PLC Training Course by Ahmedelsisy

July 11, 2017 | Author: mohamed_amri100 | Category: Programmable Logic Controller, Read Only Memory, Bit, Switch, Signal (Electrical Engineering)
Share Embed Donate


Short Description

Download PLC Training Course by Ahmedelsisy...

Description

   

 

 

Co ourse: PLC Pro ogramm ming Co oncepts  Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar 

[2008] 

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 1]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

BUILDING #2042‐ELMERAAG‐CAIRO‐RING ROAD‐ELMAADI  HTTP://WWW.CONISYS‐SHAKER.COM/  TEL:(202)29705962 FAX:(202)25204518

CONISYS S.A.E.  Control & Instrumentations System Technology  Member of SHAKER Consultancy Group 

 

Plc Training Course                             

  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 2]    

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Contents  Contents .................................................................................................................................. 3  Section 1: Introduction .................................................................................................................... 8  Binary Signal ................................................................................................................................ 8  ANALOG Signal ............................................................................................................................ 9  Number systems ........................................................................................................................ 10  Decimal System ..................................................................................................................... 10  Binary System ........................................................................................................................ 10  BCD ‐ Code (8‐4‐2‐1‐Code) .................................................................................................... 11  Hexadecimal Number System ............................................................................................... 11  Conversion rules ........................................................................................................................ 12  Converting decimal binary .................................................................................................... 12  Converting decimal  hexadecimal ........................................................................................ 13  Converting binary hexadecimal ............................................................................................. 13  Terms from computer science................................................................................................... 14  Section 2:  PLC Hardware .............................................................................................................. 16  PLC Hardware components ...................................................................................................... 16  PLC Configuration .................................................................................................................. 16  PLC Memories ........................................................................................................................ 16  PLC Status .............................................................................................................................. 17  The EH‐150 of Hitachi (Module type) .................................................................................... 17  CPU Module ........................................................................................................................... 18  Power module ....................................................................................................................... 19  Input module ......................................................................................................................... 20  Output module ...................................................................................................................... 21  Analog I/O module ................................................................................................................ 22  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 3]    

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Base unit ................................................................................................................................ 23  Expansion Cable ..................................................................................................................... 23  I/O controller ......................................................................................................................... 24  Inputs/Outputs ...................................................................................................................... 24  Example ................................................................................................................................. 25  Selection of a PLC ...................................................................................................................... 25  Review Questions ...................................................................................................................... 25  Section 3 : Programming Software ................................................................................................ 27  ActWin Ladder (LD) programming: ............................................................................................ 27  Open ActWin ......................................................................................................................... 27  Hardware configuration: ....................................................................................................... 29  Start to create a Ladder program: ......................................................................................... 32  Type the name of the symbol: ............................................................................................... 33  Select an existing symbol: ..................................................................................................... 33  Select the address number: ................................................................................................... 34  To insert a parallel connection: ............................................................................................. 37  To Delete contacts: ................................................................................................................ 39  The system library: ................................................................................................................ 43  User defined Function: .......................................................................................................... 48  User Library: .......................................................................................................................... 49  Included User Library files: .................................................................................................... 50  To print out the project: ........................................................................................................ 63  Export the content of the symbol window: ........................................................................... 63  Communication settings: ....................................................................................................... 65  To change settings: ................................................................................................................ 66 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 4]    

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

To Cut and Past /Move rungs and comments: ...................................................................... 67  To search for addresses: ........................................................................................................ 68  On‐Line Programming: .......................................................................................................... 70  On‐Line Change: .................................................................................................................... 73  Data memory tables: ............................................................................................................. 73  Export from Data Memory: ................................................................................................... 75  Import to Data Memory: ....................................................................................................... 75  Section 4: Programming Concepts ................................................................................................ 76  Control Branches ....................................................................................................................... 76  Programming Concepts ............................................................................................................. 78  Flowchart‐based design ......................................................................................................... 79  Ladder Logic from flowcharts .................................................................................................... 79  Sequence bits ........................................................................................................................ 79  Transition logic ...................................................................................................................... 80  Section 5: Programming Rules & more ......................................................................................... 81  Programming Rules ................................................................................................................... 81  A Golden Programming Rule ................................................................................................. 81  The On Dominant Rule .......................................................................................................... 81  Output Using Set Reset Technique ........................................................................................ 82  Case Study 1: Tank Filling Control using Set/Reset ............................................................... 82  Case Study: Control of Conveyor Belt ................................................................................... 84  Description ............................................................................................................................ 84  Operation .............................................................................................................................. 84  I/O Assignment ...................................................................................................................... 85  Flow Chart ............................................................................................................................. 85 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 5]    

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Section 6:Timers and Counters ..................................................................................................... 86  The On‐Delay Time .................................................................................................................... 86  The Single Shot Timer ................................................................................................................ 88  Mono‐Stable Timer .................................................................................................................... 88  Integral Timer ............................................................................................................................ 90  Up Counter ................................................................................................................................ 90  Up/Down Counter ..................................................................................................................... 91   

   

Course: PLC Programming Concepts  Course: PLC Programming Concepts  Course: PLC Programming Concepts  Course: PLC Programming Concepts  Course: PLC Programming Concepts                            Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 6]    

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Course: PLC Programming Concepts  By Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar                                                                               

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 7]    

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Section 1: Introduction  The controller has the task of leading single operations of a machine or a machine  plant that depend on sensor signals after a given function execution.  Types of signals in control system technology  The electrical signals, which are applied at the inputs and outputs, can be in  principle, divided into two different groups: 

         

Binary Signal  Binary signals can take the value of two possible states. They are as follows:  Signal state “1“= voltage available = e.g. Switch on  Signal state “0“= voltage not available = e.g. Switch off  In control engineering, a frequent DC voltage of 24V is used as a “control supply  voltage“ A voltage level of + 24V at an input clamp means that the signal status is “1“  for this input. Accordingly, 0V means that the signal status is “0“. In addition to a  signal status, another logical assignment of the sensor is important. It is a matter of  whether the transmitter is a “normally closed” contact or a “normally open” contact.  When it is operated, a “normally closed” contact supplies a signal status of “0“in the  “active case“. One calls this switching behavior “active 0“or “active low“. A “normally  open” contact is “active 1”/“active high“, and supplies a “1“signal, when it is  operated.  In closed loop control, sensor signals are “active 1“. A typical application for an  “active 0“transmitter is an emergency stop button. An emergency stop button is  always on (current flows through it) in the non‐actuated state (emergency stop  button not pressed). It supplies a signal of “1“(i.e. wire break safety device) to the  attached input. If operation of an emergency stop button is to implement a certain  reaction (e.g. all valves close), then it must be triggered with a signal status of “0“.  Equivalent binary digits  A binary signal can only take the two values (signal statuses) “0“or “1“. Such a  binary signal is also designated as an equivalent binary digit and receives the  designation of “Bit “in the technical language book. Several binary signals result in a  digital signal after a certain assignment (code). While a binary signal only provides a  grouping of a bivalent size/e.g. for door open/door close), one can form e.g. a  number or digit as digital information by the bundling of equivalent binary digits. 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 8]    

