New in Chess Magazine 2012-No. 5 (2012)

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ESPEN AGDESTE!N VIEWS OF A MANAGER

GOLUMNS BY LUKE MGSHANE, HANS REE AND NIGEL SHORT

JAN TIMMAN IS IT ALL ABOUT MEMO ?

BESTSETTERS New ln Ches s Online Shop

Move First, Think loter

Yeorbook l03

Sense ond Nonsense in

The Chess Ployer's Guide

lmproving Your Chess

by the NIC Editoriol teom

to Opening News

by Willy Hendriks

"Whql o fqntoslic book!" Sleve Giddins

"Vivid, full of ideos, ond up-todote." Rochqde Europa Mogozine

The Modern French

Ploying l.d4

A Complete Guide for Block

by Lors Schondorff

-

The Queen's Gombit

by Deion Antic & Bronimir Mqksimovic

'An excellenl piece of work." Glenn

Fleor

Second,

fully revised edition

A Strotegic Chess Opening Repertoire for White

The Enigmq of Chess lntuition

A Complete Plon of Attock with l.c4 ond 2.d4

Chess?

Con You Mobilize Hidden Forces in Your by Voleri Beim

by John Wotson

Cunning move-orders qnd poisonous sequences

"Coherenl ond logicol." Germdn Correspondence Chess Federotion

Bobby Fischer Comes Home

Ziirich 1953

The Finol Yeors in lcelond

l5 Contenders for the World Chess Chompionship by Miguel No[dorf

by Helgi Olofsson

"Thoughiful, thorough, ond bolonced." ChessCofe

"Bronslein's work might be iust the second-besl.,n Andy Soltis

Ploy the French 4th Edition

Copobloncq: Move by Move Leorn from the gomes of o Chess

by John Wotson

by Cyrus Lokdowolo

A lreosure.of instructive games

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Legend

2Ol2lssue

puBUSHER: Allord Hooglond EDTTORS-lN-CHIEF: Dirk Jon len Geuzendom, Jon Timmon

6 NIC's Cqf6 9 Your Move I 2 Pqssionole ploy in Poshkov House Little more thon o week ofter the World Chompionship motch, Moscow wos once ogoin the scene of o moior chess event. With the high number of

drows in the motch still fresh in mind, ond remembering the frustroting deodlock in the vost moiority of lost yeor's hord-fought gomes, mony owoited the seventh Tol Memoriol with some concern. Those worries were ropidly dispelled.

42 lnleruiew: Espen Agdestein The monoger of Mognus Corlsen ospires to turn the young Norwegion into o successful brond ond hopes to hove more colleogues.

48 Sosho ond Seryozhq up io Speed The Ropid ond Blitz World Chompionships in Astono ended in victories for Russion oces Sergey Koriokin ond Alexonder Grischuk.

56 Down of o new century Hoving visited 100 countries, Nigel Short loconicolly decided to visit number I Ol.

59 Hertqn's Forcing Moves 6O Moster

of the Griinfeld

Peter Svidler presents o further somple of his expertise in this grond

opening. n mwixcnrss

--.E

66 lorsen's prophecies You connot leorn much obout chess

if

you only rely on lnformont symbols

(+-, l?) or computer ossessments (+2.31, -1.08), orgues Mihoil Morin, underpinning his conviction with o foscinoting onolysis of Fischer-Lorsen, Sonto Monico 1966.

74 Close roce in Kqzon of the FIDE Women Grond Prix in the copitol of the The fourth leg

Russion Republic of Totorston ended in o shored win for the only two

ployers thot remoined undefeoted, Humpy Koneru from lndio ond Anno Muzychuk

uu (=:J

f

rom Slovenio.

82 Through the Luking Glqss Luke McShone gives his views on two

very different books.

T

gt

B A Arrilr CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE Jeroen Bosch, Mognus Corlsen, Fobiono Coruono, Peter Doggers, Chorles Herton, Humpy Koneru, Vlodimir Kromnik, MihoilMorin, Luke McShone, Alexonder Morozevich, Anno Muzychuk, Teimour Rodiobov, Hons Ree, Nigel Short, Peter Svidler, Jon Timmon, Evgeny Tomoshevsky

PHOTOS AND ITTUSTRATIONS Vlodimir Borsky, Peter Doggers, Boris Dolmotovsky, Anezko Kruzikovo, Eteri Kubloshvili, Roshit Shiriyozdonov

COVER PHOTO

86 Secrets of Opening Surprises A novel queen retreot in o populor line of the French Torrosch is the subiect of further SOS investigotions by Jeroen Bosch.

9O

Going his ovvn woy

Dick von Geet, who died on April 29 of the oge of 80, wos much more thon the mon who gove his nome to on opening, writes Hons Ree.

94 All qboul plepqlqtion? Jon Timmon presents two gomes from

the Tol Memoriol to demonstrote thot

modern-doy chess is much more thon only opening preporotion.

104 Just Checking Who is Evgeny Tomoshevsky's fovourite footboll ployer?

Mognus Corlsen: New ln Chess NEWTNCHISS 5

E

I

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Didn't I soy so?

which he managed to achieve after 59 moves.

a draw,

difficult game, as u if you didn't know so already. How can you pre' pare adequately when hess is a

there is so much information on offer? A popular opening book among club players is The Kaufman Reper-

for Black and White in which American GM Larry Kaufman offers a manageable armoury of original ideas in main lines, based on toptoire

Knew when lo hold 'em

k

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S

mong for the

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the su

of

sho

masters. Even sharp minds that have studied the secrets of the game for decades, and have put in their 10,000

hours of practice even more than

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promising gambit'. How promising, Carlsen found out when he immediately went astray with a move Kaufman warns against: LL...4d7? ')ust a blunder', said Morozevrch at the press conference. 'Just an awful move' - Carlsen. L2.6e2 6dxc5 Only now did Carlsen notice that after the planned l2...Wxa2 White has the devilish 13.€d1!, when after the more or less forced 13...4xc3 l4.6sxc3 6xc3+ 15.Wxc3 0-0 16.h4

Blacks position is terrible. 13.a3

Axc3+ L4.6xc3 Axc3 15.Wxc3 Wxc3+ 16.trxc3 6e4 L7.trc7 6xg3 18.hxg3 and in this precarious position Carlsen had to fight for

NEW

EN

CHTSS

Ae2f413.0-O! fxe3 14.fxe3 gg5 15.Axh5 Wxe3+ 16.€h1

]z

Morozevich didnt go for the standard 11.6-se2, but played: L7..8c1,, described by Kaufman as 'a rare but

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8.2

combined with the next pawn push, proves too sharp. L1,.Ah2 tS L2.

lat I

al EA

Br

lvon Sokolov

1,.d4 D,tG 2.c4 c5 Despite the draw odds, Shabalov goes for a sharp battle. 3.d5 e6 4.4c3 exds 5.cxd5 d6 6.4f3 g6 7.h3 fugt 8.4f4 O-0 9. e3 tre8 LO.ad2 6h5 But this move,

2.c4 e6 3.4c3 Ab4 4.Wc2 d5 5. cxds exd5 6.4g5 hG 7.4h4 c5 8. dxcS 95 9.4g3 Ce41O.e3 Wa5

i'ili/

you can in Fischer mode. Both players took home $12,67 3.50, first and second prize split into two. Bywinning the Armageddon play-off Sokolov earned a$253 bonus and the 2}l2World Open title.

Alexqnder Shqbqlov Philodelphio 20'l 2 (Armogeddon)

level practice and computer analysis. That the relevance of the book is not restricted to club players was shown in the second round of the Thl Memorial, when Alexander Morozevich almost beat Magnus Carlsen with one of Kaufman's ideas. After 7,.d4 at6

aABE I ll

after five seconds. As a result you dont

inexorably go down to zero seconds, but you cannot accumulate time as

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lnspired by Kenny Rogers: World Open winner Ivqn Sokolov. once, remain capable of losing a game before they have made 25 moves. Or

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That game was an Armageddon game between Ivan Sokolov and Alex Shabalov, who after nine rounds topped the standings with 7 points from 9 games. Or rather nine rounds, in Sokolovt case. Loath to play two rounds aday in the final weekend ('In Europe we dont do this'), the Dutch GM took byes in Rounds 6 and 8, and explained his success by this wise decision, happily citing Kenny Rogers' song The Gambler:'You got to know when to hold'em, know when to fold 'em, Know when to walk away and

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even 19, as happened in the encounter that decided on the winner of the 2}l2World Open in Philadelphia.

laa H

Sixteen moves underway and Blacks

position is in tatters. 16...$xh5 L7.

hc4 gh6 18.hxd6 trd8 19.4f7

Black resigned.

Putin sqys: Ask Boris! s nour

$ $ *

about

andB sian p

For the Armageddon game Shabalov won the toss and chose Black and draw odds, with White having five

the end of the World Championship match in Moscow. It is always difficult to assess the significance of such meetings. From their reactions it was clear that the chess players felt honoured, but what did Putin think? Was

minutes against his three. They played

he cleverly briefed by his staff or was he

with the'Bronstein incrementi which means that the clock only starts to run

genuinely interested in chess matters? Less than a month after the match the

knowwhen to run.'

NIC'S

CAFE

F

Russian president was in Israel. In the reports of his 24-how visit there was emphasis both on the improved relations between Russia and Israel, and on their continued difference of opinion about the Iranian nuclear programme. Officially, Russia is opposed to any preemptive Israeli attacks against Iran, but is that the whole truth? Not so if we are to believe what Putin apparently said off the record to his Israeli hosts. According to the Russian business

laughingly stated: 'There'll be no

es-

andwdllwatch the beads of sweat crawl down their foreheadsl Similar cape

beads of sweat mayhave crawled down

his own forehead when he worked on the final list of participants for the 20l2ll3 Grand Prix cycle which has

'World

would not prevent an Israeli attack on Iran. Citing their source he allegedly said that they'would not help and will not interfere'. However, Putin

Clever politics. Russion presidenl Pulin seems lo listen to Anqnd but is oll eors for Gelfqnd's thoughts.

he had had with Gelfand in Moscow. Mentioning the Israeli GM's name and his talent to think several moves ahead, he suggested that maybe the Israeli politicians should do the same.

London Colling

* I & -$

rr on intervie

e,rdr.w

Pau]s

of his ideas to spectator spor

will be hn entirely new sort of concept of a cockpit' where the players will be surrounded by the audience. As he

the

chess players

Russia

attack on Iran improve the situation? And then he referred to the meeting

ates

World Chess the first cycle

daily Kommersant, P:utrn told Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that

added that the Israelis should first consider what the change in power in Afghanistan and the ousting of Saddam Hussein in Iraq had brought. Would an

Ch

global aud than one billi

Andrew Poulson:'We'll wqlch the beods of sweql crqwl down their foreheqds.'

now been published by FIDE and AGON. Most conspicuous are the names of the players who declined to take part: Magnus Carlsen, Levon Aronian, Vladimir Kramnik (the numbers 1-3 in the world rankings) and World Champion Vishy Anand. Of course the list of qualifiers and wild cards remains impressive, as (among others) the other six top-10 players do take part, but this cannot be the dream lineup Mr Paulson musthave had in mind. No reason is given for the absence of the Fab Four of today's chess, but we guess that a lack of financial guarantees and doubts about the venues must have played a role. For next year GPs are announced in Lisbon, Madrid, Berlin and Paris. The first leg, which was supposed to start in Chelyabinsk on September 19, has been moved to London. When the Russian Chess Federa-

tion, p:uzzled by the absence of Russian wildcards, blocked the GP in Chelyabinsk, Paulson called Malcolm Pein, the organizer of the London Chess Classic, and they soon came to an agreement. That's good news! With the Classic in December and the Candidates' tournament next March there will be three major events+in London in the space of seven

monthi!

pionship, but it is expected that additional support will be secured from sponsors. The company is understood to be in talks with a number of businesses in the technology, media, financial and professional services sectors. Mr. Paulson said: "We are looking for six global sponsors in non-competing sectors." (..) Research undertaken by YouGov has shown that chess is more associated with intelligence, sophistication and strategy than any other major global sporti From o press releqse of World Chess, o new venture by Andrew Poulson, who hos bought the commerciol rights of the World Chompionship from FIDE.

'When I first dove into the chess world, I felt incredibly comfortable with these people. It was like being back in college. These were passionate, eccentric, but deeply committed people. They see themselves as the keepers of the holy

graili

Andrew Poulson in fhe Guordion 'EURO 2012. Liked Pirlo's penalty against England best so far! Wouldnt

mind the final go to penalties. Tension;) It's like playing Armageddon.' Judit Polgor reveols her possion for footboll on Twiller 'Boston Celtics now are like IvanchukGelfand-Anand, everybody tells them that it's the time to retire, but they keep on fighting & winning!' Levon Aroniqn reveols his possion for bosketboll ond experience on Twilter.

r

NIC'S

CAFE

NEW EN

CHIsS 7

Screqmingly Obvious

cle on weekenders in New In Chess

With much interest I read the article

201213.

'Sammy against the Soyiets' by Taylor

UK heyday, some of these events did indeed include large prize funds that

Kingston in New In Chess 201214. On page 66 he writes about a well-

known episode from Zurich 1953. The Hungarian GM Laszlo Szabo (1917-1993) 'missed'with 30 minutes on his clock'miraculously... the screamingly obvious 2 1. Wxg6+' with mate to follow

My explanation as a historian is the following: Szabo saw the move, but refrained from executing it! As a Hungarian few Szabo had been in soviet imprisonment in 1943 as a forced labourer. After the soviet

'liberation of Hungary in 1945 he experienced all the measures that they and the Communist Party took. In 1953 the Minister of the Interior Imre Nagy (executed in 1958) started

the anti-soviet'New Course', which was at that time unsuccessful. And Szabo knew all the machinations by the soviet players and officials that are described in the article. So how could he give help in 1953, at this critical

In their post-Fischer

1970s

have sadlylong gone.

On a small point, the first prize in the first Bank of Dubai Open (Iuly

P.O.

Box lO93

lSlO KB Alkmqqr The Netherlonds or e-moil: [email protected] Letters moy be edited or obridged

round and taking the board medal over Spassky.

As for the corrections of me, I endure them in Wintry silence. Los

Anthony Soidy Angeles, CA, USA

A Record qt the Time It was fascinating to be taken down memory lane in Nigel Short's arti-

Manykudos in my opinion are due to the new magazine format. I believe it is a handsomemagazine as well as well written with manyphotos. I have been a member since l984,the year New In Chess began its voyage to become the top chess magazine in the world in my

opinion. One other thing, please keep GM Nigel Short on your staffas a contribas I find him to be very interesting and knowledgeable. Thank you for many hours of pleasure reading New In Chess.

uting columnist, Nigel's article mentions a lower sum of '8700'for these Bank of Dubai events 'in the late 70si

That (1976) €1,000 is probably worth some 4-5 times more than that

Dominic Sciorretto

Cleorwoter,

FL, USA

in real terms'now'. I haven't, however, checked the relevarrt official UK price indices for a more precise multiple.

Bojan Kurajica, with black, in the

Lombardy was not the team captain. Thatwas USCF President lerry Spann. And Lombardy's score was not a mere 6-1, but a colossal l2-l,playtng every

Menlo Pork, CA, USA

lnleresling & Knowledgeoble

As outright winner

Wintry Silence Allow me to correct the esteemed essayist GM Hans Ree about the 1960 World Student Championship (New In Chess 20l2ll, page 85). I participated on the winning team.

Blozo Sredonovic

-

hope of the West? Thomos Bohn

the table!' The poet, trying in vain to pull himself out from under the table, announced loudly,'Piece touch6e!'

1976, London) was actually f,1,000 a record at the time for weekenders.

stage of the Cold War, to his fewish opponent, who was then the chess

Koblenz, Germony

in front of him. 'Not that one!'yelled the owner at the policemen, 'But the one under at the glass of wine

-

having defeated

last round - I just pocketed the cash. I remember it well! Croig Pritchett Dunbor, United Kingdom

Anecdole In the town of Niksic in Montenegro, two amateur chess players were drinking heavily in a coffee house that had several tables dedicated to chess. One of the chess players, who was also a locally renown poet, suddenlyjumped on the table and started to recite his poetry with"a bottle of wine in his hand, his arms swinging

to the rhythm of the poem's

verses.

At one moment he lost his balance and fell under the table, while his bottle landed on someone's head before crashing on the floor. The owner called the police, who came and grabbed the qne who was still calmly sitting and staring studiously

YOUR MOVE

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A t the start of Round 8, the last A.otr.d but one of the Tal Memo-

Morozevich's reluctance to acknowledge this unusual expression of sup-

rial, a bunch of giggling girls is sitting in the last row of the spectator section. Behind their chairs banners are lying on the floor. What is written on the banners is not yet visible, but it is no big secret who these supporters have come for. All three of them are wearing white shirts with the text'Moro is the best' painted on them in big black letters. When the object of their admiration walks on stage and sits down at the board, the girls, together with a male friend, get up to Pick uP the banners and proudly hold them high. Amid fiery red hearts can be read in bold letters: 'Moro, we believe in you!' At the same time, other members of the audience wave sheets of PaPer on which the girls have printed the straightforward'Moro'.

port maybe understandable. After five rounds he was topping the table alone, thanks to three wins, including a brilliant effort with the black pieces against Aronian. Now he is struggling to get back on his feet again after two con-

On stage, Alexander Morozevich shakes hands

with his opponent Luke

McShane and stoically looks at the board. It is hard to imagine that he has not seen his fans, but his face doesnt betray any surprise or approval. The girls' act has certainly not escaped McShane, who watches them with a broad grin.

secutive losses, against Nakamura and Tomashevsky, in the previous rounds. For Luke McShane the unPredictable whims of fate and form that made

this Tal Memorial so immenselY enjoyable have worked the other way round. The Englishman had a disastrous start with two losses in the first rounds, but instead of totally collaps-

ing he fought back with admirable composure and confirmed his class with an impressive win (with the black pieces!) over Aronian in Round 3. In Round 7 he accomplished another feat when in a titanic 94-move game he got the better of Vladimir Kramnik, who was in the shared lead after six rounds, before he, too, fell victim to the rough-and-tumble.

McShane was the winner of an Internet poll that determined the 10th participant in the Tal Memorial, an innovative attempt at audience par-

ticipation that raised an eyebrow here and there, and complaints.from players who failed to qualify. To accept the invitation, McShane had to take a holiday, as these days he has a fulltime

job in the City, a sacrifice'the strongest amateur chess player in the world'

happily made. What's more, on the insistence of his second Peter Wells, he even i,rrent so far as to take an extra day offthe day before they travelled to

Moscow! McShane had no clear idea of who constituted his active fan base, and only found out about the poll when it was too late for him to vote himself. His guess was that his enterprising and daringplay at the London Chess

Classic had not gone unnoticed.

If

that was the reason, he certainly lived up to expectations. Much to the chagrin of Morozevich's fans, McShane remainedtrue to his adventurous style ' in his eighth game to defeat another top-10 player with the black pieces

(interesting statistics: last year only 45 games saw a decision - of these, six ended in blackvictories; this time 21 games were decided - ofthese 10 out of

eight were won by Black). sL 3.1

- Dl5

Alexonder Morozevich Luke McShqne Moscow 2012 (81

L.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.4f3 6f6 4.6c3 a6 5.e3 b5 6.b3 Ag+ Z.lrg Axf3 8. gxf3 AbdT 9.Ag2e61O.Ad2 Ae7

11.f4

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Et

[email protected]

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L2.O-O 12.c5 would leave Black passive but solid.

L2.,bxc4

McShane

would rather not be passive and al-

t+ xswincurss

MOSCOW

lows his queen's knight to come out.

13.bxc4 6b6 14.c5 D,c4 A doubleedged decision, as the knight doesnt have any good retreating slluares,

but McShane felt that in combination with ...€h8, ...trgS and ...g5 he should get enough counterplay. 15. 3e1 *h8 L6.6-:e2 trgB L7 .ag3 g5

18.9f3

Provocative play. Both 18.f5 and 18.fxg5looked safer. 18...94 19. hxg4 6-sxg4 2O.trc7, Wf8 The threat 21...Wh6 (a move that would also follow after the attempt to sacrifice an exchange with 2l.Exca) cannot be

ignored.

21.4h3 at6 22.&h2 trb8

Playing on two fronts. 23.e4

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attacking skills.

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this year, the Russian Chess Federation

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24..ixe4 25.Wc3 6b2

Making maximum use of knight forks, and stronger, was 25...Wh6 26. trhl (26.9xc4 0)g4+ 27.&gr Wxh:

is hopeless) 26...68 27.€gt Afds, with a great position for Black. 26.

trb1 Ads 27.Wd2 kc4 28.trxb8 WxbS 29.We2 Ace3 30.trh1Af6

ll

32...6xt4! A devastating blow that essentially ends the game. 33.gxf4

Wxf4+ 34.4g3 Wxe4 35.Ee1 Wfs 36.AdG 6:94+ 37.&92 Ae3+ 38.9h2 e5 39.Eg1 Wf4+ 40.€h3 Wn6+

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moved their most prestigious international event to June - only to discover that perhaps they had been too cooperative when the Candidates' tournament was postponed till March 2013. For the players the change was attractive, as Moscow is a much more agreeable place when the sun is shining and

the temperatures are summery. On the other hand, for the officials of the RCF, who had barely recovered from their long work days during the world

championship match, the prospect of staging another top event so soon after was less appealing. Media inter-

est was significantly lower and the

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31.4g2 Combined with his next And with mate toming up soon, move this ends in disaster. He should

organized, it is rightly seen as one of ' the highlights of the year. So far that highlight tended to come in November, but fearing a clash with the Can-

nally announced for the autumn of

Mtr EI

Who za.Exc+ Wxf++, and White can

g&

The Tal Memorial has become a solid fixture on the calendar. Get-

didates' tournament, which was origi-

AA

McShane indicated 24...Q\e425.

resign.

32.tril

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23...Ex93! Time to demonstrate his

24.tx$

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ting stronger bythe year and superbly

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31...Axd4 32.Axe4?

White resigned.

MOSCOW

superb live transmissions by Digicast were watched by only a fraction of the numbers that followed Anand and Gelfand. In our previous issue I wrote that on average the English live broadcasts were watched by 225,000 viewers. That estimate was too optimistic. When I returned to Moscow a Digicast representative corrected

NEWENCHESS

I5

that number to between 60,000 at the

beginning to 100,000 viewers at the end of the match. Considerably fewer than the first figures, but still impressive numbers that dwarfed the online audience of around 15,000 that followed the Tal Memorial. Another complicating factor was the clash with Euro 2|l2,which must have lured away many spectators, as even in the press room in Pashkov House the football matches were followed on several laptops. Luckily for the players interested in football, the

time difference in Moscow allowed them to watch the matches that were played in the evening. Evgeny Tomashevsky, one of the biggest football experts amongst the top players, confessed that he had seen practically all the matches, with the exception ofthe one that was shown when he was battling Kramnik till late in the evening before he succumbed after 83 moves. For Tomashevsky the tournament might have come at a better moment.

In our world championship report we hinted at the secret

ery was played by the man hed helped in the match of his life. Th.y talked almost every day. 'Boris is a great player and a great human being and his help and

seconds of Anand and Gelfand, whose names

might be revealed in the years ahead (or never). The 24-year-

old Russian was one of them. At the start of the tournament he was still tired from the hard

work he had done for Gelfand. Tomashevsky

remains convinced that this workwill pay off in the near future, but here it mainly prevented him from'rehearsing' his opening repertoire in the short break between the two events. In the first half of the Tal Memorial Tomashevsky showed what he called'poor chess', but he gradually warmed up and played some good games, including a win over Morozevich. An essential part in his recov-

advice were important. He supported me in a verybad situation and he helped me

psychologically. As Tomashevsky concluded with a telling smile: An interesting situation, I finished in clear last place, but I am in quite a good mood. I am satisfied with the quality of my play in the second half and demonstrated that I can fight back after a setback. For me it was a very interesting experience. The main difference from the tournaments I usually play is that the top class players continue to pose problems. Even under the pres-' sure of time-trouble, they keep the tension and keep creating problems. for youl

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I 6 NEW iN CHISS

MOSCOW

The modest interest in the seventh Memorial was regrettable, as it was probably the greatest edition so far. It Thl

started with a bang with four decisive games and a spectacular draw in the first round and continued to offer marvellous entertainment till the very last move. Alexander Grischuk certainly wasnt the only player who concluded at the end that'almost all my games were interesting'. In fact, the excitement started at the

drawing of lots, which saw another innovation that deserves to be copied. Instead of drawing numbers from a top hat or engaging in some other non-chess related exercise, the participants determined their starting numbers in ablitz tournament. This was won byMorozevich on tiebreak (both scored 6y219) ahead of Carlsen, with the Russian earning 5,000 euro and the Norwegian 3,000 euro. Numbers 3 to 5, Radjabov, Grischuk and Aronian, also gained an extra game as White in the main event, where the total prize fund was 100,000 euro, with 30,000 euro for the winner. The players were generally positive about this unorthodox drawing of lots, although the system may still require some fine-tuning. As blitz expert Grischuk opined:

'It's great,

I think, and

it's very fair.

You earn yourself this extra white, although nowadays it's maybe better to have an extra black. But that's another storyi Carlsen produced one of the flashiest blitz moves in his game against that same Grischuk:

Cqrlsen-Grischuk position ofter 30...4e6

Where does the queen go? 31.Wxe5!

Exe5 31...Wxe5 costs a rook after 32.b8W+ Wxb8 33.trxb8+ *g7 3a. AxfS. 32.ad7t The point. Black will be a rook down anyway. 32...Wa7+

33.&h1 > 34.b89

'simple

chess'instead of the sadistic 34.hxe5.

34...Wxb8 35.trxb8 Ee3 36.Axf5 gxfs, and White won. Morozevich wasn't the only early leader to lose sight of first place in

the penultimate round. Vladimir Kramnik also suffered a rare second defeat in two days. The former World Champion had been looking forward to the Tal Memorial and welcomed the switch to |une. Last year he complained about the energy-sapping forces in Moscow in winter that kept him from winning a single game. What's more, he had learned a further lesson from the previous edition, when too much time had been consumed by social duties and press obligations. This time he met with friends and acquaintances when he visited Moscow at the end of the world championship match and he also used this occasion to talk to the press. In the week that separated the match from the Tal Memorial he planned to relax and prepare in a quiet training camp outside Moscowl That's when his good plans were spoiled. Instead of

MOSCOW

getting in the right shape physically and mentally he was struck by a virus and spent most of those days in bed. Given this undesirable prelude he was ' actually astonished by his encouraging start. Although he wasnt feeling too well, he had the better chances in the short but tumultuous draw with Carlsen in the first round and tore down Grischuk's King's Indian in a model game in Round 2. His plan had been to survive the first half and push in the second half, but as things

went

it turned out to be the other

way round. His last positive vibes he had in Round 6, when a long siege of Tomashevsky's defences that seemed to be heading for a draw brought him a win (for notes to this game see |an Timman's column in this issue - ed.).

