The Most Awesome Word List English Free PDF

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by GABRIEL WYNER fluent-forever.com

 

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Copyright © 2016 by Gabriel Wyner Published digitally worldwide via the Fluent Forev Forever er website and blog Fluent-Forever.com Cover design: Sandra Salsbury Illustrations: Sandra Salsbury (illustratingreddit), Zach Weiner (Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal), Michelle Czajkowski (Ava (Ava’’s Demon), Christopher Hastings (The Adventures of Dr. McNinja), Katie Tiedrich (Awkward Zombie), Chris Jones (Captain Excelsior and Snow󿬂akes), Anthony Clark (Nedroid), Andrea Tsurumi (her website), Der-shing Helmer (The Meek) and Jess Fink (Chester 5000 XYV). First Edition by Gabriel Wyner !"#$%&'!()$*$)+,(-

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Table of Contents  Contents 

Introduction

1 1  

The 625: Story Order



The 625: Alphabetical Order

52   52

The 625: Thematic Order

57   57

The 625: Sample Translated Pages

63   63

Frequently Asked Questions

72   72

1  3









 

 

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Your first 625 words

W elcome elcome to the Most Awesome Word Word List You

seems the most apple-like. As a result, you’ll have a harder time remembering pomme, and even if

Have Ever Seen! These words will form the foundation of your next new language. They’re some

you do remember, you’ll take much longer to 󿬁nd it. And unfortunately, that’s not even the end of the story. While you’re having this mental 󿬁ght,

of the most frequent words you’ll encounter in any language, and they’re all relatively easy to learn using pictures. In addition, because these words are grouped together into stories, they will be much easier to memorize when compared with the typical word lists that you 󿬁nd in language textbooks and classrooms, where you learn colors one day, types of vegetables the next day, members of the family the following day, etc.

you’ve probably just made the situation a little worse for next time. Every time you think of two things at once, they interconnect. So if you’re busy thinking about pommes, poires and pêches, and you’re not particularly sure which one’s which, then you’re jumbling those three fruits together into a messy jam of “Fairly “Fairly confusing French fruits that start with the letter P.” You’ll be more likely to remember all three fruits the next time you try to

What’s the story behind these lists?

 The resear research ch on this topic revo revolves lves arou around nd the concept of interference.1  Here’s the idea: Suppose you’re living in Paris, taking a beginning French class. One day, you learn a bunch of fruit names: une pomme (apple), une poire (pear), une pêche (peach). A few days later, you see an apple at a fruit stand and try to recall the word in

retrieve the word for pear or peach. I’ve run into this problem quite a bit on my own, especially in French, where I learned a lot of similar words at the same time. I still  have problems remembering whether sept  is 6 or 7, or whether jaune is yellow or green.

French. Your brain jumps into action, looking for your word through several possible routes. It’s a fruit! It’s a French word word I learned a few days ago! It starts with a P!

Looking at the numbers

 The conce concept pt of interference has been researched in a lot of diff erent erent contexts, and I’ve linked 󿬁ve related studies at the end of this article, if you’d

And because  you happened to learn three French fruits that start with the letter P (and all on the same day), you’re kind of screwed. Memo-

like to read more.  

One of the

󿬁rst

studies (Waring, 1997)

ries compete. When you try to recall your word, your three French fruits get into a kind of mental

gave test subjects a group of three to six words

tug-of-war, while you try to 󿬁gure out which one

(apple = tisahl, pear = nugaw), and recorded how

and their “translations” into a fake foreign language

1 For more on interference, check out this Wikipedia article: En.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interference_theory



 

long it took each subject to memorize the trans-

and again one week later. In both cases, the kids

lations. Half of the subjects got a group of closely

had a harder time remembering similar words:

related words (jacket, shirt, sweater), and half got unrelated words (frog, car, rain). The researchers would quiz subjects subjec ts (what’s the word for “jacket”?) until they could remember every new translation within three seconds (‘jacket’ is…ummm…iddek!), and recorded the number of times they needed to repeat the tests until a subject successfully memorized a word. These are their results:

 

And they took longer to 󿬁nish every similar-

word quiz, taking an average of 5.8 minutes to 󿬁nish, compared to 4.9 minutes for unrelated-word quizzes.