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

The summarization of n‐equivalent binary digits allows the representation of 2n  different combinations.  One can show four different types of information with e.g. two equivalent binary  digits 2x2:  0 0 Configuration 1 (e.g. both switches open)  0 1 Configuration 2 (Switch 1 closed / Switch 2 open)  1 0 Configuration 3 (Switch 1 open / Switch 2 closed)  1 1 Configuration 4 (both switches closed) 

ANALOG Signal  Contrary to a binary signal that can accept only signal statuses („Voltage available  +24V“and “Voltage available 0V“, there are similar signals that can take many values  within a certain range when desired. A typical example of an analog encoder is a  potentiometer. Depending upon the position of the rotary button, any resistance can  be adjusted here up to a maximum value.  Examples of analog measurements in control system technology:  • Temperature ‐50 ... +150°C  • Current flow 0 ... 200l/min  • Number of revolutions 500 ... 1500 R/min  • Etc.  These measurements, with the help of a transducer in electrical voltages, are  converted to currents or resistances. E.g. if a number of revolutions is collected, the  speed range can convert over a transducer from 500... 1500 R/min into a voltage  range from 0... +10V. At a measured number of revolutions of 865 R/min, the  transducer would give out a voltage level of + 3.65V.                If similar measurements are processed with a PLC, then the input must be converted  into digital information to a voltage, current or resistance value. One calls this  transformation analog to digital conversion (A/D conversion). This means, that e.g. a  voltage level of 3.65V is deposited as information into a set of equivalent binary  digits. The equivalent binary digits for the digital representation will be used, in  order for the resolution to be finer.   If one would have e.g. only 1 bit available for the voltage range 0... +10V, only one  statement could be met, if the measured voltage is in the range 0.. +5V or  +5V....+10V. With 2 bits, the range can be partitioned into 4 single areas, (0...  2.5/2.5... 5/5... 7.5/7.5... 10V). Usually in control engineering, the A/D converter is  changed with the 8th or 11th bit. 256 single areas are normally provided, but with 8  or 11 bits, you can have 2048 single areas.    Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 9]    

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

   

   

Number systems  For the processing of the addresses of memory cells, inputs, outputs, times, bit  memories etc. by a programmable controller, the binary system is used instead of  the decimal system. 

Decimal System  In order to understand the binary number system, it is first necessary to consider  the decimal system. Here the number of 215 is to be subdivided. Thereby the  hundreds represent the two, the one stand for the tens and the five for the ones.  Actually, one would have to write 215 in such a way: 200+10+5. If one writes down  the expression 200+10+5, with the help of the powers of ten as explained earlier,  then one states that each place is assigned a power of ten within the number.               

       

      Each number within the decimal system is assigned a power of ten. 

Binary System  The binary number system uses only the numbers 0 and 1, which are easily  represented and evaluated in data processing. Thus it is called a binary number  system.            

         

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 10]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

    The values of a dual number are assigned the power‐of‐two numbers, as  represented below.  Each number assigned within the binary number system is a power‐of‐two. 

BCD ­ Code (8­4­2­1­Code)  In order to represent large numerical values more clearly, the BCD code (binary  coded decimal number) is frequently used. The decimal numbers are represented  with the help of the binary number system. The decimal digit with the highest value  is the 9. One needs to demonstrate the 9 with power‐of‐two numbers until 23, thus  using 4 places for the representation of the number.                    Because the representation of the largest decimal digit requires 4 binary places, a  four‐place unit called a tetrad, is used for each decimal digit. The BCD code is thus  a 4‐Bit‐Code. Each decimal number is coded individually. The number of 285  consists e.g. of three decimal digits. Each decimal digit appears in the BCD code as a  four‐place unit (tetrad).  2  8  5  0010 

1000 

0101 

  Each decimal digit is represented by an individually coded tetrad. 

Hexadecimal Number System  The hexadecimal number system belongs to the notational systems because value  powers of the number 16 are used. The hexadecimal number system is thus a  sixteen count system. Each place within a hexadecimal number is assigned a  sixteenth power. One needs altogether 16 numbers, including the zero. For the  numbers 0 to 9 one uses the decimal system, and for the numbers 10 to 15 the  letters A, B, C, D, E and F are used.  Each digit within a hexadecimal number system is assigned a power of the number  16.       

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 11]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

 

Demonstration of the number systems  Decimal     0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19 

Binary 

*10¹   =10 

*10⁰    =1 

*2⁴   =16 

0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1 

0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 

0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  1  1  1 

*2³      *2²      =8  =4  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  0  0  0  0 

0  0  0  0  1  1  1  1  0  0  0  0  1  1  1  1  0  0  0  0 

BCD  *2¹      =2  0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1

*2⁰      =1  8  0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

Hexadecimal 

Tens Tetrad  4  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Ones Tetrad  8  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

4  0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0

2  0  0  1  1  0  0  1  1  0  0  0  0  1  1  0  0  1  1  0  0 

1  0  1  0  1  0  1  0  1  0  1  0  1  0  1  0  1  0  1  0  1 

*16¹     *16⁰     =16  =1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  1  1  1 

Conversion rules   The transformations of the different number systems are based on simple rules.  These rules should be controlled by the PLC users, since they are often used in  handling this technology. For the use of a number system on which a given number  is based, an index sign is placed at the end of a number. Here “D“ stands for decimal,  “B“ for binary, and “H“ for hexadecimal. This marking is often necessary to identify a  number system because in each system, different values can be obtained when the  same number is used. (e.g.. “111“in the decimal system has the value  111D (one hundred eleven). In the binary system, it would be 111B ,which is the  decimal value 7 (1x20 + 1x 21 + 1x22). As a hexadecimal number, 111H would be the  decimal value 273 (1x160 + 1x161 + 1x 162). 