Looking back Kramnik felt that this game'took all my emotions, it completely drained me. I started to blunder, make terrible mistakesl The next game, against McShane, was torture. 'I was just slightly better. At some point I could force a draw 10 times. But because of my shape I felt that this was the dayl should finish the tournament. With a win I would more or less force first place, especially because I

had better tiebreaks. And there was absolutely no risk in the position. To lose it was absolutely the worst nightmare I could imagine. That was really

nswincHEss

tz

a big blow for me. That was just stupid. No other word to describe it. It

was comparable to that famous game

in London against Magnus when I managed not to win with a piece up. He was defending well. I never had a big winning chance, but it's impossible to lose this position. The way I lost that completely drove me madl

Kramnik's assessment is understandable, but we shouldnt forget the

achievement of McShane, who put up a great fight. From his perspective the second part of the game looked slightly different: 'In the middlegame I thought that my chances should not be worse. With the queens on the board Black always has to be careful and I knew my position was somewhat easier to play. I had two ideas, I push my h-pawn and I try to give

check, and I knew that sooner or later I would get a chance to do one of them. And after the time-control I

whole night and combined with my overall lack of sleep already, I was a complete zom-

bie duiing this game, where I ended up

blundering a piece. Then, in the last round,

I didnt play that badly andwaswinning, andl also spoiled it. The last three rounds were like a nightmare. I still cannot understand why all this is happening, why I am so up and down. It seems to be a Yery delicate moment when it turns from good to bad or bad to good. I have to analyse it and understand myself, why

couldn

t sleep the

at three in the morning, knowing he had to play

.I

J

a

blitz tournament against no mean competition early in the afternoon. To himself it didnt come as a total surprise thathe finished in last place with2 points from 9 games.

t I ,I

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second one, a draw against Nakamura, lasted seven hours andl}7 moves. His, recovery started with a draw against

hadnt exactly been without bumps

Carlsen, followed by wins against

I

and glitches either. The most active

Tomashevsky and McShane. His only lucky break was an escape from a totally lost position against Radjabov in Round 7.

While Kramnik's loss to Caruana ruined his own chances, it propelled

wanted to cause him as many problems as I possibly could. Of course, later on, it was rather sharp and I

I

I

i

Moscow, without luggage,

I I I I I I

the young Italian into sole first place! Caruana's ride to the top of the table

was not there.

Frankfurt, which caused a further considerable delay. In the process he lost his luggage and had to fill out paperwork for two hours. In the end he arrived in

In his first two classical

it is happeningl

realizedthat probably I had an advantage. But I never thought I was necessarily going to win the game, I just

made some mistakesl In any case the loss after 94 moves had a devastating effect on Kramnik: '(The next day) against Caruana I just

in his home-town Lugano, where his flight to Zwich was delayed. As a result he missed his flight to Moscow as well and had to travel via

player doesn

t

in the world Top-10, who shy away from appearing

in Opens as long as he keeps learning, had been eagerly looking forward to the elite gathering in Mos-

games

Caruana felt totally exhausted. The first one he lost to Morozevich. The

cow; but the first days could not have

Interestingly, Caruana's dismal result in the blitz tournament gave him a serious advantage in the final

turned out worse. The misery started

round. Theoretically, seven(!) players

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MOSCOW

\r'ere still in contention for first place, but half a point ahead of Carlsen and Radjabov, the sole leader only needed a draw to claim the Tal Memorial, as the first tiebreaker was the number of black games! Caruana's only discomfort was that one of these black games was his last game against Levon

Aronian. Aronian, one of the clear pre-tournament favourites, started well with a rvin over Nakamura, but dropped to minus-1 after losing to McShane and Morozevich. The number two in the rvorld rankings was very upset about the first half of his tournament. To his mind he was trying to play too well,

too motivated, and forgot that this is usually not what makes him flourish. He has to be excited at the board and play easily, a mood he only got back into when he told himself rr.as

to let go of the pressure he had been putting on himself and to enjoy every single game. Forget about preparing and just play. He was happy about the wayhe played his last four games. Yet his performance resulted in a loss of 6.8 rating points, losing some ground in the fight for first place with Carlsen - a fight that Aronian himself says he is not obsessed about. 'I am not really in some kind of a chase or whatever. I am thinking about other

things. Apparently, I am not playing too badly but I have a lot of work in front of me, which I have to do in order to be one of the best. It's a much bigger thing. I know that many people love having some charts and everything, but I am not part of that. I'm trying to look at the bigger picturei Aronian's last-round game against Caruana became an unnerving experience for the Italian after a memory lapse in the opening.

Gr 1.1 -D70

10.€b1 trd8 11.4b5 gd7 L2.d5 a6 13.4c3 We8 14.We1

EAEg& ll llAr rAA A I A

A rare moYe that

very easy play. L4...6e5 15.4e2 e6 16.AxbG cxb6 L7.t4 ad7 L8. dxe6 Wxe6 19.4f3 We8 2O.Wh4

AtG 21,.6g5

af8

22.A.c4 &gz 23.993 Axg5 24.txg5 Ae6 25. eds Axd5 26.Axd5 I

ll

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8.Wd2 Ac6 9.0-O-O WdG

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H The beginning of some last-ditch attempts that won't change the outcome. 40.bxa3 trxdS 41.exd5 ad4

42.Hxt7+ trxt7 43.We5+ €f8 44.Wb8+ €g7 45.trxf7+ &xf7 46.Wxb7+ &e8 47.Wb8+ &d7 48.Wa7+ €dG 49.Wxd4 Bc1+ 50.&a2 Wc2+ 51.9b2 Wc4+ 52.&a7, Wxg4 53.Wf2 €xd5 54.Wc5+ Black resigned.

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Moscow 2012 (9)

Ae3

IEE r&r

Caruana had

looked at earlier in the tournament, but hadnt rechecked before the final game. The knight can go to a7 or a5.It can also go to e5, but that gives White

Levon Aroniqn

6xd5 5.e4 AbG 6.6c3 AgZ t.

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Fqbiqno Cqruonq 7..d4 a,t6 2.c4 g6 3.f3 d5 4.cxd5

h4 trc8 28.a3 Wdg 29.Wt2 AeG 3O.€a2 We7 31.trhf1 b5 32.trd3 trcc7 33.€b1 a534.94 a4 35.Ef3 WdG 36.trf6 WcS SZ.Wgg b4 38. axb4 Wc2+ 39.€a1a3

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AAA AA

Black has a highly unpleasant position and on top of that Caruana had little time left. Aronian won without too many problems. 26.,Hd7 27.

$tr

AA

As Caruana allowed Aronian to

AA tr

MOSCOW

tr

destroy his dreams, Teimour Radjabov

must have thought back to his own game against the Italian. The Azeri

unwiucnrss t g

grandmaster could still have won the tournament if he had defeated Nakamura with black in his last game. Still, he knew that his draw against the outof-form American was not the game that had cost him first prize. Against

Caruana the computer had shown a plus-2 advantage, and that is normally not the kind of advantage you need a computer for. Another game that Radjabov was critical about was that against Carlsen, where instead of making a draw he moved his king to a square that he had already rejected in his calculations (A mouse slip, as they would call it at the ICC'). He was less critical of his game against Kramnik, where he repeated moves although he was an exchange up. 'That was unclear. He had 45 minutes against my 16, and I was unsure about myplan.Ifhe stays put and doesnt do anything I dont see

ing that doesnt diminish when he expresses

his current state of mind: 'I get much more pleasure now than some time ago. I was always trying to produce some fantastic result and that

somehow overshadowed my play. Some-

and his only win so far had been with black. No one expected the Londoner to play for a draw, as this is alien to his style, and after

all he still had a theoretical chance to win the tour-

nament. He started cautiously, but in the end it was

his ambition for more that did him in.

how I feel calmer. Muyb. it's a matter of 25.

Obviously, McShane was disappointed that the tour-

that after that

nament ended on a sad

you get older every year. Maybe I feel

note for him, but quite

age;

Th.y

I have turned say

soon happiness about his

more mature, maybe something changed in my philosophy. I feel that I am huppy to play chess and I am very h"ppy to play in

performance prevailed.' 'Yeah, it's great. Although I can sort of play chess with the best players in the world and occasionally have

the tournaments, whatever happens.

scored the odd victory here and there,

where to breakl

Even after losing some strange games.

I never managed to beat three such

A11 in all, Radjabov was 'relatively satisfied' about a result that took him to fourth place in the world rankings. 'I could have done much bet-

Before

I would be stressing myself

tet but I tried. I was trying in

philosophicali The key game of the last round proved to be the encounter between the revelation of the event and the top-seed. McShane had just beaten Kramnik and Morozevich and had the white pieces. Carlsen was the only player who had not lost a game,

players in the same tournament. It is of course a bit of a disappointment to. lose today. I feel I did this to myself. But of course overall I mustbe happyi Even more delighted was Magnus Carlsen. Once again he rounded off a Tal Memorial with a win with the black pieces. In 2009 it was only good

each

didnt go to the beach. Muyb. at some point I game and did my very best,

was unlucky, but then what can you do?' Going by his recent results there can be no doubt that Radjabov will be a force to be reckoned with in next year's Candidates' tournament, a feel-

and saying how could I do that? Especially after missing a draw as I did against Carlsen. NowI am much more

enough for shared second place, in 2010 he didnt play, in 2011 it yielded him first place on tiebreak and this time he finished on top alone.

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NEWENCHESS

MOSCOW

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Carlsen also divided his tournament into two distinct halves: 'I might have gotten a better score if I had started a little bit better. Generallv speaking, I didnt get going at all at the start. In the first round against

Kramnik I made a simple tactical blunder, and I tried to correct it by playing riskily, with 6f4, which could have turned out very badly. In the game against Morozevich I was taken by Ecl, and I reacted very

br- surprise

6ll isjust a blunder and then this was pure suffering... As a professional you should not of course make such mistakes. But I pulled myself together and played that game. And against Caruana I overestimated my position from the opening. I thought rvith the two bishops White should be better, but it was nothing. The first three rounds were really a struggle, but then in the fourth round against Grischuk I found an interesting idea after the opening. When I found it at the board, I thought, OK, I just have to go for this, because it's so unusual. I felt that even with this locked-in bishop I should be doing very well. I think I was doing well up to a certain

that the position held more dangers for him than for me. Fortunately I put

winning with black. McShane played solidly in the opening; I didnt think

pressure on him,I played quickly, and he could not make the right decisions at the critical moments. 'In general, I felt that from Game 4 onwards it could have even gone better. I played as well as I could have hoped to, at the level I wanted to be

there would be many chances for me. Then he could have simplified, but he deserves some credit also for want-

point, then it got out of hand with

on. It wasnt brilliant or anything, but

time-trouble and everything. But it was a really exciting game and it was good after these first three games to

it was good. I was pressing against Aronian the day afterwards. Against Nakamura I had no special problems

finally play some chess. 'In the next game against Radjabov

with black. And with Tomashevsky

badly.

the position from the opening was more or less equal and it was never on my mind to steer for a draw. You have to take your chances and I felt

happensi

hasty moves.

The next daymost of the players leave the opulent Ritz Carlton to go home. At regular intervals they appear in the lobby with their suitcases to check out. Teimour Radjabov and his family will stay in Moscow for some more days. Magnus Carlsen, allergic to morning flights and mornings in general, has a flight in the afternoon. By that time Luke McShane has long left the Russian capital. At 2.30 in the night a taxi has picked him and his second Peter Wells up and taken them to the airport. Thanks to the

'Today

I didnt rate my chances

very highly. You can never count on

l0

Evgeny Tomoshevsky

IGM NOR 2835

IGM IGM

2770 AzE 2784 IGM RUS 280r IGM RUS 2769 IGM ARM 2825 IGM R.US 2761 IGM ENG 2706 IGM USA 2775 IGM RUS 2738 ITA

be important. And then, in timetrouble, he collapsed. As so often

I got a greatposition, but it was just a pity that I spoiled it with a couple of

123456789

I Mognus Corlsen 2 Fqbiono Coruono 3 Teimour Rodiobov 4 Vlodimir Kromnik 5 Alexqnder Morozevich 6 Levon Aronion 7 Alexonder Grischuk 8 Luke McShone 9 Hikoru Nakomuro

ing to play something more interesting. In a way that also played into my hands, because I had a position that wasn't too difficult to play and I had a massive time advantage. (With a grin) I think I also had some advantage in playing strength, which may

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time difference they arrive in London early in the morning, allowing McShane to go straight to work.

MOSCOW

NEW

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Luke McShone

Mognus Cqrlsen

6c6 3.4b5

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6...dxc6 7.d3 ad7 8.b3 I was already out of book here, but

8...0-O

9.4b2

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trawtr 22 NEI{!NCHESS

0...

Ak5 might look more natural, but

look

a

bit funny on c5.

11.9h1

Frankly, I did not quite under-

stand the point behind this move, but it obviously doesnt spoil the position. 11...4f8 L2.2,e2 c5 13.4h4 6,eG

L5...6d416.f4 Ae6

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Instead, 17.f5 gfr 18.94 was possible, but Black should be doing well then, as playing 95 is still many moves away for White, and counterplaywith ...b5c4 will always be in the air.

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Very natural, but now Black gets the chance to keep some of the tension, which improved my mood a lot. The alternative was 14.f4 q\f4 (14... exf4 15.olfs - l5.6xf4 6d+ is the point of this move order -

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17.exf5 exf4 18. trxf4 Ad6 presents

Nowthere is no need to take on f4.

tr

big deal, as such positions can

more or less be played by hand.

1

I was slightly concerned about ll.d4 exd4 l2.6rl.d4, as the knight might

AAA

The Delayed Exchange Variation was definitely a surprise, and a slightly unpleasant one, as in the resulting structures it's not all that easy to create winning chances with black.

a

Blackwith no problems whatsoever.

A

6.Axc6

not

most natural option. 10.6c3 I sort of expected this knight to go to d2, but c3-e2 is a sensible route as well, especially since it sup-

10...Ee8

After a disappointing draw in a long game against Tomashevsky in the penultimate round it was clear that my only (slight) chance of winning the tournament lay in winning this game. In theory Luke could actually also win the tournament (if he won), in addition to pulling off an unlikely hat trick against the 2800+ players, so I was hoping that he would be in a fighting mood. 7..e4 e5 2.4f3

Here, too, 15.f4

ports f2-f4fromthere.

Moscow 201' 2 (9)

6xf+ l6.6xf4 Axf5

9...f6 I also considered ...4d6/...f6, but eventually decided to go for the

A AA tr wtr ANAI.YSIS DIAGRAM

1s...4d6 16.6xd6 Wxd6 t7.Wd2, followed by 18.6xf4, is very comfortable for White) $.q\f4 exf+ rc.Hxf+ Ade tl.trf2 Ae518.Axe5 Exe5,with very dry equalitf.

14...4f8 15.4e3

17...fxe5 L8.ag1, 96 19.c3 Ac6 advantage here, but I was feeling good

about the situation, especially as my opponent was burning a lot of time.

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21,.WeL?! In view of my next move, this is a clear inaccuracy.

27....a5 Taking advantage of the fact that b3 is no longer protected by the queen, and forcing a weakening on the queenside.

22.Hd7, a4 23.bxa4 Exa4 24.a3 trf8 25.4c1tra8

a

Nevertheless, White is still fine here, as it's hard to get to the white weaknesses, and my pieces dont have very many squares.

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26.Wg3 Another inaccuracy, which is based on an overestimation of his attacking chances after the subsequent Pawn sac.

26...4b3

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[email protected]

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doesnt have any dangerous ideas.

go 34...Wd6 (34...9r4 35.Exf4 exf4 36.6ga also keeps the fight going) 35.trxf4 exf4 36.8d1 We5 37 .6)xe6+ Wxe6 38.Wxf4, and White has his best position in a long time.

31.4g5 Axg5 32.Wxg5 &97

34...Wc4 35.trfe1

I just did not want to let White get his knight to 95 (which is impossible now since the rook will be hanging on fl). Without the knight on 95 White really

27.trde1,

33.Wc1 Ht4?

35.695 Eaf8 is plain sailing, as men-

Objectively this is just a blunder, but I can understand why Luke was not too

A really careless mistake. 33...9d7 was easilywinning, as White is a pawn down with a bad position.

tioned earlier.

keen on 27.8d2 Ah6 28.We1 Ae6 29.Edl Af4, when Black is slowly but surely improving his position.

27...Wxd3 2e.ag4 I

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Now the knight on h6 is doomed. Luke was also running out of time,

34.trdl?

which didnt make it any easier.

one felt very sensible.

3a.6g5 was White's last chance. For some reason I only considered this after 34.Ed1 Wc+, when it can be easily met by ...Eaf8, as the queen protects the bishQp on e6. But after

29.6h6+ €h8 3O.Wh4 Af6

the immediate 3a.6g5 Black could

\Mhite resigned.

28...AeG I could also have taken on

c3,

but this

MOSCOW

37.93 Ht2 Now...Wa2 is a lethal threat.

38.6f5+ gxfs 39.4h3 He2 40.wgs+ €h8

nnwincnnss zg

otherwise Black would play ...c5 himself, with a comfortable position.

E!E

[email protected]

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- c45

Fobiono Cqruqnq Vlodimir Krqmnik Moscow

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This game was played in the penultimate round. In the previous game, I had miraculously survived a dead lost position against Radjabov, and as a result I was tying for first place with +1. 7..e4 e5 2.4f3 6c6 3.d4 The decision to play the Scotch for the first time in my life, in such an impor-

tant game, and especially against a player like Kramnik, wasnt an easy one. However, I felt like getting a new and interesting position from the opening, rather than bash my head against the Berlin Wall yet again. In hindsight, this decision was a perfect one.

3...exd4 4.dxd4 6tG 5.6xc6 bxc6 6.e5 We7 7,We2 Ad5 8.c4 Aa6 9.4d2 961O.Af3

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10...4g7 Before the game I had also checked 10...Wb4+ 11.€dl Ebs l2.Wc2 6re7, with complexplay, which perfectly suited my mood.

11.4g5

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11...fG This move took me by surprise, although I must admit it's avery logical one. I had looked at the following forced

variation: 11...Wb4+ l2.Wd2 Wxd2+ 13.Axd2 6loe ru.bl d6 1s.0-0-0 dxe5 16.6xe5 Axe5 L7.Eel Nz ts.f+ fe

20.48 0-021.4e2 EfeS 22.Axe5 fue5 B.Af3, with a pleasant 19.fte5 hxe5

advantage, despite the pawn deficit.

L2.extB Wxe2+ 13.Axe2 6xf6 14.0-O-O O-O-O 15.4e3 Ede8 16. ad3

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18...4d5 The most natural move, but perhaps not the best one. 18...d5 Lg.gdlleaves Black's position abit awkr,vard. However, the accurate 18...6e4r. 19. cxd6 cxd6 would have resulted in dead equality, since White can no longer capture ona7 due to ...c5.

19.cxd6 cxd6 2O.Axa7 Black should have enough compensation here, but over the board it isnt so simple to prove it. Every one of Kramnik's next moves is quite natural and hard to criticize, but each move slightly weakens Black's position until he no longer has any compensation for the pawn.

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16...d6 After 16..4g4? White can safely grab the pawn: 17.Axa7 €bz ts.h:, with a

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L7.cS The only logical way to proceed,

MOSCOW

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20...&c7

Perhaps stronger was

10...9d7!?, which has the advantage of ar.oiding q\6 check in some variations. This seems sufficient for rough equality: 2l.Hb3 &c7 22.9'e: trbS Za.

1xb8 trxb8 24.4d4 Axd4 25.6xd4 -'-f4, and Black regains the pawn with a

fine position.

21.9e3 EE

EE

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21...tra8 Another small step in the

23...trf8?

\rrong direction.

After this strategic mistake Black will be struggling for the rest of the game. It was his last chance to trade off

Better was 21...Eb8 22.trd2 EheS 23.

Eel 6xe3!. It

seems difficult to part

&

ll

a

AT

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rrith such a beautiful knight, but as is rrell known, the pieces that remain on the board are more important than the pieces that are traded off. This exchange ensures a bright future for Blacks bishop, which is much more

White's bishop. 23...6)xe3 is simply mandatory now: 24.fxe3 EeS, and Black will have to suffer a bit, but he should be able to hold the position.

versatile than White's knight. After

Now Black is even facing tactical

24.fxe3 Eb4, Blackhas adequate compensation for the pawn.

problems.

27...&d7

24...tre8

22.a3 tra4

24...&d7 25.Hb3 threatens 26.8b7, which is surprisingly difficult to

Black should still try 27... 6xe3 28.Exe3+ &d7, although this version of the exchange is clearly unfavourable for him.

Another possible continuation was 22...Ehb8 n.Hd4 6:f+z+.tre3 Axd4

& :

ll

A

E

E l-

A

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E

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A

30.4f7

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t ]

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ll AAA

trAA

25.4b6+ I was huppy to trade off some mate-

tr

rial, since it became clear that myking would never be inpny danger.

AAA

AAA

29...h6 30. 6tr wins another pawn.

I

23.treL

I

A

28.trb3 €c8 29.4d2 h5 E

pawn structure.

Er

AtrA M"yb.

counter.

ExhZ 6-tf4, and Black should be able to make a draw due to White's broken

& ll

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24.69s

2.5.6xd4 6xg2 26.He7+ &be zt.

E

E

25,.&d7 26.trxti8 €xe8 27.Ae3 MOSCOW

E

EE A

I

I

E

Atr

AA d?

AAA

e,

I continue to pursue my advantage in the most concrete way, but perhaps it

CHISS

NEW =N

27

was more practical (especially due to mytime shortage at this stage) to simply consolidate myposition and begin advancing on the queenside.

30...€c7 31.trg3 6e7 32.b4 &d7 33.trd3 d5 34.€c2 at5 35.4c3

ll

@eA

lal H& AAtr

has defended accurately, and it seems like he is beginning to get counterplay

with ...€d5, supporting his advanced d-pawn. 11

r& AI

A€4tr

I

aar AAA

EU

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A

AAA 38.f3?! An inaccuracy which... wins

A very important move, as otherwise Black gets sufficient counterplay with

...N+. 35...d4 35...Exa3 36.Hxg7 Exd3 37.&xd3 6rlrg7 38.6es+ €ao :g.Axg6 is most likely winning for White. 36.&b3 Ea8 37.495 €dG The last couple of moves Kramnik

28

NEW

EN

CHESS

the game immediately! Surprisingly, this move, which was made with only seconds on the clock, almost spoils all the hard work I had done.

The precise 38.€c4! Exa3 39.9xd4 Exd: 40.4c5+ €e5 41.€xd3 gives

White good chances to score the full point, although there is still plenty of work to be done.

38...&ds 39.he4

lat I E

A

I

& :

a ra A€4tr

I AI a

2l

AA

39...4e3?? Abizarre blunder, ending the game immediately. Instead, Black had a miraculous chance to turn the game around: 39...Exa3+!!

40.€xa3 &c4 4L Edt dxc3, and it seems like Black's advanced c-pawn will secure a draw. 40.Exe3 Black resigned. An unfortunately abrupt finish. To my great shock (and probably to that of many others as

well) I found myself in clear first place going into the final round. However, I wasnt quite up to the challenge and lost without a fight against Levon Aronian, ending up in shared second place.

MOSCOW

-il

I

NOTES BY

E A I

sr

3r.4-B30

Luke McShone

Teimour Rodiobov Moscow 2012 (2)

-\fter winning my first game against Tomashevsky I had to play McShane. \either of us could probably even imagine that Luke would play seven decisive games in this tournament. -\Ioreover, almost each of his games

&AAE

lll

ll lg

L3...ab4l? There was nothing

AA AAA A AA g treag tr

led to a new leader of the tournament!

1O.Ac3 The alternative 10.6a3 was tried against me by Grischuk. White intends to play d3 and the knight is

However, now we are at the start of

well-positioned on c4 anyway: 10...

Round 2. Let's see.

L.e4 c5 2.4f3 AcG 3.4b5 eG 4. 5.b3 ==XG6 bxc6

[email protected]

I

A A

A

AA

traAw€

A

l_\

;

i

.

&H

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Arll

I A

I Ig l

I

AA AA L

/\B tr

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AWAAA

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L4.AeL?l

AE

a

wrong with 13...0-0, but 13...6b4 just seemed a better option.

After this move Blackis atleast slightly bettet as his plan is clear. White on

I I ll I I I

I

L2.We2 Ads 13.4d2 As the bishop is now ond2,the c2-d3 chain becomes a bit vulnerable, so I decided to go for concrete measures.

the other hand is left with passive pieces and his king in the centre. Better than the text-move seemed 14. Ecl !?, for instance 14...4a6 15.6e4 trds t0.4k1, with an unclear game.

14...0-0 L5.6e4

AA

tr

This line came into fashion especially after the match Anand-Gelfand, so it's no surprise that it was tried in the first super-tournament just one week after the match. 5...d6 Preparing ...e5. Now White reacts quickly with a pawn push to the same square to prevent Black's plan.

Gelfandt team concentrated on the reply 5...e5. Anand won the decisive second game of the tiebreak after 6. 6xe5 We7 7.d4 d6 8.6-txc6 Wxe4+ 9.We2 Wxe2+ 10.&xe2 Abz t1.Aa5.

6.e5 dxeS 7.6xe5 Wds 8.4f3 We4+ 9.€f1Wfs!? A strange-looking move, connected with the idea of withdrawing the queen and avoiding d3 with tempo for White. There is also the idea of meet-

ing 10.d3 with 10...Wf6!?, depriving White of the a1-h8 diagonal, as hed have to meet 10...Wf6 with 11.c3.

E&

E

EI

A\e t1.d3 ,ed5 D.il\4 Aa6, and our game in Round 6 eventually ended in a draw.

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Arll

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1O...AfG 11.d3 Ae7 H

Arll

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q)

A

2l

A

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AA gAAA

l

A€tr

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A

AAA

2t

A

tr

AW

,\ q)

AAA gE

15...f6 Here

15...a5!? deserved seri-

ous attention! It looks dubious at first sight to put the pawn on a5, where it

may later become atarget for White's knight, but in fact the position is very

dynamic and Black will be able to

Natural development. NowWhite has to decide which plan to implement. Certainly, conquering the c5-pawn is not as easy as it looks and any regrouping has to be done accurately, as White's king is still in the centre!

