crop. We compared control and high rate of selected organic fertilizer source and contrasted it to equivalent rate of conventional fertilizer in replicated, long term field and high tunnel plots. The effect of these four contrasting systems were measured on plant and soil nutrient status and soil quality attributes. Objectives were: 1) Measure soil fertility and quality in relation to tomato production at high and low rates of N- fertilization in open field and high tunnel production systems; 2) Measure plant nutrient status in tomato petioles and compare it to nitrogen levels in soil at different growing stage; 3) Determine the effect of N availability of organic vs conventional fertilization on N availability in the soil to the plant and impact on crop yield under both open field and high tunnel systems. Key findings included: 1) Yield in high tunnel was higher than field in 2008, 2009 and 2010. There were no significant differences between source (organic versus conventional) or fertility rate treatments. 2) Tomato yields showed a significant source effect as well as a significant fertility effect. 3) Soil available mineral nitrogen was affected by production system (high tunnel, field), and fertility source and rate. Differences varied by the year the growing stage (time of sampling). At some stages of crop growth plant uptake of nitrogen and the weather (temperature and the rainfall) appear to have reduced the available mineral nitrogen in the soil, leading to counter- intuitive results; 4) Petiole sap nitrate reflected the fertility level treatment but not necessarily soil nitrogen status; 5) There were no significant differences in pH changes throughout the years. Bray1-phosphorus showed significant increase under organic management throughout the three years; 6) Organic matter varied from 20082010, increasing in the organic field and high tunnel plots but not with conventional fertility amendments.

ICHS2016/AB_175 Genetic studies of some seedling traits of tomato under normal and water deficit conditions Amir Shakeel1, Iqra Anwar1, Asif Saeed1, Muhammad Farrukh Saleem3 and Khurram Ziaf2 Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Department of Agronomy, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (A.S.), [email protected] (M.F.S.)

1

The present study was conducted to estimate general and specific combining ability effects of eight 19

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

tomato genotypes and 16 hybrids for various traits under normal and water deficit conditions. 4 testers namely TG-2, TG-9, TG-3, Z-27 and 4 lines i.e. Tom-15, Tom-25, Tibrido and Nagina were crossed in line × tester design. Crossed seeds were collected and sown in nursery. At seedling stage plants were shifted to greenhouse and were subjected to water deficit along with control treatment. Data was recorded for leaves per plant, relative leaf water content, chlorophyll content, shoot length, root length, fresh leaf weight, dry leaf weight, fresh root weight, dry root weight, lipid peroxidation (MDA test) for each entry planted under water deficit and control condition. Recorded data was subjected to line × tester analysis for selection of good general and specific combiner regarding water deficit condition. The selected good general and specific combiners’ genotypes may be useful in future breeding programm. Among lines the parents Tom-15, Tom-25 and Tibrido while among testers TG-2, TG-9 and TG-3 were found as good general combiners for most of the traits under water deficit conditions. F1 hybrids Tom-15 × TG-2, Tom-15 × TG-9, Tibridio × TG-3, Tom-25 × TG-9, Tom-25 × Z-27, Nagina × TG-9 and Nagina × TG-3 exhibited their superiority for most of the traits studied and were noted as the best specific combiners. Therefore these hybrids may be used to overcome the effects of abiotic stresses in tomato.

ICHS2016/AB_176 Sustainable food security in developing countries and the role of World Food Preservation Center® LLC Charles L. Wilson1 and Aman Ullah Malik2 World Food Preservation Center® LLC, United States of America 2 University of California, Davis, United States of America Emails: [email protected] (C.L.W), [email protected] (A.M) 1

Developing countries are facing a number of challenges with regards to their food security. Resource (natural and capital) limitations, lack of technical expertise, and access to new technologies and high food losses are among the key issues. A number of reports including that from the FAO show that about 1/3rd of food produced each year is never consumed, mainly due to high postharvest losses, particularly in developing countries. No amount of resources can provide sustainable food security should the same level of food losses is allowed to continue. That is why, food loss and waste prevention has been agreed upon as the top priority by food experts and policy makers to achieve sustainable food security. A number of initiatives in the past like the Purdue University PICS program and some recently started e.g “Save the Food by FAO and the Postharvest Education Foundation in the USA are steps forward to further this cause at different levels. Because we have invested a disproportionate amount of our agricultural resources into the production of food (95%) as opposed to the preservation of food (5%) we find ourselves with a global postharvest “Skill Gap” and “Technology Gap”. The World Food Preservation Center® LLC was established to close these gaps. We see this as a long term and sustainable way to reach food security in developing countries. Fifteen major research universities and a research institute (ARO Volcani Center, Israel) along with GrainPro, Inc. on six continents have accepted this challenge of providing an advanced world-class postharvest education to young students in developing countries and conducting research on much needed new postharvest and food preservation technologies. The World Food Preservation Center® LLC aims to educate 1000 M.Sc and PhDs from developing countries, in the area of postharvest science and technology, who upon returning to their communities with modern postharvest scientific knowledge 20

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

and entrepreneurial skills, can provide local solutions to the issues and create new opportunities in food preservation. The World Food Preservation Center® LLC is also bridging the technology gap by partnering with CRC Press (Taylor & Francis) in the production of the World Food Preservation Center® Book Series targeted toward developing countries, which will serve as resources for educators, practitioners, and researches in these countries. All these developments will significantly boost the overall efforts in meeting sustainable food security in developing countries including Pakistan, over the longer term.

ICHS2016/AB_177 Low-cost Cold Storage Technologies and Use of CFD in Optimization of Microclimate Inside Cold Stores: A review Getachew Neme Tolesa and Tilahun Seyoum Workneh University of Kwa-Zulu-Natal, School of Engineering, Private Bag X01, Scottsville 3209 Emails: [email protected] (G.N.T), [email protected] (T.S.W) Postharvest loss (PHL) of fruit and vegetables is a major problem. World is facing to feed the ever increasing world population. Though huge production of tropical and sub-tropical fruit and vegetables in sub-Saharan African countries, subjected to 30-50% of PHL. The low-cost cold storage plays a crucial role in fruit and vegetables postharvest preservation and hence tackle food insecurity and hanger. Evaporative cooling (EC) and CoolBotTM-Air Conditioning (CB-AC) cold storage are among low cost technologies for small scale stake holders. There is limited literature on airflow pattern, heat and mass transfer of empty and loaded low-cost cold storages. This paper discusses the postharvest losses of fruit and vegetables, appropriate low-cost cold storage technologies, CFD modelling of airflow patterns, mass and energy transfer taking place inside the stores. This review identified some proven appropriate low-cost cooling technologies for potential use in the region. Due to the complexity of storage designs, fresh produce properties and seasonal fluctuation of atmospheric air conditions, knowledge of transport phenomena inside the cold storage could help for optimization of cooling process.

ICHS2016/AB_178 An Arabidopsis lipid transfer protein gene At3g22600 is required for resistance against different pathogens Muhammad Amjad Ali1+2, Amjad Abbas1 and Holger Bohlmann3 Department of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Centre of Agricultural Biochemistry and Biotechnology (CABB), University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Division of Plant Protection, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, UFT Tulln, Konrad Lorenz Str. 24, 3430 Tulln, Austria Emails: [email protected] (M.A.A), [email protected] (A.A) 1

The plant parasitic, beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii induces specialized feeding sites in the roots of Arabidopsis which are called syncytia. The transcriptome study of these syncytia revealed 21

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

significant down-regulation of various defense related genes including the gene At3g22600 which belongs to lipid transfer protein family. The objective of this study was to test if At3g22600 plays a role in the interaction with H. schachtii using overexpression lines and knock-out (KO) mutant. For overexpression of this gene we used pPZP3425 vector developed in our laboratory. While for the production of promoter::GUS lines, we constructed the vector pMAA-Red which contains a pPdf2.1::DsRed fusion as fluorescent selectable marker and a CaMV::GUS cassette within the T-DNA. The promoter::GUS showed expression specifically in seedling roots, apical part of leaves, stem, flowers, and slightly in silliques which was confirmed further by RT-PCR. For overexpression of At3g22600, we used the CaMV 35S promoter after confirming that this promoter was active in syncytia up to 10dpi. The down-regulation of At3g22600 in WT syncytia was confirmed by qRT-PCR and promoter::GUS construct lines. The overexpression of this gene resulted in less number of nematodes and smaller syncytia as compared to wild type and KO mutant. This gene was also induced in wild type Col in response to virulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and salicylic acid. The overexpression lines of At3g22600 showed less number of bacteria as compared to wild type and the KO mutant showed susceptibility to this pathogen. Our results indicate that At3g22600 can induce resistance against H. schachti and Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato.

ICHS2016/AB_186 Antagonistic interaction between Potato virus S and Potato virus Y in different genetic backgrounds of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Khalid Naveed1,2, Gaurav Raikhy2, Hanu R. Pappu2 Department of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA Emails: [email protected] (K.N.), [email protected] (H.P.), [email protected] (G.R.) 1

The occurrence of two or more plant viruses in a single plant is a common phenomenon. Multiple virus infections are routine happening in cultivated potato, Solanum tuberosum. The interaction between Potato virus S (PVS) and Potato virus Y (PVY) was investigated in three commercial potato cultivars: Defender, Desiree and Russet Burbank. Mixed infection of PVS and PVY resulted in reduced PVY multiplication in infected plants of Defender, Desiree and Russet Burbank. The symptoms produced by PVY in double infections with PVS were less severe in comparison to the symptoms produced by PVY in single infections. The levels of PVS were similar in single as well as double infections showing that PVY does not have inhibitory effect on the replication of PVS in mixed infections. The symptoms produced by PVS were similar in single as well as mixed PVS and PVY infections. A similar kind of interaction was observed in three cultivars, indicating that the antagonistic effect of PVS on the multiplication of PVY is independent of the genetic backgrounds of potato.

22

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_188 Exploitation of natural products as an alternative strategy to control postharvest anthracnose and maintain quality of fruits and vegetables Asgar Ali Centre of Excellence for Postharvest Biotechnology (CEPB), School of Biosciences, the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia Email: [email protected] Fresh fruits and vegetables have relatively short postharvest life. Their storage life is limited by several factors including transpiration, postharvest diseases, increased ripening and senescence. Many storage techniques including low temperature, controlled atmosphere and modified atmosphere storage have been used for retention of freshness of fruits and vegetables. But these processes are capital intensive and costly to run. Synthetic fungicides have also been used for controlling postharvest diseases. However, persistent use of these fungicides has resulted in the emergence of resistant strains and also posed more risks to human beings and environment. Therefore, more emphasis has been given to discover sustainable, non-chemical alternative techniques. A novel approach is the use of edible coatings obtained from waste materials which are biodegradable and environmentally friendly in nature. These can generate a modified atmosphere around the fruit by providing a semipermeable barrier to gaseous exchange, reduce respiration rate and water loss. Gum arabic is a dried gummy exudate from the stems or branches of Acacia species. It is the most extensively used hydrocolloid in industrial sector because of its emulsification, film forming and encapsulation properties. Chitosan is another polysaccharide obtained from the exoskeleton of crustaceans, such as shrimps and crabs. It has become a potent alternative treatment for extending storage life and to control decay of fruits and vegetables due to its natural antimicrobial effects and elicitation activities in plant tissues. Propolis is a resinous substance, obtained by honey bee from different parts of plants. It has several antimicrobial and antifungal properties. It can also be used as an edible coating to control anthracnose of fresh fruits and vegetables. Therefore, edible coatings based on gum arabic, chitosan and propolis was developed which presents a simple, inexpensive and effective alternative for controlling anthracnose, enhancing quality and maintaining shelf-life of fresh fruits and vegetables, particularly in cold storage.

ICHS2016/AB_191 Study of spore inhibition of Ascochyta rabiei through variety of chemicals in suspension cultures Hira Nawaz1, Amjad Abbas1, Muhammad A. Ali1, Khalid Naveed1, Muhammad Shahzad1, Muhammad Shahid2 and Luqman Amrao1 1 Department of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Biochemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (A. A.) Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important Leguminious pulse crop in Pakistan, mostly grown on marginal and less fertile soils. Southern Punjab is the core area of chickpea production and it provides 80% of total produce. Because of its higher protein contents, it is important part of the diet of a majority of the people in the country. The crop yield is lower than genetic potential of our varieties. 23

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

The important reason behind low yield is fungal pathogens causing wilt and blight diseases, especially Ascochyta rabiei which causes chickpea blight. In the current study, different samples of infected plant parts were taken and followed for the isolation of fungus. The isolated types were then evaluated against different chemicals. Chemicals were used at different doses against the quantified spore suspension to assess their effectiveness and determination of their specific dose. The measurement of resistance was based on the OD at 600 nm wavelength with the help of spectrophotometer. Additionally, 30 cultivars including the spreader line will be sown in small pots supplied with spores to count the physiological and disease determinants of the plants. The same fungal isolates will be proceeded for 16s rDNA based diversity through sequencing and their virulence profiling in controlled conditions.

ICHS2016/AB_195 Production and preservation challenges of fruits and vegetables in Thal zone Muhammad Ahmad1, Muhammad Ishaque2, Farhana Nosheen3 and Niaz Hussain4 1 Agricultural Training Institute, Karor Lal Eason, Layyah, Punjab, Pakistan 2 Sub Campus Burewala, Vehari University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan 3 Department of Home, Food and Nutrition, GC University, Faisalabad, Pakistan 4 Arid Zone Research Institute, Bhakkar, Punjab, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.A.), [email protected] (M.I.), [email protected] (F.N.), [email protected] (N.H.) Thal desert is characterized by sand dunes, abundant sun shine and water scarcity. Soil of this domain is productive and virgin. However, the production capacity of this zone for fruits and vegetable is low as compared to the average production of world standards of fruits and vegetables. To know the reasons of this constraint, a study was conducted to interview the farmers for the low production of fruits and vegetables. Purposive random sampling was done to interview 200 farmers at random to probe out its reasons. It was found that farmers were incompetent and unskillful in proper raising of the vegetables nursery and fruits grafting techniques. However, they were at home in management of vegetables & fruits. Likewise, they were well aware of the marketing strategies of the fruits and vegetables but there was need to improve their awareness about the nutritional significance of fruits and vegetables. Similarly farmers were well aware about the storage and transportation of the fruits but they were ignorant of the preservation of the vegetables and fruits. It is therefore recommended that a comprehensive training program for boosting the commercial production of fruits and vegetables for the nutritional awareness and economic uplift of farmers should be launched by integrating agri-extension, Food and nutrition and horticultural departments of the universities.

24

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_196 Evaluation of lemon varieties on Australian Bigarade rootstock Ghulam Nabi1, Abdur Rab1, Abdul Samad2, Nisar Naeem2 and Noor ul Amin1 Department of Horticulture, The University of Agriculture Peshawar,Pakistan 2 Horticulture Section, Agriculture Research Institute Tarnab, Peshawar,Pakistan Email: [email protected] (G.N.) 1

The performance of lemon varieties on Australian Bigarade rootstock was investigated in the climatic conditions of Malakand, at Sub-tropical Germplasm Unit Sherkhana Malakand during 2014. Four lemon varieties i.e., Mesero, Lisbon, Eureka and Corona Foothill Eureka (CF-Eureka) were budded on Australian Bigarade (Citrus auriantium) rootstock in 2006. Experiment was laid out as single factor RCB-Design. There were four replications per treatment, each tree was considered as one replicate. The results revealed that CF-Eureka had significant superior vigor with tree height 4.02 m, trunk girth (71.67cm) and 4.38 m expanded canopy, while trunk girth was also more in Lisbon and Mesero (75.33 and 64.0 cm) respectively. Statistically there were no differences in bloom time and the fruit set per twig. However, numbers of flowers per twig were significantly more in Lisbon (35.33) followed by Mesero (27.0). The highest fruits were set by CF-Eureka and Eureka 23.6 and 22.07 %, respectively. Similarly, the lowest fruit dropped by CF-Eureka and Eureka 25.33 and 25.53 %, respectively. The mean significantly high fruit weight (262.23 g), volume (785 cm 3), pulp (88.83%), Juice (36.17%), and yield (47.33 kg Tree1) were found in Mesero lemon. The Mesero lemon also had less number of segments per fruit. The least number of seed per fruit was recorded in Eureka. CF-Eureka was also good in juice percentage (40.33), fruit volume (685 cm3) and yield (40.07 kg Tree1). The fruit chemical analysis showed that Lisbon had significantly high Acidity (10.67%) and Vitamin C contents (28.33 mg 100ml-1) followed by Eureka with 27.0mg 100ml-1. Whereas, there was no significant variation found in Juice Total Soluble Solids in rest of the lemon varieties. It can be concluded that CF-Eureka was better in overall tree growth on Australian Bigarade rootstock, however, the majority of yield components variables including yield were better in Mesero lemon. While fruit chemical quality was better in Lisbon.

ICHS2016/AB_198 The effect of potassium application on morpho-agronomic traits of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Dutch) Shujaul Mulk Khan1, Shamaila Bibi2, Adil Rehman3, Inayat Ur Rehman1 and Habib Ahmad4 1 Department of Plant Sciences Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan 2 Department of Botany, Hazara University, Mansehra, Pakistan 3 Agriculture Research Station Baffa, Mansehra, Pakistan 4 Department of Genetics, Hazara University, Mansehra, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (S.M.K.) Strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Dutch) belongs to the genus Fragaria of family Rosaceae. In present study, strawberry variety of Agriculture Research Station (ARS) Baffa, Mansehra was evaluated for different growth and yield parameters under five treatments during winter of 2013 and summer of 2014. The experiment was conducted at ARS Baffa’s field in Randomized Complete Block Design 25

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

(RCBD) with three replications. In this experiment mulching was applied at the time 13th Nov, 2013. Average values of each qualitative and quantitative characters of strawberry were evaluated according to Least Significant Difference (LSD) statistical test. Results, showed maximum value under T3 (405 g/6.75m²) for characteristics like survival percentage (83.54 %), plant height (32.05 cm), canopy size (13.62 cm), crown diameter (2.73 cm), number of branches (35.83), number of leaves (67.00), leaf length (5.87 cm), root length (3.51 cm), total number of fruits (43.93), days to 50 % fruiting (233.67), fruit diameter (3.96 cm), fruit weight (411.40 g). Moreover, transplanting date 20th Sep, 2013 is suitable to get maximum yield of strawberry variety “Chandler”. Our findings showed great variations in morphological, physical and agronomic traits of strawberry variety. These variations may be exploited to develop high yield and better quality of strawberry.

ICHS2016/AB_199 Comparative study of different potting media for tomato production in containers Muhammad Azam Khan, Waqas Khan and Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi Department of Horticulture, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.A.K.) The study was conducted in field area of Horticulture Department of Pir Mehr Ali Shah Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi during the year of 2014. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of different types of media mixes on growth, yield and quality of tomatoes on basic chemical and physical properties of soil. Experiment was consisted of seven treatments including farmyard manure (FM), poultry manure (PM), leaf compost (LC), coconut coir (CC), peat moss, mushroom waste and soil as a control. Tomato seedling of equal size was transplanted into clay pots of 14" size. Soil sample analysis showed significant difference in nitrate nitrogen (8.47 ppm), phosphorus (69.49 ppm), potassium (392.71 ppm) and organic carbon concentration in T6 (farmyard manure + poultry manure + soil) as compared to other treatments . Plant height was maximum in T6 (farmyard manure + poultry manure + soil) used at the ratio of (2:1:2) followed by T5 (peat moss+ mushroom waste + soil) at the ratio of (1:1:1) increased by 33.25 % and 28.27 % respectively as compared to T 0. Number of branches, stem diameter (1.14 cm), fresh (176.67 g) and dry (46.67 g) weight of shoot also showed maximum values in T6 (farmyard manure + poultry manure + soil). Quality parameter including Ascorbic Acid (1.73) and Total Soluble Solid (5.20) showed maximum values in (farmyard manure+ poultry manure+ soil). Ascorbic acid value in T6 is 58.7 % more as compared to control. Farmyard manure + poultry manure + soil (2:1:2) proved to be the superior media and perform best to soil nutrition and plant growth.

ICHS2016/AB_200 Food security in Oman: Challenges and opportunities Rashid Abdullah Al-Yahyai College of Agriculture and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 34, Al-Khod 123, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman Email: [email protected] (R.A.A.Y.) Food security is of utmost importance in Oman and other Arab countries in the region. Agricultural 26

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

production is limited by lack of arable lands and water resources. Water scarcity has great implications on food and water security in the country, where imports are currently at 89% of its food consumption, making it vulnerable to meeting the continuous increase in demand as the country’s population now exceeds 4 million. Although the country is suffering from water deficit, 70% of its water resources are used for agricultural production that contribute little to the overall food consumption. Despite these facts, large quantities of food is wasted, reaching 60% in some commodities and similar waste occurs in water. Environmental (ecological) and energy security has so far been sidelined and not included in the agenda that is primarily focused on food security. This talk will highlight the challenges of food production and how integrated approach can ensure that there will be adequate food, water, energy and fresh air for everyone, at all times, for a healthy and active life style.