Converting decimal binary  Integral decimal numbers are divided by the base 2 until the result of zero is  obtained. The remainder obtained with the division (0 or 1) results in a binary  number. One needs to also consider the direction that the “remainders“ are written  in. The remainder of the first division is the first right bit (low order width unit bit).  e.g. The decimal number 123 is to be changed into an appropriate dual number.    Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 12]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F 0 1 2 3

123/2 = 61      reminder  1  61/2  = 30      reminder  1 30/2  = 15      reminder  0  Allocate in the  15/2  = 7      reminder  1  clockwise direction  7/2  = 3      reminder  1    3/2  = 1      reminder  1  1/2  = 0      reminder  1              123  1  1  1  1  0  1  Pattern:  1 1 1 1 0 1 1  1x2⁶ + 1x2⁵ + 1x2⁴ + 1x2³ + 0x2² + 1x2¹ + 1x2⁰  64 + 32 + 16 + 8 + 0 + 2 + 1 = 123 



Converting decimal  hexadecimal  This transformation is performed exactly like the decimal  binary transformation.  The only difference is that instead of using base 2, we use base 16. Thus, the number  must be divided by 16 rather than by 2. e.g. The decimal number 123 is to be  changed into the appropriate hex number.    Allocate in the  123/16= 7    reminder  7  clockwise direction  11/16 = 0    reminder  11(B)              123  7  B  Pattern:  7     B  7x16¹ + Bx16⁰  112     +11   = 123 

Converting binary hexadecimal  For the transformation of a dual number into a Hex number, one could first  determine the decimal value of the binary number (addition of the priorities). This  decimal number could then be changed into a hexadecimal number with the help of  the division:16. In addition, there is the possibility of determining the associated hex  value directly from the binary number. First, the binary number is divided from the  right beginning in the quadripartite groups. Every one of the determined  quadripartite groups results in a number of the hexadecimal number system.   If necessary, fill the missing bits on the left hand side with zeros e.g. the binary  number 1111011 is to be changed directly into a hex number.               1        1        1              1        0        1        1B    0  1  1  1 1 0 1 1              0x2³ + 1x2² + 1x2¹ + 1x2⁰  1x2³ + 0x2² + 1x2¹ + 1x2⁰               7      B                                                                           H  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 13]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                                                                                                                  

Terms from computer science  In connection with programmable controllers, terms such as BIT, BYTE and WORD  are frequently used in the explanation of data and/or data processing.  BIT  Bit is the abbreviation for binary digit. The BIT is the smallest binary (bivalent)  information unit, which can accept a signal status of “1“ or “0“.                  BYTE  For a unit of 8 binary characters, the term BYTE is used. A byte has the size of 8 bits.  0 





1





0

1

Signal State 

    WORD  A word is a sequence of binary characters, which is regarded as a unit in a specific  connection. The word length corresponds to the number from 16 binary characters.  With words, the following can be represented:  0 































                                 1 Byte                                                                                                   1 Byte         Signal State 

  A word also has the size of 2 bytes or 16 bits. 

DOUBLE WORD  A double word corresponds to the word length of 32 binary characters.  A double word also has the size of 2 words, 4 bytes, or 32 bits.  Further units are kilobit or kilobyte, which stand for 210, or 1024 bits, and the mega‐ bit or mega‐byte, which stands for 1024 kilo‐bits.    Bit Address  So that individual bits can be addressed within a byte, each individual bit is assigned  a bit location. In each byte the bit gets the bit location 7 on the leftmost side and the  bit location 0 on the rightmost side.  7  0 

6  1 

5  0 

4  1 

3  1 

2  0 

1  0 

0  1 

   Bit address   

Word Address  The numbering of words results in a word address.   Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 14]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Note: The word address is always the smallest address of the two pertinent bytes  when using words, e.g. input word(IW),output word(QW), bit memory word(MW),  etc. (e.g. With a word that comes from IB2 and IB3, the address is IW2).   

IW0 

IB0 

IB1 

IB2 

IW2 

  IB3

Word address 

    Note: During Word Processing, it is to be noted that e.g. the input word 0 and the  input word 1 are in a byte overlap. In addition, when counting bits, one begins at the  rightmost bit. For example the bit0 from  IW1 is the bit of I2.0, bit1 is I2.1... bit7 is I 2.7, bit8 is I1.0...bit15  is I1.7. A jump  exists between the bits 7 and 8.  Double­Word Address  The numbering of double words results in a double‐word address.  Note: When using double words e.g. ID, QD,MD etc. the double word address is the  smaller word address of the two pertinent words.    Double word address  ID0    IW0  IW2    IB0  IB1  IB2  IB3     IW1                                       

 

IW1 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 15]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Section 2:  PLC Hardware  PLC Hardware components   PLC Configuration  •

Power Supply (Built in or external unit)  ƒ 24 V DC  ƒ 120 V AC  ƒ 220 V AC 

• CPU (Central Processing Unit)        

A computer where ladder logic is stored and processed.  I/O (Input/output)        A number of input/ output terminals are provided allowing the PLC to  monitor the process and initiate actions.    • Indicator Lights         Indicate the status of the PLC (Power on, program running, faults).   Configuration of PLC refers to the packaging of the PLC, and we can classify it to:  • Rack‐type (can handle multiple cards).  • Module‐type (similar to racks, smaller size, modules instead of cards).  • Micro (compact, small).     •

 

                 

Module Rack

Compact

PLC Memories  • RAM (Random Access Memory)         This memory is fast , but it will lose its contents when power is lost , this is  known as  volatile memory. Every PLC uses this memory for the central CPU when  running the PLC.    Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 16]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]



Rom (Read Only Memory)  This memory is permanent and cannot be erased. It is often used for storing  the operating system for the PLC.    • EPROM ( Erasable Programmable Read  Only Memory)        This is memory that can be programmed  to behave like ROM , but it can be  erased with ultraviolet light and reprogrammed.    • EEPROM (Electronically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory)        This memory can Store programs like ROM. It can be programmed and  erased using a voltage , so it is becoming more popular than EPROM's. 

PLC Status  On the front of the PLC, there are normally limited status lights. Common lights  indicate ;  • Power on : this will be on whenever the PLC has a power.  • Program running : this will often indicate if a program is running, or if no  program is running.  • Fault : this will indicate when the PLC has experienced a major hardware or  software problem.  These lights are normally used for debugging. Limited buttons will also be provided  for the PLC hardware. 

The EH­150 of Hitachi (Module type)                                        Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 17]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

It contains :    NO  Device Name  1  Power Module  2  3  4  5  6  7 

Description of function  Converts power supply to the power to be used within  the EH‐150  CPU Module  Performs operations based on the contents of the user  program, receives input and  control outputs  I/O Module  Digital input module, Digital output module, analog input  module, etc.  Basic Base  Base in which the power module, CPU module I/O  module etc. are loaded  Expansion base  Base in which the power module, I/O controller, I/O  module, etc. are loaded  Expansion cable  Cable that connects the I/O controllers for the basic base  and expansion base  I/O Controller  Interface with expansion base and CPU module 

CPU Module                              

  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 18]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

 

    No. 

Name 

Function 

 

Power module                    

   

 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 19]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Input module                       

1. LED cover this is the cover for the LED that displays the input status.  When the input signal turns on, the LED for the relevant number lights up.  The LED only lights when the module is energized.  2. Lock button when dismounting the module from a base unit, press this  button and lift up the module. The module can be fixed firmly by a screw  (M4, 10 mm (0.39 in.)).  3. I/O cover this is the cover attached to the terminal block area  4. Terminal block this is the terminal block for connecting input signals. The  terminal block is removable. 