So What Are Our Options, Then?

Similar words took more than 35% longer to

When you go by the numbers, learning similar

learn, at 11.3 11. 3 repetitions for a group of similar words, words,

words at the same time is a terrible idea. Granted, it

compared to 7.2 repetitions for a group of unrelated

feels a lot more comfortable; you can feel like you’ve

words. This This isn’t particularly efficient.

accomplished something whenever you learn new words (I learned all the colors today!), but given the

 

 

Still, time isn’t everything. What about reten-

detrimental eff ects ects it has on learning, we need some

tion? Once you memorize a group of similar or unre-

other options. So what are our alternatives?

lated words, how well do they stick?  

 

In a 2008 study, researchers tested these

In most studies, the alternative to word

groups involved learning a jumble of totally un-

ideas in a school, teaching Turkish kids 40 unrelat-

related words, and that works quite well. If you’ve

ed  English words (peg, key, rat, sun) and 40 related

browsed through my website or Appendix 5 of my

words (20 foods and 20 animals) in a classroom

book, you’ve probably run across my   list of 625

setting, and testing them afterwards on how well

words to learn in every language.

they could match English words and pictures.  They tested them immediately after each lesson

 2

 

 

The 󿬁rst version of that list was presented

room, try on, cash register– rather than words that

in typical groups (animals, professions, etc.), but

󿬁t

based upon the research, I started playing around

and coat. They’re  related  words, rather than simi-

with the idea of an alphabetical  list. Normally, an

lar words, and there’s a huge  diff erence erence between

alphabetical list would solve the similar word prob-

them.

lem at the expense of adding a new problem: the words would all sound similar. similar. But if you start with

 

an alphabetical list in English and then translate it

words. Subjects needed approximately 10% fewer

into your target language, you basically create a

repetitions to learn a group of words like “frog, hop,

randomly ordered list anyway.  So I put my English

slimy, pond, croak, and  green,” when compared

word list in alphabetical order, translated it into

with “cloud, erase, social, office, lose, and risky“:

in the same category, like sweater, shirt, jacket,

Learning related words – words that form

stories – worked even better than totally random

Hungarian, and learned that list. In practice, I found that memorizing words was much easier. I stopped getting my greens confused with my yellows (although I still  get six confused with seven; I didn’t follow my own advice when it came to numbers, and Hungarian’s six and seven – hat  and  hét –  are extremely similar looking).  

Alphabetical lists are also a lot easier to use;

I could just skim through a Lonely Planet Phrasebook, circle my A-words, then circle my B-words, and after 30 minutes, I had good translations for every word in my list. As such, I decided to supply

 

Why? When you learn related words, they

an alphabetical list in my book and added an alphabetical list to my website.

form close associations with each other – frog con-

 

help you remember the cluster of words later.

nects with green and pond. These associations will

But alphabetical and random orders aren’ aren’tt

an especially satisfying way to learn (“I learned

 This happened with your three French fruits

10 random words today” is not as rewarding as

– pomme, poire and pêche – too, but in that case,

“I learned all the fruits today!”), and fortunately,

the words were so similar that they interfered with

they’re not our only options. In one of the earliest

each other; you couldn’t remember which was

studies, researchers tried out groups of words that

which.

shared the same theme. These are words that tell a story – sweater sweater,, wool, navy blue, striped, changing



 

In our frog story, however, the words are all diff erer-

website and in Chapter 4 of the book.2 Learn each

ent enough that you won’t have trouble confusing

of your words individually, on its own terms. Play

them, and so the net result is a set of words that’s

Spot-the-Diff erences erences with Google Images and dis-

easier to remember. These sets of words can also

cover what makes French grenouilles diff erent erent from

provide you with the sense of accomplishment

English frogs. Find personal connections for vert

that’s missing from random or alphabetical lists (“I learned the slimy-green-frog story today!”). This

(green) and use mnemonics to remember the genders of your étangs (ponds). This process will build

makes the learning process more fun, which makes

up memorable associations within each word, and

you more likely to stick with it.

make those words much easier to recall long term. By virtue of the fact that you’re learning words like woman at the same time as you’re learning to wear

What’s this list and how do I use it?