MOSCOW

counter in the centre if White decides to go for the pawn immediately.

16.h3 e517.&91 After 17.g4 We6 18.693 Wfz, with ...f5 always in the air, I prefer Black's position.

CHESS

NETil =N

29

17...trb8 18.€h2 wge

I

HA :-

a

An interesting idea, but I followed initial intentions.

-y

26...Wc7 27.Wd7.

EI

[email protected]

A ll rg I I )\I

Too passive. Maybe White should have stayed put

with27.6lfi.

q)

tl JT

AA

A A

Atr

a

ll ll

31...4e7 32.0:c3

Here 32.6xf4 doesnt work: 32...Atr 33.Wf5 exf4 34.Exe7 HxeT 35.Axf6 Eds :o.Wxfit

EAs

Wf8, and Black is on top.

Agr I

32...&h8 33.tr91 And here, as 93 is coming, I decided that 33...Wg6 was the best move. Black is at no risk and somehow it is only White who has to be accurate.

AAA A A Ag AA

A

t/\

tra

tr

27 ...6114 Another idea was 27 ...a5t? . 28.A\3e2 White is doomed to a passive defence here. The rook on al is

out of play and ...c4 is always in the

Now Black's pieces are in their best positions. Everything is ready for a central break with ...f5 or ...c4.

24.Ab2 Ads Bringing back the knight, as24...c4 doesnt workyet.

25.€h1 Ae6 As ...c4 right away didn't work, I decided to try the

air. Now I made a mistake which later granted me the point...

E EAs g ll l I Er

I

...Wc7-a5 plan. E

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II

q_)

AA AW

AA

HA & =

I AT rA I ,\ AA

LI

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L

A A

tr

a

26.a3 The computer now suggests 26...q-rc7, followed by the manoeuvre ... Abs-d+.

30

NEWENCHESS

ll I A A AA AA EAA g

and also D-vf+ is in the air. Of course, the position is still OK for Black, but accuracy is required.

EfeS 22.Wd2 Af8 23.4g1 trbd8

I

l Ar

I

Now the jokes are over. White is threatenin g $ I trgl or Hgl I g4himself

Itb not that easy to break open White's position here, as Black cannot make the pushes ...f5 and ...e4 work quickly, so both sides have to regroup for a while. 19.4g3 gf7 20.4c3 Ad7 27..trhe7.

E

EAw

trtr

A

WA Ag

tr

lg

E

tr

AA

^^ AA

AAA

wtr ag

33...w96

& :

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IA

E EET

I Erg ll

AAEA

AA

trtr

I AA

I

Ntr E n A

34.wf3?! This is not a losing plan, but it allows interesting options for Black. We had both been in time-trouble for a long

28...g5 From an objective point

time, so it was our blitzing that influ-

of view 28...Dlg6t was of course the move, when Black threatens ...f5-f4 or ...f5-e4 and White's king is beset by

enced our decisions.

problems. Even ...6h+is a threat! The imme diate 28...e4 won t yield any-

thing. After 29.Nf4 Wxfa 30.Exe4 WxD 31.We2 the position is equal. 29.6xt4 gxt4' 3O.Wh5 Wgz Sr. 4)e2

Best was 34.Wxg6!, with an equal endgame: 34...hxg6 35.6v"4 &g7 36. B g5 (or 36...4d5, with equal play)

37.trgdr &96 3s.a4 fufr.

34...9h6 35.94 The only move, as otherwise Black goes ...Eg8 and 94 is no longer possible due to ...ftg3 and the capture on h3.

MOSCOW

-----

E

IE

EEtsE

ts

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I Er

ll IA AAAA W A AA A ,l.

tr&

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35...tr98 An interesting alternative rr.as 35...c4t? 36.bxc4

Wn+ti.

36.6e4 tr96 37.tr92 trdg8 38. Eag1. WgZel One more move that objectively speaking is not that good. 38...4d5!, preventing any white play

in the centre, was better, when the position is about equal.

E& -

I

Ag I I ATE ll era AA A g A

AA

Atr

H

39.a4?l After 39.We2! trho +o.trtrz trg6 al.R h5 the position is unclear, but both sides have their chances, as Black's bishop on e7 is certainly not the best piece imaginable.

He should have played4}.qk3,when after 40...4d5 41.Alxd5 cxd5 Black is only marginally better. 40...trh4! After this move Luke was, of course, Yery upset, as he realized that he was lost, while the position no

longer looked really dangerous. All the variations are in Black's favour and everynhere he is tactically winning. 41.€h1 h5! A mistake would have

f3 We6 48.Exhs+ &96 a9.Ehxg5+ A"g5 s0.Exgs+ €f/. In case of 42.gxh5,42...4xh3!! is an important finesse. It's mate in seven against the best defence O, or in2 after Afi+ 44.9m Exh3 mate.

a3.Hxg7

42.,hxg4 43.Wd1 Wh7 44.tr992 tr96 Now the second rook joins the batteryon the h-fiIe. White is helpless.

45.wg1 trgh6 46.hxg4

been 41...9h6?. 42.trh2 Axg4 43. tr"g4 trgga 44.Wxg4 tr"ga 45.hxg4, and

itt

a draw. Black

I

will not be able

to break through White's castle of pawns and the bishop on e7 suffices a good defender.

I

I AT I I

as

39...trh6

,t

Eg

Agr I AT E ll

A ATA A AWA AA Atr

trg

4O.&h2?? The king has nothing to do on h2. That was the square for the rook to defend the kingside. Suddenly, after mynext move, White is lost.

I

21

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a

ll

Ag I Ar

ll I A ATAE A AWA AA AE

tr€

42.trh2 I thought that42.g5 was best, although Black should win here too after 42...

trxh:+ 43.gxh3 €"n: 44.trh2 fxg5 45.Exh3 Wfi +e'.Axe5+ &ht +t.

MOSCOW

& :

6

AA

A

ALAE AtrE we

46...4xg4! Also winning 47

.trxh4 fxg2+

E

48. &xg2

was 46...f3

Exh+.

47.6,d2f3 48.trxh4lxg2+ White resigned. We had a great fighting tournament with lots of decisive games; maybe one of the most amazingtournaments in my life! I hope everybody enjoyed the Tal Memorial 2012 and I am once again very thankful to the organizers for the great organization.

NEWENCHESS

3I

Kt 4.6

prepared for the Candidates', where I played Radjabov and had to find something against the King's Indian. And apparently my preparation was quite good, as I scored two out of two in this line.

- E97

Vlqdimir Kromnik Alexqnder Grischuk Moscow 2012 (2) At some stage towards the end of the tournament I was chatting with Levon

(Aronian) and Magnus (Carlsen), saylng that it was such an interesting tournament and that we understood why: because there was not a single Queen's Gambit! So in this game I was grateful to Sasha for playing the King's Indian, which is always a pleasure. Not because it's a bad opening (although of course it is a bad opening!), but mainly because you can almost always be sure that there will be a full fight on the board. When you play White nowadays, there is always the danger of being neutralized and having aboring draw. So I was pleased that he played the King's Indian, but at the same time I hadnt expected it and I decided to repeat what I had played

The set-up with 12.AB steers in a new direction. It is very similar to the lines with Eel in the Bayonet Attack, which I played with good results for manyyears. The onlydifference is that instead of having a rook on el White has played 93. This is both good and

AA

AA

trAgtrg L2.ats

This is a more or less new concept. There is a lot of theory on 12.f3, one of the main adepts being King Loek, who played it an incredible number of times and got mated quite often. I decided to play l2.Ab,which I had

32

NEW

EN

CHESS

A AA

I la AE ar l ra A

a

A

A

A

tr

gA A

wtr€

A

exd5 and was very huppy with myself,

I returned to my hotel room that according to my notes I had not intended to play L3. Aa3 (which is not abad move - I also analysed it, but I am not sure it givds White any advantage) but 13. Ag2l In short, an interesting way to win a game. Fortunately, this time I remembered that my intention was to play B.Ag2.It looks a bit strange. It is a prophylactic move. True to himself, Alexander was already getting into time-trouble and came up with the most logical move:

13...h6

bad, but when preparing for Radjabov I found that it's not so obvious that 93 is worse than Ee1. But while there are

hundreds of games with Eel in this position, there are none with 93.

L2...cG

A

I

only to realize when

October, where I beat Anish Giri.

A

ll

L3.ag2

7..6t3 4)tG 2.c4 96 3.6c3 Ag7 4.e4 d6 5.d4 O-O 6.4e2 e5 7.0-O 6c6 8.d5 6,e7 9.b4 Ahs1O.g3 f5 fl.495 af6

alra AA A

uI E&

I

E

I won a nice and quick game against Anish (Giri) after 13.4a3 cxd5 14,

in the Hoogeveen tournament last

EAgE& lll a e. I l ar

&g7 22.4c4, and it's clear that Black will suffer trying to make a draw.

A standard reaction, and the main

One of the points of B.Ag2 is shown in the game. The other is that after 13...cxd5 14.exd5 e4 the bishop is not attacked and I can play a move like 15.Wb3, and this position offers

I

White good prospects.

I

L4.6eG AxeG 15.dxe6

H

MOSCOW

{lI/

EEI

ll

continuation in the linewith Ee1.

The main justification of 12.4f3 is that after the critical 12...h6 13. 4e6 Axe6 l4.dxe6 Wc8 15.6d5 6exd5 (of course 15...4fxd5 16.cxd5 just gives White a big plus) 16.exd5 e417.Ae2 6xdS 18.Wxd5 Axal 19.e7+ trtr 20. c5 Black keeps drawing chances, but it's no fun for him. The computer's best line for Black is 20...c6 21.Wxd6

.lt

il

ll AA

a

A

trAW

I

A

& : A &-

AA ll

ll A

A

A

tr

AA

15...6xe4 After 15...fxe4 I dont have to take

{

E&B$F* =EE="#F++

on e4 twice, when there would be no improvement whatsoever compared to the lines with Eel. But I can play 16.b5!, and there is no easy way for Black to equalize:

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AE

ll AAIA

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A A

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21

AW

tr

AAA

trg

ANAtYSIS DIAGRAM

A) After 17.

the logical 16...d5 I have Aa3 and Black's centre looks

lrightening but he cannot hold it 17... Ee8 18.cxd5 cxd5 19.9b3 a]fs zo.ez! 2:.e7 21.Eadl &hl ZZ.AxeT WxeT 23.exd5 6xdS 24.Wxd5

As neither the text-move nor 15...fxe4 seem to equalize, it looks as if Black has to try a slow way to play this posi-

tion with either L5...a6 or 15...6e8 EE

EE

ll

g AE ll agrI ,r

t1

AAA

A

A

H and we

tr&

or even 15...Ec8. Of course, there is room for a lot of analysis here, which I of course already did, but I would prefer not to share all of it here.

E

And here the other point of B.Ag2 becomes clear, as I dont have to take

ll

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"rdream set-up in the Bayonet Attack, which the reader should keep in mind when looking at further variations of this

AA ll a ll I nn I A

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B) I don't see any clear path to

be misplaced.

back on e4 immediately, but can play:

E

game;

rookwill

L6.6xe4 txe4

E

#:":;..';;'".

tion at the time and the reason why the Bayonet Attack became so popu- ' lar, not least, without false modesty, thanks to my own attempts. This is . not so easy to play for Black. Whenever he takes with the rook on e6, this

A

llE ll I AA A AA t

A

g

]

Ag trg

19.Wa4 This is where my preparation ended. White has nice pressure and I decided to play this rather direct move. But there are other moves that make

equality either after 16...Wc8 17.bxc6

tr

bxc6 18.Wxd6 6:fS tg.Wc5 Wxe6 20.4\e4 ztd+ zt.Ab2 (or 2t.A8), and White has a nice positional grip,

17.b5! trf6

sense, such as 19.Eb1.

Instead, 17...d5 18.4a3 wouldn't

although the knight on d4 gives Black

make much of a difference.

certain counterplay and chances to

18.Axe4 Exe6 Black has won a pawn, but it had

I didnt like the immediate 19.9b3, when Black will not go for ...d5, but play 19...trcS 20.Edl Af5, and he is more or less doing alright with the

already been shown in the 1990s that White always has quite serious pressure on the light qquares in this kind of position. This was quite a revela-

knight coming to d4. Another option was 19.bxc6bxc6 20. Aa3 (stopping ...d5 forever) 20,W c7 21.Wd3, and although Blackis apawn

equalize;

C) Or 16...Ee8 t7.Aa3

Wa5

l8.Wb3 A\fs D.6xe4 Ne420.Axe4 .N+ zt.Wd3, and things are not so simple for Black.

ffitr E

MOSCOW

nnwincnnss gg

Chess King D

up, this position is far more pleasant to play for White.

My move is more adventurous than 2l.bxc6 bxc6 22.A;a3, which the

19...d5

computer likes at the beginning, and after 22...We8 23.Axe7 dxe424.Ac5 things are still not great for Black. He still has to work hard to make a draw. Under other circumstances I might have gone for this, but by now I felt that my position was already worth more. There was no reason to sell my

Blacktries to free himself immediately. After the game Alexander told me he

didnt like his position too much and

Chess Opening Essenliols Essenliqls The complele series

didnt want to get under slow positional pressure after 19...9d7 20.bxc6 bxc6 2l.Eb1, when ...d5 is stopped and White threatens things like Wa6, followed by Ebz, and has pleasant

shares cheaply.

long-term compensation.

21...cxd5

20.trd1

21...6xd5 22.bxc6 bxc6 23.8b1 was not really an option. His pawn structure is ruined and his position looks

This is inaccurate. Better was 20.cxd5

cxd5 21.Edl, when Black probably has nothing better than transposing to the game with 2t...&hZ.

so ugly.

22.wb3 Before making this move I had to call

H

I

II s[& EI

Korsten Mi.iller Chess

A

A

IE I I ll A AA A

a

1l

Atr

tr

ombined

culate quite a few variations and it seems that this time, uncharacteristi-

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AA

ll ll

I

rh

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easy.

El E'

A



Better was 20...d4, which looks unattractive, as my bishop on e4 becomes a bomb in this position, but after 21. bxc6 bxc6 22.trb1White has decent compensation for the pawn, although it will not be easy to make progress. Alexander told me that he didnt like the look of this at all, but things arent

that

E

A

A

20...&h7

The Greolesl Ever ... seJies 3 Books combined

cally, I was quite accurate.

A

a

lt tr

Atr

AA

22...trb6?t This is almost the decisive mistake. After this move his position becomes really difficult. I don t see any clear way for him to equalize, but there were better tries.

I

I 222 Opening Trops qfter 1.e4 & l.d4 2 Booics eombined

I l aAe E ll

a ll AAA AA A

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27-.cxd5 Takilg the opportunity to correct my inaccuracy.

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MOSCOW

He could have played 22...Wd7, but after 23.4a3 d424.Eacl the computer already gives a considerable plus for White, even though he is a pawn down. I start invading the c-file and Black is almost paralysed. I spent quite a lot of time calculating 22...trf6.It seems we calculated more or less the same lines and it appears

that White is in time after 23.A;a3 (Black will probably hold after 23. Axd5 trd6) 23...Wb6, and now, as I rechecked a couple of times, I can play 2a.Axe7 Wxf2+ (on 24...trxnI

I l l l

n

have to play the brave 25.Wxd5, and

ficult endgame with 28...6f5 29.Wxe8

ie

the discovered check 2S...EdZ+ wont

Exe8 30.Exa4

d

rrork because of 26.Wc5) 25.9h1 25.Axe7 WxeT 26.trxd5 dxe4 26.Axf6 Wxf6 27.Efl, and Once again, we see White's dream Black's position is prettybad. position. I no longer saw any acceptIn view of all this, Black's best bet able way for Black to play. The same probably was 22...WcS, but after 23.Axd5 AxdS 24.trxd5 e425.Ebl

5 Ie

t

rt

It h

v

\Vhite keeps

a

N+.

27...wf7 Sasha was running down to half a minute, but there is no wayto coordinate his pieces and save the game.

After 27...8c6 28.trb5 Eca 29.9b1 I

will take both b-pawns and promote my a-Pawn. E

very pleasant plus. He

E

tbllows up with Ae3, Ec1 or Eadl and Black will suffer for the rest of

I H

I

the game.

A

ls is

1-

it i-

Er

{lI/

IIE A AE ll a ll WA A AA E

t_J

went for Alexander, who was in his usual time-trouble, which in his case doesnt mean much, as often he even starts pla)nng better in time-trouble. E

E

5 1r rc

I

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115

n d

A

II

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ts

A A

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A $tr :I

trtr

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A

A

A A

A

la\



24...axb5

I re rs

3

l. ts

n

I

29.9d1

Probably the only way to stay in the game was 24...We8, a trick I didnt consider during the game. I don't know if it saves the game, but there are certain drawing chances after 25. AcS axbS 26.fub6bxa427.Wa2 dxe4 28.We6, and nowthere is nothingbetter for Black than to go for guite a dif-

ET ts

gAe

I

E l El

estimated this move.

o



Not very difficult, but quite cute. 28...h5 As 28...€h8 fails to 29.Ed8+ Exd8 30.Wxf/. By playing ...h5 him-' self, Black stops White's h5, but it runs into a complete killer:

will

24.9a3 I think Sasha had missed or under-

:

AA

28.h4t

23.a41

I ts

A

tr

&

A very important move. 23...aG As after 23...d424.a5 he lose the pawn on b7.

EA

Ntr

'?) -E=

trAtr

trl

I

gAe ll

AA WA tr

ll

A

lgA EI

trl

lg

I A A

AA

w€ A

tr

26...b4

With three winning threats: 30.axb6,

Perhaps the decisive mistake, but also after the computer recommendation 26...8a5 the position is very bad:27.h4 (his king is coming under attack, while his rooks are completely pinned) 27...Wf6 (as 27...h5 cannot be played because of ZS.Wdt, as will soon happen in the game) 28.9d1 Exa4 29.Exa4 bxa4 30.h5 €hS :t.

30.Wxh5+ and 30.Ed7. Sasha had gone down to five seconds on his clock and without making a move he resigned. The right moment,

hxg6 tre6 32.Wxa4, and White still has to play accurately to win this, but Black's position is prettybad.

27.a5 Now it's all over.

t

the computer alreadyshowed +4or something, which normally is enough for me. It was a smooth and instructive game, which at some stage in the as

future I mayinclude in mybookHow to Win againstthe Kng\ Indian.I won quite a lot of games against the King's

Indian and this was a nice model game for how to play this Bayonettype of position.

MOSCOW

nnwinunss gs

l rl

I I

I I

l

NOTES

BY

accompanied by

a

double exclamation

g

SL

6.I _ D3I levon Aronion

subtleties at the board.

Alexqnder Morozevich Moscow 2012 (5)

For the moment all according to the

to be very vivid and memorable, with an unusuallyhigh number of decisive results for an event of this standard, and a mass of games that concluded

unexpectedly and not always logically. The main 'trouble-makers' in this affair were McShane and myself. The former ended up in the tournament accidentally, thanks to a vote on

){

E

:

I

t.l{] @

E

6CID

AA ,\/\ q)H

l{a tl

g

A

AAn A

AW &

also ended up

in the tournament

accidentally, thanks to the rotation of Russian players. In my humble view the two accidental participants demonstrated the best and most interesting play, to the joy of those who value beauty and art in chess.

AAA AA

AW

H

I IA ll I I A I I

AA

tr€

A

A

LL.ad2 White is

as though teasing his opponent: with the d6-bishop aiming at his kirg, and the f6-rook lined up against it, White removes first his queen, and

AA tr

the Russian Chess Federation website.

I

AA

book.

H

60a,

I IA AT I rE IE I I

s.af3 f5 6.4ffi ah6

This yeart Tal Memorial turned out

'-

E

mark and in general it is written that this is a clever way to proceed. This is probably so, but I had to work out the

7.b3 Exploiting the absence of the knight from e4, the plan with 7.0-O AdA S.

then his knight. White's position is solid enough to escape immediate problems, but from the standpoint of fighting for an advantage the idea of setting up a barrier with f2-f4 and blocking the position does not look the most promising.

The prophylactic 11.g3 would not have halted 11...Eh6 - after l2.cxd5 exd5 13. Axf5 2lf6 intending ... Axf5,

My meeting in the 5th round with

...trh5 and ...Waz-n: Black has

another outstanding artist, whose play in Moscow was slightly less successfuI, was one that I awaited with great impatience. Everyone was expecting a grand battle, and we succeeded in

strong initiative.

Immediately determining the posi-

tion in the centre came into consideration: 1 1.cxd5! ? exd5 12.6)e2 W e7 . Here with 8.6:$ the reply 13...96 can be provoked, removing many attacking ideas, although on the whole Black has a solid position and the outcome

producing one!

7..d4 d5 2.c4 e6

3.6c3 cG 4.e3

ad7

gEEAE

E

ET

I I a lll I I I A A

a A A

tr

A

AAA geAatr

of the opening is more pleasant for

Ebt followed by a rapid b4-b5

came

him.

into consideration.

After ll.6ld2 it was now the time

7...4d6 8.4b2 0-O 9.0-O

for me to take a serious decision whether to agree to the manoeuvring play after the possible 11...trh612.f4 6lfe n.6-tf3, or choose the audacious 11...e5, engaging in a hand-to-hand fight. Doubts about whether Black could permit himself such a 'liberty', together with my inability to calculate variations three moves ahead led to a forty-minute stupor. Intuition came to my aid: in two minutes it took the decision that 11...e5 was 'positionally justified' and that I needed to push forward! 11...e5 (42 minutes!)

A standard set-up for White with the black knight onf6le4. With his knight on h6 Black acquires additional ideas.

9...trf6 An impudent move and most probably not correct, but on the other hand,

perhaps it will be possible to give quickmate?!

a

A developing move, but one which

1O.Wc2

looks somehow strange and extravagant. A week before the tournament I finished reading Scherbakov's excellent opening monograph The Bermuda Triangle, in which +...4\dl is

Displaying amazing calm. 10.6e2

go xnwEncurss

a

looks far more understandable.

LO...6t7 The time has co*ne for White to com-

mit himself.

MOSCOW

,id

I

) I I rli

'1i

Itl

t

H

E

ll

A

iIII,

JLET

a

rA I ll

13... b5! l4.dxc6 (after 14.Ae2 the sacrifice l4...Axh2+ leads to a draw in a lengthy and fantastic variation) l4...bxc4 l5.cxd7 Black has a

After

&

arr laa I

broad choice:

AA

AAA A

agga

A

EEg & ATT I A AH

AAA

trg

JLE

ral AA A

7-12.A,xt5 Surprisingly, despite the fact

a d

k

\\'e will begin with the simple:

12.

cxd5 (taking what is on offer) 12...e4 5

i, a 11-

13.4c4

EAg

n (-

k l€

,r

@

ll rA a arr E AI

AA A AggA AAA

trtr€

AE

13...b5!. This was after analysis. During the game I was intending 13...

tg

ixh2+ 14.€xh2 Eho+ ls.€gl Wn+

rs

d

k r" te a

le

16.B olf6, assuming that after this the attack would somehow develop. Let us continue: 17 .dxc6 f4l (an excel-

Ient computer move) l8.Eael 6ga re.tug4 Whz+ 20.&f2 Wg3+ 2r.&e2 Axg4+

2L48

exf3+

n.&dz n

24.

Ze2 Axe225.&xe2t. Ee8 26.€d1 and \Vhite wins. An annoyingly straight-

te

tbrward variation.

ty ih

The alternative 13...Eh6 is more interesting; for example, after 14.f4 Bh+ 15.h3 c5 Black retains practical compensation.

-I

lal AA

16...trh6 t7.h3 ag5 18.Wxc4+ €hs tq.Efcl WxdT 2o.Wa4 We6!

Eg& rA A ATT AH

te

14

rA A ATT AH

15...4b7!? (this is obviously stronger than 1 5... Ax d7, 15... Aa6 or 15... Eh6, but 1 5... WxdT intending 1 6. 6xc4 Eh6 L7.h3 695 deserves consideration. 15...4b7 leads to an original position, in which at first sight, and in the view of the computer, White's advantage is obvious, but with every move it becomes increasingly more difficult to demonstrate this) 16.6e2!?. One of the most serious attempts. We will briefly analyse the alternatives:

AAT

7-

[email protected]

will

that essentially after any continuation White has to choose from completely unclear positions, each with some degree of risk for him. see

)t

potential of Black's position. Let us return to 16.6-p2!2.:

AAWAA A A A trtrg

am not at all inclined to consider

Levon's choice incorrect, since we

but nevertheless they reveal well the

AAWA AAA trtr*

that the computer gives preference to White after l2.cxd5, 12.g3 and 12. axf5, and in this order of assessment,

I

I

Of course, these variations are illustrative and are not.exhaustive,

I lAl AE A AggA AAA

trtr&

ANATYSIS DIAGRAM

A)

t6.bxc4 AxhZ+l t7 .*Y}r2 EhO+ 18.€91 flt, with attack;

B)

16.Efc1 Eh0 t7.h3 trg6, with

attack;

C) l6.f4l? exf3 l7.6xf3 cxb3 18. axb3 Wxd7, when B1ack's activity is sufficient to maintain the balance;

D) 16.h3 trg6 t7.fa

)\r

exf3 18.{txf:

?lg5ls unclear; E) t6.g3 cxb3 {7.axb3 WxdT 18. Aa3 Axa3 19.Exa3 Ag5!,withattack.

MOSCOW

(stronger than 20...Wtr) 21.d5 Axas 22.Wd4 Eg8, and in this unusual

position numerous wins are possible.

El

& =

{li/

rAAA ll E

t_J

A

lar

AA

AAgAA

trtr

I

E -r

A A A

,#; ":;.;:;';".;';:1, that is

possicovered 17...Wxd7 bly even stronger: 18.6xc4 (18.bxc4 695 and White may not be able to hold out) 18...Ec8!, and to 19.Wd2 or 19.Wd1 Black responds in the same

way: 19...Exc4 2O.bxc4 6g5, with

a

serious attack. Thus on the whole this

is the correct approach, and in the given concrete position 'taking what is on offer'is not altogether justified. The other prophylactic move - 12. 93 - also demanded an accurate response: I2...e4 B.Ae2 trg6! (13... Ab+ t+.cxd5 Axc3 15.Wxc3, when \A/hite is slightly better, is too depressing) 14.cxd5 (14.4h5 Eh6 - even 14...