 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 20]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Output module                             

   

1. LED cover this is the cover for the LED that displays the input status.  When the input signal turns on, the LED for the relevant number  lights up. the LED only lights when the module is energized.  2. Lock button when dismounting the module from a base unit, press this  button and lift up the module. The module can be fixed firmly by a screw  (M4, 10 mm (0.39 in.)).  3. I/O cover this is the cover attached to the terminal block area  4. Terminal block this is the terminal block for connecting input signals. The  terminal block is removable. 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 21]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

 

Analog I/O module                             

   

1. Lock button when dismounting the module from a base unit, press this  button and lift up the module. The module can be fixed  firmly by a screw (M4, 10 mm (0.39 in.)).  2. I/O cover this is the cover attached to the terminal block area.  3. Terminal block this is the terminal block for connecting output signals. The  terminal block can be connected or disconnected. 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 22]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Base unit               

1. Connector for power module. This is the connector for loading the power  module.  2. Connector for CPU module. This is the connector for loading the CPU module.  When the unit is used as an expansion base, this becomes the connector for  loading the I/O controller.  3. Connector for I/O module. This is the connector for loading the I/O module.  Type Number of I/O modules to be mounted  a. EH‐BS3(A)           3  b. EH‐BS5(A)              5  c. EH‐BS8(A)              8  d. EH‐BS11(A)           11  4. Expansion cable connector. Connector for the expansion cable. EH‐CPU104  (A)  is not support expansion unit.  5. Mounting holes (4 points). These are used when the base unit is attached to a  panel, etc. Use M4 ⋅ 20 mm (0.79 in.) screws.  6. Mounting hook for DIN rail. This is used when attaching the unit to a DIN rail.  7. Cover for expansion cable connector. This cover is used for protecting the  expansion cable connector when it is not used. 

Expansion Cable   

         

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 23]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

1.  Connector for the base unit * Connect to the connector of the basic base unit.  2. Connector for the I/O controller  Note: The connectors are represented as the base unit side and I/O controller  side for presentation purposes, but either one can be connected to either side. 

I/O controller         

   

    1. Lock button. When dismounting the module from a base unit, press this  button and lift up the module. The module can be fixed firmly by a screw  (M4, 10mm)  2. Connector for expansion cable. Connector for expansion cable.  3. Unit number switch Rotary switch for unit number. Be sure to set 1 to 4 for  expansion bases from CPU side.  Note: Other unit number than 1 to 4 may cause mal output because of undefined  address. Since CPU reads always the switch information, be sure to set after  power off. 

Inputs/Outputs  The input/output channels provide signal conditioning and isolation functions so  that sensors and actuators can be directly connected to them.  • Common input voltages are 5V and 24V.  • Common outputs are 24 V and 240 V.  In smaller PLCs the inputs are normally built in and are specified when purchasing  the PLC. For larger PLCs the inputs are purchased as modules or cards. With 8 or 16  inputs of the same type on each cards or module.  As with input modules , the output modules rarely supply any power but instead act  as switches. External power supplies  are connected to the output card and the card  will switch the power on or off for each output. Typical output voltages are listed  below:  120 Vac , 24Vdc , 12 – 48 Vac , 12 – 48 Vdc , 5 Vdc (TTL) , and 230 Vac .    Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 24]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Exa ample 

                    Sellection off a PLC  • • • •

What I/O ccapacity is required, N No of I/Os, capability o of expansio on for futurre  needs?  d, I.e. isolatiion on boarrd power supply for I//Os,  What types of I/Os arre required signal cond ditioning?  What size o of memory y is required?   What speed and pow wer is requirred of the C CPU? The greater the number of I/Os to  be handled d the fasterr the CPU reequired. 

Revview Queestions   Q : Can a PLC input switcch a relay ccoil to contrrol a Motorr?  output can sswitch a reelay.   A : No a PLC o   utput cards acts as an interface b between thee PLC and   Q : How do input and ou exteernal devicces?   A : Input Card ds are conn nected to seensors to deetermine th he state of tthe system m.  Outtput cards aare connectted to actuators that ccan drive th he process.    ourcing and d sinking o output?   Q : What is the differencce between wiring a so utputs supp ply currentt that will p pass througgh an electrrical load to o   A: SSourcing ou ground. Sinkin ng inputs alllow curren nt allow to flow from the electriccal load to tthe  mmon.  com   C easier to interrupt?  Q : Is AC or DC  A : AC is easieer, it has zerro‐crossingg.    happen if th he rated vo oltage on a device is exceeded?  Q : What can h  A : It will lead d to prematture failure.    Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 25]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

 Q : What are the benefits of input/output modules?   A : By using separate modules, a PLC can be customized for different applications. If  a single module fails, it can be replaced quickly, without having to replace the entire  controller.     Q : What will happen if a DC output is switched by an AC output?   A : AC input conditioning circuits will rectify an AC input to a DC waveform  with a ripple. This will be smoothed, and reduced to a reasonable voltage  level to  drive an optocoupler.                                                 

       

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 26]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Section 3 : Programming Software  ActWin Ladder (LD) programming:  Open ActWin  You will get the following Window:  Open an existing project, the latest project (in this case “Maxi_306.apg” or a new  project.  Select ”Create new project” with the mouse.  Click on ”OK”                   

If a dialog appears prompting you to select target system:  Select Hitachi H‐series from the list of selectable target systems , Click OK  If it’s stand “DEMO” after the driver, part of the driver or the whole driver is in  DEMO mode.               

    Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 27]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

  A new window appears where you can select what PLC language you want to use:  LD (Ladder)  SFC (Sequential Flow Chart)  FBD (Functional Block diagram)  IL (Instruction List)  In PLC specific mode only LD is available.  In Mixed mode LD and SFC are available.  All are available in IEC1131‐3 mode.  Select PLC Specific Mode and LD, press OK                 

You will now get the following screen with three main Windows:  1. Programming Window (Where you write the program, function blocks etc.)  2. Project Window (Complete hardware and software configuration of the project)  3. Symbol window (Where all symbols like Inputs, Outputs etc. can be edited)                     

  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 28]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

The upper toolbar will look like this: 

It is divided into following groups:  1. File handling and printout.  2. Cut, paste, undo etc.  3. Zoom tools.  4. Ladder editing  5. Help buttons (Do not forget to use the help system)  6. On‐Line and communication  You can always get button information if you place the mouse on a button, e.g.   