 

and skirt, you’ll 󿬁nd that those words stick even bet-

This is the exact same list of 625 words that

ter, because they’ll naturally form associations with

I provide in Appendix 5 of the book and on my website. The primary diff erence erence is that I’ve grouped

each other. Those associations will be further reinforced by the illustrations on top of each page.3 All

those words into 89 little stories that will help build

in all, this word list will help you learn your 󿬁rst 625

associations between those words and make them

words faster, and make that process substantially

faster to memorize, easier to retain long term, and

more fun. Enjoy!

more fun to study. I’ve also commissioned illustrations of each of those stories to further reinforce the associations between the words (and to make the

4 Sources for further reading

word lists much more pleasant to use).



new words in semantic sets versus semantically

 To  T o save you some time time,, I’ve also commi commission ssioned ed

unrelated sets (Erten, 2008)

professional translators to go through the 625 word lists and give you good, common translations for



each word, accurate phonetic transcriptions, gen-

Semantic category eff ects ects in second language word learning (Finkbeiner, 2003)

der and/or counter words (when appropriate to the



language) and added commentary when there are

The negative eff ects ects of learning words in semantic sets: A replication (Waring 1997)

a few diff erent erent translations that could be used for a



given English word.  

Eff ects ects on vocabulary acquisition of presenting

The eff ects ects of semantic and thematic clustering on the learning of second language vocabulary

Use this list in the exact same way you’d use

(Tinkham, 1997)

a random or alphabetical list, as I describe on my 2 If you’re using Anki, you’ll nd a guide to the ashcards you’ll be using here: hp://uent-forever.com/gallery/simple-word-ashcards 3 Remember, you’ll be playing Spot-The-Dierences and nding your own illustraons for each word in this list. The illustraons you’ll nd throughout this list are only here to help reinforce the associaons between your words and make them easier to remember. 4 I’ll try to keep updated, non-pay walled links to these arcles on this page: hp://uent-forever.com/ecient-way-to-learn-vocabulary

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Your First 625 Words

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earth – sky – up – moon – 1 – white – dot – star

©2014 Michele Czajkowski

Friday – waiter – to stand – back (body) (b ody) – pain

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

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to count – 101 – young – dog – park – to jump

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

spring – September – 20 – shallow – river ice – to melt

©2014 Sandra Salsbury



 

verb

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

to kiss – neck – to touch – body – sex (the act) marriage

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

 8

 

 Janu  Ja nuar ary y – 1s 1stt – ne new w – sp spor ortt – exer exerci cise se – he heal alth thy y

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

5 – foot – short shor t (vs tall) – woman – to wear ear – ring – tight – skirt

©2014 Sandra Salsbury



 

deaf – parent (= mother/father) – loud telephone – baby – to cry cr y – tear (drop)

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

dark – theater – king – to love – 1001 – night

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  10

 

noun

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

Winter – 2nd – August – to walk – cold – north town – rain – wet – gray

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  11

 

to buy – gift – bicycle bic ycle – it – money

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

clothing – store/shop – sign – to sell long – loose – pants – pocket – price – 80

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  12

 

70 – million – year – old (vs new) – hard – stone mountain – to fall – dead

©2014 Katie Tiedrich

adjective

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  13

 

truck – tire – ground – to carry – weight

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

0 – curved – circle – number

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  14

 

December – warm – beach – sand – island – heaven

©2014 Michelle Czajkowski

pig – 4 – leg – dirty – to dig – soil/earth to eat – corn – plant

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  15

 

family – to sit – down – glass – bottom – boat camera – photograph – sea

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

artist – copper – tool – beautiful – clay – lamp – 30 centimeter – tall

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  16

 

cheap – hotel – 7 – day – plastic – bed

©2014 Chris Jones

court – lawyer – quiet – voice – billion dollar – contract – to sign

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  17

 

evening – 11 – 15 – home – lock lo ck – to sleep

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

heart – disease – doctor – to push – needle medicine – alive

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  18

 

cat – to follow – 3 – blind – mouse

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

paper – letter – bank – manager – job – yes happy – man

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

 

19  

you (plural) – 8 – chair – restaurant – narrow table – dinner – wine – chicken – soup – spoon