ICHS2016/AB_202 Horticulture in Balochistan: challenges and prospects Muhammad Saeed Horticulturist (Retired) Fruit Development Project, Quetta /Consultant Horticulture/Agriculture/Rural Development, House No.12-C Street Number 4, Model Town Extension Khojak Road, Quetta Email: [email protected] (M.S.) Horticulture has a great potential in the Province. Of serious concern is the depletion of ground water and drought spell from 1997-2002 was a serious setback to the horticulture development. Perennial sources of ground water such as tube wells, wells, karezes, and springs were completely dried. The Provincial Government from its own resources and donor assistance has taken various steps to recharge the groundwater by construction of dams in the overdrawn basins, and to reduce the conveyance losses from source to field. Cold storages at different production areas are constructed by private sector through assistance by USAID / USDA and are functioning. The recommendations made in Horticulture Policy document prepared by the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock with the help of foreign and local consultants are approved by the Government of Balochistan and are in the process of implementation but slowly. Hopefully, it is anticipated that Horticulture will play an important role in years to come and issues confronting the sector will be resolved through appreciable extent.

ICHS2016/AB_205 Developing protocols and standards for epicotyl grafting in mango Ghulam Mustafa, Javed Iqbal, Atif Iqbal, Sidra Kiran, Asif ur Rehman Hafiz, Mushtaq Ahmad and Hameed Ullah Mango Research Institute, Agriculture Farms, Old Shujabad Road, Mutlan, Punjab, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (J.I.) Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a highly cross-pollinated and heterozygous fruit crop in nature. It is mandatory to keep such fruit plants true-to-type through asexual techniques, if further propagation is required. During this era of modernization and innovative ideas a preliminary study was conducted 27

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

to search out the most economical and short term propagation technique in mango. The freshly extracted stones of commercial mango cultivars viz. Sindhri, SB Chaunsa, Dusehri, White Chaunsa, Anwar Retual and Retual #12 were planted in polyethylene bags containing the standardized pot media to also observe the performance of these cultivars as rootstock with specific scion variety i.e. Sindhri. After the emergence of seedling mango, the epicotyl grafting was practiced at various seedling ages viz. 05, 10, 15 and 20 days before the natural detachment of stone with emerging shoot. This practice was done during the month of October, 2015 when maximum and minimum average temperature was 30C and 22C while relative humidity of the atmosphere was recorded as 80% in the lath house of Mango Research Institute, Multan. The results elucidated that the best age of seedling mango was 10 days after its emergence for the epicotyl grafting. The maximum success by 70% was achieved in seedlings of Sindri, SB Chaunsa and White Chaunsa whereas minimum success 60% was recorded in seedling of cultivar Dusehri, Anwar Retual and Retual #12. It is concluded that as the seedling age of the tested cultivars of mango increases, the success of epicotyl grafting with cultivar Sindhri on them decreases.

ICHS2016/AB_207 Biological control agents of Asian Citrus Psyllid to reduce citrus greening incidence in Punjab, Pakistan Shouket Zaman Khan Sub-Campus, Burewala-Vehari, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is a damaging pest of citrus in Pakistan and around the globe because it is an important vector of Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus, a phloem-dwelling bacterium which causes huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, a lethal and incurable disease of citrus. Weekly population phenology of ACP and its associated entomophagous arthropods (i.e., parasitoids and generalist predators) were studied in relation with flush phenology and weather factors at two different study sites, Square No.9 and PARS in the University of Agriculture Faisalabad (UAF) Campus, on two different types of citrus, Kinnow (Citrus reticulata) and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis). Populations of the psyllid increased with rise in temperatures, significantly decreased with relative humidity and reduced with rainfall. Two main peaks of adult ACP populations were seen in March-April (higher ones) and September-October. In Square No.9, only relative humidity while at PARS, both maximum temperature and relative humidity played important role in psyllid population fluctuation. Among predators, only spiders significantly increased with weather factors. Percentage branches with different ACP stages increased with increase in temperatures and decreased with relative humidity and rainfall. Parasitism rates of both primary parasitoids were observed in March-April and then from July-August to October-November. An average temperature of 12-15°C and relative humidity of 50-60% in February-March were associated with main peak flush (90-100% of branches with flush) while average temperatures of 2830°C and relative humidity of 65-75% were associated with the 2nd highest flush peaks in AugustSeptember. One or two small summer peaks of adult ACP were also recorded promoted by rains in June-July. Spiders and adult coccinellids showed negative while coccinellids larvae showed a positive association with flush growth. ACP density on sweet orange was significantly higher than Kinnow at both experimental sites, suggesting that sweet orange is a more favorable host for ACP. Tamarixia 28

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

radiata (Waterston) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam and Argarwal, 1975) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) were main parasitoid species inhibiting the Punjab region of Pakistan. Tamarixia radiata have more reproduction potential than D. aligarhensis on citrus and more abundant parasitoid species. Maximum parasitism rates were recorded usually in April and from August to November. No parasitism was recorded in hot summer (May-June) and frosty cold winter months (December-End February). Maximum relative abundance of T. radiata was in March-April and from August to October in Kinnow while from August to November in sweet orange. Maximum relative abundance of D. aligarhensis was in March and August-September in Kinnow while it was from August to November in sweet orange.

ICHS2016/AB_208 Effect of sulfur fumigation on quality and sulfur residues in grape berries of Kishmish cultivars stored at 1°C for 60 days Mujahid Iqbal Postharvest and Food Technology, Agriculture Research Institute, Sariab, Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan Email: [email protected] Grape berries of Kishmish cultivars were fumigated with sulfur at the rate of 2 grams per kilogram of fresh fruit for 20, 30, and 40 minutes and stored at 1 oC for 60 days. TSS increased with storage time and it was highest on day 60 of storage and lowest on day 0. Similarly the weight loss was also increased in storage and it was highest on day 60 of storage. The pH was also increased and it was highest on day 60 of storage. Without washing the grapes berries were not recommended for eating purposes, because the sulfur residues were high and were not permissible for eating. After washing with water the SO2 residues reduced greatly and became permissible for eating for 20 and 30 minutes fumigated berries, but it was still not permissible for 40 minutes fumigated berries; which was higher from 350 ppm, which is recommended for eating.

ICHS2016/AB_209 Field evaluation of eight Balochistani date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars under agroclimatic conditions of Khairpur, Sindh Ghulam Sarwar Markhand1, Nazir Ahmed Soomro1, Adel Ahmed Abul-Soad2, Mushtaque Ahmed Jatoi1 and Najamuddin Solangi1 1 Date Palm Research Institute, Shah Abdul Latif University, Khairpur, Sindh, Pakistan 2 Horticulture Research Institute, Agriculture Research Center, Cairo, Egypt Email: [email protected] (G.S.M.) Off shoots of eight date palm cultivars from Balochistan namely Aab-e-Dandan, Begum Jangi, Gogna, Halini, Koozanabad, Muzawati, Peshna and Shakri were brought and cultivated in 2004 to test the adaptability of these cultivars under the agro-climatic conditions of Khairpur, Sindh. The vegetative growth, flowering characteritics, fruit physical and chemical properties at various maturity stages i.e. Kimri, Khalal, Rutab and Tamar, bunch number and yield per palm were recorded during 2012 and 29

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

2013. Cv. Aab-e-Dandan, cv. Shakri and cv. Gogna emerged as early harvesting varieties in first and second week of July while cv. Begum Jangi, cv. Halini and cv. Muzawati recorded as late harvested varieties in mid of September. An appropriate performa was designed to drop the scientific and commonly used physical properties such as fruit length and diameter, seed length and diameter, flesh weight & chemical properties such as moisture content, pH, total soluble solids, total sugars, reducing sugars and non-reducing sugars at different maturity stages. It is worth to mention that there is no any published data available on these cultivars regarding their vegetative and fruit characteristics before. It was concluded from the study that the climatic conditions of Khairpur are very much suitable for planting of Balochistani date palm cultivars.

ICHS2016/AB_216 Supplementing humic acid with crushed maize grains into growing media enhances growth and nutrient uptake of tomato transplants through vigorous root system Mostafa Mohamed Rady1, Hafeez ur Rehman2 and Shoaib ur Rehman3 Botany Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Fayoum University, 63514 Fayoum, Egypt 2 Department of Agronomy, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (H.U.R.) 1

Peat moss, vermiculite and perlite are most commonly used growing media in under- and developed world. The present study investigated the response of three growing media including peat (P), vermiculite (Verm) and crushed maize grain (CMG) added with or without humic acid (HA) on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) transplants for seedling establishment, plant growth, some physiological attributes and nutrient uptake for two growing seasons in 2013-14. All three growing media viz. peat, vermiculite and CMG mixed with or without HA in following composition were: 2:1:0:0, 1.5:1:0.5:0, 1.5:1:0.5:250 respectively. Tomato seeds of hybrid ‘Champion’ hybrid were sown in Styrofoam flats (one seed per cell) under greenhouse conditions maintained with average day and night temperatures of 24º ± 3ºC and 16º ± 2ºC, respectively. The relative humidity ranged from 62.065.1%, and natural day-length for 11-12 h. None of the media affected the seedling emergence and survival percentage, however, maximum increase in stem diameter and root system volume was observed for growing media when CMG supplemented with and/or without HA. Similar response was observed for transplant height, no of leaves and total leaf area per transplant, leaf and root dry weight and total dry weight per transplant of 30 days old tomato transplants. Maximum relative water contents (RWC) and membrane stability index (MSI) with reduced electrolyte leakage was also found for HA supplemented media followed without HA but with CMG. Highest increase in N, P and K transfer ratios was also observed in tomato transplants added with HA, albeit N transfer ratio was statistically similar for CMG added with and/or without HA. In conclusion, supplementing HA with CMG as biostimulant rich in mineral nutrients, plant hormones and secondary metabolites can be used into standard growing media for sustainability of horticultural transplants.

30

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_215 Development of molecular method for sex identification in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) plantlets using Noval Sex-linked Microsatellite Markers Maryam1, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani1, Saeed Ahmad1 and Faisal Saeed Awan2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Centre of Agricultural Biochemistry and Biotechnology (CABB), University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.) 1

Microsatellite markers containing simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are a valuable tool for genetic analysis. The date palm is a dioecious and slow flowering so it is very difficult to identify the gender of the trees until it reaches the reproductive age (5-10 years). For speeding up the breeding programs and to assist the research for genetic improvements of the date palm, early selection and differentiation of young seedlings into male and female is necessary. Our objective was to identify microsatellite markers that could be used to differentiate between male and female date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) in saplings to cultivate the large number of productive female trees. 12 microsatellite primers were used with 13 date palm samples which showed that microsatellites were highly polymorphic, having a great number of alleles. Total 124 alleles were scored with a mean of 9.08 alleles per locus while allelic range varied from 5 to 16 using primers mpdCIR15 to mpdCIR57, respectively. These primers produced 15 polymorphic loci specifically in male date palm samples and the seedlings harboring the unique fragments were further characterized as male plants. Increasingly 38.46% of these loci were scored as homozygous alleles while 61.53% heterozygous allelic loci were determined. Primer mpdCIR48 produced a specific locus (250/250) in all male samples whereas the same locus was absent in female samples. Similarly a locus of 300/310 bp reoccurred in 6 date palm male samples which indicated that this is a promising candidate marker to detect the sex in date palm. The data resulted from combination of 12 primers enabled the seedling samples of date palm cultivars to divide into two groups i.e., male and female regarding their sex expression comparative to the parents (male + female) using the principle coordinate analysis (PCoA).

ICHS2016/AB_217 The role of physio-morphic characters of eggplant (Solanum Melongena L.) and its correlation with the jassid (Amrasca Biguttula Biguttula (Ishida) population variation Muhammad Ali, Muhammad Ashfaq and Azhar Uddin Bahtti Institute of Agricultural Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.A.), [email protected] (M.A.), [email protected] (A.U.B.) The jassid is the major pest of brinjal. The experiment was conducted on the six brinjal genotypes in institute of agricultural sciences university of the Punjab Lahore. The study was conducted to know the impact of physio-morphic plant characters on the jassid fluctuation. The maximum variations were observed among the resistance and susceptible brinjal genotypes due to plant height, hair density, number of primary branches, length of hair and moisture percentage. The effects of plant characters of brinjal were interrelated with the population of jassids and calculated their impact by processing the data into simple and multiple linear regression equation. The hair density on the lamina showed 31

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

the maximum impact 52.1% for the population fluctuation of jassid. While, by the simple linear equation the moisture percentage, plant height and number of primary branches showed nonsignificant and positive correlation. The hair density and length of hair on the lamina and veins showed a highly significant negative correlation with the jassids population while midrib of hair density showed the negative and non-significant effects

ICHS2016/AB_219 Performance evaluation of exotic peach rootstock “Red Leaf Nemaguard” for nursery raising in deciduous fruits Muhammad Ashraf Sumrah1, Attiq Akhtar1, Allah Bakhsh1 and Azhar Hussain2 Horticultural research Station, Nowshera (Soon Valley), District Khushab, Pakistan 2 Barani Agricultural Research Station, Chakwal, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.A.S.), [email protected] (A.A.), [email protected] (A.B.), [email protected] (A.H.)

1

Red Leaf Nemaguard is resistant to Nematode and soil moisture fluctuations for nursery production of deciduous fruit plants. The response of Red Leaf Nemaguard as rootstock for Almond, Peach, Apricot and Plum was studied at Horticultural Research Station Nowshera (Soon Valley), Khushab. The highest performance for growth behavior of nursery plants was observed in peach followed by Plum. Sprouting (82.39%), scion growth rate (6.68 cm/month) while scion and stock girth remained 1.96 and 1.31 cm at the end of December. Moderate plant height (46.39 cm) was obtained with 53.21% success rate of budded plants in Peach. The results were followed by Plum budded on Red Leaf Nemaguard by sprouting percentage (72.36%), scion and stock growth rate remained 6.3 cm. Highest plant height (46.71 cm) and success percentage (71.44%) was recorded at the end of December. It was proved that Red Leaf Nemaguard is successful rootstock for commercial nursery production of Peach and Plum where nematodes are problem for nursery production.

ICHS2016/AB_224 Studies on the effect of different spawn types and spawning rates on the growth and yield of oyster mushroom (Pleurotes sapidus) Muhammad Asif Ali1, Muhammad Salman1, Muhammad Rizwan Liaqat1, Muhammad Uzair Asif2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Botany, Government College University, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.A.A.)

1

Mushroom cultivation is most efficient and economically feasible biotechnology for the transition of lignocellulose waste materials into eminent quality protein food. The experiment was conducted in Medicinal and Mushroom laboratory Institute of Horticultural sciences University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. This study was conducted to check the effect of different spawn types and spawning rates on the growth and yield of oyster mushroom (Pleurotes sapidus). Each Spawn type (wheat grain, sorghum grain and pearl millet grain) was added at different spawn rates (1%, 1.5%, 2% and 2.5%). Cotton waste (300 gm) with 2% lime concentration was used as substrate in Polypropylene bags of 632

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

10 inches. The parameters which were evaluated as, Time taken for initiation of spawn running (In days), Time taken for completion of mycelial growth (In days), Time taken for initiation of pinhead formation (In days), Number of pinheads formation, Number of mature fruit bodies, Number of flushes, Yield (g) of 1st 2nd and 3rd flush and total yield per bag (g) with fresh weight and dry weight of mushroom during this study. The experiment was laid out in completely randomized design (CRD) under factorial design. The number of treatments was four and each treatment was replicated six times. Rapid mycelial growth (29.83 days) was found in T2 (2% millet grain spawns) whereas mycelial growth was slowest (38.83 days) in T0 (1% wheat grain spawns). Maximum yield (289.7 g) was obtained in T0 (1% of sorghum grain spawns) but minimum yield (219.45 g) was calculated in T3 (2.5% of wheat grain spawns).

ICHS2016/AB_228 Effect of climate and soil on morphological diversity of Moringa germplasm Umbreen Shahzad1,2, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani1, Mansoor Hameed3 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Horticulture, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Bahadur Campus Layyah, Pakistan 3 Department of Botany, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (U.S.)

1

The characterization, preservation and utilization of Moringa as a native plant of Pakistan is of great concern from biodiversity, ethno-botanical, dietary and pharmaceutical perspectives. This study was designed to unravel the morphological diversity of the Moringa germplasm present in ten districts of Punjab province through the morphological markers and its relationship with the soil, environment and geographical positioning. During the survey of ten districts, 137 Moringa trees were evaluated to record the diversity present in the tree, leaf, flower and fruits. The interaction of diversity with soil and meteorological factors was evaluated. The canonical corresponding analysis (CCA) showed relationship of morphological diversity with the distribution of the accessions which were strongly influenced by the different meteorological parameters. The temperature regimes influenced leaflet area. The potassium content of the soil strongly affected the distribution of the Moringa plantlets of districts Khanewal and Layyah. The soil nutritional status is determined by the nitrogen, phosphorus and soil organic matter and the pod area and pod length was associated with the soil nutritional status. Soil characteristics e.g. electrical conductivity and total soluble solids strongly influenced leaf area. Similarly the leaf area and stem diameter varied with soil sodium adsorption ratio, pH and saturation percentage. Moreover, the cluster analysis depicted morphological diversity in accessions and revealed that there were some escapees individuals which did not group with other accessions of their areas. This showed the fact that environment and the soil factors also caused some changes in the morphology of the plants. The tree qualitative characteristics indicated that the accessions from the hot and the dry regions (Bahawalpur, Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan) had more intensity of hairiness on their vegetative and reproductive parts. The surveyed area was focused on the feral plant cultivation. This cultivation was done through plantation of the cuttings of the limbs in the near bye areas so they were the true representatives of the existing wild plants and no cultivated variety was available in the focused area. The wild individuals of Moringa are quite suitable for the specific environmental conditions and well adapted to the soils; therefore, these characteristics can be utilized for the breeding of improved cultivars to fulfill the needs of the nation’s nutrition. 33

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_229 Validation of DNA markers to determine sex in papaya (Carica papaya L.) plants at seedling stage for enhanced productivity Muzaffar Javed1, Armghan Shahzad1,2, Ghulam Muhammad Ali1+2 PARC Institute for Advanced Studies in Agriculture, National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan 2 National Institute for Genomics and Advanced Biotechnology, National Agricultural Research Center Islamabad, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (A.S.) 1

Sex nature detection in papaya (Carica papaya L.) at seedling stage is extremely significant for crop yield enhancement because it accelerates the detection of the fruitful plants and alleviates unnecessary cost incurred by farmers for maintaining unproductive male plants that contribute to 4050% of the population. Only 5% male plants are required for fertilization in the field. Different DNA markers were applied to find out the sex types of 120 plants of sinta; a dioecious papaya cultivar. This specie consist three types of sex (male, female and hermaphrodite) determined by a multiallelic locus. There are no morphological differences at seedling stage in different sexes. No statistical correlation between the leaves shape, stem diameter, leaf number and height with subsequent expression of maleness or femaleness of papaya plant was found. In order to use DNA markers based genotyping in papaya for sex identification, five DNA markers were utilized. Evaluation of these markers revealed that DNA markers viz. PKBT-5, T12, W11, SDP, and Napf-76 were successfully amplified. These markers were then validated at reproductive stage when plants produced flowers and fruits. Among these DNA markers W11 and PKBT-5 successfully identified sex in papaya plants, as their maleness gene amplification was 100% in male papaya plants. Hence, these DNA markers can be used for sex determination in papaya at seedling stage to save resources and efforts to grow unwanted unproductive male plants. This exercise can enhance production of Papaya by 90-100% as the population of female plants can be increased in the field by 90-100%.

ICHS2016/AB_232 Analysis of genetic diversity as a key to conserve Berberis baluchistanica Ahrendt. An endemic species to Balochistan Shazia Saeed, Muhammad Younas Khan Barozai, Alia Ahmed and Rasool Baksh Tareen Department of Botany, University of Balochistan, Quetta, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (S.S.), [email protected] (M.Y.K.B.), [email protected] (A.A.), [email protected] (R.B.T.) Berberis is an important genus of Berberidaceae. This genus is of great economic and medicinal value. Berberis baluchistanica (endemic to Balochistan) is selected for this study is used traditionally by local communities to cure different ailments such as internal injuries and infection of human and livestock, thus over collection of this significant taxa leads to its population depletion. Genetic diversity of B. baluchistanica has been studied for the first time from five different sites of Zarghoon and Sra Ghurgai (Takatu-mountain range) of Balochistan by using Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR). Out of total sampled genotypes five were selected for this study. The morphological and molecular variation was estimated 34

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

by Numerical Taxonomy and Multivariate Analysis System (NTSYS) pc version 2.10. DNA Amplification of all genotypes was studied by using SSR markers. Out of seven primer pairs of SSR markers, four amplified twenty seven allelic variants with twenty two polymorphic bands (81%). Polymorphic bands (%) with an average of 5.5 amplified per primer. UPGMA method was used for cluster analysis indicating some genetic variability in investigated population. The average genetic similarity coefficient among the genotypes indicated that Zarghoon area population is genetically more diverse when compared with Sra gurgai. Data analyzed providing a base line study for this important species to be conserved by implementing different conservation strategies.