 

   

  Ladder editing buttons:            

                           1       2         3         4          5        6        7        8 

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Selection  Line draw  Contact symbol  Coil symbol  Arithmetic instruction(s)  Function box (e.g. Compare box)  Compare box  Rung Comment or Section comment 

 

Hardware configuration:  Open the Hardware configuration to select the hardware to run the PLC program by   clicking in the tree on ”HW Configuration”                Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 29]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

This will open six new items. They all symbolize the racks in the configuration. The  first is the one containing the CPU. The other ones are the expansion racks. Start to  click with the right mouse button on the first rack. Select the “Add Module”  alternative.                    You will now get a list of all racks available. Select a suitable rack from the list, e.g. a  BSM‐4 rack. The item will change name to”BSM‐4” and a + will appear to show that  we can fill this rack with modules.                  Click on the rack item and open it. In this case 5 new folders will appear. They are  representing the modules in the rack. Click with the right mouse button on the first  module. Select the “Add Module” alternative.                        A list of all available modules for that position will show up. The list for the first  module will contain all available power supplies. The list for the second module will  contain all available CPU modules.              Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 30]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

  The list for the rest of the    positions will contain all    Input/output modules and all    Special modules.                When the rack configuration is ready the configuration is shown like this.                Allocate Known symbols (e.g. Inputs and Outputs): Right click on the CPU and select  “Symbols/Addresses”.                    You can type the symbol names on each address type in the CPU. (Some characters,  e.g. Space are not allowed due the compatibility to the IEC standard, see help  system).           To enter the symbols in the I/O    modules. You can import symbols    from a CAD system or e.g. Word or    Excel with Copy/Paste to the    Name Column.         Mark the first cell and press  use these buttons to go from    one module to the next.  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 31]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Start to create a Ladder program:  Select the contact symbol with the mouse or press the F10 button.        Create a contact:   Move the mouse approximately to the place where you want the contact.                  Click and keep the left button of the mouse down until you see the symbol below  and drop the contact.                  Keyboard editing: Move the cursor with the arrow buttons and press Enter or  (Shift+Enter).  The symbol /address handling is probably the most important part in a PLC  programming software. The reason for this is that a significant part of the  programming time is spent here. Most programming errors are connected to usage  of wrong addresses or double usage of addresses. ActWin gives a maximum comfort,  guideline and control in the address allocation.  In order to give an easy way to define or search for an address and the symbol name  the following window will pop up automatically: 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 32]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Type the name of the symbol:  When the symbol name does not exist you will always get a suggestion of the first  free address. This makes allocation of new symbols very fast and you will avoid  double use of addresses.    When you type the symbol,    all matching symbols will    be shown.          Here you can change to an inverted    contact or edge detection.     

Select an existing symbol:  Instead of typing the entire symbol name, you can click in the list and select the  symbol you want.                    Create a new symbol:  A new symbol does not have any match. If the suggested address is OK you can press  Enter to create the symbol.                  Select an address type for the symbol:  If you want a special address, then click on the Memory address and select the type   you want. You can also type the address with the number directly in the Memory  address window.            Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 33]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Select the address number:  The first available address of the type you suggested will be suggested. Accept or  type the number you want and press Enter for OK. You can also press the “Next  Free” button to get the next available address.                    Using addresses directly:  Even though it is not recommended it can in some cases be comfortable to use the  address directly. Just type the address. The symbol on that address will be used or if  there is no symbol a new temporary symbol “__Y200” will be created. (All addresses  have to have a symbol).                    The button “Create Symbol Area” allows you to define any number of symbols in a  one operation. (see “arithmetic box” description for more details.)  Make a serial connection:  Repeat the procedure with the contact and drop the new contact close to the right  side of the first one.                  As you can see, the editing field of the rung is marked (shown as deeper). This  means that the rung is not ready and approved by ActWin. When it is completed the  marking will disappear.  Give the new contact a symbol name and an address: 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 34]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

The new symbols will appear in the symbol window. This window will also inform  about type, (start value) PLC address and the corresponding IEC1131 address  (used if IEC1131‐ programming is selected).                                    Ladder editing without symbols:  In order to make some different ladder editing without the symbol procedure for  each contact, we can turn the symbol editing off. (You can also fetch this window,  the Contact Properties, by right‐clicking on a contact).                                Make a new contact in series. But instead    of giving a symbol name, disable    “Automatic pop up” and press OK.            Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 35]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

The contact  will  be drawn without symbol and address            To make an inverted contact, Press the Shift key before you hold the left button on  the mouse down.              (This can also be changed in the Contact Properties Window).            Note that the width of the ladder diagram is flexible. (The right power line moves  rightwards).    To make a parallel connection:  Place the mouse arrow on the horizontal line where the parallel connections shall  start. Press the left button and drag the mouse down Continue to drag the mouse  around the contacts you want to connect in parallel.              When you reach the horizontal line again, and then release the left button.              The connection is completed.            Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 36]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

To insert a parallel connection:  Make the same procedure as above inside the other connection.                            When you drop the mouse button, then the circuit will be redrawn in a proper way.                To connect a contact in series:  Place the mouse arrow on the line where you want the contact. Press the left button  and drop the contact.                  To insert a contact in series:  Place the mouse arrow on the line between the contacts where you want the  contact. Press the left button and drop the contact.                  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 37]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

To draw a vertical line:  Press the line draw tool on the toolbar.                Place the mouse on the line where you want you to start. Press the left mouse button  and drag to the line where you want to end. Release the button and the line will be  completed.                          To select one or more contacts:  Press the selection tool on the toolbar.        Move the mouse to the start point (upper left corner of the group of contacts). Hold  the left mouse button down and drag to the bottom right corner.                Release the button. The contacts will be selected.                Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 38]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

To Delete contacts:  Press Delete and the rung will be redrawn without the deleted contacts.                  Undo:  Let us regret the deletion of the contacts. Go to “Edit‐menu” and press Undo (or  press ). The previous rung will now appear again.                      Create a coil:  Select the coil symbol with the mouse.        Use the same procedure as when the coil was created.                                   Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 39]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

  Create a parallel coil:  Use the same procedure as when you made parallel connections of contacts. But  drop the mouse on the right vertical line.                          Give or change a symbol to (allocate) contacts and coils:  Go to the contact or coil you want to allocate. Double Click (or click with the right  mouse button and select “Properties”).                        The Symbol selection and search window will appear. Type the new symbol name.  (You are not limited to any length of the symbol. Just use a significant, but not too  long symbol names out of practical reason. Note that blanks are not allowed.)                                Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 40]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

If you have not decided the address number from the beginning, press ”Next free”  and the software will suggest the first free unused output address.              Press OK and the coil is allocated. Continue with the same procedure or select  already existing symbols from the list.                  Note that before the rung was completed it was shown on a “lower level” When the  rung is completed and approved by ActWin the marking disappears. 

To write a rung comment:  Press the button for comment. Click above the rung, where you want to write the  comment.         Click on the  symbol. A window will open, where you can write the  comment.                Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 41]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Press OK and the comment will be inserted in the ladder diagram. 

  To start a second rung:  Select the contact tool again. Drop a contact below the first block (or later between  any blocks) and continue editing.                    You can alternatively drag and drop the symbols from the symbol tree.                  You can create new symbols in a comfortable way through drag and drop in the  symbol window.                Next free address will be used and the symbol will get an index number. In this case  “Start1” with new address X111 will be created from “Start” with address X110.                Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 42]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

 

The system library:  Open the system library, where you will find “Hitachi H‐series” Open this and you  will find three folders. One contains H‐specific Functions. The other two contain IEC‐ specific functions.                            Depending on the mode we have selected under “Tools‐ActWin Settings  Programming” the folders are open or locked. In this case the only open folder is the  ”PLC‐specific”.            To make a compare box or to insert a F or FB:  Select the Function tool. There is now a very quick way of selecting the functions.          You will get a list of available functions. Every function has an “alias”, which means a  short logical name. You can scroll down and select the right function.  You can find the right function by typing the beginning of the alias.         