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

31 – date – May – snow – shoes – to go – forest wind – to shake – thin – leaf

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

 

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wife – small/little – diamond – wedding – dress Sunday – to throw – rice

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

 June – Thursda Thursday y – 2 – team team – 22 – playe playerr – foot ball – fan

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

 

21  

to beat – horse – strong – animal – to pull heavy – box

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

clock – 9 – 40 – morning – sun su n – light – coffee nose – to smell

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

 

22  

front – bathroom – window to see – eye – garden

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

to catch – 6 – kilogram – ugly – flat – fish

©2014 Der-shing Helmer

 

23  

you (singular) – to learn – 10 – finger – computer program (computer) – technology

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

I – to cook – egg – breakfast – kitchen – good cup – orange – juice

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  24  

train station – drug – to pay – prison adult – 12 – month

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

102 – temperature – hot – dry – Summer sweat – February – pool

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  25  

nature – to sing – yellow – bird – wing – tree wood – thick – root

©2014 Jess Fink 

13 – floor – building – to pass by – death

©2014 Christopher Hastings

  26  

to draw – pen – image – to hang – wall – art

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

18 – hole – game – to play – green – yard – to lose

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  27  

big/large – hand – male – movie – actor

©2014 Zach Weiner

boy – piece – lemon – sugar su gar – cake fork – plate – 17 – April

©2014 Michelle Czajkowski

  28  

Wednesday – market – food – lunch bread – beef – banana

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

shoulder – bag – left – side – to lift

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  29  

she – to lie down – bedroom – ceiling – fan – air time – 16 – afternoon

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

plane – (train) ticket – inside – airport straight – back (direction)

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  30  

cell phone – network – 90 – minute to call – friend – to laugh

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

sister  – to swim – lake – water

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  31  

neighbor – to build – 81 – square – meter house – orange – paint

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

brother – 60 – second – high – hill race (sport) – to run – fast

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  32  

president – to win – election – Tuesday Tuesday November – 3rd

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

Saturday – bar – 21 – beer – bottle – bad student – university

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  33  

race (ethnicity) – skin – color human – (≠ animal) – to fight – sad

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

nice – secretary – outside – office bus – 62 – library – card

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  34  

light (vs dark) – blue – shirt – police – gun to shoot – murder

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

Teacher – school – 50 – half – 100 – to teach child (= boy/girl) – pencil – note

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  35  

girl – dream – to smile – queen q ueen – sex (gender) female – gold – head – rich

©2014 Michelle Czajkowski

author – 52 – week – to write – 1000 page – book 

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  36  

club – slow – music – to listen (music) instrument (musical)

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

south – west – location – 51 – space (outer space) – to fly

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  37  

Monday – train – 82 – east – direction – poor mother – to work – city

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

science – magazine – brain – to think  nuclear – heat – energy

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  38  

91 – gasoline – engine – car – transportation to drive – bridge – to turn – right – to stop

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

72 – hour – to clean – coat – blood – stain  expensive – bill

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  39  

low – valley – farm – to feed – cow – milk  to mix/stir – cheese

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

we – 4th – July – to hear (a sound) to explode – red

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  40  

husband – face – beard b eard – 10000 short (vs long) – black – hair

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

lip – tooth – to speak/say consonant – sound

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  41  

14 – 92 – to 󿬁nd – country – deep – ocean wave – no – map – edge – world

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

to taste – salt – oil – pork – apple

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  42  

61 – street/road – corner – church – priest – to marry

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

grandfather – hat – suit – weak – knee to pray – God – peace

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  43  

newspaper – reporter – attack – army metal – ship – to burn – 19 – 41 – war

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

silver – material – laptop – to close

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  44  

October – 5th – seed – to grow – pink  flower – to cut

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

Fall – season – March – camp – daughter to wake up – soft – grass – toe

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  45  

key – apartment – door – 111 – they – to live

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

roof – old (vs young) – sick – grandmother  to wash – soap – clean

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  46  

famous – band – top – radio – song 100000 – person – crowd – to dance

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

he – mean – to kill – son – knife hell – fire – religion

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  47  

71 – victim – poison tea – to die

©2014 Andrea Tsurumi

patient – injury – to break – arm – bone hospital – room – 42

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  48  

to bend – tongue – to open mouth – vowel

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

110 – pound – light (vs heavy) – soldier brown – dust dus t – pattern – T-shirt T-shirt