ICHS2016/AB_233 Management strategy against rodents infesting date-palm orchards in Nok-Kundi, Balochistan Province, Pakistan Amjad Pervez, Syed Muzaffar Ahmed and Muhammad Anwar Arain Vertebrate Pest Control Institute, Southern zone Agricultural Research Centre, Pakistan Agricultural Research Council, Old Block 9&10, Karachi University Campus, Karachi, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (A.P.) The rodent species of genus Nesokia might have migrated to Pakistan from, Iranian Balochistan and infested thousands of date-palm trees at Nok-Kundi and Mashkale, Baluchistan, Pakistan. Losses of Rs.21.32 million in a single crop season were calculated in Nok-Kundi orchards only to determine the seriousness of the problem and to justify control operations. In order to manage this rat species, studies were conducted on the biology and food preference including control trials. The species causing infestation was identified as short-tailed mole rat (N.indica). Food habit studies confirmed that rat species throughout the season feeds principally upon the date-palm fruits, stem, grasses and roots but date-palm stem was the chief of the diet. Bait enhancement studies revealed that 5% addition of date fruit in bait base may significantly enhance the rodenticidal bait acceptance, both of acute and chronic in rats to achieve a successful control of this economically important rodent pest of date-palm trees.Evaluation of most suitable bait base was conducted from no-choice and choice tests. Results revealed that rats preferred the rice most over wheat, millet, maize, peanut and sunflower seed. Burrow baiting was found most efficient technique to eradicate rat pest menace in view of prevailing ecological conditions and drifting of sand due to high velocity of dusty wind covering the bait stations. High mortility (100%) was recorded through use of 5g sachet of milk powder bait containing sodium monofluroacatate (1080) inserted deep into live burrow for safety of grazing ruminants and livestock. Zince phosphide (2%) and brodifacoum (0.005%) baits showed 75.43% and 85.71% population mortality. Burrow fumigation with Aluminum Phosphide tablets resulted up to 95.45% reduction in rodent activity.

35

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_234 Phenolics profile and anthocyanin degradation in Malus crabapple flowers Rana Naveed Ur Rehman, Yaohua You, Zhang Lei, Weifeng Chen, Pengmin Li and Fengwang Ma State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology in Arid Areas, College of Horticulture, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, People's Republic of China Email: [email protected] (R.N.U.R.), [email protected] (P.L.) This study aimed to focus on phenolic profile and their concurrent variation during different growth stages in immaculately red flowers of Malus crabapple. In addition to this, in planta active anthocyanin degradation had also been taken into account with respect to hydrogen peroxide concentration. Our results showed that Malus crabapple flowers are rich source of diverse array of phenolic intermediates and their respective concentration is mainly determined by environmental factors and genotypic response for homeostatic adoptability. Individual flower concentration of gallic acid, caffeic acid and syringic acid increased significantly. Similarly all flavonol enhanced as flower developed except epicatechin which sharply reduced during final stage. Among five floral stages, fifth stage appeared to be 'fate determining' since most of flavanol (quercetin-3-xyloside, quercetin-3-rhaminose, quercetin3-glucoside and quercetin-3-arabinoside) among per flower increased until fourth stage and degraded suddenly during last stage. While among combined flower samples cyanidin-3-galactoside degraded consistently exhibiting reciprocal relationship with hydrogen per oxide concentration. But aqueous reaction system of anthocyanin and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) showed that whole of the anthocyanin had not been degraded during H2O2 scavenging instead some other enzyme system was also involved to reinforce those degradation manifestations in plant cell. Our results suggested that concentration of each phenolic compounds is congruent to their functional ability in plants. The information about altering concentration of phenolic profile would be useful for choosing precise time with maximum concentration about key molecules which might concern for future needs.

ICHS2016/AB_241 Enhancing water productivity of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) through drip irrigation system Muhammad Sohail Waqas1, Muhammad Jehanzeb Masud Cheema1, Ahmad Waqas2 and Saddam Hussain1 1 Department of Irrigation and Drainage, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Water Management Research Centre, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.S.W.) Water deficiency is one of the most important factors restraining plant growth and dry matter which is the reduction of product quality and lack water soil or air, often during the plant life cycle. Therefore there is dire need to adopt the modern efficient irrigation methods for crop production. To address this issue a field experiment on autumn potato was conducted at Water Management Research Centre (WMRC), University of Agriculture Faisalabad (UAF). The study aims to determine the effects of different irrigation methods and irrigation regimens on potato yield and yield components. Two planting schemes with irrigation treatments were ridge-furrow sowing with furrow irrigation (F) and bed-furrow sowing under drip irrigation (D) with three irrigation schedules (i) irrigation to conserve the available water for crop (DIR1), (ii) irrigation when 10% of the available water was consumed (DIR2) 36

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

and (iii) irrigation when 15% of the available water was consumed (DIR 3) and it was replicated thrice. Irrigation regimens influenced tuber yield, and tuber yield was registered as follows F > DIR1> DIR2>DIR3. Water saving was recorded as 65%, 58% and 50% in DIR 3, DIR2, DIR1 respectively as compared to furrow irrigation. Tuber yield was recorded as 14.42 ton/acre, 11.80 ton/acre, 11.13 ton/acre and 10.45 ton/acre in F, DIR1, DIR2 and DIR3 respectively. Percentage plant emergence was 97.83 % in F and DIR3. Average number of tubers/plant was found to be higher in F that is 6.48 and lessen in DIR3 5.14. Maximum number of tillers was found in F. Deficit irrigation yield more nonmarketable tubers while treatment F yield maximum number of marketable tubers. Average yield of potato in Pakistan is 8 ton/acre while potential yield of potato crop is 15 ton/acre. It was concluded that potato was severely affected by water stress and planting configuration didn’t have any significant effect on different traits.

ICHS2016/AB_245 Prospects of floriculture sector to improve livelihood in Pakistan Noor Alam Khan, Shahid Nadeem Directorate of Floriculture, Department of Horticulture Research and Development, National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (N.A.K.) Floriculture is an innovative and high tech driven business. Floriculture in Pakistan is a neglected and still in embryonic stages. While enormous genetic diversity, varied agro climatic conditions, versatile human resources etc. offer Pakistan a unique scope for judicious employment of existing resources and exploration of avenues yet untouched. It is the need of the time to produce skilled personals and explore new means to increase farmer’s income and explore marketing to boost the economy as well as increases export. Floriculture is a profitable business because of higher income per unit area in comparison to other crops. The demand in domestic and international markets makes floriculture a profitable business. Low yield, poor management practices, lack of skilled manpower, high postharvest losses and inefficient marketing system are the main issues to be addressed. A lot of opportunities exists for creation of model nurseries and cooperative farming. Year-round flowers production is an added advantage for Pakistan compared to western countries. The stiff competition, seasonal demand and oversupply in the international market demands for high quality flowers production. Introduction of essential oil extractor as cottage industry can play a big role to boost floriculture industry. Adoption of the pattern of AVRDC (Taiwan) and PTC + (Netherlands) for farmers training and floriculture development.

ICHS2016/AB_246 Apple value chain: a case study from Baluchistan province Khalid Mushtaq, Sultan Ali Adil and Maqsood Hussain Institute of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (K.M.), [email protected] (K.M.) Apple Value Chain encompasses the full range of activities and services required to bring the produce 37

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

from farm to sale in local, national, or international markets. The value chain includes input suppliers, producers, market actors, processors and buyers. They are supported by a range of technical, business and financial service providers. Apple is a major fruit of Pakistan. Having good storability characteristics, the fruit is available for consumption, fresh as well as stored, almost throughout the year. Baluchistan and northern areas of KPK are the two apple producing areas in Pakistan that have a share of 83 & 16 percent in production respectively. The present study focuses on Baluchistan, being a major apple producing area and information was collected from different actors of the apple value chain which includes farmers, pre-harvest contractors, transporters, commission agents (Arhati), wholesalers (Pharia), traders (Ladania), retailers, processors and exporters with the objective to gain insights into marketing and economic gains across the value chain. During field visits it was revealed, that there are two types of marketing practices commonly followed by the farm owners i.e. farm managed, operated and marketed by owner himself and farm sold to pre-harvest contractor (PHC) at maturity stage. The analysis shows that there is a gap between the sales value of farms self-marketed by the farm owner and those sold to the PHC. It explains that by moving ahead in the value chain, by self-marketing the produce, there is room to sell the produce at a much premium price through usage of latest marketing techniques and modern packaging. The economic gains across the value chain are distributed like Rs.4.82/kg, Rs.5.05/kg, and Rs.17.57/kg, for commission agents, wholesalers and retailers respectively. Further, the study reveals that farmers capacity building, processing infrastructure support, and market linkages could be the major components of the apple value chain development strategy in Baluchistan. In addition, in-kind assistance to apple farmers including picking ladders, harvesting bags and field plastic crates can also be an extended strategy.

ICHS2016/AB_248 Assessment of harvest and postharvest losses of citrus fruit in Pakistan Muhammad Ather Mahmood, Mazhar Abbas, Arshed Bashir, Sonila Hassan and Sher Baz Khan Social Sciences Research Institute (PARC), Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab 38850, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.A.) Pakistan has diversity in soil and climatic conditions that favors the production of variety of fruits and vegetables. Citrus enjoys a unique position among all the fruits in Pakistan. It is the number one fruit crop in Pakistan in terms of area, production and export volume. The postharvest losses in fruits and vegetables in Pakistan are as high as ranging from 30-40 percent of the produce. A large portion of citrus fruit in Pakistan is lost during harvesting and after harvest. Little empirical work has been carried out for estimating postharvest losses in citrus. The present study was conducted with the major objective to estimate the postharvest losses in citrus fruit. A total of 115 respondents were interviewed arbitrarily involved in the production, handling and consumption of citrus fruit. The results revealed that complete and partial losses in citrus production and marketing were estimated about 8.15 percent and 19.83 percent respectively. The losses at different stages of fruit production relating picking (4.28 percent), carrying (0.92 percent), grading-packing (0.52 percent), loading-transportation (0.03 percent), unloading-auction (0.82 percent), wholesaling (5.87 percent) and retailing (15.55 percent) were reported in case of citrus. These losses were mainly caused by fruit pressing during harvesting and packaging. For minimizing the harvest and postharvest losses at farmers/producers levels, trainings should be imparted to the harvesting labor in citrus growing areas of the country in 38

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

collaboration with research institutions working in the country in post-harvest handling. It is essential to impart the necessary skills and upgrade the capacity of all the stake holders involved in the production and handling of citrus fruit.

ICHS2016/AB_249 Phenology of ‘Tupy’ and ‘Xavante’ blackberries grown in subtropical area Ibrar Hussain1, Sergio Ruffo Roberto1, Ines Cristina Batista Fonseca1, Adriane Marinho de Assis2 and Luis Eduardo Correa Antunes3 1 Agricultural Research Center, Londrina State University, Celso Garcia Cid Road, Londrina, PR, Brazil 2 Plant Production Department, Federal University of Pelotas, University Campus Capao do Leao, RS, Brazil 3 Embrapa Temperate Climate, Pelotas, RS, Brazil Email: [email protected] (I.H.) The objective of the study was to evaluate the phenological stages duration of ‘Tupy’ and ‘Xavante’ blackberries grown under subtropical conditions, aiming to optimize the production system. The experiment was conducted at Experimental Station, Agricultural Research Center, Londrina State University, PR, Brazil, during two consecutive seasons, 2013 and 2014. A completely randomized design was used as a statistical model with five replications, and each plot was composed of five trees. It was evaluated, through visual observations, the duration in days of each phenological stage of both cultivars, as follows: start of bud sprouting; start of flowering; start of fruit maturation; start of fruit harvest; end of flowering; and end of harvest. It was also evaluated the duration in days of the following fruit development stages: flower bud; full open flower; unripe green berry; ripening pink berry; and ripe berry. The phenological development of ‘Tupy’ and ‘Xavante’ blackberries were directly influenced by the winter conditions, changing bud sprouting, flowering and fruit harvesting periods. In 2013 season, ‘Tupy’ had comparatively late start of growth cycle than ‘Xavante’ but both ended fruit harvest at same time in early summer. In 2014 season, ‘Xavante’ maintained the characteristic of earliness, and ‘Tupy’ also resumed growth cycle comparatively earlier to last season. The fruit development duration was quite similar for both cultivars. ‘Tupy’ and ‘Xavante’ grown in subtropical mild winter conditions have comparatively unique phenological periods, earlier and shorter than temperate regions, thus, the possibility to grow blackberries under two annual crops to optimize the system of production is proposed.

ICHS2016/AB_250 Population dynamics and management of citrus psylla (Diaphorina citri) Faisal Hafeez, Abdul Ghaffar, Muhammad Farooq, Mauhammad Latif, Muneer Abbas and Misbah Ashraf Entomological Research Institute, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab 38850, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (F.H.) Effective management of phytophagous insect pests revolves around three basic Principals i.e biology, 39

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ecology and behavior. To date very little information is documented on ecological parameters of citrus psylla (Diaphorina citri). The objective is to record the seasonal dynamics in relation to density dependent and independent factors. Seasonal dynamics (per six inch twig for adults/nymphs) was studied fortnightly during May 2013 to April 2015. Field studies showed that D. citri remained present (under leaves, twigs and/ tender branches and shoots) on citrus plant through-out the year as adult stage. Peak population was recorded from Toba Tek Singh (5.80, 11.08 & 12.24) followed by Faisalabad (2.93, 5.95 & 7.72) and Sargodha (2.81, 5.68 & 6.27) in the month of April during three years. However, maximum nymphal population was recorded at the end of March and 1st fortnight of April, from Faisalabad (26.33, 31.73 & 29.75) followed by Toba Tek Singh (22.67, 20.07 & 21.06) and Sargodha (16.80, 19.13 & 17.06). In the same consequence, two parasitoids (Tamarixia radiata & Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis) were active, during the months of March, April and October, November. But the population of former is more as compared to latter. Moreover, seven insecticides (six new chemistry along-with a carbamate) were evaluated for field efficacy against D. citri. Thiamethoxam and thiacloprid were proved highly toxic and potent exhibiting maximum mortality after 24 hrs and 3 days whereas emmamectin benzoate was highly effective (94.34% mortality) after seven days, followed by spirotetramate and carbosulfan that are statistically different from each other. It is concluded that D. citri remained present and colonized on citrus plant. The effective parasitism is low due to fewer parasitoids population. Conservation and augmentation of natural enemy population integrated with cultural and selective chemical control techniques is dire need of the time to minimize pest population.

ICHS2016/AB_265 Endeavouring commercial heterosis for yield in indigenous single cross (F 1) hybrids in chillies (Capsicum annuum L.) Muhammad Umair, Nausherwan Nobel Nawab, Taj Naseeb Khan, Zakria Farid and Sultan Mehmood Directorate of Vegetable, Department of Horticultural Research & Development, National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.U) Chilli (Capsicum annum L) is the third most important member of family Solanaceae and has its value in human diet since 7500 BC as a vegetable, spice and condiment. Pakistan has 74.4 thousand hectares of land acquired by chillies, with a production of 190 thousand tonnes. Due to its consistent use; chillies has always an escalating demand thus, making it necessary for plant breeders to develop high yielding hybrids. For the purpose of assessing the commercial heterosis for yield and its allied traits in indigenously developed F1 hybrids. Eight quantitatively inherited traits in seven indigenous chilli hybrids were compared with their parents and one international hybrid (222-hybrid/standard). Statistical analysis depicted significant difference for all the parameters considered. Almost all the hybrids showed negative commercial heterosis for the trait i.e.; days to 50% flowering which indicated their earliness. Hybrid 5 × 4 showed maximum earliness (-41.9 %, i.e., 22 days) as compared to standard (53 days). Hybrid 1 × 4 gave maximum commercial heterosis (34.04 %) for plant height over 222-hybrid. Maximum (35.88 %) commercial heterosis for fruit length was given by hybrid 1 × 2. Commercial heterosis for fruit weight was recorded to be 93.18% greater in 1 × 2 (12.75g) as compared to standard (6.6 g). Hybrid 1 × 4 (697) resulted 80.6 % greater number of fruits per plant than 222hybrid (386). Locally developed single cross F1 hybrid 1 × 2 gave 168.4% greater green fruit yield than 40

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

international hybrid which was used as a check. This research work highlighted both early and high yielding chilli hybrids which can be further utilized as promising hybrids after further evaluation.

ICHS2016/AB_266 Genetics of direct and reciprocal cross combinations in determinate tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Ahsan Javed, Nausherwan Nobel Nawab, Taj Naseeb Khan, Nasir Mehmood Minhas, Asia Ramzan, Tahira Noor, Atif Akram and Muhammad Jawaad Atif. Directorate of Vegetable, Department of Horticultural Research & Development, National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (A.J) Four parents/lines viz; KHT-103, KHT-107, ST-100 and T-1360 were used to develop direct and indirect cross combinations to study their genetics. Combining ability and its variances were estimated by analysis Griffing’s Model-1 procedure. The hybrids were evaluated for days to 50% flowering, number of flowers per cluster, number of clusters per plant, number of fruits per cluster, fruit length, fruit width, single fruit weight, days to 50% maturity, plant height and yield. The gene action for these traits was studied. The ratio of general combining ability (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) variance revealed preponderance of non-additive genetic behavior for all parameters under study except fruit length (mm), fruit width (mm) and number of clusters per plant. The parent T-1360 was best general for yield. The hybrid T-1360 × ST-100 (0.47**) showed maximum positively significant SCA results for yield.

ICHS2016/AB_269 Development of high yielding pea variety ‘PEAS-2009’ Nausherwan Nobel Nawab1, Khalid Mahmood Qureshi2, Abdul Rashid2 and Shahid Niaz2 Directorate of Vegetable, Department of Horticultural Research & Development National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan 2 Vegetable Research Institute, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab 38850, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (N.N.N) 1

'Peas-2009’ is a high yielding and early maturing pea (Pisum sativum L.) variety suitable for both early and mid season planting. It is a selection from the cross of Knight × Arkle developed following pedigree selection procedure. Plants are mostly single stem, determinate, green in colour and bear flowers between 32-34 days after sowing. It is tolerant to diseases and heat. Seed of this variety is sweet, bold, and green in colour and fetches high market price due to attractive pod size and shape. Pods are 9.511.0 cm in length with 9.0 seeds per pod on an average basis, with a 100-seed weight of 72 g. Average green pod yield of this variety in early season planting and mid season planting is about 5.85 Mt·ha-1 and 8.55 Mt·ha-1 respectively. The overall percent increase in yield of Peas-2009 is about 35.34 % more than the standard variety (Meteor Faisalabad). This high yielding pea variety is suitable for cultivation in all the pea growing areas. 41

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_270 Peat and substitutes of peat as growing media for sweet pepper (Capsicum annum L.) nursery production Muhammad Jawaad Atif1, Ghulam Jellani1, HidayatUllah1, Noor Saleem1, Ahsan Javed1 and Atif Akram1 National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.J.A) The experiment on peat and substitution of peat as growing media for sweet pepper (Capsicum annum L.) nursery production was conducted at Directorate of Vegetable, DHRD, NARC, Islamabad during 2013-14. This work presents data on germination (%), days to emergence, seedling shoot length (cm), seedling height (cm), seedling vigor index, and dry matter accumulation (%). Maximum germination % (93.967), seedlings shoot length (24 cm), seedling vigor index (3037.4 %) and minimum days to emergence (15.333) were observed in T9 (Peat, compost and Traditional practicing media in 1:1:1 ratio). Maximum seedling height (35 cm) was recorded in T 6 (Peat and Traditional practicing media in 1:1 ratio). Maximum dry matter accumulation (38.100) was recorded in T8 (Peat and Traditional practicing media in 1/2:1 ratio). The objective of this study was to find best suited proportion of medias to compare the growth and development of sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seedlings as affected by 3 different types of growing media (peat, compost and traditional practicing media) alone and in different combinations. From the results it can be inferred that peat, compost and traditional practicing media (1:1:1 ratio) has significant effect as compared to other treatments.

ICHS2016/AB_277 Challenges and strategies to improve mango value chains in Pakistan Hammad Badar Institute of Business Management Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (H.B) Pakistan is ranked among the leading mango producing and exporting countries in the world. However, the mango industry in Pakistan is currently faced with number of challenges which hinder its potential contribution to the economy. Thus, the study was conducted to identify challenges and strategies to improve mango value chains in Pakistan. Adopting a value chain approach, data were gathered through consumer focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with the industry stakeholders belonging to the provinces of Punjab and Sindh. Thematic content analysis of data collected from value chain actors indicated heterogeneous and diversified structure of Pakistan’s mango industry due to involvement of number of value-chain actors such as input suppliers, growers, pre-harvest contractors, commission agents, exporters, wholesalers and retailers, as well as consumers. In addition, different public stakeholders were also involved in providing support services to the industry. Theses value chain actors were linked through three types of chains that carried the flow of mangoes from growers to consumers. Broadly, they were identified as traditional, modern and export chains, and each had its own dynamics in terms of chain flows and governance. Long and unorganised traditional value chains governed by spot market transactions carried the major flow of 42

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

low to high quality mangoes to consumers of all income classes. Modern value chains served the needs of middle and high income consumers by supplying better quality mangoes and export value chains that supplied mangoes to foreign consumers. The study identified challenges that came from weaknesses not only in specific tiers of the value chains, but also in value chains as a system and in the ability of public stakeholders to deliver adequate support. The study suggested the promotion of information flows within value chains and improvement of chain governance by building collaborative relationships between the value chain actors.