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 43]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

      Or the beginning of the function name. There is an also a more detailed description  of the functions. 

  Click and keep the left mouse button down on the function and drag it  approximately to the place where you want to connect it.              You can also insert a function in the ladder diagram (the upper line is the logic  condition for the comparison) Drop the button and the function is connected. The  two lower lines are the values. To allocate the value lines, double click on the line  and define a value or a constant.                    To create a User defined Function (F) or Function Block (FB):  A part of a program that will be repeated in the same program or in other programs  can be included in a Function or a Function Block.  The difference between Functions and Function Blocks is that a Function does not  keep any memory and it is therefore always possible to tell the result of a Function  calculation just by looking at it. E.g. an ADD_INT is a function.          A Function Block can keep a status from execution to execution. E.g. a CTU or a TON  are Function Blocks.         Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 44]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

  It is possible to create user defined Functions and FBs.  Create a Function Block:  Right click on the Project Folder and select New Function Block... (also possible from  the Insert‐menu.)                    Give a name to the FB.                  The new Function Block appears in the tree.                Double click on the new FB and a new window will appear where you can start to  define the FB.                In the application we are producing we use a calculation for water Flow several  times. The in parameters are different pulse counters. Build the content of the FB  exactly like you build a program. You can also take a part from an existing program  simply by Copy and Paste from the program to the FB. There are no physical  addresses in the FB. But you have to define if they are Input addresses, Output  addresses or if they are only to be represented Locally in the FB.  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 45]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                                                        Go to the Symbol Window that has been automatically created for the FB. Double  click on the L. “L” stands for Local and all symbols will be Local by default.                                   Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 46]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

The property window for the symbol appears.                You can now select if you   want to change to an Input   or Output symbol        Repeat for the other    symbols. You can also use    these buttons to go quickly    between the symbols.          In this case we only need one Input and one Output symbol.  The others can stay Local. Go back to the Main program through clicking on the Main  folder at the top of the project tree.                The new Function Block is now present in the tree. This means that you can use this  block one or several times in the program. 

          Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 47]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Drag the FB from the tree and drop it in the program Connect an input and an  output to the FB.           

Repeat for the number of times you want to use the FB. All these Function Blocks  will work as separate instances, which mean that they will work independently from  each other.                             

User defined Function:                      The difference, compared to creating a new FB, if you create a new function is that it  has automatically one EN (enable) input and one ENO (Enable Output) and besides  that only one Output.              Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 48]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

You can build up any number of Functions and Function blocks to be used one or   several times in your program.                          The name of the Output is identical      to the Function name. (In this case    “New function”).     

User Library:  In the User Library you can store Programs, Functions, Function Blocks, Hardware  configurations, Monitor tables, Data memory areas, printer settings etc. that you can  reuse.    To copy between the tree and the User Library use normally Copy‐ Past.                In other cases, e.g. for Hardware Configurations, use Drag and Drop.                          Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 49]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Included User Library files:  In ActWin some User library files are included. In the ENG library some example  projects are included. For example the “Pulse train” for Micro‐EH series.  To use this example project do following:  Right click on the “Program main” under “Pulsetrain”.  Mark the program window and select menu “Edit/Paste”.  Drag and drop the “Pulsetrain” monitor table to “Monitor”.                                  The ActWin window will look as follows: 

Define symbol area:  This is a useful function, which is available in the boxes where you define your  symbols. If you e.g. want an area of data memories DATA1 to DATA100 from WR100  – or as in this case 4 analog inputs in a row.  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 50]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

If we want to compare an analog input with a constant”1234” then we have to create  the symbol ”Analog Input” Double click on the * in the symbol window.                The Search/Enter window appears. Type the symbol name, select type (WORD). 

Type a”4” in  the”Area size”  field and press  OK. 

  Select WX type and ask for”Next free”. The next free word input is word 0 on slot 2.  Now we can use a practical feature to create an area of 4 analog inputs in a row.   ”Analog_Input1…4”.   Now all 4 Analog input addresses are created automatically. 

           

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 51]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Drag the symbol with the mouse from the symbol list. close to the connection line of  the box.                                      To write the constant, Double‐click or right click on the connection line and select  “Properties”. A box will appear where you can type the constant value. You can also  define a variable by using the binocular.                          Connect the logic output of the box with contacts and coils. The result will be: 

To make an arithmetic box:     

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 52]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Start a new rung. Select the arithmetic box tool. There is now a very quick way of  selecting the instructions. You will get a list of available instructions. Every  instruction has an “alias”, which means a short logical name. They are sorted in a  priority order, which means that the most common instruction “d = s” is on the top.  (for d = s, just press Enter).                            You can scroll down and select the right function with Enter or click with the mouse. 

  Select e.g. ”d = s1 + s2” (binary plus) by typing the alias “+” Press Enter. 

Press the left key and drop the box close to the contact.            Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 53]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

You can alternatively drag the instruction from the tree close to where you want to  connect the box.                    When you drop the box it will connect and following window will pop up. Here you  can define the symbols that are used in the instruction. The symbol type selectable.  WORD is default here. Search or define the symbol like in the contact/coil dialog.  Press  to enter the symbol and move to the next argument.                       

When the symbols and constants are defined, press OK.          A window will pop up where all editing can be done.  Delete button will delete a line.  Add Button will insert a new line. You will get a list of all functions.  Move buttons will move a line up or down.  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 54]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Edit button will allow you to change an existing line.                          Add another instruction and press the OK button and the box is completed. 

To edit the content of an arithmetic box:  Double click on the box (or Right click and select “Properties”). The edit box will  open and allow you to continue editing.                              Insert rung comments:  Select the Comment tool. Press down the left mouse button and drop the comment.   

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 55]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

     

  Write the comment and press OK.                              and the result will be: 

  To make an H PLC specific Timer delay.  Create a coil. Give the new symbol a name and select address type TD from the  address list. Press OK button. 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 56]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                                  In the Timer properties window enter Timer Preset time and select Time base.                                               Press OK button.              Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 57]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                                      Create a contact in a new block.  Contact properties window.  Create a coil with for example address Y100.                                                    Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 58]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

    If “Input_1” is true, “Output1” will be true after 10 seconds.                                            To change the Timer preset value.  Right click on the Timer coil and Select “Properties”. Click on the Timer/counter  folder. Change the preset value or time base and press button OK.                      To create an H PLC specific Counter up  Create a coil Give the new symbol a name and select address type CU from the  address list. 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 59]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                In the Counter properties window enter Counter Preset value.                                                                   Create a contact in a new block. Select the "Counter” symbol in the contact  properties window.                                Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 60]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Create a coil with for example address Y101.                                Clear current value in a Counter.  Create a contact in a new block. Give the symbol a name and an address.                                                          Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 61]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Create a coil and select the “Counter.CL” symbol in the coil properties window.                                    Every time “Input_1” goes high, the counter current value will increase with one.  When “Clear counter” is high the Counter current value will be set to zero.                                To change the Counter preset value:  Right click on the Counter coil and Select “Properties". Click on the Timer/counter  folder.  Change the preset value and press button OK. 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 62]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                           

 

To print out the project:  To make a proper printout, start to make footer and/or a header. (To be printed out  on every page) Open "Settings‐ Print Settings‐ Footer” in the tree.               