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

  49  

father – to watch watch (TV) (T V) – 32 – inch – television wide – screen – to drink – cool – beverage

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

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 The Most AWESOME WORDLIST  Y  You ou Have H ave Ever Seen ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

The Most Awesome Wordlist You Have Ever Seen is available pre-translated into 15 languages, and we're adding more every couple of months. If you'd like more information, check out http:/󿬂uent-forever.com/bundles/

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The 625: In Alphabetical Order

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52  

 

 Your first 625 (In Alphabetical Alpha betical Order) The first entries for each letter are in bold.

actor adjective adult

black blind (adjective) blood

clay clean (adjective) clean (verb)

disease doctor dog

afternoon air airport alive animal apartment apple  April arm army art artist

blue boat body bone book bottle bottom box (noun) boy brain bread break (verb)

clock close (verb) clothing club (the location) coat (noun) coffee cold color (noun) computer consonant contract (noun) cook (verb)

dollar door dot down draw (verb) dream (noun) dress (noun) drink (verb) drive (verb) drug (noun) dry dust (noun)

attack (noun)  August author (noun) baby back (body) back (direction) bad bag (noun) ball banana band (music) bank bar (location)

breakfast bridge (noun) (noun) brother brown build (verb) building burn (verb) bus buy (verb) cake call (verb) camera camp (noun)

cool (adjective) copper corn corner (noun) count (verb) country (USA, Spain) court cow crowd (noun) cry (verb) cup curved cut (verb)

ear Earth east eat (verb) edge egg eight eighteen eighty election electronics eleven energy

bathroom beach beard beat (verb) beautiful bed bedroom beef beer bend (verb) beverage bicycle

car card carry (verb) cat catch (verb) ceiling cell phone centimeter chair (noun) cheap cheese chicken

dance (verb) dark date (May 7) daughter day dead deaf death death December deep diamond die (verb)

engine evening exercise (noun) expensive explode (verb) eye (noun) face (noun) fall (season) fall (verb) family famous fan (electric)

big/large bill (noun) billion bird

child church circle (noun) city

dig (verb) dinner direction dirty

fan farm(sport) (noun) fast father

  53  

 

February feed (verb) female fifteen fifth (5th) fifty fight (verb)

hair half hand hang (verb) happy hard hat

kitchen knee knife lake lamp laptop laptop laugh (verb)

million minute mix/stir (verb) Monday money month moon

find (verb) finger fire (noun) first (1st) fish (noun) five flat (adjective) floor flower fly (verb) follow (verb) food foot (body part) foot (measurement) (measurement) forest fork forty four fourteen fourth (4th) Friday friend front game garden

he head healthy hear (a sound) heart heat (noun) heaven heavy hell high hill hole horse hospital hot hotel hour house human hundred husband I ice image inch

lawyer leaf learn (verb) left (direction) leg lemon letter library lie down (verb) lift (verb) light (/dark) light (/heavy) light (noun) lip listen (music) (verb) location lock (noun) long loose lose (verb) loud love (verb) low lunch magazine

morning mother mountain mouse mouth movie murder (noun) music narrow nature neck needle neighbor network new newspaper nice night nine nineteen ninety no north nose note (on paper)

gasoline gift girl glass go (verb) God gold good grandfather grandmother grass gray green ground grow (verb) gun

injury inside instrument (musical) island it January job juice July jump (verb) June key kill (verb) kilogram kilogram king kiss (verb)

male man manager map March market marriage marry (verb) material May mean (/nice) medicine melt (verb) metal meter milk

November nuclear number ocean October office oil old (/new) old (/young) one open (verb) orange (color) orange (food) outside page pain