ICHS2016/AB_280 Comparative field study of biochemical and phenolic antioxidants of mint leaves treated with biofertlizer and humic acid in the absence and presence of urea fertilizer Maryam Aslam1,2, Bushra Sultana2, Farooq Anwar3,4 and Hassan Munir5 Department of Chemistry, Government College Women University, Faisalabad 2 Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, AlKharj-11942, Saudi Arabia 4 Department of Chemistry, University of Sargodha-40100, Sargodha, Pakistan 5 Department of Agronomy, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad Email: [email protected] (M.A) 1

The important constrain to limited crop production and food security in developed as well as developing nations around the globe and more specifically among poor farmers of Pakistan is soil infertility. The problems of the resultant land degradation can be reduced by implementing good farming strategies. Organic fertilizers are known to improve bio-diversity and can be a huge depository to cope excessive carbon dioxide. While comparing chemical fertilizers, organic fertilizers slowly release the desired soil nutrients to the growing plant and hence nutrient supply is maintained for longer time period. The present research was conducted to investigate the effect of root priming treatments on a list of biochemical and antioxidant parameters on mint leaves grown in two soil modes i.e. presence (A) and absence of urea (B). Bio-fertilizer and humic acid (6 h, 9 h and 12 h) were used as roots priming agents. Bio-fertilizer was applied to roots 30 minutes prior to sowing while roots primed with humic acid were sowed before 6 h, 9 h and 12 h of priming. Biochemical parameters showed proline contents as 15.09-43.17 µg/g FM in A and 12.78-37.23 µg/g FM in B; MDA content as 4.45-27.15 and 16.54-35.51 ŋg/g FM and total soluble proteins as 3.95-18.71 µg/g FM in A and 5.4721.67 µg/g FM in B. The variation regarding total chlorophyll content (TCC) and carotenoid content was found to be 2.406-5.310 in A mg/g FM and 1.745-6.713 mg/g FM in B; and 0.218-0.457 mg/g FM in A and 0.313-0.679 mg/g FM in B, respectively. While determining phenolic contents, the results found in A and B experiment was as 9.28-18.54 and 4.54-13.49, respectively. Antioxidant analysis showed the following results; reducing Power as 0.882-1.345 and 0.816-1.136 at 10 mg/mL and DPPH° as 0.186-0.441 and 0.212-0.489 (IC50). Further, HPLC analysis was performed for the quantification of phenolic acids. Overall study showed that growth regulators as root priming agents performed well against control samples (in which no roots were primed), however, non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were seen in two treatments, Bio-fertilizer and Humic acid (6 h priming). The comparable results were also seen in two soil modes. Therefore, it can be said that application of urea (a synthetic fertilizer) in the soil can be minimized and preferred for the safer and ecofriendly production of mint. 43

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_281 Antioxidant and antitumor potential of different extracts of Ricinus communis and Anethum graveolens Faiza Nazir1, Raja Adil Sarfraz2 and Maryam Aslam1 Department of Chemistry, Government College Women University Faisalabad, Pakistan 2 Central Hi-Tech Laboratory, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (F.N) 1

The methanol, ethanol and aqueous extracts of Anethum graveolens and Ricinus communis was studied for antitumor potential, antioxidant activity, total phenolic and flavonoid contents. The antitumor potential was determined by potato disc assay. While the antioxidant activity, total phenolic and flavonoids were evaluated by DPPH radical scavenging assay, Folin–Ciocalteau assay and aluminium chloride method respectively. The maximum antitumor potential of methanol extracts of Anethum graveolens was 89.40% at 10,000 µg/mL and that of Ricinus communis was 88.34% at 1.0 µg/mL. The maximum antioxidant activity was found for methanol extract of Ricinus communis. Maximum flavonoids were found in ethanol extract of Ricinus communis. The total flavonoids were found in the range of 83.83 to 669.83 mg QE (Quercetin Equivalent) /g plant extract. Maximum total phenolic contents were found in methanol extract of Ricinus communis i.e. 12.67 mg GAE (Gallic Acid Equivalents)/ g plant extract. It was concluded that methanol extract of Ricinus communis was source of high phenolic contents, antioxidant activity and antitumor potential.

ICHS2016/AB_282 Diversity of whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) on citrus in Punjab (Pakistan) Muhammad Tayyib1, Shahid Majeed2 Muhammad Jawwad Yousuf3 Department of Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Entomological Section, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab 38850, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.T) 1

The present research was conducted to collect and identify whitefly species associated with Citrus plants from Punjab, Pakistan. It is situated 29.240 N to 33.560 N latitude, 70.250E to 74.310 E and altitude vary between 125 to 2291 meter. Whiteflies are moth like, minute insects belonging to family Aleyrodidae. These are polyphagous, feed on large number of host plants like crops, fruit plants, ornamentals, weeds and vegetables. This research has resulted in the identification of 7 species under 4 genera. Seven species viz., Aleurocanthus russellae, Aleurocanthus woglumi, Bemisia giffardi, Dialeurodes citri, Dialeurodes kirkaldyi, Dialeurolonga elongata, and Dialeurolonga lagerstroemiae were identified from the pupal cases mounted on slides. The specimens were collected from 20 different localities of Punjab viz., Bahawalpur, Bhukkar, Chakwal, Dera Ghazi Khan, Faisalabad, Gujrat, Islamabad, Jhelum, Kallar Kahar, Lahore, Lodhran, Multan, Muree, Okara, Rahim Yar Khan, Rawalpindi, Sahiwal, Sargodha, Sialkot and Vehari. A taxonomic key for the identification of species is also prepared. Species richness has been calculated by using Shannon Weinor index of biodiversity. Species richness value is maximum for Sargodha, followed by Faisalabad and Multan.

44

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_285 Analyzing the biophoton responses of spinach to organic and inorganic growing systems Shaghef Ejaz1, Karoline Maria Jezik2, Muhammad Akbar Anjum1, Werner Stumpf2, Heidrun Halbwirth3 and Karl Stich3 1 Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan (60800), Pakistan 2 Division of Vegetables and Ornamentals, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, A-1180 Vienna, Austria 3 Institute of Chemical Engineering, University of Technology, A-1060 Vienna, Austria Email: [email protected] (S.E) Stress conditions noticeably enhance spontaneous emission of bioluminescence or biophoton in plants. The ultra-weak bioluminescence or biophoton is the emission of photons at an intensity less than 1000 photons/sec/cm2. This radiation is induced by electronically excited molecules that exist in living cells. Biophotons provide novel information to visualize the physiological states of plants. Generation of reactive oxygen species as a result of abiotic stress or pest/pathogenic infestation has been found to be accompanied by this ultra-weak photon emission. These bioluminescence markers provide informative view of oxidative stress signaling and oxidative stress damage in plants during adverse conditions. A highly sensitive system based on the technique of photon counting imaging using photomultiplier tubes has been developed to determine the dynamics of photon emission. Considering biophotons as oxidative status markers, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the organically and inorganically grown spinach. Results showed that strongly enhanced biophoton emission was observed in inorganically cultivated spinach leaves. Further, nitrate content, and specific activity of polyphenol oxidase and dihydroflavonol reductase were also higher in these plants. Comparatively, organically grown spinaches showed low biophotons emission along with higher trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ascorbic acid content and total flavonols. Similarly, specific activities of peroxidase, chalcone synthase, flavanone 3-hydroxylase and flavonol synthase were found to be higher in organic spinach. Inverse correlation of biophotons count with TEAC, antioxidants and specific activities of enzymes involved in flavonoids biosynthesis was also evident in organically grown spinach. This study highlights the potential of biophoton imaging to monitor oxidative stress in plants grown under different growing systems. Furthermore, biophotons generation might be a reliable marker in diagnosing oxidative status of leafy vegetables.

ICHS2016/AB_289 Standardization of olive curing with Sodium hydroxide at different physiological stages Ghazal Miraj1, Riaz Alam2 and Bibi Haleema3 Biochemistry Section, Agricultural Research Institute, Tarnab. Peshawar, Pakistan 2 Olive Research & Development Institute, National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan 3 Plant Physiology Section, Agricultural Research Institute, Tarnab, Peshawar, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (G.M), [email protected] (R.A), [email protected] (B.H) 1

Fresh olives are naturally very bitter because they are rich in oleuropein. Olives curing or removing 45

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

the bitterness is the most important step for its post-harvest management and storage. Experiment was conducted during 2013 at Bio-chemistry Section, Agricultural Research Institute, Tarnab, Peshawar, to standardize the curing of olive at three physiological stages i.e. full green, lemon green and semi ripen. The olive fruits of the three maturity stages were kept separately in different Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions (1%, 1.5%, 2%, 2.5% and 3%). Control treatment was given by soaking the fruit in simple water. After complete curing, washing of olives was done by dipping the olive in clean water and then washed after 1 hour time interval until complete removal of NaOH. Washing of olives was tested by applying phenolphthalein (1% w/v in alcohol) on the olives. Results showed that 1 % NaOH solution took more time in curing (60 hrs) where high concentrations of NaOH (2.5% & 3%) resulted in early curing i.e. 33 hrs and 24 hrs respectively but consequently more time in washing (68 hrs). It was concluded from the results that the full green olives may be cured with 2 % NaOH solution for 39 hours and then washed for 48 hours. The lemon green olives can be cured for 48 hrs with 1.5% NaOH and 36 hours washing afterwards. The semi ripened olive fruit cured with 1.5% NaOH in 46 hours and took 4 hours for complete washing.

ICHS2016/AB_295 Quorum sensing and quorum quenching bacteria from rhizospheric populations associated with gladiolus corms Kashif Riaz1, Sahar Jameel1, Akhtar Hameed1, Raja Qualib Hussain1, Yasar Sajjad2 and Muhammad Jafar Jaskani3 1 Department of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad Campus, Abbottabad. KPK, Pakistan 3 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, , University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected]af.edu.pk (K.R), [email protected] (S.J), [email protected] (A.H), [email protected] (R.Q.H), [email protected] (Y.S), [email protected] (M.J.J) Gladiolus is an important cut flower holding a noticeable position in the international flower market. The beneficial properties of rhizosphere associated bacterial populations are regulated by quorum sensing (QS, cell density dependent gene regulation) and quorum quenching (QQ, attenuation of QS). In this study the QS activating (Pseudomonas and Burkholderia sp) and NAHL degrading (Acinetobacter and Bacillus sp) culturable bacteria were isolated from gladiolus corms (one month post germination) using serial dilution method on nutrient agar medium. QS and QQ properties were verified through bacterial biosensor strains (C. violaceum CV026 and A. tumefaciens NTLR4) on TLC plates. These were identified through BLAST searches of their PCR amplified 16srDNA sequences. Molecular characterization of rhizosphere bacteria associated with gladiolus rhizosphere is important for gaining an insight into the structure and function of these microbial populations which can be further put to use for beneficial purposes.

46

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_298 Impact assessment of extension services for modern carrot husbandry in districts of Faisalabad and Layyah: a farm level analysis Muhammad Tariq, Muhammad Amjad, Tanveer Ahmad, Asmat Batool, Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir and Anam Noor Institute of Horticultural Sciences, , University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (T.A) A case study was conducted in two Districts (Layyah and Faisalabad) of Punjab province during the year 2014-15. An intensive extension campaign was launched in this area under the project “Improving farmers’ profitability and human nutrition through popularization of carrots” to assess the impact of this project. Information regarding farmer’s trends to carrot cultivation, extension skills and major limitations for carrot production was collected. Results depicted that a considerable number of farmers have knowledge about seed rate (60%), best sowing time (90%), use of recommended fertilizers (58.33%), intercropping (70%), pests and disease information (90%) and also awareness of pesticides (70%). However; there are some constraints such as the involvement of middle man (83.3%) and high input costs (85%). In light of these results, profitability of carrot cultivation can be promoted by providing guidance on market avenues and price fluctuations, by boosting up the role of mass media like newspaper, radio and television, creating awareness about the use of pesticides, encouragement for direct marketing and promoting the education within the farming community.

ICHS2016/AB_300 Effect of rootstocks on postharvest quality of peach fruit cv. ‘Flordaking’ Muhammad Javed Tareen1, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi2, Muhammad Naveed Tareen1 and Hafeez-urRahman3 1 Directorate General, Agriculture Research Institute, Quetta, Pakistan 2 PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan 3 National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.J.T.), [email protected] (N.A.A.), [email protected] (M.N.T.) Peach is the most important stone fruit crop after apricot in Pakistan. Mostly, high yields are dependent upon the selection of proper rootstock along with some promising scion varieties. The peach fruit being highly perishable requires great care during harvest and postharvest handling. In this study the effect of three different rootstocks; (GF-677, Peshawar local and Swat local) were evaluated on peach fruit cultivar ‘Flordaking’. The rootstocks were evaluated by determining performance of the fruits at 0 °C during five weeks storage period. Effect of the rootstocks on different fruit quality parameters were observed during the storage life included; percent weight loss, skin color luminosity (L*), chroma (C*) and hue angle (h°), fruit flesh firmness, soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA), SSC:TA ratio, fruit juice pH, sugars (total, reducing and non-reducing sugars), ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and free radicals scavenging activity. The post-harvest performance; storage period, decreased weight losses, higher flesh firmness, lower SSC, highest TA was found in fruits of trees 47

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

grafted on GF-677 rootstock whereas pH of fruit juice was recorded with no difference between GF677 and PL rootstocks and higher in SL rootstock. Highest SSC:TA ratio was observed in fruits from SL rootstock. Quality parameters of; skin color, GF-677 rootstock showed significantly higher L* (lightness), lowest changes in C* while, for h° the treatments showed similarity in their performance. The rate of increase in total and reducing sugars was significantly lower in GF-677 rootstock. Free radicals scavenging activity and ascorbic acid content were significantly higher in the fruits from GF677 as compared to other two rootstocks.

ICHS2016/AB_302 Impact of environmental components on plant growth in guava cultivars during summer season Muhammad Usman, Muhammad Ahmad Ali, Bilquees Fatima, Samida Qamar and Hafiz Sibtain Ahmad Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.U) Different guava cultivars were explored for changes in vegetative and reproductive growth patterns and to identify phenological stages during the summer season. Increase in leaf blade length (LL), width (LW) and ratio length/width (LL:LW) was significantly higher in the initial 0-16 days interval for leaf growth, and afterwards no marked increase was observed. Average ratio LL:LW was greater in cvs. ‘Round’ and ‘Pyriform’ compared with cv. ‘Pink Flesh’. Flower bud growth (BG) was significantly higher from 0-10 days in cvs. ‘Round’ and ‘Pyriform’ followed by cv. ‘Pink Flesh’. Fruit size of cv. ‘Round’ was markedly higher (68.46 mm) compared with cvs. ‘Pyriform’ and ‘Pink Flesh’ (53.24 mm and 46.74 mm) and fruits attained market maturity in 65-70 days. Expression of growth increment in different cultivars relative to cv. ‘Pink Flesh’ at day 15 (12.08 mm; taken as the lowest fruit size) revealed that final fruit growth at harvest (85 days) was 3 times greater in cv. ‘Pink Flesh’, 4 times in cv. ‘Pyriform’ and 5 times in cv. ‘Round’. Pearson’s correlation analysis revealed significant correlation among cultivars and temperature. Vegetative growth was positively correlated to temperature in cv. ‘Pink Flesh’ and ‘Pyriform’. Leaf growth in different genotypes was negatively correlated to Rain fall (%). Both temperature and relative humidity were positively correlated to genotypes for fruit development; however, rainfall and sunshine showed no significant impact. These studies helped to identify the key environmental components related to foliage and fruit growth across guava genotypes. However, further extensive studies are suggested for better understanding of environmental and genotypic relationships in plant growth and development.

48

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_304 Strengthening horticulture extension system in Punjab: Status, challenges and strategies Basharat Ali Saleem1, Aman Ullah Malik2, Muhammad Luqman3 and Muhammad Azher Nawaz4, Muhammad Nawaz Khan5 1 Department of Agriculture, Extension Wing Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan 2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Department of Agriculture Extension, University College of Agriculture, University of Sargodha, 40100, Sargodha, Pakistan 4 Department of Horticulture, University College of Agriculture, University of Sargodha, 40100, Sargodha, Pakistan 5 Citrus Research Institute, Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (B.A.S.), [email protected] (B.A.S.), [email protected] (A.U.M) Overtime horticulture has emerged as one of the most potential enterprises in augmenting the growth of economy. To meet the food requirements of ever growing population of the world there is an increasing trend of fruits and vegetable production around the globe, with maximum increase of vegetables in Asia (50% over the period) There is wide range of options for horticultural crop diversification which ensures nutritional security. It also offers more employment opportunities and scope for poverty alleviation through labour intensive farm operations all the way to large agro industries. This sector has tremendous potential for improving the livelihoods of small-scale farmers who are in large majority in the country. Different research studies have proved that production of diverse variety of fruits, vegetables and cut flowers are more profitable for small land holders due to their capacity to produce value added agricultural commodities. Despite of its significance at national and household level this sector has been facing a number of constraints and challenges. In the existing agricultural extension system and rural advisory services, generally in the whole country and specifically in the Punjab province, there are no dedicated extension services for the F&V growers. Further, extension services also lack capacity for rendering services for horticultural produce processing and export. The major focus of agricultural extension department has always been on production of major agronomic crops. The horticulture extension has always been like an extra activity. Further the extension agents are seldom trained especially for horticultural crops to strengthen their competencies. The Extension Field Staff (EFS) need to be equipped with Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) related to fruits and vegetables to ensure food production and processing on sustained basis. Since decades there are some posts of Assistant Horticulture officers at divisional level and Horticulture Officer at regional level but not specific for horticulture extension as these are attached posts. An independent directorate for horticulture extension in the Punjab is under development without any clear organizational set up. Scanty existence of horticultural extension in present extension system is lagging behind the horticultural crops. Establishment of dedicated horticultural extension may bring multifarious benefits like provision of timely advisory services to growers and processors and reducing the ever persisting information gap for improving overall supply chains. In addition, through use of more modern e-based and mobile extension tools, accessibility to good agricultural practices in production and processing will be more convenient, being readily available.

49

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_305 Export quality Kinnow mandarin production in Punjab: Status, recent advances and future prospects Aman Ullah Malik1,2, Basharat Ali Saleem3, Iqrar Ahmad Khan2, Abdul Rehman4, Muhammad Yasin5, Hamid Bashir6, Muhammad Ahsan6, Saajid Aleem4, Asif Ali7, Muhammad Nawaz Khan8 1 University of California, Davis, United States of America 2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Department of Agriculture, Extension Wing Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan 4 Deptartment of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 5 Institute of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 6 Deptartment of Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 7 Office of Research, Innovation and Commercialization, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 8 Citrus Research Station, Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (A.U.M), [email protected] (B.A.S.), [email protected] (B.A.S.) Kinnow mandarin (Citrus nobilis Lour × Citrus deliciosa Tenora) is the mainstay of our citrus industry. The overall area under citrus in the country is approaching 500, 000 acres, with Kinnow planation closer to 70%. Pakistan is an important global producer (over 2.2 million tons) and exporter (374, 000 tons) of citrus, mainly Kinnow mandarin. Despite the vibrant figure of export, quality fruit production of Kinnow is under serious threat due to blemishes caused by several biotic and abiotic factors, along with some serious quarantine concerns (citrus canker, and fruit fly). A recent survey showed that due to cosmetic quality issues, the farm gate rejection varied from 20 to 50%, with some orchards completely rejected by exporters. Analysis revealed that about 47.5% blemishes were related to diseases (mainly scab+melanose, and canker), 29.5% linked to insect pest (mainly mites and thrips) and 15% physiological/physical nature. While the symptoms of melanose were widespread, the disease isolation work showed presence of only Elsinoe fawcettii (scab causing pathogen) on fruit. Overall, Alernaria alternata was the most severe fungal pathogen, although Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was the most severe fungal pathogen of twigs. In vitro studies showed Score and Nativo as effective fungicide against E. fawcettii. Lack of orchard hygiene, over irrigation, unclean harvest tools, and carry over plant debris and soil etc could be the potential causes of widespread spread disease inoculum. As far as the improvement in Kinnow quality are concerned, there is real potential to improve it through recommended practices at critical stages of fruit growth and development. As an outcome of the campaign against citrus diseases by Punjab Agriculture Department, this year the disease intensity is lower as compared to last year. Adoption of Good Agricultural practices (GAP), optimum crop nutrition especially potash fertilizer and micronutrients application, increasing organic matter in the soil and use of recommended spray program and correct techniques for pesticide application, as well as sanitation in harvest and fruit handling operations are the key measures. Overall, this paper provides an in depth analysis of the Kinnow quality issues, recent advances and international perspective (USA, Australia, South Africa work) on the subject along with sustainable quality improvement strategies.

50

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_313 Changes in the physical and biochemical fruit quality characteristics of new indigenous mango germplasm during ripening Asad Ali1, Ahmad Sattar Khan1, Ishtiaq Ahmad Rajwana2 and Iqrar Ahmad Khan1 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Horticulutre, Muhammad Nawaz Sharif University of Agriculture, Multan, Punjab 60800, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (A.S.K) 1

Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is an important tree fruit commercially cultivated in tropical to subtropical areas throughout the world. Along with existing commercial mango varieties, Pakistan is naturally blessed with a wide range of unexplored indigenous mango germplasm. Very little information is available about the physical and biochemical fruit quality characteristics of these indigenous germpalsm during ripening. Therefore, present study was conducted to evaluate physical and biochemical fruit quality parameters of these potential indigenous mango germplasm during ripening to find out the best stage of fruit consumption with highest nutritional value and taste. Physical, physiological and biochemical quality characteristics of fruits were recorded periodically at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 days of fruit ripening. Results indicated that soluble solid contents (SSC) of all mango germplasm increased as the ripening period progressed; however, highest SSC was recorded by “MLT239”, “MLT-658”, “KHW-644” and “KHW-250” fruits on day-7 to day-9 of ripening. Titrateable acidity (TA) of all the mango germplasm exhibited a decreasing trend during ripening period. Highest carotenoid contents were found in “MLT-251” and “KHW-250” and “KHW-643” fruit. Total antioxidants were highest in mango accessions “MLT-239”, “KHW-250”, “MLT-658” and “KHW-644” at full ripe stage. Data regarding total phenolic contents showed a decreasing trend from day-1 to day9 of fruit ripening and among all germplasm significant higher results were found by fruit of “KHW644” and “KHW-250”. In conclusion, majority of indigenous germplasm exhibited best eating quality and nutritional values at day-7 to day-9 of fruit ripening. Fruits of the mango germplasm also showed variation in their harvest maturity and physic-chemical fruit quality characteristics.