Export the content of the symbol window:                          Test the printout with a preview:          Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 63]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

      A page looking like the final Paper print out will be shown on the screen.                       

                          Paper Printout:   You can click on the symbol             then you will get the complete printout. You can  also select "Print” in the File menu to get a more detailed printout Command.                      

If you select “Print  all” You will get a  selection list: 

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 64]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Select what printout you want and press Print. You can select to print out a part of a  program. Mark it and then select the program in “Print all”.                                         

Communication settings:  Go to menu “Tools‐Driver settings "For     RS232 communication you can select  Comm. port and baud rate. For TCP/IP programming you can enter IP Address and  port number.  For more information see manual For the Ethernet card (For example EH‐ETH)                                Network address.  From menu Tools / Driver settings” Select the “Network address” folder.  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 65]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

LUMP address:  With this you can program/monitor different CPU´s in a LINK system. If you not  using LINK connection, the value should be: FF, FF, 00, 00. Link: Link module  number.  Unit: Sub station number.  Station numbers: For multi‐drop use. Enter station number on unit you should  access.                                         

To change settings:  Go to ”Tools‐ActWin Settings” We have started in the ”PLC specific” mode, which  only allowed us to write programs compatible to traditional programming. If you  want to continue in the IEC1131‐3 programming, select ”IEC1131‐3” or ”Mixed  mode” You can also find folders for Language, Display and Save. Under” Save” you  can order AutoSave, which is practical.                                                                                            Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 66]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                        Under Display you can select a higher contrast display of the ladder diagram instead  of the modern relief type. This is practical on some computer screens. You can also  edit the font's sizes etc. in all screens. If you select High contrast the screen will look  like this:                                 

To Cut and Past /Move rungs and comments:  Left click with the symbol   on the rung or the rung comment in order to mark  one or more rungs and comments. (To mark more rungs keep the  button  down.)                  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 67]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                                    Now you can drag the rung or comment with the mouse to another place in the  ladder diagram and drop it. Start from the left of the left power line.  You can delete the rung by pressing or you can Cut/Copy/Paste with the  commands in the Edit menu rungs and comments or the buttons       

To search for addresses:   Try the Find  and Replace  to find   and replace symbols in the program. A nice way to get a quick overview of the  existence of addresses in the program and to go to the relevant place is to Right click  on a symbol.   

             

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 68]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

A list will appear informing about the rung numbers and e.g. if it is present as a  contact or coil, if it is open or closed etc.     Click on the rung number you want to go to and you will move to that place in the  program.                    Let us change the rack configuration. We therefore have to change the addresses in  the program.              We therefore have to change the addresses in the program.  To move addresses  Click on the Move symbol in the symbol Window.                 A “Move address” window will pop up. Define first and last address in every group  to be moved and the first destination address.                          Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 69]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Press the Move button and symbols will change. Continue until all address are  moved.    All I/O addresses in the list and in the ladder program will change. 

 

On­Line Programming:  Communication / Transfer:   Following buttons are available:                                                      1     2        3       4      5          6       7         1. RUN (Start the PLC)  2. Stop  3. Monitor.  4. Transfer the program to the PLC  5. Upload the program from the PLC  6. Go On‐Line (First Compares PLC‐PC)  7. Update program.    Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 70]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

You can also use the Communication‐menu commands            Transfer the project to the PLC:   Press the On‐Line button            when On‐Line is OK the button will change to     Click on the Monitor button        . Now you can see the monitor status in the ladder   diagram 

  Monitor Windows:  Many times you need to see monitor information from different parts of the  program, which can not be shown just by a rungs on the screen. Then you can create  one or more I/O Monitor tables:                            Right click on the ”Monitor” folder under Settings in the tree.  Click on "New monitor I/O table”. A window will pop up where you can give the  Monitor box a unique name.    Write e.g.”MONITOR1”. A symbol in the tree under Monitor will show the new  Monitor box. We have to define the content. Right click on the symbol and select       Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 71]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

"New Monitor Symbol”.                          The Symbol selection and search window will pop up. Select the symbols in the box  one after the other. You can now see the symbols in the tree and if monitor is on  then you can see the status.                 You can select the symbols in the monitor table in two ways:   Click on the S button. The Symbol selection and search window will pop up. or just  drag the symbols from the Symbol window.                          You can place the monitor window anywhere on the screen and decide the size. You  can define several Monitor Windows for different purposes and display them  together on the screen.  You can catch the Monitor table and the current values if you press the Copy button.  This can e.g. be copied in to Excel.        Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 72]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                   

On­Line Change:  Continue to edit the program as you did in Off‐Line mode. Now the rung or rungs  that are changed and not updated in the PLC are marked. (It looks like the rung is  higher) The Update button will be active.   

  When you press the button the PLC program will be updated with all changes and  the markings will disappear. The Update button will be inactive again           

Data memory tables:  To make a Data Memory table: Right click on Data memory in the tree.  Select "New Data Memory table”.        Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 73]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

                                    Give a significant name to the table Define the first and the last address in the table.                      The new table will now be present in the tree. Right click on the table to do one of  the following:   • Edit the uploaded memory content  • Upload from the PLC  • Download to the PLC  • Verify that the content in the table and the PLC are equal.                      Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 74]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Select From PLC and Edit data memory. You can now modify the content and  download to the PLC.     

Export from Data Memory:  Make a Data Memory table covering the memory area:   Right click on the Data memory table and select FROM PLC. Select EDIT DATA  MEMORY Select Decimal Display mode.  Press Copy Grid  Export to e.g. Excel to take care of the data                                             

Import to Data Memory:  Copy data from e.g. Excel. Select EDIT DATA MEMORY. Select Decimal mode Mark  the first cell to give data into. Press  This operation can take a long time if  the table has got many values. In such case select smaller tables.                  Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 75]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

Section 4: Programming  Concep pts  Con ntrol Bra anches 

                    Con ntrol schem mes  Con ntentious: tthe values tto be contro olled changge smoothly (the speeed of the caar) .  Loggical: the vaalues to bee controlled d are easily y described d as on‐off  (the motor of the  car is on or offf).  Lineear: can bee described as a simplee differentiial equation n.  Seq quential: a logical conttroller that will keep ttrack of tim me and prevvious eventts.      A siimple rela ay controller         

                         

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 76]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

A PLC with re elays 

                         

Lad dder Progrram 

                 

Lad dder                         

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 77]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

Lad dder logic i  inputs 

  dder Logic  Outputs  Lad                        

Pro ogrammiing Conceepts  • • • • • •

Boolean logic design.  Karnau ugh maps.  Ladderr logic.  SFD (Seequence Flow Diagram m).  Flowch harts.  Cases sstudy. 