AfO gives Black quite good compen-

nnwincnrss gz

- ls.Axfl+ €xfl

meets

faces problems) 14...Wh4, and after

with 18...4xe4!, when Black is completely alright. Otherwise White

and bring out his pieces to their most active positions.

the approximate 15.Efc1 6-:fe rc.

has a kind of not very regular French.

dxc6 bxc6 the position is completely

13...€xh7 L4.cxds Eg6

From these considerations the first continuation that comes to mind is

unclear.

I thought that this was almost the only

l2.dxe5?t merely plays into Black's - 12...6\xe5 3.6}-2 Eh6.

move and I made it quite quickly. But both 14...W c7t?., saggested by Levon

sation

and White

hands

HA

ll

&

illl/

E

-

I A

U

and 14...Eh6 were quite sensible

arr

a

alternatives.

E

E A

A

lt-

Ei

IIE A

tl' '\ t3 ul)

at the press conference after the game,

ll

E

a \llu

a Ar& rE E

-:

fi

,r

I'\

2l

AAg a AAA tr€ tr

AI AE A

During the game I thought that

12...

tr

tr&

Exf5 would force a draw, but I wanted to fight on and so I chose the move

15.Adxe4 t,t6 16.hxf6+ Wxf6

played. But in reality after 13.Wxf5

L7.t4

White captures with the torrect' knight - l4.6,cxe4t (I only calculated 14.9h5 6fe rc.We2 Axh2+! 16.€xh2 6194+ and Black wins, and e4

EIA

ll

l4.Nxe4 dxe4 15.Wxe4 6)95 when after 16.Wc2 Blackhas 16...6f3+ with

rA

EiA

LI

:

60e,

-

I

ll AA AH

IA A AI AA A AAW AA -H

A

tr

tr

AA

13.Axh7+ A sensible fighting choice. After 13. AxdT AxdZ 14.f4!? (if 14.cxd5, then l4...Axh2+ gives a draw, but other possibilities also have to be calculated) 14...4e6! this position is easier for Black to play. Fortunately for him, the obvious sacrifice 15.6dxe4 dxe4

t6.4\e4 Ehe v.6xa0 6xa0

38 NEWiNCHESS

18.e4

{li/ H Er ,e

AEA

AAg

E

ll

-

A A

perpetual check) 14...6)c5 ts.6f6+ gxf6 16.W c2 and White's position is preferable.

ar&

E

20.&h1, and on failing to find a direct tactical blow, I considered this position to be favourable for White. However,'after 20...A:d7 it is not easy to understand what in fact is happening and who is better.

The quiet development 17...AdZ is also good, since it is not easy for White

to advance his pawns. The ambitious move in the game is less harmonious, since it combines to a lesser degree the two objectives: development and

AAWA AAA

L2...e4

17...4m rc.Hf2 Ee8 19.e4 (not essential, but logical moves) 19...Wxd4

17...4h6?l 18.6e4!

AA

Practically by force we have arrived at the next important position, since for the first time Black has a wide choice. During the game, not without reason, each of us overestimated his position, which will explain many of our deci-

sions and inaccuracies. To try and assess such a position correctly during a game, and on the basis of this decide on the immediate aims, then candidate moves, and also calculate them correctly - this is possible only in books! In reality everything is simpler. White's plan is clear - to advance

gfs

HA

ll

r&

E

-

rE

EA

Ag AEA AA AAW AA

tr

A

tr

activity.

tr€

19.dxc6

I did not consider this simple move, but I kept checking cooperative lines such as 19.695+ tr"g5 20.e4 Wna Zt. e5+ Wf5 etc.

HA

E

ll

lg

-

fi6

r/\JL

g

EA

AEA

AA

AAW

trtr

AA €

19,..4e7?

his pawn centre. If he is able to do this in comfort, his advantage will

This move is easily explained, but in principle it is a bad choice to change

be undisputedt Black's objective is to prevent this, and at the same time try

strategy and give up playing for

MOSCOW

activity. One bad move (lZ...6,helt)

l2th to the 20th move, on practically even ground Levon unexpectedly began playrng incorrectly. The simple 21.9d3 ExcT 22.Eacl would have

left White with an obvious advantage, and, also important, given him a much easier game in the approaching

time scramble.

21-...trxc7

EIA

ITE E I

E

-

s e

)t

A A

e

il

AAA)t

A

AA

trg gave rise to the next one, figuratively

speaking.

I

considered the correct move 19...

\4,

andl even saw that after 20.8R there is the sacrifice 20...N$, when I even hit on 2l.Exe3 Wxfa 22.trg3 €fS. This is correct in general and it is even difficult for White (23.cxb7 ZeSt 24.Nd6 Axc2 25.6xe8 E"g3

23.cxb7 Axc4 24.bxa8W Axe2 25. tret Af: with a black edge; 2l.Wc4+ Ae6 22.cxb7 trb8 B.Wc6 Ads z+. 693 Axc6 2s.6xf5 Axg2 26.ah4

Axfi 27.211196 Aa6 is again unclear; finally, 21.d5 bxc6 22.dxc6 Aa6 23.h3 Ee8 and again Black is alright.

28.

The difference between 20...&gS and the more 'human' 20...€hS is revealed in the variation 20...*h8

bSg We2 and

Black wins), but after 20.Eael I could not find any ways to

2l.d5bxc6 22.Wxc6 Wxe4 23.Wxa8 6xe3 24.Wxc8+ and wins - with the

develop my initiative, and a happy tuture for the h6-knight was conclusively ruled out. Meanwhile, the

king on h8 White has a tempo-gaining check on h3, but with the king on g8 he does not, and after 24...4f8 it is the end for White.

26.hxg3 We3+

27.&h2 Ae4l

problem-like

20.c7l E

E

ll

r&

6

11 r'\.5L8

Ei

NowWhite's advantage is obvious.

aaH^ AA AAg AA trE

ANAtYSIS DIAGRAIYI

p rr r)

20...€g8!! would have left all the questions open: 21.h3 Ee6 22.hxg4 Wxe4 is unclear;2LEe2 AtA zz.hZ Exc6 is clearlybetter for Black; 22.Wc++ Ae6

tr

AA

22.6c3? Apparently it was for this that 21.9b1 ' was played. But in principle the exchange of queens does not frighten . Black - it has not become much easier for the white pawns to advance, and on the other hand the blackking is not in danger of coming under attack. After the active moves 22.d5 or 22. 695+ Black would have had to play accurately to avoid an immediate collapse, and in any case White would have retained a definite advantage.

22...Wxb1 23.traxb1

:EIA

[email protected]

llE -

20...trc6

EIA

IIA

r&

E

n

A

\ilu

s

-

H

E

E

ltaq

AAg

trtr

A

g

ts

lt

AA AA H

AAA

AA

21.9b1? After brilliantly conducting the difficult section from the MOSCOW

,{

A

21

a_--l

A

AA

trg

23...trd71 Preparing the development of the bishop at its optimum post b7. Objectively the position is still roughly equal, but in the approaching time scramble it is much easier for Black to play. White's only sensible plan of advancing his pawns

NEWiN CHESS

39

involves the considerable risk of blundering one of them @.

24.Hbd7, b6 25.e4 ab7 26.h3 Ag8 27.e5 Ec8 28.d5 I was expecting the more cautious 28.

E2. The move in the game

came as a

31.4g5+ g96 32.Exd5 Axd5 33. Edl. 6e7 34.4d4 trc2 35.94

I

pleasant surprise to me. I

rA I

r&

EiA :-

AA

AA AA

a

AA

AA

A

oEr H

all the white pawns.

Levon played 5.Wb3 against me at the London Classic six months earIier. Like 5.Wb3, 5.495 is a comparatively rare move in this position, and although I had looked at it, I forgot

36.trf1Ac137.4f3 Axf4

what Black was 'supposed' to do, and

35...4d2! The most accurate. After 36.f5+ €xg5 37.trxd2 E;lrdz:S.4e3+ €tr+:g.Axd2 €xh3 the king eats up

A A

A

tr&

that occurred to me.

29.e6 The first step towards the precipice. After 29.d6 Axc3 30.Axc3 Exc3 31.e6 Eds lz.ez D-xe7 33.dxe7 tre8 34.Ed7 White should be able to hold on. Strangely enough, 29.trf3

decided to improvise.

5...dxc4 6.a4

I

I

A

I

A

I

I I A IA ,\

JE.

A oEr Uts

AEq),\ A

A

A

T

q)

tr

A

29...trdd8

A .E-

A

AA

r&

/\,\

moves, and after

38.4h4+ €gS 39.6f3+ €hG 40.

!{

h4 Hxa2 White resigned.

,I

A

,\ q)

AA AA

gA

tr

6...h6! I considered some other options, but I think this was a good reaction, pre-

trtr

. Axf6 exf6 looks comfortable enough for Black (compared with a Trompowsky, perhaps) as White has 7

A

some kind

sL 3.1

of

- Dl5

weakened the b4-square.

Levon Aroniqn Luke McShqne Moscow 2012 (31

Coming on the heels of two losses,

30...trxd5

this win provided a huge psychological boost for my tournament, but also from an aesthetic point of view I was unusually pleased with it.

Now all Black's pieces are at last in play and it is he who assumes the attack! Playing at 30 seconds a move, it is unrealistic for White to hold such

1,.d4 d5 4.6c3 a6

2.4f3 Af6 3.c4

MOSCOW

ge l III I I A I A IA A ,\

EA

have had to think.

no unwixoruss

A

7.g]h4

A

mirage. After the unaesthetic 30.trf3 there would still have been all to play for and, most important, Blackwould

position

ll ll

ing the bishop offthe g5-d2 diagonal.

A

3O.6e4? This involves

a

laa

I ts

paring an exchange sacrifice by kick-

A

a

$m E

tr

Now it is all over. Through time-trouble inertia there followed three more

A

&E

EA

& =

A A

zo.fs is also acceptable.

rA I

AAAA

5.495

,r

EE

,\ q)

E AWEA tr

A

t l

28...A:b4I no longerhad the strength to work out the subtleties of whether or not the check on c5 was needed. I simply made the first sensible move

fuz

AA ,\ q)

E

^r

2l

tr

AI I 6 A&

EA-

A

E

EAASEE I llll a ll I

c6

I

q_)

A

tr

a

ggA AA AAtr

7...b5 It turns out that 7...e6 would transpose to the famous game Van Wely-

Topalov from Wijk aan Zee 2006. At the board I could only remember the rough contours of that game, but recalling the style with which Topalov won gave me confidence to sacrifice the exchange, which is not an easy

decision when you're on0l2.

I think it was an accurate

decision

to play 7...b5 first, for two reasons. Firstly, 7...e6 8.e4 was a position I was

unfamiliarwith. Secondly, after 7 ...e6 8.e3 b5 9.axb5

cxb5 10.Axf6 gxf6 11.Axb5 axb5 12.Exa8 Aba+ etc. as in the Van Wely-Topalov game, the Dutchman was able to insert the exchange on f6, which I thought probably helps

White, although Topalov won

a

&

greatgame anyway. Of course, since Topalov reached the positi on via 7 ... dxc4, he had less options than I did

I

A

8.axb5 cxbS 9.Axb5 9.Axf6 exf6! will bring the bishop to b4 even quicket so this wasn't an

ATA

option for White.

/\ft

E

I rA I I

6

here.

H

A €AAA AA

9...axb5 1o.trxa8 Ab7 11.tra195 12.4g3 e6 It's an important detail that despite an extra tempo, theret still no better

15.4e1

response to ...4b4+ thanthe awkward

15.fu5 is the move I was concentrat-

&e2arrangement.

ing on during the game, but I remember noticing that something like 15...

aA

I A

A

tr

E

E

@E

IA

I rA I I ,\

sm E

5-

AA AA

tr

13.e3 Ab4+ L4.*e2 6,cG I remembered Topalov used the

tr

ala5 r6.f3 hbr tz.trb1 ads 18.€f2 Aal is a typical way to cause trouble before White unravels.

15...6a516.4e5

0-O si

[email protected]

illl/ A

q_) rh

w€A

F?

Ar

ATA ,r

21

I

ra l AI tta

&AAA

,\AH sm E' q)H

manoeuwe ...4\6-a5-b3 in his game. Probably White's position is not worse in theory, but in practice it's easier to

tr L7.h4

handle the black side.

It was possible to eichange a couple of

H

{

MOSCOW

White still has problems, as ZO.WdZ? runs into a fork. So 20. WcZ 6b: 2l.Ea7 Eb8 and with ...e5 to follow Black's counterplay endures.

,\ '{r\q)

t3

.8.

minor pieces, but after 17.Arf6 Wxf6 t8.6c2 We7 19.4txb+ Wxb4

sets of

L7...94 L8.6c2 Ae7 19.€e1

E&

\lli/ A

ET

I

A

ra l

IA

AA

F7 --.

A

A sltr E

IA AA

€4tr

19...4b3 I remember it being a difflcult decision whether to play this immediately, or defend the pawn on 94. I believe the line which worried me after 19...h5 was the counter-sacrifice2o.f3 Dlbz zt.traz Wbo 22.trxb7 WxbT 23.4e2, when I saw a lot of counterplay on the light squares. However, it looks like Black can snuff

that out with 23...6d7! followed by ...f5, with advantage. Therefore, I suspect this was a more accurate way

nnwixcHnss nt

to play, although White had

better

options along the way.

the difficulties are well illustrated by an alternative line: 22.8a7 Wbe ZZ. ExbZ WxbT 24.A;eZ, which superificiaIly looks comfortable for White, but after the simple 24...Wa6!, with ideas of ...Wa5+ or...Ba2, the inability to castle is a real nuisance!).

20...h5 2L.9:e2 zl.Rt? might have been better played immediately, although after 21...N7

22.49 f5I stillprefer B1ack. 22.t3 22.Ea7t? might have been a good try to stir up trouble. My computer thinks that Axg2-h3 is still pretty strong in

20.tra2It looks positionally naive to exchange the dark-squared bishop for the sake of a pawn and a check on94. But after analysing for a while, I sus-

this position, but I would probably have prsferced 22...4e4, although 1 hadnt appreciated that a key tactical point works in Black's favour: 23.f3 Axc2 24.Wxc2 Axe5 25.dxe5 WUet 26.EYfrt? &xfl 27.exf6 Wg3+ 2S.gf1 €xf6, with a big advantage.

pect that was the best option.

20.Axf6 Axf6 2t.Wxg4+ €h8 was the extra possibility I chose to allow, instead of the counter-sacrifice on the previous move. White has won a pawn, but Black's king is not really exposed, and giving up White's bishop is quite a concession.

22...alds 21...4d6 My approach to the position was that, although White is partly untangled, the inability to castle is still a nuisance. So I had no intention of acti-

22...Axe5 23.dxe5 6d5 was moqe forcing, but I was trying to avoid the exchange of queens after 24.e4 af4 25.Wxd8 trxdg. In fact, White is in terrible trouble there

as

well.

vating the rook myself by capturing on 92 and inviting play down the g-file, especially since I saw that the move I played promised good play in the centre. However, my computer wants to play

2l...Axg2 22.trg1 Ah3!?, which ANATYSIS DIAGRAM

Now 22.Ea3, and after Black breaks wtth22...e5, the game is complex but I feel White is doing alright (although

: proue our chess lz

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23.txg4?

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you

tto

is

an interesting alternative: 94 is well secured, and although the bishop on h3 loola a bit odd, it does deprive the king of some oxygen. Nevertheless, after the text-move I cant find anything really satisfactory for White.

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34.We8+ *ds :s.Wdz+ &e4 36. trf4+ &xe3, which wins. There was

3O...Axf3 31.gxf3

not a chance of my playing that way, and indeed I considered 30...Ec1+ in that line, which was perhaps good

White can resign.

enough. However, the move I played

ter-

3a.&g2 6xf3) 33...6d2+ 3a.*g2 We4+ 3s.€h3 Wd:+ 36.€h2 trd8!

B.Axd6 might have been the

I cant claim to have gotten this far in

Truth be told, I'm not sure where the decisive mistake is in this game, but after this I'm confident Black is winning. Still, the alternatives dont look great. 23.f4 Af6 prevents anyfunnybusi-

-

g4,andWhitet position

ness on

is

31...We3+ 32.We2 3z.&flhxga 33.fx 94 (or 33. Egl NZ+

but after 23...Wxd624.&A

my calculation.

f5 White is still in a bind.

32...Wc1+ 33.Wd1 We3+ 34.We2

23...4xe5 24.dxe5 WbG At the time it wasn't clear to me that this was stronger than 24...Wc7,b:ut this felt more direct and I didnt have a

The main threat is ...6d4, while ...trd8 is coming as well.

wf4

lot of time to choose.

E&

2s.af3 25.&f2 trda is followed by ...6f4 and

I

...trd2.

A 5-

I

{ll E

I

e e

n

A

I

I

AA AE

traa ge

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A

tr

25...6xe3

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gtr

ANAtYSIS DlAGR

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looked simpler and most probably winning, although I hadnt worked

3s.gh2? I dont think I calculated it too well,

out all the details.

but White is lost after 35.gxhS Ed8 36.Wg2+ &nz zz.Wgs Wd+t. 35.&A was probably the best chance, but 35...Eds ao.trdl Wh2+ 37.&e3 Wxe5+ 38.&n Whz+ 39.&e3 Wxn+ must be winning for Black. 35...Wxf3 36.trf1 We4+ 37.&fr2 37.We2 Wbt+ picks offthe rooh and the queen will rejoin the fray with check viaa7.

26.Axe3 Wxe3+ 27.We2 By now I was desperately short of

A

w

AA

2s...trd8 26.Axds trxds 27.W8 trd2 28. gf6 Exc2 29. Wg5+ €fs :0. Eft looked far from simple to me during the game, as White has protected e3 and threatens Wh6+ etc.

I

tra

I AA

AA

I

lal gAA I AA

E&

4

a2, so

37.E;a3 Wa+ is very strong, although

ribly ugly. lesser evil,

31.Wxcl 6xcl hits the rook on

time, and so I threwin a couple of repetitions to gain time on the clock and get closer to move 40. Frankly,I didnt

seriously consider taking the repetition here. I felt that it would be a miserable waste of an opportunity, and, more pragmatically, I couldnt see why I shouldnt be winning in the position

[email protected]

Atvl

I

ment depends on the line 3t.WhO+

ge8 32.Whs+ &dz zl.Exf/+ €c6

[email protected]

I

Ei

A

The computer points out that 30...c3!! is absolutely winning, but that assess-

Ei

27...WcL+ 28.Wd1 We3+ 29.We2 Wc1+ 3O.Wd1

a

A

37...o,d2 38.trg1Wf3+

after 34...Wf4.

A tr A

I I

I

A ,c. (+)

5=

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White resigned. 39.€el We3+

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simplest.

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chess is not as popular as he believes it can be?

'It's important to know that the

i . :

media should be your friends, they are extre-mely important tools. It's not E

c 3 E E

E

IE E

E

a E

g 5 E = g

E E

I

He likes to read about sport stars. The

way they built their careers, the way the forces around them helped them become stars. He has devoured several biographies of Tiger Woods, who

revolutionized golf, not only by his unique talent and his successes, but perhaps even more because of the clever strategies of Woods and his team to make the world interested in watching him excel in his sport. Why is it that millions want to watch Woods, when golf was never a big spectator sport? Why is it that cycling

is so popular, when for hours nothing much is going on and many races are only decided in the final couple of hundred meters? Why is it that

44

NEWINCHESS

enough to be just the best chess player. It's the media that actuallymake you a superstar. Ifyouwant to make abrand out of yourself as a chess player, it is not enough just to play chess. You need to talk to the media, have interesting stories to telll He adds that the same goes for tournament organizers. Th.y could also do with advice from

professional managers.'To promote the event and to make it more entertaining. To make sure it is interesting for both the press and the audience. A chess tournament is not just

number one in the world rankings on most of his trips around the world. Typically you can see Agdestein sitting in the press or VIP room following the game of his prot6g6 on his iPad. Watching chess live is one of the perks of his job, as he loves chess. He is of master strength himself and has represented Norway at two Olympiads. He admits that watch-

ing Carlseris games can be nervewracking, then starts to laugh as he adds: 'But Magnus very rarely disappoints you. He mostly does better than you expectl Still, it wasn't his love for chess

that led to their cooperation. From the early days of the Inter-

for the players, itt an event for a world audience and for the media as well. You should keep this in mind when you plan things. And chess can do that quite a lot better than what is happening todayl

Espen Agdestein is Magnus Carlsen's matlager. For the past

two years he has accompanied the

!NTERVIEW

net boom Agdestein was successfullyinvolved in numerous online

ventures in Norway. He worked

for the Norwegian branch of Scandinavia Online, the leading Internet company in the Scandinavian countries, andwas actively

li

involved in creating profitable websites. One of them was Art of Taste, a Norwegian website on wine and food, which he developed from an idea into a business. The site was sold in 2005 'with high return for the shareholdI

I I

ers'. Between 2005 and 2009 he was a

it

member of the board of executives of Hjemmet Mortensen, the main publisher of weeklies and magazines in Norway, where he was responsible for the online division.

Gorry Kosporov The first time he heard about Mugnus was at a Christmas parq some

nine years ago, when his brother Simen, who at the time was still the $

5

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i :

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i I

i

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number one grandmaster in Norway, spoke about the amazing talent of the l2-year-old boy he was training. Simen also told him that Magnus was going to take ayear off from school to travel with his parents and sisters and to play chess, and that it would be good if someone sponsored that trip. Espen called the manager of Microsoft in Norway, explained the situation andthe software companyended

In his first year Agdestein man-

ple of Norwegian ministers, potential

aged to find four sponsors who each

contributed amounts in the region of 140,000 euro. Knowing Carlsen's pop-

ularity now; that sounds like an easy job, but actually it took a lot of time and energy. 'Even though Magnus was

on his way to be Number 1, there is no big culture for sponsoring chess

sponsors.'

G-Stor Rqw Another cooperation that made a big splash in the media was the one with G-Star, the Dutch fashion brand that hired Magnus Carlsen as a model in a campaign together

players. But I was quite sure we would succeed. Chess is such a big game, an intellectual sport, and in societytoday intellectual skills are all that matter. It

with American movie star Liv Tyler.

used to be about being fast, now it's

on together. They wanted Magnus to be more famous in New York before

all about the mind. In this sense the best chess players represent extremely

good values. Even with girls, young intellectual guys are much more popular these days. In fact, many companies have already used chess to sym-

bolize their strategic thinking.

So

up sponsoring Magnus' first tour. Espen also helped him with a further sponsor deal three years later and he

know whenever Magnus achieved something special or was involved in

joined Magnus and his father Henrik ('just for the fun of it') when they went to Moscow to meet Garry Kasparov. This meeting would have farreaching consequences. Agdestein became really involved when the possibility arose of Magnus training with Kasparov. Henrik Carlsen called him to explain that the sessions with Kasparov would be costly and asked him if he wanted to consider helping them to find serious sponsorship. At

something interesting. I made a chart, how many times we wanted to appear

ao xnwlucurss I

cooperation with Kasparov created huge interest. I organized dinners with Magnus and Kasparov, a cou-

how come they havent used any chess players? The reason is simple: because chess players are not well known to the mass public. So I had to work on the contacts with the media. Let them

the end of 2008, Magnus was 17 and ranked fourth in the world. Due to the deep crisis in the media industry at that point, Agdestein was not enjoying his work as much as he would like to. So the timing was good and having given it some thought he quit his job and began to work fulltime for Magnus Carlsen. At first he worked as his agent, trying to find sponsors and cre-

'We were kind of luclcy, because this

ating media contacts, but from 2011 onwards he became responsible for his management, taking over these tasks from his father Henrik.

in the Norwegian media, in

chess media, in bigger magazines. For us to

'Th.y approached

us

in the first place,

but the match in New York, Mugnus vs. the World, that we worke{l

they presented him in the Fashion Week. Th.y did everything to make that event as interesting as possible. Kasparov was there and it waS a very good venue. But even then it can be hard for a sponsor to see what he gets in return for sponsoring a chess player. Because chess is not a TV sport and it is not well covered in the sports pages. With golf you will have your logo on TV and that has a lot of value. Companies have ways to calculate how much exposure they get and this is difficult with chess, so you have

to be creative. We were asking for quite a decent amount and then you have to make sure that you can give something back. I started calling the media in Norway, always telling them when something was happening. And theywere impressedi

prioritize, for me to understandwhen we can say yes and when we can say no. He had a lot of appearances in the press. Nowwe have another problem. Now we have too many requests for interviews and have to say no to quite a lot. He doesnt need more exposure in Norway, we onlywant to maintain it. Nowwhen we get exposure abroad I tell the Norwegian newspapers and television stations about it. That's what makes Magnus different from the other big sport stars in Norway. Chess is totally global and being number one in chess can give you a big article in Der Spiegel or Time,but being the best cyclist in the cErntrywill not give you

liar situation for a sport that has a worldwide following. The absence of more managers pluzzles Agdestein, although he can partly explain it. 'Only the top 30 players in the world can make a decent living out of chess. So there is too little money to attract good managers. Which is a pity, as

that kind of exposure.

managers

INTERVIEW

Storved for money Not counting Kasparov, Magnus Carlsen is the only chess player with a manager at the moment. A pecu-

will add something. They

will find sponsors for the players and then the sponsors will start to market the game and use chess in their communication.' He agrees that the poor negotiating

position most grandmasters are in it easy for organizations like FIDE to produce one-sided contracts that are not always in the interest of the players. 'Of course it's difficult for a chess player to go through a complicated contract. Th.y are so eager to get into the cycle that they are ready to sign anything. Because the chess world is kind of starved for money and tournaments. If you get only one

has made

invitation per year,you don t have any negotiating position with FIDE, you have to accept anything they come up with. What I did for Magnus is that I

made sure that all the contracts were fair. That they are balanced and not

one-sided. Hopefully that is helpful for others as well. Because there are other players that are in a negotiating position, too. One of Magnus' sponsors is a very good law company, Simonson. They have helped him since he was 13. After helping Mugnus for so many years they know a lot about the world of chess, so that is very helpful. Quite often when we have requests the organizers implement them in their contracts, so that it's also good for other players.'

was involved in as Veselin Topalov's manager.