ICHS2016/AB_315 Influence of seasonal variations and storage on quality of raspberries cultivated in greenhouse, high tunnels and open field Liaqat Ali1, Muhammad Sarwar Yaqub1,Birgitta Svensson2, Beatrix W. Alsanius2 and Marie E. Olsson2. 1 Horticultural Sciences, University College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, 63100-Pakistan 2 Department of Horticulture, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O.Box 103, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden. Emails: [email protected] (L.A.), [email protected] (L.A.) The present study examined the seasonal and environmental variation for phytochemical differences and shelf life after harvest with the raspberries cultivated in open field (OF), high tunnels (HT) and in greenhouse (GH). The quantitative analysis were made by high performance liquid chromatography. Significant differences were found for data analyzed for different years, time of harvest, and their 51

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

interactions with storage time. The content of total sugars increased from early to late season harvest by 24% and 48% in the two investigated years in OF production, and by 16% and 62% in GH production, though it decreased by 30% and 15% in HT production. Generally, the highest values for titratable acidity were found at the late harvest in GH and HT production. During storage, the content of glucose and fructose increased, while the content of sucrose decreased, and often the smallest changes found during storage with fruit harvested late in the season. The vitamin C content was lower in HT and OF raspberries at the end of the season, while the ellagic acid content in general decreased from early to late harvest time in all production systems. Anthocyanin content varied significantly with time of harvest, though no consistent pattern was found, generally increased during storage. Significant but smaller changes were found for Total Phenolic in GH and HT production though OF raspberries was twice in one of the investigated years as compared with the others. In average for both years, no changes during storage were found in the content of total phenolic, ellagic acid and vitamin C. In conclusion, the sugar concentrations showed the greatest variability, with differences between years, within season, and during storage.

ICHS2016/AB_327 Economic analysis of jasmine cut-flower: A case study of Punjab, Pakistan Muhammad Ashfaq and Muhammad Usman Institute of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.A) Floriculture has been considered as a potential business due to divergence of farmers towards high value floral crops and consumption of flowers in social events as well as for industrial production in Pakistan. The present study was designed to estimate the production cost, net income and BCR of jasmine cut-flower. Purposive sampling technique was used for the data collection. Data were collected from districr Kasur, Lahore and Sheikhupura. A total of 50 respondents of jasmine cut-flower were interviewed. To determine the impact of different socioeconomic and agronomic factors on the production of Jasmine a Cobb-Douglas production function was employed. The results of the findings revealed that total cost of production of the jasmine small farmers (Rs.275531) was less as compared to medium and large farmers. The total cost of production of the jasmine medium farmers (Rs.278111) was high as compared to small (Rs.275531) and less than that of large farmers (Rs.293016). Total average cost of production of all farms was Rs.279719. The total revenue of the small, medium, large and all sampled farmers in the area was Rs.666385, Rs.615441, Rs.640017 and Rs.630346, respectively. The net income was the highest of the small farmers i.e. Rs.390854 followed by large farmers (Rs.347001) and medium farmers (Rs.350627). The BCR of the sampled small, medium, large and all farmers was 2.42, 2.21, 2.18 and 2.25, respectively. The results of the econometrics model implied that the variable of education of the farmers, land preparation cost, FYM cost, fertilization cost and irrigations applied had positive and significant while the variable of chemical cost had negative and significant impact on the dependent variable (yield of jasmine). The educated people need to be encouraged to adopt cut-flower business. The farmers should be encouraged to prepare good quality land to get better and high quality yield of jasmine flowers.

52

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_330 Molecular characterization of new variant of Tomato Leaf Curl Palampur Virus from Cucurbita pepo in Pakistan Muhammad Shafiq and Muhammad Saleem Haider, Sehrish Mushtaq Institute of Agricultural Sciences (IAGS), University of Punjab, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.S.) Cucurbita pepo L., of the family Cucurbitaceae is commonly known as zucchini, courgette or summer squash when immature and pumpkin or winter squash when mature. Begomoviruses associated with shortening of leaves, vein swelling and enations in C. pepo, was cloned and sequenced. These were compared with reported sequences in NCBI database using BLAST analysis and preliminary results showed that clone MU6 and MU7 have highest nucleotide sequence identity of 97% and 98% to Tomato leaf curl Palampur virus (ToLCPMV) DNA-A and DNA-B isolated from tomato in India. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis grouped MU6 (DNA-A) and MU7 (DNA-B) into wellsupported clades together with ToLCPMV. Thus, both clones: MU6 and MU7 are new variant of ToLCPMV from Pakistan. Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of the partial repeat construct of ToLCPMV clone obtained in this study to Nicotiana benthamiana induced severe upward leaf curl symptoms and flow of viral DNA were detected in infected plant leaves. To our knowledge this is the first report of ToLCPMV infecting Cucurbita pepo in Pakistan.

ICHS2016/AB_331 Relationship of environmental conditions with PVY disease development in Potatoes for sustainable crop production Muhammad Nasir Subhani1, Muhammad Imran1 and Waseem Abbas2 Institute of Agricultural Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan 2 Arid Zone Research Institute, Bhakar, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.N.S.)

1

The correlation of maximum and minimum temperature (oC), relative humidity {R.H, %}, wind speed (km/h) and rainfall (mm) with PVY disease severity in potatoes were determined at variety level during 2014. None of the variety had significant correlation with rainfall. Three varieties had significant correlation with wind velocity, twenty varieties had significant correlation with relative humidity, five varieties had significant correlation with minimum temperature and sixteen varieties/lines had significant correlation with maximum temperature. Seven varieties had highly significant correlation with maximum temperature. Twenty one varieties had highly significant correlation with minimum temperature. None of the variety had highly significant correlation with relative humidity. None of the variety had highly significant correlation with rainfall. Twenty four varieties had highly significant correlation with wind speed. The correlation of maximum and minimum temperature ( oC), relative humidity {R.H, %}, wind speed (km/h) and rainfall (mm) with aphid was also determined at variety level. “Sixteen” varieties had highly significant correlation with maximum temperature. All varieties had highly significant correlation with minimum temperature. Only one variety SH- 5 had highly significant correlation with relative humidity. None of the variety had highly significant correlation with rainfall. “Twenty four” varieties had highly significant correlation with wind velocity. Eleven 53

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

varieties had significant correlation with maximum temperature. No variety had significant correlation with minimum temperature. Twenty two varieties had significant correlation with relative humidity. None of the variety had significant correlation with rainfall. Three varieties had significant correlation with wind velocity. There was significant correlation of Air temperature (max and min) relative humidity and wind velocity with PVY disease incidence and Aphid population.

ICHS2016/AB_337 Effect of different N, P and K combinations for reproductive growth and malformation physiology of mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Dushari Muhammad Azam, Faqir Muhammad Tahir, Raheel Anwar, Muhammad Jafar Jaskani, Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri, Mohammad Shafi Ullah Institute of Horticultural sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.A), [email protected] (R.A) Malformation, arguably the most important disease of mango worldwide, it is widespread and destructive and is of growing concern because its etiology and control are not well understood. The experiment was conducted at experimental fruit garden of Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad during 2006. The objective was to find out the effect of different fertilizer combinations such as T0 (control), T1 (N1000g), T2 (P1500g), T3 (K1500g), T4 (N1000g + P750g), T5 (N1000g + K750g), T6 (P1500g + K1500g) T7 (N1000g + P750g + K750g) on reproductive growth and malformation physiology of mango (Mangifera indica L.) Cv.Dushari. Various parameter were recorded such as total number of panicles per tree, total number of flowers per panicle (male & female flowers), total number of fruit drop% age (Initial and Final), maturity time, sex ratio, malformation intensity percentage, time of emergence, size of panicle, growth rate compared with healthy panicles. The result revealed that reproductive growth was performed better in T7 over all other treatments. Fertilizer performed better in combination and can be applied on commercial level to increase the orchard output and reduce the intensity of malformation.

ICHS2016/AB_346 A study of cost-effective and environmentally-friendly postharvest technology of litchi Shreef Mahmood and Mohammad Golap Hossain Department of Horticulture, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur 5200, Bangladesh Email: [email protected] (S.M.), [email protected] (M.G.H.) Sulphur-based treatments are an established method of reducing postharvest loss of litchi, but due to increasing concerns of health and environmental issues these methods have been limited in many countries. The present study, therefore, aimed to develop a safe, environmentally-friendly postharvest method for litchi. The experiment was carried out at the laboratory of Horticulture, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh during the period from April 2015 to June 2015. Two cultivars of litchi namely, Bombai and Madraji were stored in polyethylene bag, bamboo basket with litchi leaves and open conditions at 5°C and ambient 54

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

temperature for 9 days. In all cases, fruits that were stored in open conditions rapidly lost weight and became unmarketable within 3 days due to rapid pericarp browning. In contrast, fruits kept in polyethylene bag reduced weight loss and retained pericarp colour greatly during storage. Decay symptom was observed when the fruits stored in ambient temperature either in polyethylene bag or in bamboo basket with litchi leaves; however no decay symptom was found in fruits kept at 5°C irrespective of storage treatments. The changes of TSS, pH, ascorbic acid and total phenolics in the aril were minimum in the treatment of polyethylene bag than that of bamboo basket with litchi leaves and open conditions. Overall, fruits of both cultivars showed similar storage behavior and maintained better fruit quality at 5°C than ambient temperature.

ICHS2016/AB_350 Geographical variability in biochemical attributes of guava cv. Round leaf extract Umair Raza1, Muhammad Usman1, Muhammad Shahid2, Bilquees Fatima1 Institute of Horticultural Sciences University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Department of Biochemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.U).

1

In the current study leaves of different strains of guava cv. Round collected from geographically different localities were assayed for their antioxidant activity and other biochemical compounds. Strains DGSM1-2, SBGSM5, MGSM5, and GGSM1 were found significantly higher for antioxidant activity (81-82%) compared with other strains (43-50%). Total phenolic compounds (TPC) were found more in strain DGSM1 (340 mgGAEg-1) and GGSM1 while SBGSP4 showed the lowest content (181 mgGAEg-1). Strains DGSM1-2 and MGSM5 were rich (>600 mgCEg-1) in total flavonoid compounds (TFC) while different SBGSP (1-5) strains contained the lowest amount of TFC (190-200 mgCEg-1). Total soluble sugars (TSS) and proteins were the highest in strain SBGSM5 (71 mgg -1; 363.52 mgg-1) while the lowest TSS and protein values were found in WGSP1 (31.79 mgg-1; 167.24 mgg-1). High variability was found among similar strains obtained from different localities compared with their genotypic variation. These studies indicate higher availability of total phenolics, flavonoids and their potential for higher antioxidant activities in indigenous guava strains. These natural resources could be exploited as source of nutraceuticals and for their preventive role against chronic diseases.

ICHS2016/AB_353 Effect of different edible coatings on fruit quality and storage life of bell pepper Abadullah, Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi, Muhammad Shafique, Sami Ullah, Abdul Ahad Qureshi Department of Horticulture, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.S.) The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of different edible coatings on fruit quality and storage life of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. ‘Yollo Wonder’) under extended cold storage at 8 ± 1oC with 90-95% RH for 24 days. Fruits were coated with different concentrations of gum arabic (6, 9 and 12%), Aloe vera gel (4, 5 and 6%) and cinnamon oil (0.5, 0.75 and 1%). Bell pepper fruits 55

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

coated with 12 % gum arabic exhibited significantly reduced weight loss, membrane leakage, chilling injury, decay incidence as compared with uncoated fruits during cold storage. Similarly, 12% gum arabic coating treatment retained higher ascorbic acid content, fruit colour, titratable acidity, pH and lower total soluble solids, as compared to control. These results suggest that 12% gum arabic coating can be used to retain better fruit quality by delaying chilling injury and decay development in bell pepper for 24 days of cold storage.

ICHS2016/AB_360 Emerging international compliance issues: Challenge to fresh fruits and vegetable exports Najma Yousaf Zahid, Nadeem Akthar Abbasi and Tahir Mahmood Department of Horticulture, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (N.Y.Z.) Pakistan annually produces 13 million tons of fresh produce, divided into fruits 46% and vegetables 54%. Its market value at current factor cost is estimated around US$ 2 billion. The annual export of fresh produce is estimated around half a million tons which earns foreign exchange of worth US$ 140 million. Fresh fruits and vegetables export is a growing industry and pace of both production and exports can be much accelerated. In the Medium Term Development Framework 2005-10, production of fruits and vegetables has been projected at about 18 million tons by 2009/10 and exports at US$ 238 million. The major challenge being faced by the fresh fruit export industry is the increasing issues of international compliance mainly focused on food safety (SPS measures), traceability, residues of different agro-chemicals, lack of good agricultural practices, reduction of post harvest diseases and pests (quarantine treatments) and issues pertaining to safety of food packaging materials. Currently, the hazards analysis and critical control point (HACCP), Global GAP, British retailer’s consortium (BRC) and monitoring of maximum residues limits (MRL’s) are the major challenges. An integrated and comprehensive approach is required to address these issues from both the Government and Private sector to meet the export targets as addressed under the MTDF of the Government of Pakistan (US$ 238 million) by the year 2010.

ICHS2016/AB_361 Inheritance pattern of lycopene, total soluble solids and ascorbic acid contents in Solanum lycopersicum L. under cadmium (Cd) stress 1

Muhammad Mazhar Hussain1, Asif Saeed2, Asif Ali Khan2, Atif Mehmood3, Bilquees Fatima4 Directorate of Vegetable Research, Department of Horticultural Sciences, NARC, Park Road, 45500, Islamabad, Pakistan 2 Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Institute of Soil Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, Ayub Agriculture Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan 4 Institute of Horticulture, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.M.H.)

A set of 13 tomato genotypes were crossed in line x tester mating design using eight lines as female 56

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

parent and five lines as male parent to access the inheritance of quality traits (total soluble solids, ascorbic acid contents and lycopene contents) under cadmium stress condition. Forty F1 hybrids along with their 13 parents were evaluated in CRD design with two cadmium levels, i.e. 3 ppm, 6 ppm and control. In the present study general combining ability (GCA), specific combining ability (SCA) and better parent heterosis were computed. Under both levels of stress, significant variation was found in lines, testers, crosses and line × tester interactions for all the studied traits. On the basis of GCA results the line Picdeneato and tester 17882 were found best general combiners while SCA results indicated that cross combinations Roma × 17883 and Picdeneato × Marmande were found good specific combiners. Heterosis results indicated that cross combinations Sitara TS-01 × 17882, 7035 × 17882 and Roma × 17882 performed well for most of the traits under study in terms of significant heterosis. As non-additive type of gene action was found for most of the traits studied therefore, hybrid breeding is recommended for developing cadmium tolerant tomato plants. Positive heterosis for lycopene contents, ascorbic acid contents and total soluble solids could be considered best criterion for selection under cadmium stress and these hybrids may be exploited by hybrid breeding programs for cadmium contaminated or sewage water irrigated soils.

ICHS2016/AB_364 Environmental friendly strategies for management of basal rot disease of onion Arshad Javaid and Roma Akhtar Institute of Agricultural Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (A.J.), [email protected] (A.J.), [email protected] (R.A.) Onion (Allium cepa L.), the second most important horticulture crop in the world, is attacked by a destructive soil-borne fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae, resulting in basal plate rot disease. The present study was carried out to investigate the potential of antagonistic fungi Trichoderma spp. (T. pseudoloningii, T. harzianum and T. reesei) and leaves of Withania somnifera for the management of this disease. In vitro interaction studies revealed T. harzianum as the most effective biocontrol agent against the pathogen. In pot trials, dried leaf material of W. somnifera (1%, 2% and 3% w/w) and inoculum of T. harzianum were mixed in the soil which was already inoculated with the target fungus F. oxysporum f. sp. cepae. The negative control had no fungal inoculum or soil amendment, whereas positive control had only inoculum of F. oxysporum f. sp. cepae. The highest disease incidence (87%) and infection index (93%) were recorded in positive control. Different doses of dry leaf manure reduced the disease incidence and disease index to 41–66% and 16–42%, respectively. Combined application of T. harzianum and leaf material reduced the disease incidence to 20–53% and disease index to 14–28%. Extract of dry leaves of W. somnifera was prepared in methanol and fractionated using organic solvents n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol in order of increasing polarity. Antifungal activity of these fractions was checked against the pathogenic fungus using malt extract broth as growth medium. Ethyl acetate fraction showed the highest antifungal activity where its highest concentration (200 mg mL-1) decreased the fungal biomass by 24% over control. The results of the present study conclude that basal rot of onion can be effectively managed by combined application of W. somnifera dry leaf material and biological control agent T. harzianum.

57

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_369 Postharvest losses and storage potential of strawberries packed in conventional plastic baskets Muhammad Fiaz, Raheel Anwar, Aman Ullah Malik, Jawad Hassan Institute of Horticultural Sciences University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.F), [email protected] (R.A), [email protected] (A.U.M.), [email protected] (J.H) Strawberry is perishable fruit and prone to mechanical injuries due to high water content resulting in short shelf life. Therefore, study was carried out to estimate the marketable fruit and evaluate shelf life potential of strawberries packed in plastic baskets (10 kg) and transported through conventional transport. Fruit was purchased from fruit market and transported to lab where mechanically injured and safe fruits were sorted out to estimate losses in conventional packaging material. Grading was also practiced to estimate the proportion of different size fruits in packing. After that fruits, marketable fruits were kept at four temperatures 0°C, 5°C, 10°C and 20°C to evaluate against disease incidence, quality parameters and shelf life. Study revealed that mechanically injured strawberries were almost 60% while large and small size fruits were 53 and 47% respectively. In terms of storage potential, strawberries kept at 20°C were consumable only for two days because disease incidence and spoilage deteriorated the strawberries. While strawberries kept at 10°C were consumable till 7 days after that disease prevailed in them, anyhow strawberries kept at 5 and 1°C exhibited shelf life of 9 days. From this study it was concluded that plastic basket and conventional transport causes mechanical injuries and reduces marketable fruits as well as shelf life therefore improvement in packaging material and transport system is required.

ICHS2016/AB_370 Influence of salicylic acid and storage duration on storability of persimmon fruit Muhammad Sajid and Islam Rashid Department of Horticulture, The University of Agriculture Peshawar, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.S.) To assess the response of persimmon fruits to the dipping application of salicylic acid and storage duration on storability, an experiment was evaluated at the Post Harvest Laboratory, Department of Horticulture, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar during the year 2013. The experiment was laid out in Completely Randomized Design with two factors factorial arrangement and repeated three times. Persimmon fruits were dipped in salicylic acid at the concentration of 0, 2, 4 and 6 mML -1 for ten minutes. After air drying the fruits were stored at ambient condition (18-24oC and 50-70% RH) and their quality parameters were studied at ten days of interval for one month. The fruits that were treated with 6 mML-1 of salicylic acid showed maximum fruit firmness (2.29 kgcm-2) and titratable acidity (0.27%) and the minimum juice contents (25.55%) and total soluble solids contents (19.24 o Brix). The untreated fruits showed highest percent disease incidence (19.17%), percent weight loss (17.28%), juice contents (35.68%) and total soluble solids (20.97 oBrix) with lowest fruit firmness (1.47 kg-cm-2) and titratable acidity (0.23%). Storage duration significantly influenced all the quality parameters of persimmon fruits. The fruits stored for 30 days of storage duration showed highest disease incidence (25.00%), weight loss (21.44%), juice contents (33.15%) and TSS (21.19oBrix) with 58

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

the lowest fruit firmness (0.83 kg-cm-2) and titratable acidity (0.24%). The freshly harvested fruits showed highest fruit firmness (3.28 kgcm-2) and titratable acidity (0.28%) with the lowest disease incidence (0.00%), weight loss (0.00%), juice contents (25.49%) and TSS (18.82 oBrix). The interaction of salicylic acid and storage duration significantly influenced only percent disease incidence and percent weight loss, while non-significantly affected the fruit firmness, juice contents, TSS and titratable acidity. It was concluded from the results that salicylic acid effectively maintained the quality attributes of persimmon fruits through sustaining the fruit firmness, juice contents, TSS, and titratable acidity. However, the treatment of 4 mML-1 of salicylic acid was the most efficient as it minimized the percent disease incidence and percent weight loss of persimmon fruit as well as maintained other quality attributes. It was recommended from the experiment that persimmon fruits could be treated with 4 mML-1 of salicylic acid after harvest to maintain the quality attributes for 30 days storage at ambient condition (18-24oC and 50-70% RH) at Peshawar.