 

 

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 78]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

Flo owchart­b based desiign     De escribing prrocess conttrol using fflowchart.

  Co onversion off flowchartss to ladder logic. 

   Fllowchart s  symbols                          nstructing g a flowcha art   Con      Understand U d the processs.          Determine t D the major aactions, these are draw wn as block ks.         Determine t D the sequencce of operaations, these are draw wn with arro ows.         When the se W equence maay change u use decision blocks fo or branchin ng. 

Lad dder Logiic from fllowchartts       Blocks of Ladder logic code.       Normal Ladd der logic. 

Seq quence bits 

 

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 79]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

 Transition l  logic  

  ogramming g Example es  Pro

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 80]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

Section 5: Programming  Rules & & more   Pro ogrammiing Ruless  A G Golden Pro ogramming Rule 

A= (A + A [1])). A [0]

Ou utput

OR

And

Exit con ndition

Latch Entrance condition c

App plication o  of the Rule e 

 Th he On Dom minant Ru ule 

App plication o  of the Rule e   

 

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 81]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

Outtput Using Set Rese et Technique

Casse Study 1  1: Tank Fiilling Conttrol using g Set/Rese et 

Tan nk Filling C  Control 

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 82]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

Rising Edge 

Fallling Edge  

Exa ample: A Siingle Turn n Motor Ap pplication  

              Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 83]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

The e Program m 

  other Solu ution  Ano

   Case Study:  Control o  of Convey yor Belt 

Desscription   Th he  system  is  made  up  u of  a  motor‐driven n  belt,  carrrying  som me  pallets  from  a  pallletize to a w warehouse. Three sen nsor are alsso present, respectively Start, Staack and  Stop p.     

Ope eration     Th he  present  t of  a  pallet  at  the  beeginning  off  the  belt  is  i belt  deteected  by  seensor  1  whiich  enabless  motor  M,  starting  the  t convey yor  belt. Th he  belt‐flow ws  until  thee  pallet  Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 84]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

reacches  senso or  2  which  stops  mottor  M. The  belt  startss  flowing  again  a only  when  w a  new w pallet hass been load ded and dettected by ssensor 1. Seensor 3, loccated at thee end of  the  belt,  stopss  motor  M  each  time  it  detected d  the  preseence  of  a  p pallet,  read dy  to  be  oaded. unlo

I/O O Assignm ment 

        Flo ow Chart

   

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 85]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

Section 6:Timers  and Cou unters  • • • • • •

 The On n Delay Tim mer.  The Sin ngle Shot Timer.  Mono‐SStable Timeer.  Integraal Timer.  Up Cou unters.  Up/Dow wn Counteers 

The e On­Dela ay Time 

 Exa ample: Saffe Starting g Operation n      W Write a PLC C code to en nsure that  the operattor wants tto start a m motor by p pressing  two o PBs simulltaneously for one seccond in ord der to start the motor. 

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 86]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

  Exa ample: Starrting Sequ uence      Itt  is  commo on  in  Silo’ss  applicatio ons  that  co onveying  belts  b startss  in  sequen nce  and  stop ps in the reeverse sequ uence. Design a Laddeer program that can peerform thiss task.    on Start ‐> m3 on ‐> d delay 1 ‐> m m2 on ‐> delay 2 ‐> m1 1 on  Upo Upo on Stop ‐> m m1 off ‐> delay 3 ‐> m m2 off ‐> dellay 4 ‐> m3 3 off   

     Detergent  Filling Lin ne  Casse Study : D Desscription:     Th he in feed co onveyor caarries deterrgent boxess to be filled and then n carries it aaway to  be p processed  in anotherr stage .A p photocell iss located un nder hoppeer to stop tthe box  read dy  to  be  fiilled  .A  hop pper  contaain  the  dettergent  is  located  at  tthe  middlee  of  the  con nveyor wheere a valve  controls its drain A leevel switch h is located d at hopperr button  to  indicate  i falll  of  level  .An  operatting  panel  contains  a  a start  and d  stop  butttons  for  man nual  operaation  and  alarm  a lamp p  for  warning.  The  paanel  also  co ontains  auttomatic  and d manual bu uttons for m mode selecction.   N.B. A bake is used to sto op the conv veyor from coasting.  perations:  Scenario of op The conveyo or starts m motion by prressing start push buttton located d at the pan nel .  1. T 2. T The convey yor carries  the boxes  of detergen nt & contin nues motio on until onee of the  boxxes is deteccted by the photocell  (located under the hopper) theen it is stop pped by  the brake.  3. T The valve o opens the h hopper gatee to dispen nse the calcculated am mount of deetergent  (nearly for fivee seconds).  Afteer the gate  of hopper  is closed, tthe convey yor starts m moving agaiin and the  cycle is  repeated 

  

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 87]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

The e Single S Shot Time er 

  Mo ono­Stablle Timer 

Circcuit opera ation:      O Output R1 is on at thee same time the leading edge off input x1 ((from off to o on) is  deteected.  The  leading  ed dge  of  inpu ut  x1  is  dissregarded  while  w MS12 2  is  on.  Wh hen  the  currrent time vvalue is more than thee set time v value, MS12 2 is off.   How wever,  if  in nput  x1  is  off  at  the  first  f scan  aand  on  at  the  t second d  scan,  then n  MS12  deteects the leaading edge.. 

 

  Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 88]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

Desscription      Th he plant consists of a  four streetts crossing,, the four streets are ccontrolled by four  trafffic‐ lights, iin parallel two by two o.   

 

      Ope eration     Th he  traffic  iss  regulated d  by  trafficc  A  and  B.  The  green  signal  on  traffic‐  ligh hts  A  is  alw ways associaated to red d on traffic‐ lights B. A After a fixeed time t, o on traffic‐ llights A  the yellow signal must sttart up, folllowed then n by the red d and green n signal on n traffic‐  ligh hts B. 

Tra affic Light C  Control 

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 89]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

Inttegral Tim mer  Circcuit Opera ation:     Th he current timer value of TMR13 3 is updateed while inp put X0103  is on. The current  timer  value  iss  held  when  input  X0 0103  is  off..  When  inp put  X0103  is  on,  the  current  updated aggain.TMR13 3 is on wheen the currrent time vvalue is mo ore than  time value is u the set time vaalue, and offf when CL13 is on.               

Starr Delta sw witch 

           

Up Counter   Up Counter Tiime Chart  

                                                                              

Copyyright © Conisyss 2008

 [P a g e  | 90]  

 

            [Dr. Ashraff Elnaggar]

 

     

   Up/Down 

Counter 

    Up / Down Counter Time Chart:        Current Value Remains the Same Disregarded 

    

Copyright © Conisys 2008  

 [P a g e  | 91]   

 

             [Dr. Ashraf Elnaggar]

View more...

Comments

Copyright ©2017 KUPDF Inc.