Espen Agdestein met Owen Williams and spoke on the phone with him when they negotiated the contract between Kasparov and Carlsen. 'There were some things I was curious about and he gave me some advice.I think he must have been good

for Garry because

a visible

manager was the already mentioned

Garry Kasparov. The flamboyant

15

h tt8 Dt I

ll, it.

ld s.

ct ts ry

Englishman Andrew Page left a clear stamp on the 13th world champion, by not only looking after his business interests but also teaching him how to dress well. Later, former tennis player Owen Williams became Kasparov's agent, a role the 81-year-old American still has. The other two managers that made a name in the chess world are Carsten Hensel from Germany, who used to work for Madimir Kramnik and Peter Leko, and Sil-

vio Danailov from Bulgaria, who gained notoriety for the conflicts he

I

i I I

i

think he likes to be more and more professional.'

as a manager,

Emolions Not surprisingly, Agdestein watched with con-

Garrykepthim

a

siderable unease when he saw the press conferences at the recent world cham-

know how they have done their job. But he seems to refer to Danimportance of a good image. 'For a business to be associated with Magnus, he should not be involved in any scandals. It's not stresses the

'

they were asked. But he doesnt solely want to put the blame on the players.

'The organizers should also have prepared ques-

is very important to

tions themselves in

help a player to achieve

advance, so as to cover the most important issues

a strong and positive

before the others start asking their questions.

brand, to create new and positive things. To

That would have been a good idea. It was very difficult for the players, but it would have been good if they had tried harder to give the press and the chess world more information about their emo-

work on projects, for instance a book project,

for business, but also develops the brand of the player. That's important, because one of the problems with chess

players is that people dont know them. Why should you pay a lot for a chess player in an adwhen nobodyhas heard about him? That doesnt make sense. You

in

a good and positive way for businesses to be interested in being associated

with the player.'

Agdestein counts himself lucky that, unlike many players that have diffi culty handlirry publicity, Carlsen in fact likes his public role. 'He adapts

!NTERVIEW

I

many of the questions'

good if people don't Iike him. In general it

have to develop the brand of a player

I

pionship match in Moscow, where both Anand and Gelfand failed to hide their annoyance at

ailov indirectly when he

that can be both good

Scqndols The first chess player with

done in different sports and he knows that Tiger Woods, even

after an awful round of golf, has to talk to the media, to do his job. I

long timel About the others he has nothing to say, as he doesnt

for

naturally. Magnus reads a lot about sports. He knows how much a basketball player in the NBA earns, he knows a lot about how things are

tions and feelings.'

Foreseeqble qnd bolonced An important element of Carlsen's public persona are his appearances away from the chess board, which inevitably also invoke criticism if he has worse results. Agdestein understands the thoughts behind such criticism, but nevertheless rejects it. 'Very important is that all these activities should not harm his chess. He has to do all these corporate things, but this

newin cnrss

lz

.

should not keep him from training. That is a big priority for me. If you look at other sports, like tennis, they do all kinds of things for their sponsors or together with their

has mostly been commanding, but the thought of losing it may get on a manager's nerves. 'Of course that sometimes makes me nervous. But

sponsors. That is an impor-

tant part of their job. But in the chess world there is this feeling that a chess player

should not do anything but study chess 24 hours a day.I get a bit provoked when I hear things like that. Because I think that Magnus finds it meaningful to know that his job is a

bit wider. He enjoys it and it widens his horizon. He makes more money and he still has plenty of time to do everything he wants to do. We regularly have meetings where we discuss and plan things and make schedules, so that everything is as foreseeable as

it's impossible to make everything

possible and that everything is balanced. And of course I also talk a lot with Henrik, who knows him welll

dependent onhim havingthe number one spot. That would be putting too much pressure on him too. We dont

Red Hot Chili Peppers An essential part in the promotion of Magnus Carlsen is his Number 1 spot in the world rankings. Since

have anything like that in the contracts with the sponsors. When your brand is strong enough you no longer need to be Number 1. You may be Number 3 and chasing Number 1. Tiger Woods is now number ten in

he conquered the first place his lead

eg nnwixcHrss

INTERVIEW

the world and we still follow him. TV broadcasts of golf drop.by 40 per cent

if he is not playingl For the moment this is not his concern. Agdestein wants to explore new horizons and hopes that chess will be structured better, so that new initiatives can be developed. Th"y want to improve Carlsen's presence in the new'social media, on Twitter and Facebook, explore the opportunities that technical. developments on smartphones offer. Of course there is tension too, but that's the great thing about sport. For the moment he enjoys the life he is leading to the full. The progress and the prospects of his client and the experiences he coultl not have dreamed of or expected. A lot of things actually. By myself I probably wouldnt have gone to the NewYork Fashion Week twice. Meeting Liv Tyler, stuff like that is cool. And in Rio, before the Sao Paulo Grand Slam, we were approache.d by the manager of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, who wanted to meet Mugnus and play chess with him. Magnus sat with them for hours plapng chess

and they were enthusiastic, while there were thousands of girls screaming outside. So many things like that happening. It's exciting to open your mailbox every d"y- r

Peter Doggers

one team! When we do things, we

[rhe Radisson Blu hotel complex in I A.aum is located on the northern

want to do it the best way possiblel

Kazhgaleyev was referring to the exemplary organization of the 2012

bank of the Ishim Rivet along Saryarka Avenue. Besides the many cars passing by, you regularly see groups of amateur cyclists dressed in professional gear riding the avenue on fast bikes. On the way from the airport to the hotel you pass the beautiful Velo-

drome, a brand-new indoor hall for cycling and other sports. Cycling is big in Astana, as witness the professional racing team bearing the same name that takes part in the Tour de France and other big races. 'The Astana team of a few years back is exemplary for how things are done

in Kazakhstan,' said the country's 50 NEW:NCHESS

Rapid and Blitz World Championships 2012. From the get-go - a slick (though somewhat chaotic) opening ceremony that included the presence of President Nursultan Nazarbaev - it was clearthat moneywas not an issue. The main sponsors were two Kazakh-

stan public companies active in the metallurgy, mining, oil and

gas

sectors.

strongest grandmaster Murtas Kazhgaleyev. 'Th.y had Alberto Contador,

Located close to a small beach and boasting a spa health centre, pool,

Lance Armstrqng, Levi Leipheimer and Andreas Kioden all together in

sauna and fitness facilities, the 5-star Radisson hotel was arguably the best

ASTANA

venue the players could have hoped

ier Dominguez won the 2008 Blitz

he was involved in the organization

tor. During the tournament, former Destiny's Child singer Kelly RowIand stayed in the same hotel - she had come to perform at a local music

World Championship in Almaty.

the championships. About a yeff ago, FIDE President

t-estival.

d 1r

The World Rapid and Blitz was only the third big chess event ever held in

st

Kazakhstan. Four years ago, Lein-

t,

Back in 2001, Garry Kasparov won a

six-player double round robin ahead of Vladimir Kramnik, Boris Gelfand, Alexey Shirov, Alexander Morozevich and Darmen Sadvakasov, then the rising star of Kazakh chess. These days, Darmen works fqr the Kazakh government and the chess federation, and

ASTANA

of

Kirsan Ilyumzhinov had a meeting with the Kazakh President at which one of the topics was the organization of chess events in Kazakhstan. They

decided then and there to hold the 2012 Rapid and Blitz World Championships in Astana. For these rela-

NEWENCHESS

5I

tively new championships FIDE skips official bidding procedures, as long as the host cities offer attractive financial conditions. In the same manner, next year's championships have already been given to Khanty-Mansrysk. Then, in March 2|l2,Ilyumzhinov returned to Kazakhstan to sign an agreement with the Kazakhstan Chess Federation that included a chess-inschools project. It is likely that Ilyumzhinovhad more business to do

in

conditions were excellent. The boards, tables and chairs were aligned in two rows and roped ofl so that the spectators - about 50 each duy - could come to about 1.5 meters from the boards and follow the action without bother-

took part in both tournaments. For each event the organizers could enter two wild cards, and three more spots could be earned at a qualifier previous to the main event. For the rapid cham-

mentary provided by GMs Sergey

pionship, Alexey Dreev, Igor Kurnosov and Vladislav Tkachiev qualified, while Murtas Kazhgaleyev and Anuar Ismagambetov got the wild cards. For

Shipov (Russian) and Robert Fon-

the blitz, DmitryAndreikin, Le Quang

taine (English) using an audio set. The

Liem and Nikolay Chadaev qualified, and Pavel Kotsur and

ing the participants. While doing so, they could listen to the online com-

Rinat |umabayev were

Kazakhstan besides chess,

but that's another story.

the wild cards.

For the drawing of lots, a group of beautiful models entered the stage, dressed in either white or black and wearing masks. |ust like eleven years ago, at the

names were missing in

Obviously, some big

Astana, most notably Levon Aronian, Vladimir

Kramnik, Vishy Anand and Hikaru Nakamura.

tournament won by Kasparorr, the players had to 'pick a girl'

The main reason for their absence was the fact that

to find out their lot number. The numbers were attached to the bottom of a little sou-

they only received thelr week of |une. According

venir, a replica of the Bayterek

to

building, the famous monu-

having outlined concrete

invitations in the first

ment and observation tower in Astana's modern centre, built in 1997 when Astana became the capital of the

games were shown on two big LED screens on each side of the playing area

country. (Trivia: that's why the Bayterek is 97 meters high!)

with four diagrams each. Unfortu-

The only player who couldnt attend the opening ceremony was Sergey

they were not entirely compatible with the software, a problem which was only partly solved on the very last day.

nately, these screens showed the games

in horrible pixel quality. Apparently

Karjakin. He travelled from Simferopol, where he had spent some time with his family, but the SimferopolMoscow flight was delayed for three hours - exactly the time he needed to catch his connecting flight to Astana! Karjakin arrived exactly 24 hours later, at 7 a.m. of the first playing day. Getting a few hours of sleep before the first game, which started at 3 p.m., he skipped the technical meeting.As a result he would only find out at the end of the first day about the Corsica/ Sofia rule which was in effect! But all this didnt exactly have a negative

The Rapid World Championship was

a single round robin

of 15 rounds

held over three days, with five rounds

played each day. The time-control was 15 minutes plus l0-second incre-

ments. The Blitz World Championship was a double round robin of 30 rounds held over two days, with 15 rounds played on each day. The timecontrol was 3 minutes plus 2-second increments.

Magnus Carlsen, Teimour Radjabov, Sergey Karjakin, Alexander

Sadvakasov, despite

plans already months before, the federation only got the green light to hold the event about a month before the start. The eleven top GMs who did play had been selected by FIDE based on the |anuary l, 20L2 rating list. This was a controversial decision. As Ruslan Ponomariov argued in his blog at ChessVibes.com, there had been a qualifier for the World Blitz right after the Aeroflot Open in Moscow in February 2011. There, Ponomariov and five other GMs qualified for the World Blitz, which was supposed to take place right after the Thl Memorial in November 2011, until the Russian Chess Federation cancelled the blitz part. Ponomariov felt that he had qualified for Astana, and according to Aeroflot organizer Alexander Bakh, Kirsan Ilyumzhinov himself had made a promise that these six players would

play in the next World Blitz. How-

influence on his play...

Morozevich, Vasily Ivanchuk, Alexan der Grischuk, Veselin Topalov, Peter

At times it was

Svidler, Boris Gelfand, Victor Bolo-

in Astana Geoffrey Borg of FIDE said that he didnt know about this

gan and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov

agreement.

bit hot inside the playing hall, but for the rest the playing

sz nrwEncsrss

a

ASTANA

ever,

It was no coincidence that the start

White can easily build up the pres-

of the tournament, on July 6th, coin-

sure on the kingside, as Black has no counterplay.

cided with a national holiday in Kazakhstan: the Day of the Capital, which is also the birthday of the President. Despite his logistical problems Sergey Karjakin started with four consecutive wins, one of his victims being his compatriot Alexander Grischuk.

22...trtc8 23.4c3 gh8 24.ad2 E4c6 25.atL gG 26.Aeg alB 27. dg2 ae7 28.trg3 b5

cK 4.9 - 812 Sergey Korlokin

5vidler-Corlsen position ofter 52.Ed6

Alexqnder Grischuk Astono 2012 (4)

52...tra3 s3.trb6 trd3 S4.tra6 trb3 55.trc6 Ea3 56.EbG trc3 57. tra6 trb3 Draw.

L.e4 cG 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Afs 4.4f3 eG 5.4e2 6.e7 6.0-0 hG 7.Abd2 ad7 8.ab3 A96 9.a4 Af5 10.a5 Ec8 11.c4 Ae712.cxd5 cxd513. Ad3 O-0 L4.94 Ah4 15.6xh4

The players dutifully repeated their moves before asking the arbiter permis-

Desperately trying to find some play on the other side of the board.

29.axb6 ExbG 30.gxf5 exfS 31. 6e3 EbS 15...4xd3 Four days later the same position

sion to drawthe game, because the Corsica/Sofia rule was in effect. This rule was a novelty for a'fast chess' event, and nobody was really sure about its pur-' pose. ('I think it's a bit ridiculous', said Peter Svidler), but over the course of . the five days everyone was paying less and less attention to it, and on the final day the players simply offered draws in drawn positions themselves, and not a single time did an arbiter object. Needless to say, there were almost no short draws (except for Mamedyarov and Radjabov, who drew all their games against each other quickly).

was reached between the same play-

I

ers in Round 2l of the blitz tournament. There, Grischuk deviated with ls...Axh4 16.Axg6 tug6 17.Wd: gs,

Carlsen reached 4r/215 thanks to a devilish trick against Igor Kurnosov. It wasnt correct, but good enough in

f,

andthe game ended in

the fast lane!

F

moves.

)r

16.Wxd3 Axh4 L7.Ad2 f5 18.h3

d

Be7 L9.t4 aG 20.gh2Wl7 2L.trl3 Zc4 22.tr9L

g

I

F

a

draw after 44

t-

Now Karjakin finishes the game nicely

e

with

d

32.6xf51 gxfs 33.Wxf5!

D

Black resigned.

[, le td Y-

)E

is

Following a draw with Veselin Topalovin Round 5, Karjakin allowed Magnus Carlsen to draw level at the top at the end of the first day. Carlsen drewh{s game against Svidler. The last bit went like this:

ASTANA

Kurnosov-Corlsen position ofter 54.Hf2

54...9Xf3+!?

nrwlnurss sg

ment, Ivanchuk at some point forgot about his clock and lost on time while trying to find a winning plan. Still furious with himself, and prob-

This involves the loss of a pawn, but Carlsen has looked deeper.

55.trxf3+

TPR

*97 56.Axc6 Ee2+

57.

,+,

2 Mognus Cqrlsen

trt2

NOR

:af,4.9'.ti:til+i,'iriCtii. 2837 lOV2 2856

gvz

3

ably

2808

4 ShokhriyorMomedyorov AZE 2726 9V2 28lO

P

& :

,\

73

(-L

I

I ll

8 Vosily

gl

AA

A

/1 A A

r'uttiiinus ,1.i9 tiae

6 Boris Gelfond

lvonchuk Dreev

lOAlexey

AA

t

Etr&

2738 g

2735

UKR

2769 7V2

2712

RUS

2677 7

2697

Kurnosov

l4Victor

1,5*

Bologon

l6Anuor lsmogombelov

2663 6

RUS

MDA2732

.ryA KAZ

6

IE

al

4

I AA AA €A

AEAT

Corlsen-Koriokin position ofter 53.Eh8

the trick works. White

without Black's a-pawn.

54.9f5 EcS+ 55.4e5 Af8 ExhT+ gg8 57.Eh8+ gf7

56. 58.

Exf8+ Black resigned.

White resigned.

On the third and final day of the rapid event, Alexander Grischuk was wear-

Carlsen finished the second playing day with a firm lead. The Norwegian was lYz points ahead of Karjakin and Topalov. The Bulgarian was even sur-

ing a T-shirt with the text'Show illusion, curious incidents'. This turned out to be an apt way of summarizing what was about to happen, with Vasily

prised himself about his good form after his disappointing loss against Vallejo in a rapid match in Leon a few

It started with the encounter Karjakin-Ivanchuk in Round 11. The

weeks earlier. In the 10th round Carlsen beat Kar-

Ukrainian number one played well, reaching a better endgame in which

jakin, who blundered in an ending

he basically had zero chance of losing.

with just three seconds on the clock.

However, despite the lO-second incre-

CHTSS

snow. The arbiter who sat next to Carlsent board during both games, Ashot Vardapetian of Armenia made sure he

won yet another game, against Peter

62...&d7 63.€d3 €c6 64.6a7+ gb7 And the knight is trapped.

EN

big lead had evaporated like melting

With two rounds to go, Karjakin wns half a point ahead of Carlsen and duly

I

&de ez.6lae .

NEW

Carlsen remained sitting in his chair

for a few seconds, realizing that his

Svidler. Carlsen couldnt get through

could still save himself with 62.6k7+

54

2521

,

next roundl

A

53,..trc4+? Instead, 53... Afet s+. Axf6 (or 54.trxhz €g6) 54...€xf6 55.Exh7 €96 56.trhS is a draw even 62.&e2? Now

jakin defeated Radjabov and Kazhgaleyev. After resigning his game,

wasnt administering Carlsen's board for a third consecutive time in the

€A &

2642 257'i::

tr

is on

the ropes.

58.trxb2 6:xb2 59.4a7 &fG 60. Axb5 €e6 61.&13 D-:cA

Th'e world's Number 1 then also lost his game against Grischuk, while Kar-

2647 i,lliie-e-B

2471 3V2

Still following the intended path, but better was 57...ExA+ 58.&xf2 6lxbZ because of 59.4\al 6-ldt+ 60.€e2

6xd+ 61.€ff 6x4,andWhite

again...

RUS

l2lgor

57...trxb2?t

tsR

full of adrenaline, Ivanchuk

then inflicted the very first loss upon Carlsen the next round. The tournament was suddenly completely open

Ivanchuk playing a key part.

ASTANA

Radjabov's defences, but even trailing by a point, the Norwegian could still win the tournament: if two players were to tie for first, an Armageddon game would decide the outcome. However, Karjakin drew his last game against Kurnosov, finishing clear first, a superb score of llYzlll. After escaping with a draw against Topalov

with

in the final round, Carlsen ended on l0/z points, while Mamedyarov and Topalov finished on

9Yz

points.

Bring on lhe blitz One day later, again at 3 p.m., play resumed with the first 15 rounds of blitz.It was clear that, being the top seed, Carlsen was determined to win this event, but again he seemed to be lacking energy, getting offto start of only 2%16.

a

modest

Sergey Karjakin, who had been dubbed the'Steinit z of rapidchess' the day before, started strongly again and was leading after nine rounds with seven points. However, he then fell

I

F

back, scoring only 2.% points in the Iast six rounds. At the end of the first day it was Alexander Grischuk, the rvinner of the 2006 Blitz World Cham pionship in Rishon -le-Zion, Israel,

I

A

estr

/\E

Blitz in 2007) and Dmitry Andreikin, who couldnt be considered an outsider either. The 22-year-old Russian GM is a legend of Internet blitz, and in Astana he won games against three former blitz champs: Carlsen, Ivan-

lvonchuk-Korlokin

Andreikins win against Le Quang Liem was pretty: EE

I

IA fi

I

o o

a r& AEAT

U F

u

ll

&(b

aa

21 l1

U

trA

€A

Iost a winning position after a huge blunder:

position ofter 40...4f8

$.Ac++ 43.4e5+ &gS After a2...&g8

HE

EE

I

g

l A

trAA

&AA

A

A

I I Ar&r

A

A

El

*f6

leads to mate.

A

L ]

IA

50.6f6+? 50.d6! is the typical winning move immediately spotted by an engine but not by a human in timetrouble. It's not that White has time to get a second queen (which stops a human from looking at it); no, the pawn takes away the e7-square from the black king in one of the lines: 50... blW st.Afo+ &g7 52.Qk8+ andhere 52...9f8 fails to 53.9h8 mate. 50...€f8? 50...€97! draws here: 51. Nl+ and White has to give perpetual check. (But not 51.4e8+? €f8, and Blackwins!) 51.6h7+ &g8 52.Ali6+ €f8 53. *g8 54.4f6+ *f8 Assum-

0:h7+

Andreikin-Le Quong

47-.Exe7+! AxeT 42.trxe7+

A€

position ofter 49...b2

chuk and Grischuk.

EE .r+E

AA

rg

kin, Ivanchuk (who won the World

I )\ q)

rvho was leading the pack. Three play-

ers were trailing by a point: Karja-

&

AA

gA

rt .E

Corlsen-lvonchuk position ofter 52.€h2

ing that his opponent is about to offer a draw, Karjakin repeats moves without thinking. It's not clear whether he could already have claimed a draw here, because in the blitz tournament the arbiters weren't writing down the complete games, only some endgames in which the 5O-move rule was relevant. However, Karjakin might have taken a peek at the digital screen that showed the game in the playing hall!

55.4d7+ €98 Ivanchuk had refuted an incorrect piece sacrifice by his opponent, and

was about to finish the technical

A

phase.

52...de4?? 44.h4+ The 'silent' 44.Ag7leads to

52...6lf1+ is in fact mate in six.

mate even more quickly.

53.Axg7

44...&h6 45.ag7+ &h7 46.4f6+

B1ack resigned.

Black resigned.

Ivanchukt role in the blitz was practically the opposite from his contribution to the rapid. Against Carlsen he

)\ (.L

And then against Karjakin he took revenge for his rapid loss, in a game that realy fitted the premonition of Grischuk's turious incidents' shirt.

ASTANA

e$m /\EI

rg

I

&

I AA

A€

56.We8+!

NEW=N CHFSS

55

2

Mognus

NOR

2837

l9V2

4

Alexonder Morozevich RUS

2770

l7V2

Cqrlsen

Rodiobov AzE 2788

17

2749

I5

6

Teimour

8

Peler Svidler

RUS

lO Boris Gelfond

ISR 2738

l3V2

l2

AZE 2726

r3

Shokhriyor Momedyorov

14 Rinot

l6

Jumoboyev KAZ

Povel Kolsur

KAZ

2561

t2

2571

8

at the same time, Grischukwasnt surprised.'I think it's normal when a person achieves the best in what he likes the bestl he said. 'For example, Kramnik likes classical chess best and he

achieved the best in classical. For me

itt blitzl It is well known that Grischuk prefers blitz over classical chess. Already in 2001, in an interview in New In Chess when he was 17, he said: 'For 99 per cent of humanity nothing will be lost, because they don t understand the depth of the game anyway. For them it is much more interesting to see the players move quickly and to see the expressions on their faces

FR

4.4

- Cil

Mognus Cqrlsen Alexonder Morozevich Astono 2O12 Ropid (2) Carlsen was happy with this game. 'Morozevich is a strong player and I beat him quite easily.

3.6c3 6fG 4.e5 atdT 5.f4 c5 6.4f3 6cG 7.4e3 Ae7 8.Wd2 bG 9.4d3 0-0 10.0-0 fG 11.exf6 Axf6 L2.&h1 c4 L3. Ae2 Ab4 L4.keS 6xe5 15.dxe5 1,.e4 eG 2.d4 d5

6-se416.We1 d4?! This is just good for White because of the next move.

when they get nervous.' In Astan*a, Sergey Karjakin and

Finally Ivanchuk, who has collected a fewmore seconds thanks to the incre-

Alexander Grischuk had the strongest nerves: both of them won one of

ments, sees the mate.

56...*h7 57.Wxf7+ €hG 58.Wf8+

*g5 59.Wf4+ Black resigned. On the final blitz day, Grischuk added 9Yz points, to reach a total of 20 points from 30 games. For Carlsen the tournament was a few rounds too short.

L7.HdL hxc3 18.bxc3 Axc3 19.9f2 b5 2O.Axd4 Axd4 2L. Exd4 Wa5 22.9:13 trb8 23.trfd1 n.Wh4.t was also strong.

The Norwegian finished with 8(!) wins in a row but fell short by half a point to catch Grischuk. Karjakin fin-

23.,Ab7 24.trd7 Axf3 25.Wxf3 trbd8 26.tr7d6 trde8 27.W94

ished third, one point behind Carlsen.

Ee7 28.trxe6 EefT 29.93 Wxa2 30.We2 a5 31.tred6 c3 32.e6

During his winning streak, Carlsen seemed

truly invincible. He even

started one game, against Teimour Radjabov, with 1.a4 andwon convincingly! This, however, was an inside joke. At the previous World Blitz, in November 2010 in Moscow, Radja-

the two $40,000 first prizes. After the tournament, these two friends ('Sashd and 'Seryozhei to friends) revealed

bovhad said to Carlsen at some point: 'Everyone is so tired now; you might as well start with 1.a4 and still winl A quip that Carlsen had not forgotten.

match on ICC.

Grischuk was both surprised and not surprised that he won his second blitz world title in Astana. He was surprised, because he fell ill after the first day of rapid chess and suffered from

a flu for the next four days. Afterwards the Muscovite was grateful to Boris Gelfand, who had given him pills which had worked wonders! But

56

NEWENCHTSS

Ee7 33.f5!

that as part of their preparation they

had in fact played an online blitz

At the final press conference, Carlsen said: 'It's funny for me in a way. In theiapid tournament I had a huge lead, while in the blitz tournament I was way behind all the time, and both times it was just enough for second place. My only regret is that the tournament is over, because especially at the end it was great funl With that last sentence, he was exprfssing the general feeling of most participants.

ASTANA

33...Wa3 The pawn cannot be taken: 33... Exf5? 34. Eds+ EfS 35. ExfS+ €xfS 36.Wf3+ and mate.

34.Wxb5 gb4 35.9d5 gG 36. fxg6 hxg6 37.trd7 trfe8 38.tre1

& :

H

I

EE

E

E

I

,r

r\

lw $u

E

I

A

n

A

x,{

tr 38...a4?l More resilient was 3e.€g2 trfS.

:S...

Wb6

39.&92! Excellent prophylaxis, preventing

a check

on b1.

39...WbG 4O.Ee4! The last piece joins the attack. 40..,trxe6 4L.H94

*h8

42.Hh4+ &98 43.trh6 g5

44.Wxg5+ Black resigned. Kr r5.3 -E94 Veselin Topolov Teimour Rodiobov Astono 2012 Ropid (7) L.d4 AtG 2.c4 86 3.6c3 AgZ +. e4 dG 5.4f3 0-0 6.4e2 eS 7.0-0 exd4 8.Axd4 tre8 9.f3 c6 10.€h1

6:c4 30.f4 Axa3 31.Axa3 Wxa3

36...4xd5? Black should

32.t5 Ac4

played 36...cxd5!, and now 37.gxf7+

Because things havent exactly gone according to plan on the queenside, Topalov now speeds up his attack on the kingside with a piece sac. II

16.trg1 AeS I

I

I I ,

ll

[email protected]

I ll ,{ JI

tl

AA

a

.e0a

-

rA I AAI

ll

Et

gTAA

al a AAA ,t t'l. ]

WAA

trtr€

I&a '/

2}ll,between Gelfand and Grischuk.