  54  

 

paint pants paper parent park (location) pass (verb) patient (noun) pattern pay (verb) peace pen pencil person photograph piece pig pink plane plant (noun)

rice rich right (direction) ring river roof room (in a house) root run (verb) sad salt sand Saturday school science screen sea season second (2nd)

six sixteen sixty skin skirt sky sleep (verb) slow small/little smell (verb) smile (verb) snow (noun) soap soft soil/earth soil/eart h soldier son song sound s ound

tea teach (verb) teacher team tear (drop) technology telephone television temperatu temperature re ten theater they thick thin think (verb) third (3rd) thirteen thirty thousand

plastic plate play (verb) player pocket poison (noun) police pool poor pork pound (weight) pray (verb) president

second (time) secretary see (a bird) seed sell (verb) September seven seventeen seventy sex (gender) sex (the act) shake (verb) shallow

soup south space (outer space) speak/say (verb) spoon sport spring (season) square stain stand (verb) star stone stop (verb)

three throw (verb) Thursday ticket (train) tight time (noun) tire (of a car) toe tongue tool tooth top touch (verb)

price priest prison program (computer) pull (verb) push (verb) queen quiet race (ethnicity) race (sport) radio rain (noun)

she ship shirt shoes shoot (a gun) short (long) short (vs. tall) shoulder sick side sign (noun) sign (verb)

store/shop straight street/road strong student sugar suit (noun) summer sun Sunday sweat (noun) swim (verb)

town train (noun) train station transportation transportati on tree truck Tuesday turn (verb) twelve twenty twenty – one (etc.) two

red religion reporter restaurantt restauran

silver sing (verb) sister sit (verb)

T-shirt table tall taste (verb)

ugly university up valley

  55  

 

verb victim voice (noun) vowel waiter wake up (verb) walk (verb) wall war warm (adjective) wash (verb)

watch (TV) (verb) water (noun) wave (ocean) we weak wear (verb) wedding Wednesday week weight west

wet (adj.) white wide wife win (verb) wind (noun) window wine wing winter woman

wood work (verb) world write (verb) yard year yellow yes you (singular/plural) young zero

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The 625: In Thematic Thematic Order

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our irst  in Thematic rer with notes: ey ey ateory wors (i.e. wors (i.e. animal) are designated with a little superscript C (ike this ). earn these C

words word by using - other pictures/words on your flashcards (i.e. animal  dog, cat, fish...). Check out the pecial cenarios section of the   Gallery in the book to see an nd

example, or watch the second half of the ickstarter webinar recordings. asiy onfoune maes (i.e., girl looks like daughter) are designated with an asterisk (ike this this). hese are groups of words that will use very similar images (girl/daughter, marriage/wedding). marriage/weddi ng). earn these words by adding a personal touch (i.e., the name of a daughter you might know) or an additional word or two in your target language (i.e., daughter  might  might go with mother/father ). ). gain, see the pecial cenarios section of the    nd

Gallery for examples, or watch the ickstarter webinar. nima: dog, cat, fish, bird, cow, pig, mouse, horse, wing, animal   C

Transortation: train, plane, car, truck, bicycle, bus, boat, ship, tire, gasoline, engine, (train) ticket, transportation   C

ocation: city, ocation:  city, house, apartment, street/road, airport, train station, bridge, hotel, restaurant, farm, court, school, office, room, town, university, club, bar, park, camp, store/shop, theater, library, hospital, church, market, country (U, France, etc.), building, ground, space (outer space), bank, location   C

othin: hat, othin:  hat, dress, suit, skirt, shirt, -shirt, pants, shoes, pocket, coat, stain, clothing   C

oor: red, green, blue (light/dark), yellow, brown, pink, orange, black, white, gray, color   C

eoe: son*, daughter*, mother, father, parent ( mother/father), baby, man, woman, brother*, sister*, family, grandfather, grandmother, husband*, wife*, king, queen, president, neighbor, boy, girl, child ( boy/girl), adult ( man/woman), human ( animal), friend (dd a friends name), victim, player, fan, crowd, person   C

ob: eacher, ob:  eacher, student, lawyer, doctor, patient, waiter, secretary, priest, police, army, soldier, artist, author, manager, reporter, actor, job   C

  58  

 