ICHS2016/AB_371 First report on fungi associated with market quality deterioration of Fragaria X annasa (strawberry) in Punjab, Pakistan Salik Nawaz Khan, Shumaila Farooq and Umar Khalid Institute of Agricultural Sciences University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (S.N.K.) Strawberry is perishable and has short stay period in the market and is highly sensitive to market environment. Therefore it is marketed very wisely by grower and market stakeholders. Because of fluctuation in temperature and unpredictable rains deterioration by postharvest fungi is accelerated in summer season. In the present study series of surveys at fortnight interval were conducted in markets and retailer shops during the months of March to May in the markets of Lahore. Quality deterioration in strawberry was assessed by association of postharvest pathogen s expressed as %lesion area fruit surface and sensory parameters. Regular sampling from the available markets exhibited inconstant intensity of fungal flora associated with postharvest losses in strawberry. Potential causal agents from fruit surface and pulp were transferred to Potato dextrose agar (PDA) using different isolation techniques and incubated at 25±2. Isolated pathogens were characterized into surface and pulp contaminants on the basis of their association. A total of 5 fungi were isolated from rotting strawberries. Among isolated fungi four were grouped under Surface adherents and one as pulp contaminant. Surface associated fungi have high occurrence frequency (80%) as compared to fungi isolated from pulp (20%). Identification was performed by macro and microscopic observation of colonies characters growing on MEA (malt extract agar). Pure cultures of isolated fungi were identified with the help of key developed by Barent and hunter and submitted to FCBP. It was first report of postharvest fungi associated with strawberry available in Lahore markets. Further investigations on relationship of packaging material with these fungi are under progress.

59

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_373 Development of an effective and economical protocol for micro-propagation of olive Ishfaq Ahmad Hafiz1, Sehrish Ishaq1 Tauqeer Ahmad1 Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi1 and Ikram Ali Malik2 Plant Tissue Culture Lab, Department of Horticulture, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan 2 Department of Agri. Economic, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (I.A.H.)

1

Tissue culture is an efficient technique utilized in raising the disease free certified olive (Olea europaea) nursery. However, this procedure is expensive to be adopted on commercial scale due to the costly growth regulators like zeatin which is the most effective cytokinin in olive micropropagation. Therefore, the trial was designed to find effective, economical and easily available alternatives of zeatin for two olive cultivars Coratina and Frantoio. For this purpose, different concentrations of coconut water, zeatin, BAP were used. Significant differences were observed between olive cultivars (Coratina and Frantoio) and growth regulators (CW and BAP) for the number of shoots per proliferated explants, shoot length and fresh weight. Coratina proved to be better in all the parameters producing 1.556 shoots per explants, 2.427 cm shoot length and 106.0 mg fresh weight as compared to Frantoio in which all these parameters resulted out to be only 1.389, 1.703 cm and 96.77 mg respectively. The interaction between the cultivars (Coratina and Frantoio) and growth regulators (CW and BAP) was also significant. The best interaction between cultivars and growth regulators occurred at 50 ml l-1 CW & 0.025 mg l-1 BAP with Coratina producing the maximum number of shoots (2.0), shoot length (2.707 cm) and fresh weight (143.40 mg) while compared to Coratina, Frantoio produced lesser number of shoots (1.780), shoot length (2.533 cm) and fresh weight (132.70 mg). Among the treatments involving the standard concentration of zeatin or BAP alone and in combination of CW and BAP, 50 ml l-1 CW & 0.025 mg l-1 BAP proved to be the best treatment which replaced zeatin successfully by producing 1.890 number of shoots, 2.620 cm shoot length and 138.1 mg fresh weight. From the economical point of view, the combination of 50 ml l-1 CW & 0.025 mg l-1 BAP costs only Rs. 5.17 per plant as compared to the use of 4.0 mg l-1 zeatin which costs Rs. 7.01 per plant and reduction in cost per plant was 26%.

ICHS2016/AB_375 Management of mango diseases anthracnose and blossom blight by ecofriendly methods Shazia Iftikhar and Anam Rasool Department of Environmental Sciences, Fatima Jinnah Women University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (S.I.), [email protected] (A.R.) Mango diseases anthracnose and blossom blight has caused intense damage to the mango yield and export so its control is required. Fungicides are being used for their control which effects the environment as well as human health so the introduction of different ecofriendly methods for the control of these diseases is the need of hour. For this purpose the study on the ecofriendly management of mango anthracnose and blossom blight has been carried out. Plant extracts of Akk (Calotropisprocera), Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis), Neem (Azadirachtaindica) and Garlic 60

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

(Allium sativum) were prepared. Three different concentrations including 1.25%, 2.5% and 5% of these plants extracts were applied in vitro on fungal isolates of Choletotrichum gleosporiodes. Results were assessed for the best concentration application on mango trees. 5% concentration of each extract was proved to be most effective for the inhibition of Choletotrichum gleosporiodes and 5% eucalyptus extract displayed maximum percentage growth inhibition of 79%. Consequently 5% concentration of each extract was sprayed on the four replicates of mango trees in field application. Results revealed that all selected botanical extracts (eucalyptus, neem, akk and garlic) exhibited antifungal activity and among them eucalyptus is more effectivein control of both diseases anthracnose and blossom blight.

ICHS2016/AB_377 Morphological identification and characterization of fungal pathogens cause diseases in mandarin varieties of Sargodha orchards Amber Khan and Shazia Iram Fatima Jinnah Women University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (A.K.) As Citrus fruit are attacked by number of pathogens that affect the citrus fruit quality and cause heavy economic losses. So, the study objectives to identify and characterize the fungal pathogens from mandarin fruit of orchards of Sargodha district that are involved in citrus fruit cosmetic problems leads to quality degradation.Sampling was done from orchards of Sargodha Punjab, Pakistan. Out of 57 samples 27 samples were selected from which pathogens were isolated on basis of symptoms of diseases. The purified cultures of fungal pathogens were then identified and characterized. The identified microbial pathogens include 13 different types of fungi. Fungal pathogens like Fusarium sp., Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., Curvuleria sp., Alternaria sp., Colletotrichum sp. Guignardia sp. and Diplodia sp. were found to be associated with the citrus fruit of Sargodha orchards. These pathogens are attacking on mandarin varieties and become sourceof many diseases like stem end rot, green mold, blue mold; Fusarium rot, black rot, Post bloom fruit drop, Aspergillus rot, anthracnose and Alternaria brown spot diseases. These diseases cause serious damage to the citrus fruit and compromised the export quality of citrus fruit.

ICHS2016/AB_382 Effect of foliar application of boron on fruit yield and quality of sweet cherry cultivars Imran Ahmad and Muhammad Sajid Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Crop Production Science, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (I.A.) A Field Experiment “Effect of foliar application of boron on fruit yield and quality of sweet cherry cultivars” was conducted at Kalam Summer Station Agriculture research Institute Mingora, Swat during the year 2014. The experiment was laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with split plot arrangement replicated three times. Sweet cherry cultivars (Sasha, Stella and Sunburst) were assigned to main plot, while the boron levels (0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75% and 1%) were subjected to 61

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

subplot. During the experiment various qualitative and quantitative parameters were studied. The mean data represent that sweet cherry cultivars, boron levels and their interaction significantly affected all parameters. Results of the experiment showed that among the cultivars the maximum leaf area (46.05 cm2), fruit diameter (2.54 cm), percent pulp (90.40%), total soluble solids (16.13 0Brix), titratable acidity (0.85%), total sugars (11.58%) with minimum number of fruit kg -1 (187.71) was recorded in sweet cherry cultivar Sunburst. The maximum fruit set (78.65%), yield (99.67 kg) plant 1 with minimum fruit drop (18.02%) was recorded in sweet cherry cultivar Stella. The foliar application of boron also significantly influenced the quantitative and qualitative parameters of sweet cherry cultivars. The maximum leaf area (53.59 cm2), fruit set (83.06%), fruit diameter (2.55 cm), yield (104.11 kg) plant-1, percent pulp (89.29%), total soluble solids (16.71 0Brix), total sugars (13.59%) with minimum fruit drop (13.49%) and number of fruit kg-1 (184.92) was recorded in sweet cherry cultivars sprayed with 1% of boron. However the maximum titratable acidity (0.89%) was recorded in fruits of sweet cherry cultivars of control treatments. In case of interaction most of the growth, yield and quality attribute except titratable acidity was significantly improved. The results of the interaction showed that the maximum leaf area ((53.94 cm2), fruit diameter (2.59 cm), percent pulp (90.59%), total soluble solids (16.86%), total sugar (14.13%) with minimum number of fruit kg -1 (187.71) was recorded in sweet cherry Sunburst at 1% of boron. The maximum fruit set (88.30%), yield (107.67 kg) plant-1 with minimum fruit drop (10.76%) was recorded in sweet cherry cultivar Stella sprayed with 1% of boron. On the basis of present study it was concluded that sweet cherry cultivars Sunburst and Stella sprayed with 1% of boron showed best results regarding yield and quality fruits production under the agro climatic condition of Swat Valley.

ICHS2016/AB_386 Comparative study of high health and conventional mango nurseries in Pakistan Nazim Hussain1, Asif Mahmood Arif1, Shafqat Saeed2, Munawar Raza Kazmi3, Faisal Sohail Fateh4 and Iftikhar Ahmad5 1 Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Punjab 60800, Pakistan 2 Muhammad Nawaz Sharif University of Agriculture, Multan, Punjab 60800, Pakistan 3 Australian High Commission, Islamabad, Pakistan 4 National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan 5 Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) Islamabad, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (N.H.), [email protected] (A.M.A.), [email protected] (S.S.), [email protected] (M.R.K.), [email protected] (F.S.), [email protected] (I.A.) Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is an important fruit crop of tropical and sub-tropical areas of Pakistan. Young mango trees are traditionally raised in the soil under or between the canopies of large mature trees. These traditional nurseries are responsible expose germinating seedlings to soil borne pathogens such as Ceratocystis fimbriata that causes mango sudden decline and air and water borne pathogens such as Fusarium subglutinans that causes mango malformation disease. These diseases and sub-optimal growth conditions slow the development of the seedlings and increase the grafting and transplant losses. When such trees are field planted they typically result in low yields, poor fruit quality and high disease management costs. A recent Australian aid initiative in conjunction with Pakistan Universities and Government has been to encourage the production of mango seedlings in 62

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

pots using soilless media and hygiene principals. This study compared the performance of mango seedlings grown under traditional and potted nursery systems in the Multan district of Punjab. Seedlings grown under the high health system out performed traditionally grown seedlings in many areas. Germinating seed were ready for potting-up in 15 days compared to 30 days, trees were grafted after 220 days compared to 540 days and field transplant survival was 100% compared to 70%. Plant density in the high health nursery was increased by 250%, costs reduced and workplace efficiency increased by less weeding, and improved water use efficiency. Much of the improved performance has been attributed to reduced incidence of disease, development of superior root systems and improved nutrition.

ICHS2016/AB_388 Geo-statistics and GIS based spatial distribution of various soil boron forms and selected physicochemical characteristics in apple orchards of Pishin, Baluchistan Tariq Ziad1, Muhammad Tariq Siddique1, Azeem Khalid2, Shahid Mahmood2 and Humair Ahmad Malik3 1 Department of Soil Science and SWC PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan 2 Department of Environmental Sciences, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan 3 Land Resources Research Institute National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.T.S.) Baluchistan is the hub of apple production in Pakistan. However boron deficiency in apple orchards grown at arid elevated plains impairs the apple fruit production. Keeping in view boron deficiency issue in apple production system, a study was planned to assess the boron deficiency in apple orchards of Pishin district. Initially a survey was conducted in farmer grown apple orchards. Spatial variability in physico-chemical characteristics and boron forms has been developed in studied area soils using Geo-statistics and GIS as diagnostic tools. Sixty soil samples (surface and subsurface) were collected from five locations (Pishin, Barshore, Bostan, Hurmzae, Khanozae) using GPS. Readily soluble, specifically adsorbed, oxide bond, organically bound, extractable and residual fractions were studied for various soil boron forms. For physico-chemical characteristics pH, calcium carbonate, organic matter, sand, silt and clay were determined and analyzed using geo-statistics and GIS. Ordinary kriging was applied to prepare the map of spatial distribution of selected physico-chemical properties and boron forms to classify the area for information. The best fit semivariogram model was spherical on bases of RMSE criterion. The selected physic-chemical properties i.e., silt, clay, pH and extractable boron were found strongly spatial dependent at surface and subsurface, while organic matter was moderately spatial dependent at surface and strongly spatial dependent at subsurface. Boron forms were strongly spatial at surface and subsurface.

63

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_392 Effect of NPK fertilizers and commercial biofertilizers on southern blight disease and plant growth in chili Nighat Sana, Arshad Javaid and Amna Shoaib Institute of Agricultural Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (N.S.) Chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is the world’s most widely grown spice. Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., a soil-borne fungal pathogen, causes southern blight disease in chili pepper and results in significant yield losses. Disease is generally managed by application of chemical fungicides which also pollute environment and adversely affect human and animal health. The present study was carried out to manage this disease using two commercial biofertilizers namely Biopower and Feng Shou in combination with recommended and half doses of NPK fertilizers. The highest disease incidence (74%) and plant mortality (61%) were recorded in positive control where S. rolfsii inoculation was done without any other treatment. The two biofertilizers either alone or in combination with two doses of NPK fertilizers significantly reduced disease incidence to 7-26%. Likewise, plant mortality was reduced to 0–26%. Under biotic stress of S. rolfsii, both the biofertilizers significantly enhanced shoot growth over positive control either with or without recommended dose of NPK fertilizers. S. rolfsii inoculation significantly reduced chlorophyll and protein contents while enhance peroxidase (PO) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities in chili plants. The two biofertilizers further enhanced PO and PPO activities in non-fertilizers treatments. This study concludes that southern blight of chili can be managed by application of Biopower and Feng Shou either with or without application of recommended dose of NPK fertilizers.

ICHS2016/AB_396 Effect of different levels of pruning on ber (Zizyphus mauritiana) cv. Dehli Suffaid at Bahawalpur Muhammad Azhar Bashir1, Faheem Altaf1, Kashif Shabir1, Naseem Sharif2 and Muhammad Ishfaq2 1 Horticultural Research Station, Bahawalpur, Punjab, Pakistan 2 Horticultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.A.B.) The jujube or locally known as ber fruit (Zizyphus. mauritiana Lam.) is well adapted to arid climatic conditions and a rich source of vitamin C. It goes under dormancy during May-June and needs pruning for canopy management as well as good fruiting for coming fruiting season. How much pruning is optimum for ber fruit depends upon variety, climatic conditions and cultural practices. The current experiment was carried out at Horticultural Research Station Bahawalpur (Pakistan) to explore the best level of pruning and suitable time of pruning for improvement in productivity of Ber cv. Dehli Suffaid during 2011-213. Five pruning levels i.e., pruning of previous year growth upto 25% (T1), 50% (T2), 75% (T3), 100% (T4), & control (T5= without pruning) were applied to full grown plants of Dehli Suffaid variety during Mid May of each year. The experiment was designed according to RCBD with 3 replications. The parameters with respect to new growth of shoot, flower, fruit and yield expressed maximum yield (209.67 kg/plant), number of shoots (13.03), number of panicles (75.87) and number of fruit (122.) per pruned branch in the plants where 50% pruning of tree was carried out. The plants 64

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

where 100% branches were pruned showed delay in initiation of growth (58 days) and had minimum yield (152 kg/plant). Plants under control (un-pruned) exhibited early initiation of growth with minimum panicles (48.73) and fruit (79.67) per pruned branch. Fifty percent pruning from previous growth seemed to be a judicious level of pruning in Ber cv. Dehli Suffaid compared to 25, 75 & 100%.

ICHS2016/AB_406 Water and nutrient use in peri-urban vegetable production of Faisalabad, Pakistan Shoaib ur Rehman1,2, Zikrullah Safi3, Sami Ul Allah4, Shafique Maqsood4 and Hafeez ur Rehman5 Organic Plant Production and Agroecosystems Research in the Tropics and Subtropics, University of Kassel, Germany 2 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 3 Department of Soil Science and Irrigation, Department of Economics and Extension, College of Agriculture, Kabul University, D-1006 Kabul 4 Grassland Science and Renewable Plant Resources, University of Kassel, Steinstr. 19, D-37213 Witzenhausen, Germany 5 Department of Agronomy, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad-38040, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (S.U.R.)

1

A research study was carried out to evaluate the effects of different fertilizers and irrigation rates on the growth dynamics and final yield of four vegetables in Faisalabad, Pakistan (2011 to 2012). The experiment was comprised of three levels of mineral fertilizers (unfertilized control, F 0; farm yard manure, FYM (F1) on the basis of dry matter contents (DM) ha -1 containing 108 kg N, 27 kg P, and a mineral fertilizer treatment (F2) containing the same amount of N and P as in F1 respectively. Two irrigation intervals with the recommended (RI) and half of the recommended irrigation (HRI) were applied. Two vegetable species pea (Pisum sativum L.) and cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) were selected for dry matter yield. Dry matter yield and concentrations of organic carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) were assessed at final harvest. Yields were ranged from 7,500 to 13,00 (kg ha-1; P < 0.05) for pea and 4600 to 7500 for cauliflower at RI while reduced irrigation decreased respective yields by 12% and 19%. Apparent average nutrient use efficiency remained highest in pea with 611% for N, 319% for P and 3683% for K. Water use efficiency expressed in kg DM m-3 of water applied was significantly higher for RI and declined across both irrigation level for pea and cauliflower, in the sequence of F2, F1, and F0 respectively. However, pea crop exhibited more water and nutrient use efficiency in all treatments.

65

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_408 Organic matter and nutrient (NPKC) losses via surface run-off in Urban Agriculture (UA) of Kabul, Afghanistan Zikrullah Safi1, Ghulam Muhammad Bahram2, Muhammad Alim Alimi1, Shoaib ur Rehman3 Department of Soil Science and Irrigation, College of Agriculture, Kabul University, D-1006 Kabul, Afghanistan 2 Department of Economics and Extension, College of Agriculture, Kabul University, D-1006 Kabul, Afghanistan, 3 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (Z.S.), [email protected] (S.U.R.)

1

Kabul the Capital City of Afghanistan is located at elevation of 18, 00 masl. with the current population of 4.2 millions. The constructed areas have been encircled by urban fields. Climate is highly continental; rainfall always contributes water as a supplemental irrigation to Agricultural crops. Sedimentations in streams, water courses, and in Kabul River are often observed. Urban fields have been regularly used for fresh vegetables and cereals in the rotation for food and feed production. Agriculture productions rely on fertilizers, but use of night soil and city biowastes are in abundance. Torrential rainfalls are observed as a main source of soil erosion. The run-off degrade environment by contamination of surface water, underground water, Kabul River and other low Laying water bodies. A study on “Organic matter and nutrient (NPKC) losses via run-off in the Urban Agriculture (UA) of Kabul”, was conducted on 2012-2014 to quantify NPK and Corg losses via runoff in the urban areas of Kabul. Four endemic crops of Kabul Province were planted in the rotation. The results showed neglect erosion according to the universal soil losses equation. The total average soil in two farms (n= 27) in the duration of three years were 248.48 kg ha-1. Wheat and millet had 14.46 and 15.11 %, barley and maize had 21.55, and 21.02 % soil, respectively. In control plots of college farm 23.89 %, Guzargah farm 30.86 % and combined losses in both farms were (27.86 %). The average total N, P, K losses were 0.19 Kg ha-1, 0.013 kg ha-1, 0.27 kg ha-1, and Corg 2.61 kg ha-1, respectively. Statistically the variation showed significant differences (p Compost + Zn + Mg > Compost + Zn/ Mg. The result revealed that both the bio-control (Compost and TH) could be used to control the heavy metal pollution in soil.

ICHS2016/AB_411 Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) cultivation in southern Punjab Ishtiaq Ahmad Rajwana, Kashif Razzaq and Syed Bilal Hussain Muhammad Nawaz Shareef University of Agriculture, Multan 60000, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (I.A.R.) Lotus (Nucifera nelumbo),one of the oldest perennial rhizomatus aquatic, ornamental, edible and medicinal plant which is grown as a non-conventional crop commonly in China, India, Japan and Australia. In Pakistan it is mostly grown in wetlands of various districts of southern Punjab such as Muzaffar Garh (Wasinday wala and Gul wala), Dera Ghazi Khan (Ghazi Ghat, Saidhan Shah and Seamin wali) Tanusa (Matwani wala and kachi canal) and Multan (Head Muhammad Wala). Locally, lotus is considered as a floating weed collected from spontaneous growth of the plant naturally. Commercial cultivation is available on a very small scale. Plants seldom grown from seeds or tubers, since seeds do not produce flower in the first year and develop into tubers. Mostly, it starts flowering during the month of July and August with pinkish and yellowish white coloured flowers in Southern Punjab. All parts of lotus plant such as root, rhizome (locally called as Bah), leaf and flower stalk, flower, pollen, stamen, young and mature leaves, seed and embryo are edible in various forms. These plant parts exhibit multiple nutritional and medicinal properties. Rhizomes are sold about 1500-1800/Mond in market. Demand of lotus especially as a flower and vegetable is growing. For people who are short of time to maintain landscape plants, Lotus is the right choice since it requires little maintenance. So far studies about morphological, bio-chemical and genetic characterization of wild germplasm available in wetlands of Pakistan is lacking which need intervention by the scientific community before it is too late. 177

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

ICHS2016/AB_414 Effect of various doses of Imidacloprid and exposure times on growth and flowering of Narcissus salome (daffodils) cv. Salome Muhammad Haroon1, Usman Shaukat Quershi1, Imran Hassan1 and Muhammad Asif Aziz2 Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Crop and Food Sciences, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan 2 Department of Entomology, Faculty of Crop and Food Sciences, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Shamsabad, 46300 Murree Road, Rawalpindi, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (M.H)

1

Flower industry has a paramount importance worldwide. Narcissus Salome; the commonly speaking daffodils also holds good position for the aesthetic point of view. Effect of different concentrations and exposure times on the growth and flowering in Narcissus Salome was investigated. Four treatments T0: (control), T1: 1.5 % for (4, 6 and 8 sec), T2: 1.7 % for (4, 6 and sec) T3: 1.9 % for (4, 6 and 8 sec) were applied under two factorial design. Most of the vegetative and reproductive attributes were significantly influenced by the imidacloprid exposure and obtained results revealed that treatment T3 was the most affective as compared to the other treatments. This treatment gave the inimitable outcomes, concerning the earliest germination and increase in flowering, stalk length, leaf length, flower size and fresh and dry flower biomass. From this data it was convinced that imidacloprid (1.9% concentration) had significant effect to improve the germination rate, plant growth and flower quality of narcissus.