17...4e6 18.6e3 trad8 19.We1 aG 20.Wg3 Ac8 2L.h4 b5 22. cxb5 axbS 23.a3 6f8 24.Wh2 6e6 25.AgS Ac5 26.Wg2 Ae6 27.b4 arc 28.Ae1 Wa7 29.6-:c2

AA

A

&e6 4o.Wf5+. 37.exd5 Wb2

trA tr& 33.Axh5!? gxhs 34.f6 Ah8 35.96 AxfG 36.4d5!? The engines actually prefer 36.Wf3, with excellent prospects for White. H

I

I

I

H

ll ,\

JL/\

u\ 4

A A A ll-

A i

I

A A

A

t_l

$tr E

40.

37...

39.Wg6+

Ac3!. 38.gxf7+

gf8 38...€xf7 39.Wg6+

&e7 40.Wh7+ and 38...€hs 39.Wg6 quickly lead to mate. 39.Wg8+ &e7 4O.f8W+! Black resigned. RL7.4

-

C67

Mognus Corlsen Astono Ropid 2012 (13) 7..e4 e5 2.t,t3 hc6 3.4b5 AfG

4.0-O 6xe4 5.d4 AdG 6.Axc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Af5 8.Wxd8+ €xdS 9.4c3 hG 10.trd1+ €e8 11.h3 Ae7 L2.6e4 6,gG L3.ad4l?

[email protected] ll lll

& =

I6/1

&e7, and now

€xf/

Alexonder Grischuk

$tr E

-tr-

trA tr& ASTANA

I_

A

//1\

\JL

L7.6tc2 A new try. 1Z.Wet 6f8 18.Wf2 a6 t9.6b3 Aeo 20.c5 Ead8 2l.cxd6 trxd6 22.Wc5 trxdt 23.trxdl afd7 24.Wxe7 ExeT was played at the last Amber tournament, Monaco

&xf7 38.Wg6+ &e7, and White should take the draw with 39.Whz+ EfS loses to 38.gxfl+

ah5 11.g4 6t6 L2.at4 h5 13.gs ah7 L4.Wd2 We7 15.trad1 6,d7

have

l

A

ar

,\ uL ,\ q)

AAA

trAtr

AA

A



NEW:NCHTSS 57

25.4d5! Ac6

€dG 38.trh8 a5 39.trh6+ &c7 40.

ls.Ahs &dt rc.a+ Ees 17.Adz Ads

Again 25...trg6 offered better drawing

trxhS &d6 41.trh6+.€c7 42.&t4

was Kosteniuk- Stefanova, Beij ing 2008.

chances, because after26.Eel Ace ZZ.

13...6xe5 Black has to take the pawn, because otherwise 14.f4 just

8\c7 Black has 2Z ...Exf6!. 26.6xc7! Exg2+ 27.&11, Ec8 28. tre7

A new move. 13.Ee1 c5

14.6$

Ae6

gives White an advantage.

53.axb4 axb4

L4.At4 Ad6 15.8e1 fG 16.Axe5 Axe5 After 16...fxe5 White can take on d6 and play f4, but interesting.

17

b6 43.€e5 ag2 44.trh7+ €b8 4s.Hg7 AfS 46.€d6 Ae4 47.c3 Ah1 48.Ee7 AgZ 49.b3 Ah1 50. Ee2 €b7 51,.trb2 Af3 52.b4 cxb4

.6l3t? is also

17.6xf6+ gxf6 L8.t4 c5 19.4b5 Ad7 20.ac3 Eg8 27..txe5 Axh3 22.exl6+ €f8 23.tre2 Ag4 24. Ee3 Ad7?! 2a...trg625.trf1EdS is about equal.

Threatening2g.6e6+ and 30.f7+,

so

Blackhas no other choice than to give an exchange.

28...trxc7 29.trxc7 tr86 30.f7 Ef6+ 31.€e2 trxf7 32.trxt7+ €xf7 33.Ef1+ €eG 34.€e3 h5 35.trf8 Ads 36.a3 *e5 37.Ee8+

sg newiucnrss

ASTANA

54.trxb4 Grischuk knows what he's doing. 54.cxb4?2.

would be a theoretical draw.

54...Ae2 55.c4 €a6 56.€c6 &a5 57.trb5+ &a458.9d5 Black resigned.

I

Killer K's Ht

,Th. 33-year dominance of chess I by players whose surnames begin with'K'

is unique in sports history. Lest you quip All Russian names start with Kll consider the first six Sovietborn World Champs (A, B, S, T, P, S). The 'K era' really starts in 1974, when Karpov beat Kortchnoi in the Candidates' final preceding Fischer's implosion. Anatoly humbled Viktor twice more ('78 &'81), followed by 5 consecutive Karpov-Kasparov matches (1984-1990). With the tragicomic split of FIDE and the PCA (1993-2006), the hegemony of K's diminished just slightly. GM Short became the first 'non-K' challenger in 19 years, when he fell to Kasparov in '93. GK then won everything in sight while his

[email protected]

a

trA

I \llli

ffitr E

rg

:

A .E

:,

ustr

AAA

gAA taa

E

Blqck lo move ond win

I

l=J

tr€

Block lo move qnd

win (probobly!?)

*** EE

II

ll

PCA strove to supplant FIDE's absurd politics. After Kasparovbeat Anand in the last PCA WC (1995), the ersatz, ir-

lg I

la

regular FIDE WC was the only game in town. Even these events produced a'K-K' match (Karpov-Kamsky 1996) and two surprise'K' FIDE knockout tourney champs (Khalifman & Ka-

simdzhanov). Kramnik shockingly dethroned Kasparov in 2000 and reigned for 8 years until Anand finally

A tr II

lll

str

A Mtr 6

e

n

tr

AAA

rh

IA

E

A

g

White lo move ond win

White lo move ond win

struck a blow for the rest of the alphabet in 2008.

For eoch problem, the gool is to find the quickest ond cleorest winning line unless otherwise noted. A 'winning line'could rqnge

from checkmote, to being o pown up with no obiective compensotion for the opponent.

ll tuH

I

EB

60a \-r

EEgI A WrA A&

LA

t-a

E

Al

Level of difficulty:

-4 stors, I is'eosiest' ond 4 'most difficult'. The stor roting refers to the difficulty of I

A

finding oll the relevont voriotions, not iust finding the right key move.

Solutions on poge 63

t

A

}

tr Blqck lo move ond equolize

FORCING MOVES

I

A

ll

Mtr E

White lo move ond win

NEW:N CHTSS

59

n cricket, a bats-

piciously. I was perturbed to discover

man traditionally raises his bat to

the venue was not the comfortable

the pavilion,

in

acknowledgment of

applause, upon hitting a century. In late May,

I felt

of elation, although a similar sense

minus the clapping, upon visiting my 100th country - Peru. For someone who didnt travel abroad once during his first decade, it is not a bad little achievement. At least this is one tompetition where I am still ahead of my old rival Garry Kasparov O. The occasion for my latest South

the press conference a couple of days earlier, but a tent on campus grounds. I had not anticipated such an unexpected turn and, it being late autumn, I had to hurriedly send for a sweater.

distance, which cast long shadows. Luckily the weather held, otherwise we would have had the pounding of rain on the canvass roof to add to our distractions. If the players had it bad, the dozens of spectators who

ministryto prove it, he had to endure

had ventured to the city outskirts

in

didnt help either.

gave a simul at the imposing and

1855, atPlaza San Martin, in the centre of historic Lima. A suit and tie were prerequisites to gain admission to this gentlemen's club for the countryt political and business elite, and

bastion of power and respectability. However, once past the courteous, but strictly formal, liveried footmen, the atmosphere was most welcoming.

Thankfully, the chess was not unduly taxing and I conceded just a single draw from 17 or 18 boards, before

enjoying a most convivial dinner with fine wines with my vanquished adversaries.

The match with |ulio began inaus-

NEWENCHESS

of the 2010 Khanty-Mansiysk FIDE General Assembly. As the newlyelected Peruvian Delegate, with thb

venerable Club Nacional, founded

I

Incidentally, Adrian Noriega was victim of the most notorious heist

Worse, the board was illuminated by a solitary light, at several metres

were even more neglected: basically they couldn't see a thing. None of this excuses my exceedingly poor play on the first day, being fortunate only to go 1-2 down (I have become very sluggish out of the blocks in recent years), but certainly the conditions

American trip was a rapid match against |ulio Granda. Prior to that,

60

hall at the modern l]niversidad Cientifica del Surwhere we had conducted

dum, at the behest of the sponsor, we also played ablitz game with backward-moving pawns. It was won by |ulio. One suspects this curious innovation is likely to prove ephemeral.

competent driving force behind my trip, Adrian Noriega, apologized profusely for the state of affairs, saying that unfortunately he had not been directly responsible for arrangements on site. He dashed over to meet the university authorities that evening. Next day everything was in order, with scores kept, abundant lighting and cameras all correctly positioned. Miraculously I even overcame my dismal start, winning with white in the fctrrth and sixth games to clinch 3y2

-2y2.

an extraordinary speech by Kirsan

Ilyumzhinov in which, without

a

scintilla of evidence, the Kalmykian space-traveller claimed the previous

incumbent (and safe Kirsan vote) was, in fact, the legitimate Delegate. Outrageously, the matter was put to a generalvote (which is whyit is essential to have independent observers to ensure free and fair elections) and

Adrian was duly ousted. Had the election been any closer, it is unquestionable that this blatant example of

electoral highway-robbery would

The highly articulate, pleasant and

the match

documentation from the sports'

In abrzarre adden-

SHORT STORIES

have gone to court.

Mylast official engagement in Peru was in many ways the most interesting. A school simul, in a rough part of town, may not sound the least bit

noteworthy, but the kids of 'Saco Oliveros' - where chess is part of the curriculum - were exceptionally strong. I had already witnessed the World under-13 Champion |ose Martinez trounce Iulio Granda in an informal one-on-one game a few days previously, so I was particularlywary. I survived against him, from a position of inferiority, and conceded four

I know not: nevertheless, the fact

including one against a cousin of the famous Cori siblings. I was more than happywith my PlaY and final result (+23 =5). Almost all

Albertan players. Still, I got Paid, which is not something that can be taken for granted these days, so all

the new generation of talented Peruvian kids are from the same grouP of 28 schools where chess is taught. The majority are from modest familybackgrounds - which simply goes to prove that the talent is all there, if only it is allowed to flourish. I snatched a few days at the end to stay at the marvellous UNESCO World Heritage Site of Cusco, high in the Andean mountains - feasting upon alpaca and guinea-pig (to the utter disgust of at least one American tourist) in Spanish colonial splen-

On the way there, I stopped offfirst

Chess Olympiadbid for 2016. Unfor-

at the vibrant Annex Chess Club, in downtown Toronto, where I hadbeen made a verywelcome guest the previous year. Those attending the lecture, which preceded the simul, were a lit-

tunately this ambitious project eventually collapsed, but I have no doubt that with his tremendous energy and

tle surprised to see me striding out

diose schemes.

onto the stage, guitar in hand, to per-

From Toronto, I flew to the capital, Ottawa, where I stayed with my good friend Gordon Ritchie and his wife Marg. Gordon is more or less retired these days, but as a govern-

other draws

-

dour. From there I took the Orient Express (which was neither briental'

nor'express') through spectacular landscape to the famous Inca city

of

-

as

Machu Picchu

which really is

good as it is hyped. It was a fitting end to a most memorable trip. June brought me back to the Amer-

icas, this time north

to the 7th

Edmonton International, in Canada. If truth be told, it was not the strong-

was fine.

brief duet ('Under the Boardwalk and A Hard Day's Night') with club founder Ted Winick on tromform

a

bone. Whether this aural assault had any influence on the evening's Play,

'Atleast this is one

"comnetitiorl' where'I am still rqad of Lny

old rival

est round-robin in which I have ever

participated - being designed prima-

rily to provide norms for the local SHORT STOR!ES

remains I won all my games.

Ted, incidentally, was one of the primary movers behind the Toronto

personal integrity he will succeed with other perhaps slightly less gran-

ment minister he was one of the principal architects of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Deal - about which he

wrote an illuminating account enti-

tled 'Wrestling with the Elephant'. Upon arrival he presented me with a copy of Sh ort v Kasparov: the Hij ack of the 1993 World Chess ChampionshiP,

which I knew of, but had never seen. It took me 18 years before I could bring myself to look at these painful games again (I gave a lecture on the match in Ottawa last year) and I guess

that in another decade or so I will be able to read Bill Hartston's bookwithout flinching unduly. My simul at the RA Chess Club,

nrw:ncHnss ot

.

where

I

representatives, but had it not been for Mikhalevski's catastrophic penultimate day, in which he was routed by tail-ender Dale Haessel - around

have been a frequent guest

(along with Alexey Shirov), went smoothly and I dropped just half a point. Two days later I won a small rapid chess tournament, in Part to raise money for the Canadian Ol)rm-

pic team, with a score of

515.

By all

accounts the lecture which I delivered

soon afterwards was well received, although some were a little shocked by -y Damascene conversion to the

value of endgame study. Canada is an absurdly large coun-

try. The flight to Edmonton took over four hours in itself. My tourna-

ment began with a disastrous first round defeat to the Israeli GM Victor Mikhalevski. From the fairly routine play, a draw would have been a normal result, but I failed to respond correctlywhen my opponent grabbed a scorching hot pawn just before the time-control. Instead of making two precise moves, leading to a decisive advantage, I flubbed it and lost miserably.

cz NswincHrss

Mikholevski-Short Edmonton 2O12 position ofter 24...6)94

25.Wxa7? This pawn robbery I failed to

should have lost quickly.

punish my opponent and played 25...h5 and lost, missing a reasonable drawing chance further on. However, after the correc t 25...Wb2 26.trf1

€gS! followed by...Ae+ White could have resigned.

Thereafter I was playing catch-up. Despite the odd scare, I basicallY made short work of the six Canadian

SHORT STORIES

350 points his inferior - and U.S. Womens Champion, Irina Krush, I would not have caught him, let alone surpassed him. My final tallY of 719 - one point clear of the field may have looked, to those who had not followed the event closely, like a convincing victory. but it was really anythingbut. It was a very friendly event - well organized by Micah HugheY with sterling support from Vlad Rekhson. All were delighted by the great showing of local man Robert Gardner, wh6

justty earned an IM norm. Micah, fine fellow that he is, has promised to axe the loathsome double rounds next year. With growing sponsorship likely for Calgary in2}l3,the oil-rich province of Alberta is now making a small but increasingly important contribg-

tion to the

chess calendar.

r

Forcing Moves E& -

EiA

Ui/ E

al I ll trA 6 g

ll IE )\I l: I

$tr E

g

AA

A

tr

AA

AA

Kt

lacked any chinks

in his armour, and always seemed to see one move deeper than anyone: 7....Ax12+! 2.Wxf2 Wxa5 3.6xe6! Axg2! 0-1

I $m a

ll {li/ E

& :

LA

I

E E ts

AI

A A

E

A

tr

AA

g

$m E a

AA &

21

E

Korpov-Stoionovic Volievo 2007

Jonkmon-Kqsimdzhqnov Wiik oon Zee (Sonnevonck) 1999

The dashing young master from Zlatoust vanquished a pantheon of Soviet legends with killer technique

The dark-horse Uzbekistani winner of the 2004 FIDE Championship

Volleio-Kospqrov Linores 2005 The king of the

&

(-L

Jt-

tl

EJL

and a sharp white repertoire featuring the Keres Attack vs. the Sicilian. 1.Wh 4 6xc6? Missing a stock

(at age 25), is a sharp positional player with a venomous tactical eye. Here

he unveiled a marvellous resource: L...a941! and White should settle

funny alternative:

for 2.Exd6 Wxd6 3.Wxg4 Wge+l :...Wd:+l? and ...Wg6. 4.WxgG fxg6

2.af6l

Ae7 3.6-:xe7 ExeT 4. 698! with threats on e7lh6. Or 1... Dldt 2.Dle5! Axe5 3.6lf61.2.4f6 h6

5.8d1= If 2.6lf5?1, 2... Exdt + 3. Exdl Wg6 .Wxg4 trxf5. Instead, White succumbed to shock:2.Wxg4?.! Eg6

3.Wxh6+ 1-0

3.Wc8+ (3.Wf3) 3...&xg7 4.Ed8 (in for a penny, in for a pound; but Black

threat, but Black is busted. Herr Computer gives 1...h6

a

is already a pawn ahead,

4...Wf6!

5.942.?

with initiative)

Ee2 o-1.

J.Polgor-Kholif mqn Zurich ropid 2009

Make some popcorn and feed this to your favourite engine for sport. Watch 4 queens and2 rooks trade punches for moves on end; uniquelyboth kings are immune to quickmate. Predictably

Judit tanked quickly 7-...g2 2.a8W g1W 3.9d8? Wcl+ 4.&b4We4+ 5.c4 Ef3 6.96f8 Exba+ 0-

1. Is

white worse,

or lost, on 3.Wad5l? Wc1+ 4.9b4 Ef4+ 5.9b5 s.c4 Hd+r. skewers two

if 5...Wxc3, 6.Exf/!!! WxfT? z.Wht+ &g8 8.Wd8+ Wf8

queens, while

Kromnik-Roshkovsky Moscow l99l

Kramnik's positional genius culminates in combinations of wonderful mathematic clarity. We associate Vlad with the ancient Berlin Wall, not the Sveshnikov Sicilian he once favoured!

g.Wtd5+ holds, though 6...We4! seems to favour Black... 5...Wf1+ 6.gb6 and now Rybka4 first tries

1.9g5! Threatens z.Exhl +. 1...Ed7 2.gh6 Tlpical Kramnik: simple and

6...Wel 7.W6c6!, then switches to the logical 6...e4! with scads more pre-

Black can't escape the pin and hold mating {quares, e.g. 2...Wd5 3.trxd7. 3.Axe4l trtt7? 4.Wxh7+ 1-0

posterous lines in the offing.

deadly. Now 3.Exh7+ looms. 2...Wc5

SOTUTIONS

Kortchnoi-Tql Erevon 1962

Viktor was most at home in the kind of complex positions many dread. L. ExdT! WxdT 2.eG Wa7 Rybka suggests z...Wbs+ 3.9h4 95+ 4.€h5 We8+ 5.&xg5 Wg6+ 6.Wxg6+ hxg6 7 .d7 axb2 8.e7 but the text is more artistic: 3.We5! axb2 4.e7 gf7 5.d7! 1-0 (5...gxdl e .Wfe+ mates).

iNCHISS 63

Trop spo

ele the o not Dovi

worl

med ofter moin EO 52.9 - D90 z, the lo rgest Dovid Nqvqro Peler Svidler roducer in Progue 2012 (31 Republic) sow Laf3 af6 After a somewhat traumatic expesh between rience in the Maroczy in Game oro ond o I decided to shelve 1...96 for the time being and see what David had preployer. This pared in the Anti-Grtinfeld, an opening we both play a lot with black, and Svidler come occasionally with white. 1

unting

chollenge for the Czech number I . Hoving survived on unpleosont position in the first encounter, the Russion chompion struck with two wins in Gomes 2 ond 3, before clinching o 3- l victory with on eosy drov/ on the finol doy. The highlight of the motch wos Gome 3. Mony consider Svidler to be the Ieoding expert in the Grijnfeld. You moy begin to understond why if you ploy through this exciting gome, guided by his lucid ond informotive comments.

2.c4 96 3.4c3 d5 4.cxd5 6xd5 5.9b3 AbG 6.d4 Agt z.e+

ue&

llAr

H

2012 - with black! I, however, first noticed this possibility more than a year ago, after this move order had been played by Illescas in the Spanish League against Negi, with a very stark follow-up - tO...AcS was met by 11.h4!?.

Deciding (not unreasonably) that this is likelyto become popular eventually, I spent some time looking at this line, and after a while found a very curious idea, which seemed to equalize in some lines and lead to extremely unusual complications in others.'Finally I get to use it,' I said to myself, and blitzed out:

1O...Axe2 L7..kxe2 e5 And now I got very lucky, of sorts

one down and with this game being his last white, he plunged ahead aim-' ing for complications and the promise of a mating attack. In Aronian-Navara, Black played 11... Aa6 here, and soon had an excellent position - but Lev's play in that game left quite a bit to be desired, and I was certain David had something in mind there.

I

As usual, I had expected something else - David lost an unpleasant game to Le Quang Liem with 7.4f4 recently, and I assumed he would lean in that direction. But the text-move is not what you would call a novelty...

EA

ll

7...g:94 8.4b5+ c6 9.6g5 0"0 10.

Ae2

ll

uv

llAr

tr

I

AT

'/\rr\jL

AA

trA

6

AAAA cb =

E

A very fashionable line, made famous bythe #me myopponentwon against

the all-conquering Levon in Wijk

PRAGUE

H&

AA

AAAA

A€

E

12.wh3

q A

A&

wa

AA

H&

u

rAr A ll la

utr E'

EA

-

had the scoreline been different, David might have spent a bit more time here, looking at various options. But being

This looks very exciting, but in fact this move is wrong on two counts - it does not lead to anything particularly good for White, and there is a much better one available. l2.dxe5 h6 is, of course, the point of Black's play - and after the normal 13. 6B a8d7 he is, in fact, doing quite well. However, as soon as my parvn landed on e5, it dawned on me that in

NEIIIiNCHESS

65

my'analysis' I had completely ignored I 3. Ah3 ! . After the pretty much forced

why - Black is first with real threats. But I wanted to drive White's forces

8...68d7 t4.f4 6)c5 15.Wc2 6da+ 16.€fl Black is in a lot of trouble. But I did not have to panic for very

back, and chose a more domesticated

EA

ll

L2...hG 13.4f3 exd4 14.AxhG tre8! Now Black is fine, and will be more than fine if White is not careful.

EA

ll

Et

[email protected]

rA rA

AT

IA AA

tr

a



tr

An understandable decision

gl I

IA

rA

AA

,\ q)

After 15.695 Black has a choice

between the safe and equal 15...9d7

16.Wxd7 6SxdZ t7.Axg7 €xg7 18. 6xd+ c5 t9.W2 f6 and rs... Af6 t6.f4 6c4, which looks extremely promising - Black is better prepared for a direct confrontation here;

Duringthe game I was mainlywor-

ried about 15.693, but after the clever

15...4f6! Black is doing very well: 16.0-0 wdz;

g

E

,\ q) fl ._l

/\,{ A

tr

d; l' o..

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ll

IE

illi/

A

aaw

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,,"*."J;;

A) #a';", correctty worried about 17...4h8!?, and after 18.6)f4 (18.4f8 f6!) 18...9c6 (18...f6 re.a]f3 95 20.A:dl Wfr leads to a very oddlooking position. Black seems to be OK here as well) the following Martian line is suggested as best play by the machine: 19.Ed3 (19.Afs Wfo) re-.a8d7 20.trR 6fe zt.4\ff &xfr

*o

beginning.

AA

€trtr

15.Axg7 &xg7 t6.6fxd4 Exe4

I

,\ q)

is wrong) 22...8xf3 23.Wxf3 gxf5 24.gxf5 6)c6 25.trhg1+ &fl ze .trge Ehg glack is doing fine, although after 27.W* (27.trdgr Wxhz) 27... 6-:e7 28.Wc7 the game is only judt

ll

IA A w AA AA A

17.0-0-0 Wf6, and Black is just fine;

II

gtr

21 wh;i;;

la

not exactly rosy either:

I

A

EA g [email protected] rA ll ATA

after the game, but the alternatives are

A

tE-

worse than the alternative, but it makes things much more comfortable for Black, and therefore it is not

- David

uu

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AAgtrE AAAA

continues in the samevein as 12.Wh3, hoping to create something tangible on the other side. However, White's king will become fair game as soon as Black solves his immediate problems. David was very critical of this move

-

E

the best choice. White should have playedtl.g+:

15.0-O-O

-

A

E

17.wh4?! This move is not objectively much

EA AA

ll

option.

long.

&

EA

;:;,,;-il'

to meet

2r.6f5 with 21...gxf5 22.gxf5 Wfrzt B.Ehgl+ €f8, gives Black a big edge. L7...tG 18.Axg7 WxgT 19.4h3 Ac6 Now Black is clearlybetter. 20.trd3 A good practical choice, White can ill afford to do nothing and wait for the pawns to appear on d3 and c4.

20...95 Allowing Eg3 and 6ef4 may have been an option, but I thought this move should be winning.

too: r6...Waz (16...Afoli) 17.Wh4 f6 18.Axg7 WxgT l9.aB 6c6, and

22.95 6fd7 B.2lxg6+ €g8! 24.6lxh} Ae5, and Black is supposedly better. I will offer no opinion on this - I

21.9h5 Exe4 22.14 Trying to open some files on the kingside. 22.Eg3 trh4 n.WR EeB is com-

Blackt monster pawn centre is ready

planned to play 17...f6;

pletely losing. Here I paused and tried to take stock.

15.0-0 c5 16.695 is fine for Black

to

ro11.

B) t7...f618.4xg7 WxgT t9.6f3

15...c5 16.6gs gd7

Exe4 20.693, and now both David

The machine insists that 16...4f61 17.Wg3 AcO t8.h+ is safe for Black,

and

and after

l9...qk4it

oo newixcnrss

is not hard to see

I thought 20...trf4 21.6f5!

was

very dangeroqs for Black, but even here, after the cool

PRAGUE

My initial

assessment was

that I

needed one final long calculation to end the game, but the more I thought, the less obvious the solution appeared.

Finally

I

settled on the move which

forced the queen trade while improving the position of my king. Or so I assumed.

&

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22...Wr7 22...D]b4 23.8g3 Wfz looked totally winning, until I spotted 24.Exg5+!, and after 24...&f8!

2s.Wh6+! €e8 26.Hg7r. Wc4+

27.

4\8 8\a2+ 28.€bt Axc3+

29.bxc3 Wb:+ 30.€c1 Wxc3+ 31.€b1 Black has no mate, and will eventually have to switch to the defence with ...Ee7 if he wants to win, and then it will be White's turn for a while.

Black is better after 22...Wh7 23.Wxh7+ €xh7 2a.69 6-tb4, e.g. 2s. Eddl tre3 26.frg5 6)xa2+ 27 .*bt 6b+ zs.Ehfi

and now the fantastic-looking 28... 6c4r. 29.gxf6 Ee5!, cutting off the knights and preparing to surround and burythe f6-pawn.