Society: religion, Society:  religion, heaven, hell, death, medicine, money, dollar, bill, marriage*, wedding*, team, relationship, race (ethnicity), sex (the act), sex (gender), murder, prison, technology, energy, war, peace, attack, election, magazine, newspaper, poison, gun, sport, race (sport), exercise, ball, game, price, contract, drug, sign, science, God rt: band, song, instrument (musical), music, movie, art eeraes: coffee, tea, wine, beer, juice, water, milk, beverage   C

oo: egg, cheese, bread, soup, cake, chicken, pork, beef, apple, banana, orange, lemon, corn, rice, oil, seed, knife, spoon, fork, plate, cup, breakfast, lunch, dinner, sugar, salt, bottle, food   C

ome: table, chair, bed, dream, window, door, bedroom, kitchen, bathroom, pencil, pen, photograph, soap, book, page, key, paint, letter, note, wall, paper, floor, ceiling, roof, pool, lock, telephone, garden, yard, needle, bag, box, gift, card, ring, tool ectronics: clock, ectronics:  clock, lamp, fan, cell phone, network, computer, program (computer), laptop, screen, camera, television, radio oy: head, neck, face, beard, hair, eye, mouth*, lip*, nose, tooth, ear, tear (drop), tongue, back, toe, finger, foot, hand, leg, arm, shoulder, heart, blood, brain, knee, sweat, disease, bone, voice, skin, body Nature: sea*, ocean*, river, mountain, rain, snow, tree, sun, moon, world, Earth, forest, sky, plant, wind, soil/earth, flower, valley, root, lake, star, grass, leaf, air, sand, beach, wave, fire, ice, island, hill, heat, nature   C

Materias: glass, metal, plastic, wood, stone, diamond, clay, dust, gold, copper, silver, material   C

MathMeasurements: meter, centimeter, kilogram, inch, foot, pound, half, circle, square, temperature, date, weight, edge, corner Misc Nouns: map, Nouns: map, dot, consonant, vowel, light, sound, yes, no, piece, pain, injury, hole, image, pattern, noun , verb , adjective C

Note

C

C

Use these last three ou er adete as adete as labels to help distinguish between very

similar-looking similar-lookin g words (i.e., to de er death ou dead adete) adete)

  59  

 

Directions: top, bottom, side, front, back, outside, inside, up, down, left, right, straight, north, south, east, west, direction   C

Note

ou may not find all of these in your glossary, and you may have trouble finding pictures

even if you do. hats fine. kip them for now, or use my collection of images for directions and prepositions at Fluent-Forever.com/ppendix   Seasons: ummer, pring, Winter, Fall, season   C

Numbers: , Numbers:  , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , million, billion,  ,  ,  ,  ,  , number   st

Note

nd

rd

th

th

C

f you search for a number uo oe do to tre three youll three youll find pictures of

objects ( apple,  monkeys, etc.). his usually works until . hen search for the digits (, , ). oull find colorful numerals, address signs, etc. Use these images (picture of hotel room ) instead of text () these pictures easier to remember and they dont get mixed up as easily. Months: anuary, Months:  anuary, February, arch, pril, ay, une, uly, ugust, eptember, ctober, ovember, ecember Note

oull usually find pictures of holidays and weather. dd in the number of each month (-

) to get more specific. Days of the week: onday, week: onday, uesday, Wednesday, hursday, Friday, aturday, unday Note

oull usually find pictures of people going to work on ondays and partying on

Fridays/aturdays, Fridays/atu rdays, etc. o get more specific, use an image of a weekly calendar with weekends greyed out and indicate which day you want.  have an English-free one at FluentForever.com/ppendix.. Forever.com/ppendix Time: year, month, week, day, hour, minute, second, morning, afternoon, evening, night, time   C

Note

oull find pictures of clocks and calendars. f needed, define each time division in terms of

another time division, i.e.  x muto      (  (ora ora), ),  ora ora     x  (muto (muto ont worry about plural forms (you dont need the word for minutes yet) Verbs: work, play, walk, run, drive, fly, swim,  swim, go , stop,  stop, follow, think, speak/say, eat, drink, kill, die, smile, laugh, cry, buy*, pay*, sell*, shoot(a gun), learn, jump, smell, hear* (a sound), listen* C

(music), taste, touch, see (a bird), watch (), kiss, burn, melt, dig, explode, sit, stand, love, pass