ICHS2016/AB_415 ELISA- based evaluation of potato germplasm for resistant source against PLRV under natural field conditions Aamir Sajjad1, Waseem Waris1, Muhammad Asif1, Atif Shehzad2, Suleman Azmat1 and Muhammad Aslam Khan1 1 Department of plant pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Centre of agricultural biochemistry and biotechnology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (A.S.), [email protected] (W.W.), [email protected] (M.A.), [email protected] (A.S.), [email protected] (S.A.), [email protected] (M.A.K.) Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is affected by many diseases but potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) is most damaging one. For this purpose research was designed to detect the residual viral titer through DAS ELISA and its value was compared with the visually observed symptoms to evaluate the plant response. Twenty seven advanced varieties/ lines of potato were evaluated. The evaluation of resistance source in potato germplasm against PLRV was carried out in research area of Plant Virology Section, AARI Faisalaba. Tubers of each variety/line was planted on the ridges replicated twice, plant to plant and row to row spacing being 30cm and 60cm, respectively. Data was recorded according to disease rating scale. Out 0f 27 varieties/lines no line had immunity against PLRV. Seven varieties FD 35-36, SH-5, FD69-1, FD 60-2, Lady Rosetta, Cruiser and 394021-120 were resistant, while six varieties Astrix, Santee, 178

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

394055-40, 394005-115, 396240-181 and 39-6266-33 were moderately resistant. One line FD-7-2 was moderately susceptible and twelve varieties/lines Cardinal, Diament, FD48-41, FD49-28, FSD Red, FSD White, 393574-61, 391202-158, 396240-21, 394002-120, FD1-9 and Desire were found susceptible.

ICHS2016/AB_416 DAS ELISA based evaluation of sponge gourd against CMV to find resistant source under natural field conditions Waseem Waris1, Aamir Sajjad1, Muhammad Asif1, Atif Shehzad2, Suleman Azmat1 and Muhammad Aslam Khan1 1 Department of plant pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan 2 Centre of agricultural biochemistry and biotechnology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (W.W.), [email protected] (A.S.), [email protected] (M.A.), [email protected] (A.S.), [email protected] (S.A.), [email protected] (M.A.K.) Sponge Gourd (Luffa cylindrica) although susceptible to many pathogens but cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is most damaging one. Fifteen advanced varieties/lines were grown in the research area of the Vegetable Research Institute, AARI, Faisalabad. Disease samples were collected from those plants showing typical mosaic like symptoms. On these 15 varieties/lines Double antibody sandwich ELISA (DAS ELISA) was performed for the confirmation of CMV in the samples. Results indicated that there was positive reaction with CMV used as antigen against CMV monoclonal antibodies. Out of 15varieties/lines, there was no line found to exhibit immunity against CMV virus. Ten varieties i.e. JK Asma, White long, UTSA-V, PKBG-3, NAGA F1, Sorot F1, Rama F1, Malika F1, Adventa 1601and Desi Tori were found highly susceptible to CMV. Three varieties i.e. Adventa 1602, Adventa 1101 and Sonal White exhibited susceptible response against CMV. One variety i.e. Sahil Target was found moderately susceptible against CMV. Only Adventa 1102 exhibited moderately resistant response to CMV.

ICHS2016/AB_418 Standardization of a technique of walnuts harvesting for quality produce Malik Mohsin Abbas1, Zeshan Niaz1, Raheel Anwar2, Muhammad Ashfaq1 and Muhammad Ashraf Sumrah1 Horticultural Research Institute, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab 38850, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.M.A.), [email protected] (R.A) An experiment to evaluate the difference amongst the quality and marketability of walnut fruits harvested by two different technologies i.e. harvested by conventional method and harvested via new technology, under the environmental conditions of Murree Hills during the year 2010 to 2011. The data regarding the color of fruit/appearance, by using Hedonic Scale, maximum scores (7.8) were recorded by the walnuts harvested by new technology and least scores (4.1) were recorded by using the primitive technology. The data regarding the color of fruit, Texture of fruit and taste of fruit revealed that the walnut fruit harvested and dried by new technology scored the 7.8, 7.6 and 7.4 179

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

scores respectively as compared to walnut harvested by old technology which were 5.5, 5.3 and 4.8. The walnut harvested by new technology fetched 29.33% more market price as compared to the walnut harvested by old technology.

ICHS2016/AB_419 Validation of molecular markers and detection of resistant genotypes against tomato mosaic virus Muhammad Younas, Sundas Shahzad, Sajid ur Rahaman and Muhammad Zaffar Iqbal Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Punjab 38850, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (S.S.) Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) is among one of the most infectious and devastating virus diseases in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L). It can lead to severe yield losses. The practical and effective method of controlling this disease is through genetic control by introducing major resistance genes in Tomato plant. For this purpose first thing is to find genotypically which varieties/hybrids are resistant and which tolerant for the disease. Marker assisted selection (MAS) has become very important and useful tool in selection of ToMV resistant tomato lines or hybrids. The objective of this research was the validation and detection of resistant/susceptible genotypes against Tomato mosaic virus with the help of DNA markers linked to disease sequence. So that the obtained information could be used further in the development of varieties against TMV. Gene Tm-2 conferring resistance to ToMV has been reported and is being utilized in tomato cultivar development. In present study, three Molecular markers, Tm2RS-f2/r2, Tm2RSf3/r3 and Tm2aR- r3 /TM2R-r4 derived from TM-2 gene were synthesized and assessed for validation in our local tomato genotypes. Out of these markers, marker Tm2RS-f2/r2 was validated. This marker was derived from the gene sequence which confers susceptibility for the disease. The validated DNA marker was surveyed on 40 tomato genotypes, out of which 33 showed the susceptibility band while band was found absent in 7 genotypes that might be considered homozygous or heterozygous for disease resistance on the basis of present results or it could further be confirmed by applying the markers related to resistance. So, the present validated DNA marker should be used in marker-assisted selection in variety development against disease.

ICHS2016/AB_420 Comparative Analysis of virus-specific small RNA profiles of three biologically distinct strains of potato virus Y in infected potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Russet Burbank Khalid Naveed1, Neena Mitter2, Artemus Harper3, Amit Dhingra3 and Hanu R. Pappu1 1 Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA 2 Qeensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia 3 Department of Horticulture, Washington State University, Pullman, USA Emails: [email protected] (K.N.), [email protected] (A.H.), [email protected] (N.M.), [email protected] (A.D.) Deep sequencing technology has enabled the analysis of small RNA profiles of virus-infected plants 180

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

and could provide insights into virus-host interactions. Potato virus Y is an economically important viral pathogen of potato worldwide. In this study, we investigated the nature and relative levels of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) in potato cv. Russet Burbank infected with three biologically distinct and economically important strains of PVY, the Ordinary strain (PVY-O), tobacco veinal-necrotic strain (PVY-N) and tuber necrotic strain (PVY-NTN). The analysis showed an overall abundance of vsiRNAs of 20-24 nt in PVY-infected plants. Considerable differences were present in the distribution of vsiRNAs as well as total small RNAs. The 21 nt class was the most prevalent in PVYinfected plants irrespective of the virus strain, whereas in healthy potato plants, the 24 nt class was the most dominant. vsiRNAs were derived from every position in the PVY genome, though certain hotspots were identified for each of the PVY strains. Among the three strains used, the population of vsiRNAs of different size classes was relatively different with PVY-NTN accumulating the highest level of vsiRNAs, while PVY-N infected plants had the least population of vsiRNAs. Unique vsiRNAs mapping to PVY genome in PVY-infected plants amounted to 3.13, 1.93 and 1.70% for NTN, N and O, respectively. There was a bias in the generation of vsiRNAs from the plus strand of the genome in comparison to the negative strand. The highest number of total vsiRNAs was from the cytoplasmic inclusion protein gene (CI) in PVY-O and PVY-NTN strains, whereas from PVY-N, the NIb gene produced maximum total vsiRNAs. These findings indicate that the three PVY strains interact differently in the same host genetic background and provided insights into virus-host interactions in an important food crop.

ICHS2016/AB_421 Optimization of Protocol for in vitro regeneration of selected cultivars of banana to combat food security issues in Pakistan Arslan Bashir1, Shazia Erum2, Aish Muhammad2 and Mustafa Sajid2 1 International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan 2 National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (A.B.), [email protected] (S.E.), [email protected] (A.M.), [email protected] (M.S.) Banana is herbaceous, monocotyledonous and evergreen perennial plant. Most of the banana cultivars are susceptible to BBTV and it causes significant economic losses to banana production. Micropropagation is preferred over the conventional method of propagation in banana due to faster multiplication rate, uniformity in planting materials and production of disease-free planting materials. The present study comprises of three exotic banana genotypes viz: Wiallium-8818 hybrid, Pisang and Brazilian. Different combinations of IAA, NAA and BAP along with MS were prepared for optimizing tissue culture protocol. The Clorox at 50% concentration for 20 min give minimum contamination percentages, both fungal and bacterial, and optimum survival percentage. Seven different combinations (T0-T6) of BAP and IAA and five combinations (RT0-RT4) of NAA and IAA were used to optimize multiplication and rooting protocols. It was found that BAP and IAA at 2.5 mg/lt and 1 mg/lt respectively (T5) gave maximum (6.53) mean number of shoots per explants while longest shoot length (7.14) was recorded at MS with BAP and IAA at 1 mg/lt and 1 mg/lt (T4) respectively. Maximum mean fresh weight value (12.96) was recorded in MS medium supplemented with BAP and IAA at 5.0 mg/lt and 1.0 mg/lt (T6) respectively. The genotype Wiallum-8818 hybrid gained maximum value for mean number of shoots per explants (4.94) and longest shoot length (8.52) while the genotype Pisang gained maximum fresh weight value (8.95).It was found that NAA at 0.5 mg/lt (RT4) gave maximum 181

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

(5.70) leaves per shoot while mean roots per shoot (4.67) was recorded at MS with 1mg/lt NAA and 1mg/lt IAA (RT3). Maximum mean value (5.58) for longest root length was recorded in MS medium supplemented with at 1mg/lt NAA and 0,5mg/lt (RT2) respectively. The genotype Wiallum-8818 hybrid gained maximum value for mean leaves per shoot (4.47) while variety Pisang showed maximum value for roots per shoot (4.11) and longest root length (5.48). The propagated germplasm under in vitro conditions were further acclimatized in the green house and transported in the research fields of Sind. Moreover, disseminated to the local farmers in Sind.

ICHS2016/AB_422 Propagation of avocado through vegetative techniques under Islamabad condition (Cv. fuerte) Jawad Hassan1, Muhammad Imran Kasana2,Muhammad Noman2, Muhammad Bilal Qadri1, Muhammad Fiaz1 and Naima Razzaq1 1 Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad-38040, Pakistan 2 Horticultural Research Institute, National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) Park Road 45500 Islamabad, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (J.H), [email protected] (M.I.K), [email protected] (M.N), [email protected] (M.B.Q), [email protected] (M.F), [email protected] (N.R) Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a berry fruit of Lauraceae family grown worldwide in tropical regions. It is commercially propagated by budding and grafting. Cleft grafting is more successful in systematic plant development in terms of shoot number, shoot length, leaf number, leaf size, canopy spread and stem girth than other propagation methods. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vegetative propagation in Avocado (Cv. Fuerte) under Islamabad condition. In this regard one year old Avocado seedlings were selected and two types of treatments i.e., Cleft graft and Tongue graft were performed. Experiment was performed according to CRD design with three replications. One replication contain three plants so, 18 plants were grafted. The data collected was statistically analyzed by LSD. Graft success, Number of shoots, Shoot length and Number of leaves were more in Cleft graft than Tongue graft. Cleft graft showed better results than Tongue graft.

ICHS2016/AB_423 Fruit plant certification scheme, Pakistan Muhammad Naeem, Iftikhar Haider, and Ilhammudin Federal Seed Certification and Registration Department, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.N.), [email protected] (I.H.), [email protected] (I.) An organized and quality conscious nursery setup is essential for sustainable development of the horticulture sector. Government of Pakistan launched ‘Fruit Plant Certification Scheme’ in KPK during 1990s. This scheme is now being extended throughout the country. This is an interactive approach involving public and private sectors to ensure production of true-to-type and disease free nursery plants. The Provincial research system has to establish fruit plant Germplasm Units (GPUs) to provide 182

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

quality propagating material to the nurseries. The nurseries have to produce disease free plants with approved rootstock and scion to provide the orchardists. Federal Seed Certification and Registration Department (FSC&RD) facilitates establishment and functioning of GPUs, registers fruit plant varieties as well as nurseries, and regulates certification of nursery fruit plants. The expected outcomes of the scheme are value addition to the nursery plants, establishment of true-to-type orchids of improved varieties and production of high quality fruits with desired characteristics.

ICHS2016/AB_424 Management of tomato mosaic virus through Allium cepa, Calotropis procera and Azadirachta indica in relation to epidemiological conditions Tariq Farooq, Muhammad Aslam Khan, Muhammad Dilshad Hussain and Aamir Sajjad Department of plant pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (T.F.), [email protected] (M.A.K.), [email protected] (M.D.H.), [email protected] (A.S.) Among the viruses prevalent on tomato, tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) is the most important, widespread and commonly occurring virus disease in tomato crop throughout Pakistan. To identify resistant source against this disease, studies were conducted on screening of the tomato lines/varieties against the tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), in relation to epidemiological factors. Ten tomato lines/varieties were collected from the Ayub Agriculture Research Institute (AARI), Faisalabad and transplanted in the research area of Department of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture Faisalabad. The resistance/susceptibility of these lines/varieties to tomato mosaic virus was checked under field conditions. The influence of environmental factors on disease development was studied through correlation analysis. Out of ten tomato lines/varieties Naqeeb was found to be highly resistant to disease whereas a line VRI-575 was found resistant. While two varieties Riogrande and Savana were moderately resistant. One variety Baby Red, Two lines i.e., SBS-292 and GHT-2 were moderately susceptible to ToMV. One variety Nemador and one line GSL-198 was susceptible whereas the variety Nagina was highly susceptible to tomato mosaic virus. Different plant extracts (A. cepa, C. procera and A. indica) were evaluated for their efficacy against the disease. The most effective treatment was A. indica extract at 1% concentration. It gave a significant reduction in disease as compared to untreated control. There was significant correlation of temperature, relative humidity, rain fall and wind speed with tomato mosaic virus disease incidence.

ICHS2016/AB_425 Gucchi - a precious mushroom of Pakistan Sheikh Muhammad Iqbal Department of Microbiology, University of Haripur, KPK, Pakistan Email: [email protected] (S.M.I) Morels grow in a specific habitat after snow melting. Local people make special efforts in March to May to find their growing places. Morels generally appear in the open ground, in hedges and roadside under hardwood and coniferous forests. In Pakistan, morels are mainly found in Gilgit, Swat and Jhelum-Neelum 183

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

Valleys. These are a good source of income for the natives and enjoy a prestige both as good food and good fortune among the people of the area. The annual production of dry morels is 80-100 thousand Kg per annum. The total quantity of morels exported from Pakistan during the last few years in given in this paper. Marketing and world export potential markets of morels are described. Post harvest handling as drying, grading and packing procedures has been explained. Six species of Marchella which were reported in Pakistan had been described in detail.

ICHS2016/AB_427 Impact of Acetamaprid, Imidacloprid and Diafenthiuron on Bemisia tabaci and tomato leaf curl virus disease incidence Muhammad Dilshad Hussain, Muhammad Aslam Khan, Tariq Farooq and Aamir Sajjad Department of plant pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab 38040, Pakistan Emails: [email protected] (M.D.H.), [email protected] (M.A.K.), [email protected] (T.F.), [email protected] (A.S.) Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is one of the most important vegetable crops of Pakistan. There are many viral diseases that affect tomato crop, while the Tomato Leaf Curl Virus Disease (TLCVD) is one of the major diseases of tomato crop all over the world and it is distributed throughout the Pakistan. Under natural conditions tomato leaf curl virus disease spreads by Bemisia tabaci. The epidemiological factors and the population of whitefly significantly increase the spread of disease. The study of environmental data demonstrated that increase in maximum and minimum temperature increased the disease incidence of TLCV and population of Bemisia tabaci. The relative humidity was negatively correlated with disease incidence and whitefly population. While the rainfall had significant effects on whitefly population, humid condition suppressed the disease. Management of Tomato Leaf Curl Virus disease through chemicals revealed that among the insecticides Acetamaprid was most effective against insect vector of TLCVD.

184

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

Author’s Index Index contais an alphabetical listing of all authors of ICHS2016 abstract (both oral and poster) found within the abstract section of this book. Authors are indexed regardless of their affiliation differences within similar names.

A Aamir Nawaz 103 Aamir Sajjad 178, 179, 183, 184 Aamna Riasat 122 Abadullah 55 Abdul Ahad Qureshi 55, 122 Abdul Ghaffar 39, 121 Abdul Hasib Viyar 120, 123 Abdul Majeed 76 Abdul Manan 109 Abdul Moiz 15 Abdul Rashid 41 Abdul Rauf Tahir 71 Abdul Razzaq 174 Abdul Rehman 8, 50, 124, 139, 143 Abdul Rehman Khan 8 Abdul Samad 25 Abdur Rab 25 Abid Mahmood 3, 76 Abid Niaz 3, 76 Adeela Munawar 86 Adel Ahmed Abul-Soad 29 Adil Khan 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 156, 166, 167 Adil Rehman 25 Adnan Munawar 167 Adnan younis 97, 130 Adriane Marinho de Assis 39 Ahmad Sattar Khan 51, 82, 84, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 169, 170 Ahmad Waqas 36, 113, 114, 116, 149 Ahsan Akram 79, 97 Ahsan Javed 41, 42 Ahtisham Arshad 168 Aijaz Hussain Soomro 173 Aish Muhammad 181 Akhtar Ali 100 Akhtar Hameed 46, 134, 135, 136 Aleena Mushtaq 133

Ali Aslam 131 Ali Khan 144 Alia Ahmed 34 Allah Bakhsh 32, 108, 109 Allah Rakha 88 Aman Ullah Malik 20, 49, 50, 58, 67, 68, 84, 139, 140, 142, 170 Amber Khan 61 Amir Shakeel 19, 86 Amit Dhingra 180 Amjad Abbas 21, 23, 95, 98, 99, 100 Amjad Farooq 9, 79, 82 Amjad Pervez 35 Ammar Javed 88 Amna Ali 157 Amna Fayyaz 113 Amna Shoaib 64, 115, 177 Anam Noor 47, 137, 138, 154, 155 Anam Rasool 60, 165, 166 Anam Zahid 145, 147, 166, 167 Anjum Perveen 8 Anser Farooq 104 Anum Intisar 122 Anum Nawaz 157 Armghan Shahzad 34, 112 Arshad Javaid 57, 64 Arshed Bashir 38, 107, 108, 117 Arslan Bashir 181 Arslan shehroz 100 Arslan Shehroz 95 Artemus Harper 180 Asad Ali 51, 68, 85 Asad Ullah 134, 137 Asgar Ali 23 Asghar Ali 132 Ashfaq Ahmed Maan 98 Ashifa Rafiq 123 Asia Ramzan 41, 127 Asif Ali 50 Asif Ali Khan 56, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 156, 166, 167 Asif Mahmood Arif 62, 168

185

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts Asif Saeed Asif ur Rehman Hafiz Asmat Batool Ata-ul-Haq Ather Mahmood Atif Akram Atif Iqbal Atif Mahmood Atif Mehmood Atif Riaz Atif Shehzad Attiq Akhtar Autar K. Mattoo Avtar K. Handa Awais Ahmad Awais Ghani Ayesha Maryam Ayesha Rasheed Ayesha Sameen Ayub Jan Azeem Khalid Azhar Hussain Azhar Uddin Bahtti Azher Iqbal Azma Iqbal Azmat Ali Awan

19, 56, 86 27, 106 47, 137, 138, 150, 154, 155 124 107 41, 42 27, 106 3 56 82, 130 178, 179 32, 108, 109 11 10 74 157 174 146, 166, 167 161 118 63, 169 32 31 101 130 118

B Babar Khan Barrira Meryum Basharat Ali Basharat Ali Saleem Bazgha Zia Beatrix W. Alsanius Bibi Haleema Bilal Jafar Bilal Younas Bilquees Fatima Birgitta Svensson Bushra Mushtaq Bushra Sadia Bushra Sultana