23.493 This came as a surprise. I had expected

23.Wxfl+ &xfr 24.693, when after 24...6lb4 25.trb3 Ee3 26.Exe3 dxe3 27.fxg5 8)xa2+ 28.€dl EdS+ 29.&e2 Edz+ 30.€xe3 Exbz Black is clearly better, but it was objectively stronger than the text.

laa

I

ll

laa

I

a A A

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Cb

I

ll H

I I

A

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EE

2_\2l

ANATYSIS DIAGRAM

AA

case of averyusefulblunder. Amazingly, despite seeing it in a lot of other lines, I managed to completely forget24.8c3 was possible here. I almost played 23...ab4,before notic-. ing that White can continue the trapeze

act with 24.6)xe4r.? 6xda+ Q4...Wc4+ 25.E,c3r. and did see it here...) 25.&d2, and Black will need to take a few difficult decisions. Objectively, he is still better after 25...0sxb2 26.Wh6

-

0)2c4+

& :

I

27.&ct 6ldlt

28.fxg5 f5, but

I think I can be excused for not being entirely sure about that during the game.

24.Hc3 Not, of course, 24.&d2

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,{,l.

g

23...Wc4+ A

q) q) n ,{ A 2_\

tr

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2lAu 25.Wg6+ &fs zo.Wxf6+ &e8, and Black's king escapes easily, while White's definitely doesnt. Luckily for me, my next few moves were forced, and I managed to collect myself and get back to work re-assessing the scenery.

RETI,S "OTHER'CLASSIC ln many ways, more comprehensive and instructive lhan Modern ldeos in Chess

"A brilliant sequel."- Andy soltis

PRAGUE

NEWENCHESS

67

24...dxc3 25.Wg6+ €f8 26.Wxf6+

30.trd1+?

opposite side of the board, unable to

&e8 Despite the king run, Black is still in control - White cant do much

But it goes unpunished.

help the kit g.

with only one active piece.

After 30.Wxc4 fu,lc4 3l.6xg5 6ld4 32.a3e41 (32.a4 Ee3 is totally lost, but White is just in time to block the e-file) 32...6b5 33.a4 6ba:+ 34.*a2

&c6

35.f5

blW+

36.Exb1

hxbl

37.*xb1

36.Ec1 This hastens the end, but I was rather

27.996+ Here and on the next move 27.b3 loses to 27...Wb4: 28.Wg6+ &dz zg.6xe4 Wa3+ 30.&d1 Ed8!, and with the final piece joining the

ANAtYSIS DIAGRAM

fray, Black wins easily.

27...&d7 28.Wxe4 cxb2+ 29.9b1

Black is better , but his task will not be easy at all - the f-pawn is very strong.

30...6d4 31.Wxb7+ gd8 32.Wb8+ €d7 Gaining a little time.

33.Wb7+ €d8 34.Wb8+

disappointed that I did not get to demonstrate the main idea: 36.€i1 Eb6 37.Wcl 6d6!, and despite the queen trade, Black still gets through to the king: 38.Wxc4 6xc4 39.4f5

€c7 is simpler: 40.Ec1 6b:+ 41.€b1 ga a2.6-:lg5 - 42.Exc4 gxh3!, and White either loses the rook or the h-pawn will queen - 42...6xc1+ (39.a4

43.€xc1 Eb2 winning) 39...6a3r. 40. 6ea (+O.6xa4cxd441.Exd4+ &e8 is mate) 40...€c8 41.Ec1 Dx2t,and after 42.Eet (42.fu,4 Ea6l $.6rrra3 6xc1 winning) 42...gxf4 Black gets to the knight on e3, and wins. 36...Wa4 Or 36...W d3+ 37.&a1 Eb6 38.aA Wa6 - Black has a Pleasant choice now.

37.&a1 trbG 38.Wd2 AdG

29...Ee8? I played this very fast - while David was thinking on move 27, I'd calculated the whole line ending in 35...Ee6, and decided I had too little time to spend it on alternatives to what was clearly a good move. Howevet this was a mistake.

After 29...4d4! Black is just winning - there is nothing White can do

to prevent the b6-knight joining the attack with decisive force: 30.Wxb7+ Qo.af2 6a4; 3o.Edl Ads) 30...€d8 31.We4 hd5, and White can resign.

34...6c8! 35.Wxb2 35.Wb3 6ae f (there is also the more prosaic 35...Wcl+) 36.Wxc4 6xc4 is totally lost for White - Black will soon have a mating attackhere.

35...Ee6 The white knights paint a sad Picture. There is no defence - too many of White's resources are stuck on the

Black's domination is complete. After:

39.8c3 o,c4 40.9d3 gb4 41. Eb3 We1+ White resigned. A very exciting game - all the more so because of the many serious mistakes we both made,I suppose.

2 Dovid Novqro

og mwlncnnss

r

PRAGUE

A few years

ago, the following

thought hit me: what if Petrosian actually referred to the *, T etc. system of

Tbelieve that my doubts were only lresolved in the computer ized era. I am puzzled when I hear young players complaining after a loss that:

'I had a slight

+0,34 advantage' or:

'I was winning by +3.78'. Personally, I would be more convinced if they had shown me a concrete plan, accessible to human understanding, rather than these inexpressive numbers.

annotation so typical for the Informant? Whlle helping the publishers to deliver some information within a limited space, the absence of verbal explanations almost completely eliminates the personal character of the comments. Concrete lines and their 'cold' evaluations are submitted to the scrutiny of fashion, but certain phrases of great players and thinkers are bound to maintain their validity forever. As starting point for a detailed discussion on this theme I have taken a game

FISCHER-LARSEN

between the two players that the Soviets regarded as the main threat to their hegemony back in the'60s. One of them,

the winner, happened to be a prolific annotator and writer, and his comments to this game have

a

perennial value. Tak-

ing into account the ulterior course of history, I believe that some of them have a marked prophetic character.

30.7 _ CB2 Bobby Fischer Benl Lorsen Sonto Monico 1966 RL

e5 2.at3 6c6 3.4b5 a6 4. Ha4 olt6 5.0-0 6xe4 6.d4 b5 7. Ab3 d5 8.dxe5 Ae6 1-.e4

s'

EgEAE lll I IAA I la A AA AAA AAA

traAg

tr€

Over the years, I found no better way of explaining the fascination caused by the Open Variation of the Spanish Opening than mentioning two highly qualified, but also contradictory evaluations of its merits.

In his famous Die Moderne

Schach-

partie, Dr. Tarrasch, who also is the godfather of the variation, considers Black's position to be better on account of his active knight, queenside and central mobile majority as well as the weakness of the white e5-pawn.

Almost half a centurylater, the worldt best player and renowned theoretician Paul Keres showed himself rather sceptical, pointing out the exposed position of the e4-knight, the weakness of the queenside pawns and White's attacking chances on the kirgside thanks to the gdvanced e-pawn. We can see that bbth esteemed gen-

FISCHER-tARSEN

tlemen referred to the same strategic elements, but drew completely oPposite conclusions! Paradoxically, both seem to be right, and I always thought that the final outcome of the opening depends on which of the above evaluations is more closely related to the actual course of the game. If Black can make use of his active knight, put his pawns into motion, or surround the e5-pawn, his position would lookvery nice indeed. But White would get on top if he managed to clear the b1-h7 diagonal, put pressure on d5 and b5 and create tactical threats around the f6-square.

However, something was missing

NEWEN CHT^SS

7I

from the picture: the domain between these opposite opinions was too wide and required some guidance.In order to get at least some stability (in chess, geometry, or the Universe), at least three reference points are needed. Some months ago, I managed to widen

Axd2 was slightly less popular.

Although he obtained an advantage

11...Afs!? Larsen chose this rare continuation both for his book and for this

tually lost to Beliavsky (apparently

1

1...

ambitious game. Apparently, he also liked having three reference points when evaluating a variation, since in the booklet he had written: 'Keres

up myperspective when I came across the following comment on this game by Larsen:'I had just written a booklet analysing this Open Variation of the Ruy seen from Black's point of view I thought that ordinary chess players (amateurs, as explained in a comment written 12years later - MM) ought to play such openings instead of following the latest fashionl In order to suit amateur play, a variation is supposed to be original, offer chances to unbalance the position, but also to be riskier than others. In other

psychological dimension to his

words, navigating within the limits traced by Tarrasch and Keres implies

discourse: At this time, the variation

an increased element of uncertainty; this was the kind of element I

proved a huppy choice against

missed when trying to understand the essence of the Open Spanish!

Fischerl Myfeeling is that he did not refer to the opening phase. As will be revealed soon,

9.c3 Ac5 1o.6bd2 0-0 LL.Ac2

ui/ H& I lll

E

E

ts

IAA

IA.IA

A

AA AAAE

trAWtr&

At that time, the approved continuations were 11...f5 and 11...q\A,while

on time) and had problems reaching draw against Smyslov. These games may have offered Kortchnoi a hint about his mighty opponent's weak a

defends his central

points. Previously, he had successfully played the French Defence in the Candidates' finals against Karpov (1974) and Spassky (1977), and most of the commentators and spectators were expecting a con-

knight, aiming to

tinuation of the theoretical

incline the balance towards Tarrasch'

discussion in this opening.

evaluation. In his notes to the game, Larsen adds

decided to take up Larsen's

shows sympathy, Euwe has little faith, Pachman considers this move weak.' Abstractly speaking, I would observe that Black

a

However, the challenger 'amateur line' as his main "

weapon, at least in the first half of the match. His choice

was entirely justified in the games in which a complex middlegame, withouf a

clear-cut evaluation, arose.

Karpov succeeded in win-

Fischer played impeccably up to a certain point. Larsen's statement was probably related to the typical Open

ning two games in which he managed to eliminate the element of uncertainty right from the opening. In the eighth game he got a decisive attack, and in the 14th he transposed by force to a pleasant endgame with

Spanish structures, with their afore-

opposite-coloured bishops, one of his

mentioned element of uncertainty. Two almost imperceptible mistakes urere enough to turn a better white

specialties. By a strange coincidence, Larsen wrote

position into an unpleasant one.

AAA

from the opening each'time, he even-

Remarkably, a similar psychological situation occurred,12 years later on the occasion of the match for the world title between Karpov and Kortchnoi, Baguio 1978.In L977, Karpov had faced this same variation twice.

a book on the Baguio match. He must have felt very much at home when commenting on the games in which Kortchnoi had been Black. When trying to explain the challenger's opening strategy, he imagined the following witty discourse, addressed to Karpov: 'Look, there is this rarevariation ofthe

t Bringing you updated, timely, fair, and objective chess daily news and information from around the globe

zz nrwEncurss

FISCHER.TARSEN

Ruy. In my camp we have studied it very deeply. The books have verylittle to say about it and they are full of mistakes. What do you know about this variation, Mr. Champ? If you do not know enough, you are free to get out on move 10, or 9 or 8, or maybe you would like to find another first move?'

After many years of experience with the Open Ruy Lopez I can testify that the last sentence is not a mere 'bravado'. More than once, I had the surprise of facing 5.d3 or 4. Axc6 against strong players who usually went for the main lines. In some rare cases, l.e4 specialists preferred to start the game with the super-safe 1.c4, although this was not part of their usual repertoire. Finally, one of my team mates in the national team confessed to me once that he plays the Italian instead of the Spanish only because he is afraid of

5...Ne4.

L2.ab3 Ag+ 13.6xc5 Axc5 14. tre1

above. Kortchnoi tried two different continuations related to the other aforementioned plans. In the second match game he introduced the novelty t+...d41? and in the fourth used the supposedly mistaken 14...4h5. In both cases, Black reached a draw without too much fight. Karpov made use of Larsent 'advice' and deviated on move 9 in the eighth, 10th and 12th games, and even on the

first move (l.ca) in the sixth! In the 14th game he returned to the then

This is a critical position from Karpov's games from 1977 andfrom two at Baguio 1978. Black's main ideas

main continuation 9.c3 and Kortchnoi once again showed himself ready to repeat the variation. It is likely that he would have chosen a third alternative on the 14th move if he had been given

(according to Tarrasch' scenario)

a chance

are preparing ...d4, attacking e5, or regrouping with ...Ans-ge , ...8)e6, and then prepare a massive advance of the queenside pawns.

idea on move 13, but more about this later). This kind of flexibility reminds me of the classical Scheveningen tabiya

White's task is somewhat easier to explain: he must prevent all the above ideas in order to consolidate his space advantage. This sounds like easier said than done, but Fischerb powerful play shows that such a pretentious approach is within Whitet reach.

14..,Ee8 This natural move corresponds to the second idea expoged

(Karpov came up with

a

new

from the early Karpov-Kasparov in which the differences

matches,

from one game to another were made by semi-waiting moves like ...Ea8-b8 or Ae3-g1. In other words, the line that Larsen recommends to the amateurs of the year 1966 proved viable for such a high-lqvel battle like the Baguio match.

FISCHER.tARSEN

15.4e3! Typical for Fischer; very strong and easy to explain at the same time! White prevents ...d4 and forces the knight to retreat in order to play Wa: before Black gets to play...Ah5(-g6). This will lead to the weakening of the

dark squares (after ...96), which

is

quite dangerous in the absence of the blackking's bishop. The approved continuation then was 15.4f4, which was supposed to lead to an advantage according to an old analysis by Rabinovich. Larsen mentions that the rehabilitation of the variation started with his questioning this old evaluation, which offers an excellent example of how trends and fashions change throughout history. Even more interesting is that in 1977 Karpov failed to understand the merits of Fischer's opening play and preferred the old move in both his tournament games!

The critical line goes: 15...d4 (15... Ans hadbeen suggestedbyKeres, but led to an advantage for White after 16.

mwincunss z3

Ag: he6 t7.Wd2t? 6xt ts.6,h4! in Karpov-Smyslov, Tilbur g 197 7) 16.b4 (the modest 16.h3 AhS tz.cxd4leads

to simplifications:

17...

Axf3 18.Wxf3

6xd419.Wc3 6xc2 20.Wxc2 A-le6 2L.Eadl. In Karpov-Beliavsky Len-

continuation is 21.Wff Axf3 22.gxB Qxl zz.A*z+ €fs. The better structure and perfect coordination offers Black adequate compensation for the

Larsen gives 19.Wd2 Axc2 20.Wxc2 oxd+2l.cxd4 6lfs zz.Ae3 Ee6, fol-

missing pawn.

do anything to avoid a position with a backward pawn and would go for 20...

15...6e6 16.Wd3 96 17.AhG

lowed by...c6, as solid though quite passive for Black. Personally, I would

c5!?

ingrad 1977, Black played the passive 21...We7, allowing f4-f5 fairly soon in the game. 21...9h4! 2L4d EedS

2l.D-xe6fxe6.

Er

would have been safer, ensuring Black reasonable stability) 16...Dre6 17 . Ae4

ll

\ilu H

a

llla A

t \

AAA

AAW

L7...2,e7!? An interesting psycho-

ANALYSIS DIAGRAM

This is where the old analysis ended, but Larsen wrote that he could not see an advantage after 17...Wd7.I entirely

agree, but feel that he should also have suggested a continuation after the natural 18.493. After a few hours of analysis my favourite was 18...a5!?

(18... Wxc into

to 19.Qxc6 ..Ead8 r\ps ce

logical moment. Larsen explains that 17...A:f5 would have transposed to the line given in the comment on the next move. By withdrawing his bishop one move later, he will force a choice on Fischer, possibly one of the most difficult situations in a chess player's life. Although Larsen does not exPlicitly admit it, the evaluation of the two lines leaves little doubt about the fact that Black has lost the theoretical battle and has to gamble in a typically complicated Open Spanish

EB

I

rg llr

EAA IA ATAA AAA

.

AAA tr wtr& ANALYSIS DIAGRAM

Black has got rid of the pin and has

consolidated his c6-knight. The immediate threat is ...695. A possible

74

NEWiNCHESS

Strategically, Black seems to be OK, but the kingside weakness becomes quite relevant after 22.Ag5! Wal ZZ.' Af6, followed by Eadl -d3, h2-h4, etc. 19...4xf5 2O.Ad2 Wh4

E

I

gE

'&

sltr

AAA

tr

AAA

if forced to abandon its advanced position, would remain passive and allow White to gain space by a mas-

a

AAA

AAA

The position has become quite inter-

.,,

$m E

A tr

l ar A' lA

I rAA

tr

ll

al I raa fi

I ,l 2\ U

E&

I

/' \ E={

g

E

*

ANAtYSIS DIAGRAM

middlegame.

19...4). 18.4d4 afs

2O.cxd4 6xd4 21.Wxd4 Wxd4 22. 6lxa+ trxd4 B.R He624.a3,with an active bishop pair and a space advantage) 19.a3 axb4 20.cxb 4 Ea6

trE

tr*

19.Axf5

Larsen knew that Fischer treasured the bishop pair and had surely counted on this move. My personal feeling is that it is also the best in the circumstances (which could justify awarding17...0k7 a'?!' rather than a't?' if chess wd.s only about moves and not about emotions).

FISCHER.tARSEN

esting. The evaluation very much depends on whether Black can maintain his apparently shaky position. His main problem is the f5-knight which,

sive pawn advance.

Larsen considers the position to be roughly equal, which is too optimistic, but onlybecause of a concrete detail. 21,.WtL?! Another typical move for Fischer, who usually looked for clearcut plans, avoiding unclear lines unless really necessary. The otherwise el-

egant queen retreat threatens 93, fol-

lowed by f4, with a strong, maybe decisive, kingside initiative. He may simply have overlooked Larsen's answer.

Larsen points out that 21.Wxd5? would lose material to 21...trad8 22.Wc6 6x7. The main alternative (and, as we will see, the strongest move) was 21.Wf3, attacking the knight and preparing to launch the same kind of attack with

93, etc. Larsen analyses 21...695, when White has a choice. ET

EEB

ll

I

I

ll IAAA

AW A AAA A A A

after 25.Axf5 gxf5 26.tre3 f4 27.Hf3 because of back rank problems: 27... tradS 28.Ee1 d429.Axf4dxc3 30.bxc3 6xf4,3 1. Exf4 Exe5!, and Black is even slightly better) 25...d 4r. 26.g4 6ta t.

--=a.

EE

EE-

I

ll

ll

al

tr

tr&

him

a

bit superficial. With the knight

on 95, 22.Wxd5t is entirely possible. Larsen's line continues with 22...trad8 n. Axg5 Wxg5 24.W c6 Ee6 25.W xc7 Ed2 'with good plap In fact, after the obvious 26.4b3 the pressure against fZ restricts Black's possibilities, mak-

ing his compensation for the lost

a

IA A AA AAAS

it comes to concrete variations; in this case, his trademark optimism makes

pawns questionable. !.4

I

H

A

I

ANATYIS DIAGRAM

A very elegant way to neutralize the bishops. Once the f4-square has been

E

I

&

E

I I A I

I raa la

,l{ U

AAAA

tr

AAA

trw€

27-...6tc5!

ANATYSIS DIAGRAM

Making full use of the knights'versatility. The knight takes control of the d3-square, which will prove essential one move later, while the e6-square is cleared for his relatively unstable

22.Wf4 Wxf4 B.9rf4 6Naz+.Adz cs. Larsen assessed this interesting position once again as unclear. At first, I somehow doubted that Black can resist the advance of the kingside pawns sustained by the powerful bishops, but a couple of hours of analysis convinced

colleague.

22.99 Wc4 EE

me that the knights have sufficient

--E

E:-

dynamism to maintain the balance.

ll

rl

I

rATAA \ilu AA AAAA A E

chronically weakened, Black gives up a pawn in order to eliminate the darksquared bishop. 27.9:xr.3 dxe3 28. ANATYSIS DIAGRAM

25.94 Ah4 and 25.f4 h5 are not too dangerous, and the most principled move seems to be 25.R1?, threatening

g2-94.(25.a4 yields little, and Black can react with 25...Eed8!?, preparing ...d4. Compared with the main line, White fails to win the 'weak' f-pawn

Exe3 Ead8. The e6-knight is at least as strong as the remaining bishop, while the control of the only open file gives Black the initiative. Seeing this confirmation of Larsen's evaluation, I more than ever understood why the Soviets regarded him as an

briginal strattgisti

However, Larsen is less accurate when

FISCHER.tARSEN

tr

trw€

A

Without fearing Ad: on the strength of the previous move.

23.Wgztt Fischer must havebeen hypnotized by

the weakness of the dark squares on Black's kingside. When ceding absolute control of the other half of the board to Black, he may have underestimated the communication betrveen the wings. He should have played the less ambi-

NEWIN CHESS

75

tious 23.Wxc4 bxc4, with equal

Consistent, but losing. 29.cxb4? drops

but a high number of letters to the

chances in a complex position.

material to 29...d4. He should have resigned himself to defending the unpleasant endgame after 29.f3bxc3

editor pointing out errbrs should be an alarm signal. In this concrete case Larsen had a highly qualified judge

30.Wxd2 cxd23t.Edl Ae6 32.4f6d4 33.8d3 c5 34.E3xd2 a5.

(his opponent), and managed to pass the exam. Times have changed and players can check their analysis with the computer. However, doing a good job when writing an article remains essential, at least this is what personal experience has taught me. Having published analysis on numerous opening variations over the past years, I have built up a very useful tool when it comes to

23...affi! This is an echo of the line involving the pawn sacrifice ...0)8 from my analysis on the 21st move. After elim-

inating one bishop Black can exploit the weaknesses left behind by White's aggressive pawn play in the opening.

29...bxc3 3O.WhG 6eG

24.Axd3 Wxd3 25.4g5 c6 26.94 ag7

&

rar I

A

A

A

A

AWA €

Finally, Fischer understood that his

attack is not working: 3l.Af6 d4 32.Wxht+ €xh7 33.Eh3+ Who. So

preparing for a game. I simply choose a line according to my mood and usg my own article to prepare. Although we are speaking about players of a completely different level, I feel that once again the universal character of Larsen's attitude is confirmed.

he resigned.

It is already remarkable that

27.He3 The conclusions of the comment on

the 21st move should not make us underestimate Larsens calculating skills. In fact, his sharp tactical skills were an important auxiliary to his original strategic play. In his notes

for

Chess

Informanf, Ivkov unsus-

pectingly recommends 27.8ad1, but Larsen had a deadly trump up his sleeve: 2/...Hxe5! g

27...wd21 The black queen's activity is very annoying. Although occupying an advanced position in the white territory, it hinders White's coordination. Larsen describes the situation very plastically: A little sand has got into the machinery of the attackl

28.b3 White still has some hope. After gh3-h6 and Afo (forcing...6eo) tre will only need to play g4-95 in order to create the deadly threat of WxhZ!+ followed by mate. He just lacks one tempo, though.

28...b41

A strong move on the queenside, which will totally annihilate White's attack.

29.wh3?

76

NEWiNCHISS

Summing up this memorable game, we can say that Larsen used a toy to kill a giant. Fischer famously hated losing, but howwould he have reacted if he had been told that the variation chosen by Larsen was for amateurs?!

1966

booklet played such

a

Larsen's

role in the

Baguio match, but his match book continued the trend. More than any-

thing examined so far, the following comment certainly has a prophetic character.

There are two interesting aspects

connected

to this

paradoxical

situation.

First of all, I would refer to Tal's comment (and display of modesty) 'We are all amateursi This pun seems to be working in many languages, by the way. Indeed, aficionado, dilettante, liubitel' and amateur all refer to someone who likes and derives pleas-

H

,e

IA

I

{lll Er

I

[email protected]

lll

rAla

aa,\

A

2l 2tH

tr

A

-!t-

)\ q)

AAA

ure from some activity. Larsen probably fell in love with the variation he had worked on and could not resist using it when given the chance, without thinking about the risk involved. Secondly, I cannot help thinking of

This position was reached in the fourth game after l4...Ahs. It was supposed to be dubious in view of

Botvinnik's way to

1s.ags

assess

the poten-

tial for progress of (already) strong grandmasters. According to the Patriarch, it is essential to publish articles

and books in order to let the public judge the correctness of the analysis. If the readers r&main silent, it means that the work has been done properly,

FISCHER-LARSEN

AWtr

Karpov played the modest 15.h3, and the game ended in a draw after 15... EeS 16.Af4 6yc6 t7.Ad2

&e p.Adz.

hcs rs.Aflt

15...wd7 15...Axf3 16.Wxf3 Wxg5 17.Wxd5 was known to slightly favour White

since the game Bronstein-Flohr, Moscow 1944.

care, taking into account the permanent danger ofa sacrifice on h7.

black knight has problems finding a good slluare, while the e-pawn is a

The main contours of the prophecy came true nine years later, when Kortchnoi himself played two games illustrating both sides of the issue.

real killer.

Two rounds later, Kortchnoi used a similar algorithm to Larsen's to rehabilitate the variation.

16.4e3 The old analysis went 16...6e6? t7.Axh7+!+ €xh7 18.Ags+ €96 19.Wd3+, winning. Larsen had given

this line in the booklet, but later discovered an improvement for Black:

Htibner-Korlchnoi Tilburg lnterpolis 1987 (3) position ofter I 6...6xe7

L6...ka4 The above tactical operation does not work now because Black would have the defence t9...Wf5 at the end. Since the b2- and e5-pawns are hanging, Larsen considered the position to be quite OK for Black.

In fact, things are less simple and White can keep an advantage.

17.wd3 age maintains the pressure against both pawns, but after 18.4h6 the king is exposed and the h5-bishop may 17...96

This tabiya, arising from the 9...6c5 variation but featuring the same materialbalance as in Larsen's line, enjoyed a period of popularity, mainly because of Kortchnoi's effort. Previously, Hjar-

L7...6e4t

tarson had tried 17.48 against him, but found himself struggling after

Black has excellent compensation for the pawn and went on to win an

17...6a4. When the next move was played, Kortchnoi failed to notice the difference.

instructive rook ending.

L7.b4 o,a4? 18.Axh7+ €xh7

ing a small detail of a linguistic nature. I have in my library several translations of Larsen's 50 Selected Games (in English, Spanish and Russian),

get into danger if it is not exchanged

for the f3-knight soon. White's main threat is We3-f4, whereas the b2-pawn is not too important.

18.9d2 White has parried the immediate threats and Black has problems finding a good reply to the planned b2-b3.

What we see here is the reverse of the lines after the 21st move in the Santa Monica game. Larsen managed to make the position playable from a tactical point of view; but strategically speaking he failed to sense the dangers.

What Kortchnoi had planned against 15. Ag5 remains an open question, but the lesson to be learned from Larsen's comment is that Black has to choose the retreat squares for his knight with

A.Sokolov-Kortchnoi Tilburg lnterpolis 1987 (51 position otter 17.b4

19.eG and Black resigned!! 19...fxe6 is obviously bad because of 20.4\g5+ &96 21.g4, but the real point is that the

third rank is not blocked: tg...Axf: 2o.Wd3+ Ae4 21.Wh3+!, winning the queen. The elements that made this combination{possible are closely related to Keres's description: the

FISCHER.TARSEN

Simply preventing the sacrifice.