  60  

  by, cut, fight, lie down, dance, sleep, wake up, sing, count, marry, pray, win, lose, mix/stir, bend, wash, cook, open, close, write, call, turn, build, teach, grow, draw, feed, catch, throw, clean, find, fall, push, pull, carry, break, wear, hang, shake, sign, beat, lift Note

For verbs, youll probably need to learn your languages word for verb and add it to any

verb that could masquerade as a noun (to ( to  vs vs a  a ). ).  give you guidelines for this in the pecial cenarios section of the books Gallery, or in the discussion of flashcards at the end of the ickstarter webinar recording. ecties: long, short (vs long), tall, short (vs tall), wide, narrow, big/large, small/little, slow, fast, hot, cold, warm, cool, new, old (new), young, old (young), good, bad, wet, dry, sick, healthy, loud, quiet, happy, sad, beautiful, ugly, deaf, blind, nice, mean, rich, poor, thick, thin, expensive, cheap, flat, curved, male, female, tight, loose, high, low, soft, hard, deep, shallow, clean, dirty, strong, weak, dead, alive, heavy, light (heavy), dark, light (dark), nuclear, famous Note

For a few of these adjectives, you may need to learn your languages word for adjective

and add it in cases of ambiguity (i.e., to ea vs ea vs a ea room). ronouns: , you (singular), he, she, it, we, you (plural, as in yall), they. Note

ake sure you read about these in your grammar book before adding them. anguages

divide their pronouns into many categories. ungarian, for instance, has   words  words for you (singular informal, singular formal (for acquaintances), acquaintances), singular official (for teachers, policemen, bureaucrats), plural informal, etc.), and depending upon how you count, apanese either has o o   pronouns or to to of   of  pronouns. Well need to have some pronouns o  in  in order to deal with grammar ater , so youll want to find at least a few words to refer to yourself or someone else. oull find a good explanation of pronouns (and a list of them) in the beginning of your grammar book. ote that you dont  dont yet need hm need hm her h ther et Well get them later, when we discuss grammar. ow do you learn these without translations Use pictures of people pointing at themselves/each other. other.  have a collection of these at Fluent-Forever.com/ppendix  if your Google mage searches dont turn up anything good. Use these images, and if your language, like ungarian, has different sorts of pronouns for different sorts of relationships (i.e., friends vs acquaintances), then take a few minutes to think of some people youd use these pronouns with. Use their names on your flashcards.

  61  

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SAMPLE PAGES FROM THE TRANSLA TRANSL ATED WORD LISTS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

  62  

 The Most AWESOME WORDLIST You Have Ever Seen ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 

habillement – magasin – panneau – vendre long – ample –  pantalon –  poche –  prix –  quatre-vingts

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

Part of Speech (and gender)

French Word

habillement

m. noun

magasin

m. noun

panneau

m. noun

vendre

verb

long

adjective

ample

adjective

pantalon

m. noun

poche

f. noun

prix

m. noun

quatre-vingts

card. number

Pronunciation  in IPA

                   

English Translation

Notes

abijmɑ̃ ma.ɡa.zɛ̃ pa.no

clothing

1

store/shop

2

sign

3

vɑ̃dʁ lɔ̃ ɑ̃pl pɑ̃.ta.lɔ̃ pɔʃ  pʁi ka.trə.vɛ̃

to sell long loose

4

pants pocket price 80

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  64  

 The Most AWESOME WORDLIST You Have Ever Seen

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Familie –  sitzen –  hinunter –  Glas  Boden –  Boot –  Kamera –  Foto –  Meer

©2014 Sandra Salsbury

German Word

Part of Speech (and gender/plural form)

Familie

f. noun (pl. Familien)

sitzen

verb

hinunter Glas

adverb   n. noun (pl. Gläser)

Boden

m. noun

Boot

n. noun (pl. Boote)

Kamera

f. noun (pl. Kameras)

Foto

n. noun (pl. Fotos)

Meer

n. noun (pl. Meere)

Pronunciation in IPA

 

Notes

ami.ljə

family

zn

to sit

nnt ɡla

down glass

1

bodn

bottom

2

bot 

boat

kaməʁa

camera

 

oto

photograph

 

m

sea

 

       

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