186

127 171 68 49, 50, 77 10 51 45 103 85 48, 55, 56, 139, 167 51 16 144 43

C Charles L. Wilson Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub 125, 148

20 87, 88, 101, 104,

D David H. Byrne Dr. Babar Ehsan Bajwa Dr. Muhammad Atif Randhawa

9, 79, 82 1 85

E Ehsan A. Qadir Ehsan Ullah Khan Elaf Anjum

124 11 173

F F.A.Nehvi Faheem Altaf Faheem Khadija Fahim Nawaz Faisal Hafeez Faisal Hayat Faisal Saeed Awan Faisal Sohail Fateh Faiza Nazir Faqir Muhammad Tahir Farhana Nosheen Faria Azhar Farooq Ahmad Khan Farooq Anwar Farrukh Azeem Farukh Naveed Fazal Rabi Fazal Rehman Fengwang Ma Fiaz Hussain Fozia Furqan Aslam

17 64, 163, 164, 165, 172 5, 83 109 39 3 7, 31, 79 14, 62, 67, 168 44 54, 153, 154 24 79 84 43 99 93 102 86 36 3, 77 145, 151, 166, 167 116, 149

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

G Ganesan Vadamalai Gaurav Raikhy Getachew Neme Tolesa Ghazal Miraj Ghulam Abbas Ghulam Jellani Ghulam Muhammad Ali Ghulam Muhammad Bahram Ghulam Mustafa Ghulam Nabi Ghulam Sarwar Markhand Gul Bostan Gul Nawaz Gulzar Akhtar

124 22 21 45 161 42, 126 34, 112 66 27, 106 25, 118 29 102 116, 149 79, 97

H H. U. Khan Habat Asad Habib Ahmad Habibullah Nadeem Hafeez Ahmad Sadaqat Hafeez ur Rehman Hafeez-ur-Rahman Hafiz Mahmood Ur Rehman Hafiz Muhammad Shoaib Shah Hafiz Muhammad Usman Aslam Hafiz Nazar Faried Hafiz Sibtain Ahmad Hameed Ullah Hameedullah Hamid Bashir Hammad Badar Hanu R. Pappu Haroon Rasheed Hasan Sardar Hassam Ishtiaq Hassan Munir Hassan Raza Heidrun Halbwirth HidayatUllah Hina Safdar Hira Nawaz Holger Bohlmann

12 13 25, 82 99 84 30, 65, 118, 176 10, 47 175 139, 140 113 87, 88, 148 48 27, 106 94 50 42 22, 180 7 109, 128 85, 88, 100 43, 86 156 45 42 78 23 21

Huiming Zhang Huma Abbas Humair Ahmad Malik Humayun Khan

10 4, 78, 104, 127 63, 169 126

I Ian S.E. Bally 13, 14, 67, 94 Ibad Ullah Jan 147, 148, 149 Ibadullah Jan 150, 156 Ibrar Hussain 39, 118 Iftikhar Ahmad 1, 5, 62, 67, 69, 71, 74, 75, 79, 97, 168 Iftikhar Haider 182 Ihtisham Wahid 121 Ikram Ali Malik 60 Ilhammudin 182 Imran Ahmad 61 Imran Hassan 178 Imran Ramzan 95, 100 Imtiaz Ahmad 104, 162 Inayat Ur Rahman 156 Inayat Ur Rehman 25 Ines Cristina Batista Fonseca 39 Iqra Anwar 19 Iqra Naeem 4 Iqrar Ahmad Khan 50, 51, 143, 144 Irfa Sohail 156 Irfan Mehmood 107, 108, 117 Ishfaq Ahmad Hafiz 60, 111, 131 Ishtiaq Ahmad Rajwana 51, 68, 141, 143, 177 Islam Rashid 58 Izzatullah Sherzad 120

J Javed Iqbal Jawad Hassan John M. Dole

14, 27, 94, 106, 156 9, 58, 182 1, 5

K Kamran shah Kaneez Fatima Karl Stich

118 135 45

187

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts Karoline Maria Jezik 45 Kashif Razzaq 109, 141, 177 Kashif Riaz 46, 134, 135, 136 Kashif Shabir 64, 163, 164, 165, 172 Khalid Mahmood Quershi 126 Khalid Mahmood Qureshi 41 Khalid Mushtaq 37 Khalid Naveed 22, 23, 180 Khawaja Muhammad Saim 153 Khizra Narmeen 156 Khurram Ziaf 19, 69, 79, 86, 137, 145, 146, 150, 152, 154, 155, 157, 160, 161, 162 Khushbakht Alia 99

L Laraib Hameed Leon A. Terry Liaqat Ali Luis Eduardo Correa Antunes Luqman Amrao

154, 159, 162, 163 68 11, 51 39 23, 113

M Madiha Butt 87, 88, 148 Madiha Liaquat 156 Mahnaz Kiani 79 Mahwish Rashid 161 Makiya Rafiq 106 Malik Abid Mahmood 89 Malik Fiaz Hussain Ferdosi 171 Malik Mohsin Abbas 80, 81, 96, 109, 164, 173, 179 Mansoor Hameed 33, 143 Maqsood Ahmed 15 Maqsood Hussain 37 Mariam Munir 129 Marie E. Olsson 51 Maryam 31 Maryam Aslam 43, 44 Maryam Azhar 154 Maryam Nair 170 Mauhammad Latif 39 May Elfar Altamimi 19 Mazhar Abbas 38, 103, 108, 117, 152, 153 Mehdi Maqbool 13 Mirza Arslan Abid 158

188

Misbah Ashraf 39 Misbah Iqbal Qamar 124 Moazzam Jamil 7 Mohammad Golap Hossain 54 Mohammad Hanif 153 Mohammad Shafi Ullah 54 Mohsin Bashir 69, 87, 88, 125, 145, 146, 148, 149 Mohsin Raza 105 Mostafa Mohamed Rady 30 Mubashir Zahid 115, 152 Mubeen Sarwar 88 Muhammad A. Ali 23 Muhammad Aamir 175 Muhammad Adil Zubair 85 Muhammad Afzal 18, 81, 95, 108 Muhammad Ahmad 24 Muhammad Ahmad Ali 48 Muhammad Ahmed Waqas 87 Muhammad Ahsan 50 Muhammad Ahsan Khan 142 Muhammad Ahsan Khatana 123, 125, 145, 146 Muhammad Ahsan Raza 86 Muhammad Akbar Anjum 45, 75, 93, 106, 119 Muhammad Akmal 112 Muhammad Akram 84 Muhammad Ali 31, 147, 157 Muhammad Alim Alimi 66 Muhammad Amin 84 Muhammad Amjad 47, 69, 75, 87, 88, 103, 115, 137, 138, 148, 150, 152, 154, 155, 157, 159, 160, 161, 162 Muhammad Amjad Ali 21, 95, 98, 99, 100 Muhammad Ammar 94 Muhammad Anwar Arain 35 Muhammad Aqeel Feroze 123 Muhammad Arshad Hussain 90, 91, 92 Muhammad Asam Riaz 95 Muhammad Asghar 8 Muhammad Ashfaq 31, 52, 91, 92, 132, 157, 179 Muhammad Ashraf Sumrah 32, 108, 109, 179 Muhammad Asif 69, 178, 179 Muhammad Asif Ali 32, 109, 110, 128, 145, 146, 147, 151, 166 Muhammad Asif Aziz 178 Muhammad Asif Kamran 6 Muhammad Aslam Khan 75, 79, 178, 179, 183, 184 Muhammad Ather Mahmood 38 Muhammad Atiq 133

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts Muhammad Awais Ghani 69, 115, 125, 137, 145, 147, 148, 152, 154, 159, 160, 161, 162 Muhammad Awais Khalid 2, 71, 72, 73 Muhammad Azam 54, 68, 69, 119, 120, 125, 145, 146, 152, 153, 154, 156, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 166 Muhammad Azam Khan 15, 26 Muhammad Azhar Bashir 64, 163, 164, 165, 172 Muhammad Azher Nawaz 3, 49, 77 Muhammad Babar Shahzad Afzal 93 Muhammad Behzad Rafiq 74 Muhammad Bilal Chattha 171 Muhammad Bilal Qadri 182 Muhammad Bilal Younas 88, 89, 100 Muhammad Dilshad Hussain 183, 184 Muhammad Farooq 39, 127 Muhammad Farrukh Saleem 19, 86, 142 Muhammad Fasih Khalid 93 Muhammad Fiaz 9, 58, 159, 182 Muhammad Hamid Mumtaz Qureshi 121 Muhammad Haroon 178 Muhammad Hussnain Siddique 99 Muhammad I. Nabi 101 Muhammad Imran 53 Muhammad Imran Kasana 93, 182 Muhammad Iqbal 7, 15 Muhammad Irfan 83 Muhammad Irfan Ashraf 101, 104 Muhammad Irfan Nawaz 95 Muhammad Ishaque 24 Muhammad Ishfaq 64, 80, 81, 96, 110, 163, 164, 173 Muhammad Israr 12 Muhammad Jafar Jaskani 7, 31, 33, 46, 54, 79, 80, 96, 125, 135, 136, 142, 143, 144, 153, 154, 163 Muhammad Jahan Zaib 105, 127 Muhammad Jahanzeb 85, 89, 100 Muhammad Jarrar Ahmed 115, 177 Muhammad Javed Tareen 10, 47 Muhammad Jawaad Atif 41, 42 Muhammad Jawwad Yousuf 44 Muhammad Jehanzeb Masud Cheema36, 113, 114, 116 Muhammad Kamran 4, 78, 101, 103, 104, 105, 122, 124 Muhammad Kashif Raza 173 Muhammad Luqman 18, 49 Muhammad Maaz Aziz 81

Muhammad Mahmood ur Rehman 137, 157 Muhammad Mazhar Hussain 56 Muhammad Modassar Sharif 71 Muhammad Mohsin Raza 133 Muhammad Mumtaz Khan 119 Muhammad Munem Khan 84 Muhammad Munir 7 Muhammad Muzammil Jahangir 47, 69, 123, 125, 128, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 156, 161, 166, 167 Muhammad N. Rasheed 3, 76 Muhammad N. Zouq 3, 76 Muhammad Nadeem 9, 82 Muhammad Naeem 182 Muhammad Naeem Abbas 142 Muhammad Nafees 7 Muhammad Nasir Subhani 53, 171 Muhammad Naveed 72 Muhammad Naveed Aslam 91, 92 Muhammad Naveed Tareen 10, 47 Muhammad Nawaz Khan 49, 50 Muhammad Noman 182 Muhammad Qasim 69, 71, 74, 79, 107, 117, 130 Muhammad Rafique Asi 16 Muhammad Rashid Shaheen 88 Muhammad Razaq 175 Muhammad Rizwan Liaqat 32, 110, 128 Muhammad Rizwan Tufail 113 Muhammad Saad Qureshi 120, 125 Muhammad Saeed 12, 27, 89 Muhammad Sajid 58, 61 Muhammad Saleem 75 Muhammad Saleem Akhtar Khan 115 Muhammad Saleem Haider 53, 157, 171 Muhammad Salman 32 Muhammad Salman Haider 143 Muhammad Saqib 96 Muhammad Sarwar Yaqub 51 Muhammad Shafiq 53, 171 Muhammad Shafique 55, 121, 122, 159 Muhammad Shahid 23, 55, 140, 143 Muhammad Shahzad 23 Muhammad Sohail 88 Muhammad Sohail Mazhar 1 Muhammad Sohail Waqas 36, 113, 114, 116 Muhammad Sudheer Tariq 127 Muhammad Tahir Akram 119, 120, 123, 125 Muhammad Tariq 47, 115

189

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts Muhammad Tariq Malik 14, 94 Muhammad Tariq Siddique 63, 169 Muhammad Tayyab Tahir 119 Muhammad Tayyib 44 Muhammad Umair 40, 126 Muhammad Umer Chattha 171 Muhammad Umer Younas 89, 100 Muhammad Usman 48, 52, 55, 96, 132, 139, 167, 171 Muhammad Usman Arshad 122 Muhammad Usman Chattha 171 Muhammad Uzair Asif 32, 110, 128 Muhammad Waleed Abdullah 150 Muhammad Waqar Hassan 175 Muhammad Waseem 143 Muhammad Yaseen 2, 71, 72, 73 Muhammad Yasin 50, 86 Muhammad Younas 180 Muhammad Younas Khan Barozai 34 Muhammad Yussouf Saleem 8 Muhammad Zaffar Iqbal 180 Muhammad Zahir Aziz 2, 71, 72, 73 Muhammad Zameer Kayani 90, 91 Muhammad Zeeshan Majeed 18, 95 Muhammad Zeeshan Rafique 146 Muhammad Zeshan Ahmed 113 Muhammad Zeshan Rafique 145, 151, 167 Muhammad Zohaib Anjum 103 Muhammad Zubair 14 Muhammad Zunair Latif 95, 100 Mujahid Ali 101, 104 Mujahid Iqbal 29 Munawar Raza Kazmi 62, 67, 168 Muneeb Ahmed Khan 75 Muneer Abbas 39 Mureed Abbass 7 Mushtaq Ahmad 14, 27, 94, 106, 165, 172 Mushtaque Ahmed Jatoi 29 Mustafa Sajid 181 Muzaffar Javed 34

Nadeem Iqbal 105 Nadeem Saeed 86 Nadia Bostan 102 Nadia Liaqat 134 Naeem ur Rehman 111 Naheed Akhtar 163, 165, 172 Naila Zeerak 78, 101, 124 Naima Razzaq 182 Najamuddin Solangi 29 Najma Yousaf Zahid 56, 111, 112 Naseem Akhter 169 Naseem Sharif 64, 80, 81, 96, 110, 173 Nasir Mehmood Khan 68 Nasir Mehmood Minhas 41 Nausherwan Nobel Nawab 40, 41, 112, 126, 127 Naveed Ahmad 82, 89, 115 Naveed Ahmed 75 Naveeda Anwar 73 Nazim Hussain 62, 168 Nazir Ahmed Soomro 29 Nazir Javed 4, 78, 101, 104, 105, 127 Neena Mitter 180 Niaz Hussain 24 Nida Mahren 142 Nigarish Munir 3 Nighat Sana 64 Nisar Naeem 25, 118 Noor Alam Khan 37 Noor Saleem 42 Noor ul Amin 25 Noor Ul Haq 68 Noor-ul-Ain 72 Nuzat Habib Khan 16

O Osama Bin Abdul Hafeez

115, 129, 157, 159

P N Nadeem Akhtar Abbasi 10, 13, 26, 47, 55, 60, 111, 112, 121, 122, 131, 159 Nadeem Akthar Abbasi 56 Nadeem Fazil 15

190

Paul Gadek Pengmin Li

13 36

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts

Q Qaisar Shah Safi Qumer Iqbal Qurat-ul-Ain

6 8, 103 131

R Rabia Saleem 156 Raheel Anwar 5, 54, 58, 83, 140, 142, 153, 154, 179 Raja Adil Sarfraz 44 Raja Qualib Hussain 46, 134, 135, 136 Rana Husnain Shabbir 84 Rana Naveed Ur Rehman 36 Rashad Mukhtar Balal 83 Rashad Waseem Khan Qadri 54, 69, 119, 120, 123, 125, 146, 153 Rashed Saeed 117 Rashid Abdullah Al-Yahyai 26 Rashid Ahmad 69, 125 Rashid Hussain 162 Rashid Saeed 108 Rashida Perveen 14 Rasool Baksh Tareen 34 Raza Ullah 6 Rhonda Rae. Janke 19 Riaz Ahmad 106, 157 Riaz Alam 45 Riaz Mahmood 175 Rizwan Liaqat 109 Robina Kausar 98 Roma Akhtar 57 Rosnita Binti A. Talib 15

S S. Bashir 101 Saajid Aleem 50 Saba Hameed 3, 77 Sabir Aziz 130 Sadaf Altaf 144 Saddam Hussain 36, 113, 114, 116, 149 Sadeed Iqbal 149, 150, 156 Saeed Ahmad 2, 7, 31, 73, 80, 96, 138, 139, 140, 169, 173, 174

Safdar Ali 16, 122 Sahar Jameel 46, 134, 135, 136 Sahar Rashid 139 Saif ud din Taj 80, 84 Sajid Aleem Khan 4, 78, 104, 105, 127 Sajid Ali 139, 140 Sajid ur Rahaman 180 Sajjad Akhtar 8 Sajjad Hussain 93, 119 Sakeena Tul-Ain Haider 169 Salik Nawaz Khan 59 Salwee Yasmin 17 Sami Ul Allah 65, 176 Sami Ullah 55, 121, 122, 159 Samida Qamar 48 Sana Asghar 110 Sana Khan 149, 150, 156 Saneela Arooj 103 Saniya Mehk Qammer 112 Saqib Ali 118 Saqib Shehzad 80, 84 Sehrish Ishaq 60 Sehrish Mushtaq 53 Sergio Ruffo Roberto 39 Shafique Maqsood 65, 176 Shafqat Saeed 62 Shaghef Ejaz 45, 93, 119 Shagufta Kamal 101 Shagufta Umar 172 Shahab Habib 113 Shahbaz Talib Sahi 122, 133 Shahid Abbas 84 Shahid Javed Butt 9 Shahid Mahmood 63, 169 Shahid Majeed 44 Shahid Nadeem 37 Shahid Niaz 41 Shahina Fayyaz 12 Shahzad Ahmed 116, 149 Shahzad Maqsood Ahmad Basra 142, 169, 170 Shaista Jabeen Khan 16 Shamaila Bibi 25 Shamim Akhtar 127 Shaukat Ali 8 Shazia Erum 181 Shazia Iftikhar 60, 67, 165, 166 Shazia Iram 61 Shazia Saeed 34

191

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts Sheeraz Qamar Sheikh Muhammad Iqbal Sher Baz Khan Shi Lei Shirjeel Zawar Shoaib ur Rehman Shouket Zaman Khan Shreef Mahmood Shujaul Mulk Khan Shumaila Farooq Sidra Kiran Sitwat Riaz Sjeela Javed Sobia Noor Sobia Saleem Sobia Samreen Sohaib Sarfraz Solangi Qamaruddin Sonila Hassan Soomro Mushtaque Hussain Sufiyan Qureshi Sufyan Ahmad Suleman Azmat Sultan Ali Adil Sultan Habibullah Khan Sultan Mehmood Sumaira Saeed Summar Abbas Naqvi Sumreen Siddiq Sundas Shahzad Sundus Akhtar Syed Ahmad Raza Gillani Syed Bilal Hussain Syed Muhammad Zia-ul-Hassan Syed Muzaffar Ahmed Syeda Anum Masood Bokhari

159 183 38, 117 9 139 30, 65, 66, 176 28 54 25 59 27, 106 80, 81, 110 16 2, 71, 72, 73 160 135 136 9 38, 107, 108 9 102 167 178, 179 37 136 40, 126 105 123, 143 2 180 115, 177 146, 147 119, 177 162 35 93, 160

T Tahir Khurshid Tahir Mahmood Tahir Saeed Tahira Noor Taj Naseeb Khan Tanveer Ahmad Tariq Farooq Tariq Mukhtar

192

67 56 3, 76 41, 112, 127 40, 41, 126, 127 47, 103, 137 183, 184 12, 90, 91, 92, 111

Tariq Ziad Tatsiana U Datsenka Tauqeer Ahmad Tayyaba Tayyaba Shaheen Tehreem Jabbar Thiruchelvam Thanaraj Tilahun Seyoum Workneh Tony Page Turab Ul Hasan

63, 169 10 60 152 140 152 68 21 13 152

U Umair Raza Umar Iftikhar Khan Umar Khalid Umbreen Shahzad Ummad Hussain Usman Ajmal Usman Shaukat Quershi Uzair Qasim

55 152 59 33 158 122 178 126, 127

W Waqar Abdus Sammad 148 Waqar Ahmed 3, 77 Waqar Asghar 124 Waqar Karim 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 156, 166, 167 Waqar Shafqat 96 Waqar ul Zaman 104 Waqas Ashraf 122 Waqas Khan 26 Waqas Malik 106 Waseem Abbas 53 Waseem Waris 178, 179 Wazir Ahmed 73 Weifeng Chen 36 Werner Stumpf 45 William Bill Miller 97

Y Yaohua You Yasar Sajjad

36 46, 135, 136

2nd International Conference on Horticultural Sciences: Abstracts Yasir Hamid Yasir Iftikhar

71, 73 78, 83, 103, 124

Z Zafar Iqbal Zaghum Nawaz Zahoor Ahmad Sajid Zahoor Elahi

78, 101, 124 110 174, 175 127

Zahoor Hussain Zaid Mustafa Zakria Farid Zeeshan Hassan Jaffery Zeshan Niaz Zhang Lei Zhou Zongshan Zia Ullah Khan Zikrullah Safi Zora Singh

5, 83 87, 148 40, 126 101, 124 179 36 16 68 65, 66, 176 5

193

Sponsors Higher Education Commission Islamabad, Pakistan

Endowment Fund Secretariate University of Agriculture, Faisalabad

Pakistan Science Foundation

Australian AID

id

n

Sc

ta

ie n

ces

Pa k is

So ci

et y

ra tu of Hor ticul

l

Institute of Horticultural Sciences, UAF

Pakistan Society of Horticultural Sciences

View more...

Comments

Copyright ©2017 KUPDF Inc.
SUPPORT KUPDF