18.Axe4 dxe4 19.Wxd7 ExdT 20.ag5 Age Zt.e6 Ed3 22.ext7+ AxfT 23.4\xe4 Ads

I cannot conclude without mention-

which has facilitated my understanding of all the nuances of the text. On the Baguio match, however, I only had the Dutch edition. As a teenager I had quite good German and combined with more careful reading, this proved enough to understand about 75 per cent of the Dutch text, which is more or less equivalent to the pure chess content. Shortly before writing this article, a friend lent me the English version for a few days, and I soon realized the significance of the missing25 per cent. Together with his lor,e for and deep knowledge of chess, it is the refined humour of this outstanding player and highly cultured person that makes his comments so unique.

r

unwiucnrss zz

\

of the FIDE Women Grond Prix in Kozon, the copitol of the Russion Republic of Totorston, ended in o shored win for the

The fourth leg

only two ployers thot remoined undefeoted, Humpy Koneru from Indio ond Anno Muzychuk from Slovenio. In the overoll GP stondings World Chompion Hou Yifon is in the leod, oheod of Muzychuk. With two tournoments to go the Chinese top-seed, who finished shored third in Kozon, remoins the cleor fovourite, olthough severol ployers con continue to cherish hope. Among them ore Koneru ond Muzychuk, who onnototed their best efforts f rom the 4th GP for us.

victory to catch the early leader, Elina Danielian.

1-.c4 e5 2.83 AcG

3.6c3

gG 4.

7...axb{ 8.axb4 0'O 9.d3 tre8 The plan behind this move is to threaten ...e4 against White's Af3.

Agz Agt 5.trb1 EO

r5.13-A25

Koleryno [ohno Humpy Koneru Kozon 201219) After the Gibraltar tournament I took a break for four months. I felt playing in the Women's World Rapid and Blitz in Batumi just before the Grand Prix in Kazan was like a warm-up. In the first seven rounds of the Grand Prix, I made six draws and won one game, against the tail-ender of the event. After so manydraws mywin in Round 8 against Antoaneta Stefanova felt like rain in mid-summer.

A )( ]

I

L

AA AA AAAAA

trAW€ atr

Rather than going for the regular d3, 6f: kind of positions, White opts for an early queenside roll.

10.b5 I think tO.AgS

is an interesting alternative, e.g. 10...h6 tt.AxfA Axfe l,Z. 6fi Ag713.0-0 d6 14.bs Ee7 rs.Q-d2 e4l6.W c2 e3 17 .fxe3 6f5, rvhich ulti-

After the rest day I played against

5...a5 6.a3 atB 7.b4 7.d3 0-01S.6fa d6 9.0-0 h6 10.b4 matelyledtoadrawinSchaller-Hein-

Lahno Kateryna. This was a crucial

would lead to the main

KAZAN

lines.

emann, Gladenbach 1997.

NEW iN CHESS

79

LO...6e7 L1,.atg I didnt like this move and would have preferred Ll.e4, keeping the centre under control, e.g. 11...d6 12.6ge2 Ae6 13.0-0 c6, with equality.

11...d5 This I played instantly. To be honest,

I didnt

calculate what would hap-

pen after l2.orl,le5, assuming that this position should do well for Black.

L2.cxd5? Kateryna spent more than 30 minutes on this move. Meanwhile I started to go deeper into the position and actuallyfound thatl2.6)xe5 is an interesting try. Let's have a look l2.6xe5r.? 6y+ n.a+t (13.f4 6xe5 14.fxe5 Axe5 l5.da Ag7 16.cxd5 6fS is excellent for Black) 13... 6xe5 14.dxe5 Afs ts.e+ Axe5:

L2...D-:exd5 13.6xd5 B.Abz doesnt change the fate of the position. After 13...6)xc3 14. Axc3 6ds ts. Abz e+ we have transposed to the game.

13...Axd5 Black has taken the initiative. The only question is in which way White is going

to surrender?

L4.gb2

L4.W c2 is also met by I4...e4 15.dxe4 6ca, with a black advantage.

18...Ea2! Due to my opponent's inaccuracies I have managed to build up an edge without much effort. My two bishops and rooks are doing their jobs perfectly, whereas \,Vhite is having several

Now 16.axd5 AxdS 17.cxd5 Ac3+

problems:the pawn on b5 is weak, the king has to be secured and of course the rook on hl is yet to wake up. 19.h4 An obvious move to make space for the kirg.

18.4d2 Axe4 19.0-0 Axg2 20.Axc3 Ee4 is clearlybetter for

Clearly worse was 19. trbzzt.trcl Exb5.

ANAtYSIS DIAGRAM

Axfi 21.&xfl Black.

L4...e41 15.dxe4 Ac3 16.Wxd8

After 16.0-0! at least White is not worse:16...dxe4 17.6lr,le4 Wxdl 18. trxdt Ea4 l9.Abz Axb2 2o.trxbZ &g7 21.0)c5 Exc4 22.6xb7 6c8,

Black is much better after l6.Axc3

with equal chances.

go xrwEncnnss

Axc3+ 17.&fl Wxdl+ 18.Exd1 Exe4 1e.h4 Eb4.

16...trxd8 ! 7.Axc3 Axc3+

18.9f1

KAZAN

Ecl

Hc2

2}.trbl

19...trb2 2O.Ec1 A critical moment in the game. Now the time has come to take a decision: whether to capture the b5-pawn or to maintain the pressure on the 7th (or 2nd, if you will) rank.

Y

AEB I I ll I A AA E AA E AAA gE

tr

27...treB After ZZ...Eag Black wins a-pawn in all variations: 28. €g2 A-xe2 29. 9xe2 Exe2 30.6c5 Ea5 31.4d3 Exe4, or 28.6)c5 Eaa2 29.&92 Edc2 30.Exc2 Hxc2 31.4b3 Axe2 32.Axe2 Exe2 33.trf1 Exe4. However, my plan is to place the rook on e5 and to start rolling the passed c-pawn.

22...trcd2 The tricky 22...Hb2 doesn't work here, as after 23.trxb2 trdt t was dis-

24.98

(imagine

20...Hc2l

appointed seeing

At first I intended to take the pawn on b5, but then I thought this would

this position with the pawn on h2,

release the tension in White's position: 20... Exb5 21.Exc3 Ebt+ 22.0k1

Ah:+) 24...ExeL+ 25.*92 trxhl

trddl n.&gr Exel+ 24.&h2 Exht+

23.trc7-Aa5 24.6,d3 Ac4

ZS.Axhl

when White would be lost

28.D.c5 treS 29.6b3 trb2

d:ue

to 24... 26.

Ec2, which leads to equaliry

c6.

ll

I

EB

ll

&

a/1

tL/\

I I I

AAA

-iE-

squares.

[-l

AA EA

The knight doesn't have proper

L-l

AA

tr €E

3O.Ec3 As 30.6a1 runs into 30...f5 31.exf5 trxf5 32.€92 Axe2 fi.Axe2 Exf2+, and Black should be winning.

30...c5

37,.Q:c7-

c4

Threatening 25... Axd 3 26.exd3 AUO.

25.4f3 Axb5

I considered this position

as playable for White, even though I have

two connected passed pawns on the queenside. It would not be easy to roll them, for instanc e 26.f4 f6 27 . Af3 &fz zs.g+ h6 29.&93 &e7 3o.Ee3 95 31.e5 gxf4+ 32.&xf4 Eb++ ::. Ee4 fxe5+ 34.€xe5, and Black has achieved nothing. 21,.trb1, AeG 22.0-:eL

EB

I I AI 8 AA EA E AAA ll

tr a€tr

During the game I was not at all interested in playing with opposite-coloured bishops: 25...4xd3 26.exd3 AAe zl.Ae2 Ea8 28.f4 Eaa2 29.trh2 Edb2, although this position clearly favours Black, too.

26.6,c5 I wanted to hold on to the bishop pair at the cost of a pawn.

26...AbG 27.0-txb7

,\ q) 6 A ---

32.&92? A serious mistake. After this White cannot avoid losing material. She should have played 32.8a3 Ac5 33.Ea8+ EeS 34.tra5 h5 35.&g2 c3 36.trd1 Ec8, although here, too, she would be in for a hard time.

I AA

AA

32...4c5!

EIAA

tr t€ -a==1_'r\/\

KAZAN

tr

White's pieces are stuck. The rook on c3 and the knight don't have any elbow room.

NEW iN CHESS 8

I

Intending to place the bishop on el, attacking the base of the pawn

33.h5 Ab4 34.Ee3 Ec2

ll

AEr\ ET A

&

structure.

47.&tL Ad6 48.trc6 Ab4 49.tra6 I decided not to commit my pawns

I

too early, as pawn exchanges might give White chances to hold. Now I am

trying to get the king to the centre. I wanted to try all other plans before moung my pawns.

trAA

E AAg

atr

The white king cannot move, as it

35.4b3 cxb3 36.Exb3 Ae7 37. hxg6 hxg6 38.e3 €gZ 39.trhb1 AcG 40.tr3b2 trxb2 41,.Hxb2

needs to stop ...4e1.

64.trb3 After 64.94 (with the idea of 95)

Axe4 42.Axe4 trxe4 43.trc2

64...

95 the blackking marches towards the -

f2-pawn.

64...Hc2 65.trb5 €c6 66.trb8 €d5 67.Ec8 &e4 68.9g2 &d3 69.&f1 Ec1+ 70.&92 &e2 77..

Ar& I

trc6 Ab2 72.HeG

49...trd2 s0.trb6 Ac3 51.Ec6 Ae5 S2.tra6 EdG 53.Ea7 &fG 54. trb7 tra6 55.€92 €e6 56.trb4

E

E

tr

AA A*

trll

Ac3 57.trc4 Ae5 58.trb4 €f5 59.trb5 tra2 60.€f3 *eG 61.€92

Ac3 It is clear that Black has material enough

for

a

win, but must still find

a

plan to

break Whitet structure.

43...trb4 44.&t1,af6 45. g g2 Hb2

46.trc4 Ae7

82

NEW iN CHESS

A quickerwayto winwas 61.-trb262. Ec5 f5 63.€fl gs 6a.&g2 g4 6s.&ft Ado oo. Ea5 Hc2 67.&g2 Ac5 68. Ea6+ €ds 09.trf6 *e5 7O.Ec6 *e4

A

AA

E

&Ag

7r.Ha6 AA+zz.tra4Eb2.

62.€f1 &d6 63.trb7 f6

KAZAN

7

2...trc2 Simplest

was

7

2...8f1.

game of Antoaneta, White played14. hxf6+ instead of 14.€b1. So basically the current position was a bit new for both of us, as I did not have anygames

73.t4 €e1+ 74.&13 &t1, 75.94 tr12+ 76.*g9 Or 76.&e4 Ee2 77.g5 fs+ ZS.€dS Edz+ 79.&c6 &f2, andwins.

76...4c3 We were approaching the final timecontrol with a minute each left on our clocks.

77.95 f5 78.trx96

in this line either.

cK r 2.3 - BI9 Annq Muzychuk Antoqnelo Slefqnovq Kozon 2012 (2)

14...trd8 15.Axf6+ Axf6

tr

12.0-O-O

IA

A A

Ae7

ll

EA€ H

I

H

&

AA

l ra

I){

utr hh

deserves attention and is probably

844

AA

tr

even stronger than the move I played. The idea of 16. 6e5 is that Black cannot

tr

play 16...c5 nowinviewof tz.Wbs+.

mate) 81...Egl 82.&h2 Eg2+ 83.9h3 mate.

79.€h3 €91 With the idea of 80...Eh2+ 81.€93 Ael+ 82.&B Hfz+ 83.€g3 Eft+ 84.€h3 Ef3 mate, or the direct 80... Ael, threatening 81...Eh2 mate. 79...E;91also leads to a mating net: 80.€h2 Ael 81.e4 Ag3+ 82.&h3 €fz ga.exf5 trhl+ ra.&ga Eh4 mate. 80.e4 lxe4 81.tre6 4e182.f5 82.Exe4loses to 82...Eg3+ 83.&h4 Ee3+, and 82.Ee8 is met by 82...9:f2, and wins.

tr

16.We2 is another interesting possibility, played by strong players as Vallejo, Xie |un and Hou Yifan. It surely

A

€g1 8a.Eh7 trhz

AA

16.6e5

J{

n

AA

BrN a5=

E

aAll

t ]

AA

a

sltr E'

4

78...H92+ Instead, 78...4e1!! leads to a mating net: 79.Hf6 Eg2+ 80.€h3 trg4 81.Eh6 (81.Exf5 runs into S1...Eh4

uu

a

Ege

a rl.t{

E

Arr I rA I it

ll

3.4c3 dxe4 4. axe4 afs 5.4g3 ag6 6.h4 h6 7.at3 6d7 8.h5 ah7 9.4d3 Axd3 1O.Wxd3 e6 11.4d2 agt6

1,.e4 cG 2.d4 d5

E

[email protected]

16...0-0 L7.at4 ads 18.493 wb6

13.€b1 Antoaneta had never faced the move 13.&b1, but this line of the Caro-Kann has many transpositions.

L9.c4 E

ll gr

Usually Black plays 13...0-0. The textmove, 13...Wc7, is a rare continuation,

especially followed by 1a...trd8, but this was what I had expected, as after B.De4 Stefanova played a game in which she carried out the same plan.

1,4.ke4 This position could

E&

g

13...Wc7

Arr I I ts:

,\ A q)

A

/\&&/'\

$tr EI

AA

also

arise from the move order 8.6-:le4 Wc7 14.&b1. In the aforementioned



/fr E

AA

trE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 I9loll12

E

I

TPR

IGM SLO 2598 V2 * V2V2V2V2VIV2 I I I I

AA

4

Elino Dqnielion Tationq Kosintsevo nq Lohno 8

I

& : Eh4 mate, White resigned.

*lllV2lV2l

lGMARM2484V2V2V2OO xllV2

i IGM RUS 2532

,g.'Aiird 83...

2623V2V2O

GM

6 7

.:

Cb

82...Hh2+ And as 83.&g is now met by

Hou Yifqn

O* I

0 101

I lGMUKR2546OV2V2V2 100*V2V2 lV2 '.2sle o o-V2 o V2V2V2Vr * l V2V2 V2V2V2 O V2

V2V2V2

loNodezhdoKosinlsevo IGM RUS 2528 V2OO1/2 I OV2V2O * lVz IlAliscGqlliqmoVo',r':, '';6'-'RUS,'2482.0 Or O O O lV2OV2O * I t2Betul CemreYitdiz wGMTUR 2333 0 0 0 I O 0 0Vzvzl/zO * 1

,._,.a,.....'..,

KAZAN

,

7V2

2651

7

2620

6

2553 2517 2481

5Y2 5

4V2 4V2

3 2t/2

2452 2452 234,2 23o,6

.

nswEucHEss gg

L9...4b4?

26.4c7

A novelty, which was found over the board. Still, it looks as if the knight goes into the wrong direction. The

Now White gets a large advantage, as Black doesnt have enough time to coordinate her pieces.

correct move is 19...6f6.

EB

20.9b3?! Objectively speaking, 20.Wf: is a better move, but during the game I

llAaArr 22.Wxfr+ €hs

2l.dxc5 Exdt+ 22.trxdl trd8l glack

edge.

equalizes.

21,...trxdl+ 22.trxd1 WaS 23.a3 B.6xf8leads to a draw by perpetual

2O...trxd4 After 20...c5 White

slightly better endgame with comfortable and easy play: 21.a3 2Xs zz.Wxbo 6xbO 23.dxc5 Axc5 24.&c2. gets a

ll grl AAE

sltr EI

AA

gtr

[email protected]

A ll

I

a A

H

AA t_l

tr

27,.6d7 I was very surprised when

I

28.trdl wf++. 23...gf5 + 24.&aL Q:c2+ 25.&a2

been a foregone conclusion.

aAll ll gAI A AWA €AA AA

AA &E

Au& E

t_l

25...trd8? Probably the decisive mistake. As said, she should have played 25... Ee8!. The difference'compared to

AA

WA

AA

E

Play might continue 21...Efd8 (\tVhite

is also slightly better after 21... Exdt+ 22.trxdl Wc5 23.a3 6)a6 24. Adz Wxc4 2s.6xf8 €xf8 26.4e5)

AA

the game is that the bishop stays on 93 (and does not go to c7) and now, after f3, White does not threaten 94. For instance, 26.Wxb7 Dtxa3 27.4\5 (27 .bxa3z. Wc2+) 27 ...6)c2 28.6xc6

Ag5 29.Wd7 EaS, and White is probably better after 30.€b3. But it would be quite

in

a

difficultto make such a move

tournament game.

KAZAN

AA

tr

26...Ee8 Maybe 26...8c8 would have been a better practical choice: 27.Wxb7 Ee8 (before playing 26.6c7 I could not

find the refutation of Zl...Exc7 for some time, until I finally saw that the queen returns to b3 and White is win'-

ning: 28.Wxc7 Wga29.Wbs+ &hz 30.trd2 Wxc4+ at.Wb3; 27...Wg4 does not work either: 28.Wxc8+ €h7 29.6f8+ Axfs 30. gd8 Wxc4+ 31.b3,

followed by 32.Wd3+, exchanging the queens) 28.Wxc6 WxD 29.4d6!, and

White is winning. 27.13

E&

llAaErr ll

gAI

n

A

AWA &AA-

H

ANAtYSIS DIAGRAM

ge mwixcHrss

A\

L

U

E&

Arr ll

E&

ll

saw

cross mymind.

AAE

z+.We2, with a white

check 23...Wf5+ 24.&cl Ag5+ 25.f4 Axfa+ 26.gxf4Wxf++ 27.trd2 Wfi+

21.Wf3! suggested by the engine. Analysis shows that White is better in all lines. Still,losing a tempo, while giving a pawn - this idea did not even

ll gr

.&hz n.Wg6+)

rook and the b7-pawn are hanging, and the knight on c2 also seems to be in danger. I thought that the position was already much better for me, but I was wrong. If Black had played 25... Ee8 now, the result would not have

a

ll

t_l

n.WB &hl

(22..

Here I was very satisfied with my position, which I had seen when playrng 20. gb3. White has excellent compensation for the sacrificed pawn: Black's

Et

gAI

ll

wanted to defend the a2-pawn, which maybe hanging in some lines. Weak is 20.We4?, when after 20...c5

A

H

Now it is difficult for Black to complicate the game. If she doesnt want to put the queen on h7, she will have to sacrifice

a

piece.

27...g:95 Also losin g are 29

.bxc6 and

...b5 28.cxb5 6xa3 6)xa3 28.bxa3 WxhS

27

27 ...

29.Wxb7.

28.94 wh7 29.t4 29.6e5 was also a good option,

putting the knight in the centre and preparing Ed7.

29...Ah4 30.trd2 6-teL El

llAa

[email protected]

I I

Au&

ll

I

A A

AA .5LA

A

Atr A

t__l El

31.We3 The idea of this move is to centralize the queen and defend the e4-square, as Blackwanted to play...We4. But even stronger was 31.f5! exf5 32.Wxb7 fxg4 33.He2, andwins. 31.Wxb7? was bad inview of 31...6f3.

31...bG 32.6e5 c5

l A ll

E&

ll

la A Ag gAtr

33...493 34.6cG Also strong was 34.f5 ? Axe5

4O.Wxe1

Axe5 exf5 36.493!, and wins.

Much more precise was 40.6xe8 6f3 4l.A)xc7 Sxdz 42.6xe6+, but pressed

34...95 35.hxg6 fxg6 36.4e5

by time-trouble

35.

I took the wrong

piece.

I A

[email protected]

IA I

AA Jt-A A

ira

/\JL

35.Wa4 b5 36.cxb5 We4 37.8xh4, which looks like winning for White, but with some complications.

Clearly bad was 33.Wh3? We4 34.Wxh4 f6, and White has achieved nothing.

This loses outright. More stubborn

was 40...trd8. Initially I thought that 41.Ef2 was winning, but then Black has the trick 41...4g3!, when

I ll

Aa A AA

after 42.4:hl+ she can simply play a2...&g8 and the position is no longer that clear. This is why White should play 4l.Ee2, maintaining a huge

AtrW A

33.We2! There were different possibilities to win a piece immediately but then I would have to put the queen or a rook on h4, where they would be 'out of playi This would give Black time to organize some counterplay: 33.8h2 6)c2 34.WU:t (going for the bishop with 34.Wc3? is not good, as in a few moves I would face problems with my own bishop: 34...6d4 35.Exh+ EcS 36.4d6 Ed8, and there is no escape and Black saves the draw) 34...Dld4

40...g:t+

Et

advantage.

4L.Hd7 Ee7 42.Hd8+ *97

36...9s Black cannot take the bishop, 36...Wxc7, because of 37.EdZ with 38.We4 and mate.

37.ad7 Wf7 38.fxg5 AxcT 39. 6f6+ &f8

43.We4 hxgS

I

tr

I

Es

lAg I IA ra AA A

Atrgd KAZAN

I

I A

E uv&

LA

A

$Itr e

I U'1

-

A

€A 44.DhS+ Black resigned, as after 44...th6 15. Ehs+ itt all over.

r

xnwEncnrss gs

[uke McShone ndrew Soltis's What

it

Takes to Become a

Chess

Master has,

as

chess books go, an

intriguing title. In

a

subtle way, it promises rather a lot. Just what might we expect to find inside? A sort of 'Novice

to Pro in 24 hourslperhaps? Nothing of the sort - this is a book aimed at experienced players keen to take the next step. Nor is it a book suggesting that masters have some distinctive attitude to the game which differentiates them from other players. There is no special sauce for chess expertise. If anything, it's more like compost - a collection of fertile concepts which will matter in the long term. I really like the book, and although it is not directly comparable, in some ways it reminded me of one I found useful some time ago - Iohn Nunn's Secrets of Practical Chess, which stood out for its collection of well-illustrated themes, often bringing to my atten-

seem to me very well chosen - here is one from the chapter entitled'What Matters Mosti To quote Soltis (slightly abridged): 'The biggest difference between you and a master is not his deep opening knowledge. It is not his endgame skill. Or his ability to calculate further. The

Wxc5+ n.&fl. But 23...Wf5 is annoying. It stands to reason that if tactics are the problem White should take steps to eliminate them. He began with the unassuming 27,.&gLl

biggest difference is that he knows

the previous diagram. But the position is no longer double-edged. White has a serious edge. What made the difference? Of course, itt the white kirg. It is now out of checking range. Once the king is no longer a factor, there'S something else that matters most, the insecure Black king and pawns.'

what he wants... A master looks at the board and knows what kind of position hed like to play two or three moves from now. That's hard for non-masters to do because in any position there are so many things to weigh. There is material to count, king safety to evaluate, weak squares to consider, as well as good and bad bishops, outposts for knights, and so on...

might gain confidence if there is

a

perpetual check to fall back on. As a much younger player, I had until then assumed that most attacks fell into two categories - brilliancies if they ended in mate, and misguided flailing otherwise. The idea that an attack could be

fully justified even if it was not destined to end in victory was an impor-

I really like this example, for a couple of reasons. Firstly, it is a great

Ei6

example of the theme of 'what matters most'. In many ways king safety

H

EIE

l&l

is a more subtle concept than, for example, pawn structures or colour

rAll

complexes, perhaps because it's more

Adoms-Rodiobov

bound up with the question of timing, which indeed involves understanding what matters most in a given position. Secondly, itt the sort of thing that is very difficult to learn from a computer. Mine suggests there are manymoves of similar merit in the above diagram, but

Enghien-les-Boins 2003

to my mind the continuation which

position ofter 2O...&eZ

Mickey chose is clearlythe correct one.

AA

trtr

Arh EE

A A

W€A

A

'Black has weaknesses all over his side

of the board. But it's hard to get

at

cln avert this with 21. Ac4 and then 21...Ac5 22.Axc5+

ment on move 28 homed in on the most important feature of the posi-

which is intended to illustrate thinking about things that might add a little extra to your game. The examples

NEW EN CHLSS

The principle of looking for what matters most in a given position is

2l.Axc5+ Wxc5+ n.&fL he has n...Wb4!, attacking the f- and ba way of

book divides into nine chap-

them because he also has targets to attack, at b2 and f2, and he can use the n-b6 diagonal tactically. For instance, if he is allowed to play 21...4c5 and

ters, each based around a concept

86

Black resigned just half a dozen moves

later.

an important one. Apart from Soltis's selection of examples, another which springs to mind can be found in my annotations to my game with Aronian in New In Chess 20l2ll, where |on Speelmans suggested improve-

tant realization. Soltis's

three more or less routine moves since

'Here's an example:

tion new ideas or ways of looking at the game. For example, one lesson that sticks in my mind is the idea that a player launching into an attack

Then came 21,...Ac5 22.Axc5+ Wxc5+ 23.€h1 White has played

pawns. White

THROUGH THE TUKING GTASS

tion, while ignoring the conventional wisdom about leaving rooks behind passed pawns.

Soltis is a strong advocate of studying well-annotated master games, and I suspect that annotations such as those that appear in New In Chess helped inspire many of his examples. Good notes, as Soltis explains (as opposed to very brief symbolic notes), help to

reveal a lot of important subtleties which you might otherwise miss. The difficulty can lie in knowing what to look for in those games, and in many ways that seems to inspire the content in this book - the things which masters take for granted, but which others may struggle to understand. These are ideas to digest and absorb slowly,

and in practice will depend on a good knowledge of many other aspects to be used well. For example, the concept of 'Winnability'is an important one - an advantage is all very well, but is it big enough to win? Sometimes a position 'wins itselfi but others require a more

active prosecution of the advantage.

Another notable point which Soltis makes, is that'it is usually easier to win with a substantial positional advantage than with an equally substantial mate-

rial advantage.' Clearly, it's not feasible to prove the truth of that, but I can

of quiz exercises which highlight the theme under discussion, and here is one from the aforementioned'Winnability'chapter.

I IE

t&]

A

E rr&I A

€A

A

point, and often under-appreciated, but I also suspect that a certain type of player may start'seeing' little tactics everywhere, when there are none to be had. As with all good ideas, it should

be consumed as part of a balanced

position ofter 36...o5

type of work, one whose appeal grew on me more gradually than Soltis's book. The subject, chess intuition, is

consider first? And does it work?' I futty agree that White should look at 1.Ed5 first, which forces play into a pawn endgame which may well be winning for White. However, I disagree with Soltis's implication that the move leads to a win. After 37.trd5 trxdS 38.exd5 *g6? was a lemon, perhaps played in time-trouble. Af-

fiendish one, which Beim acknowledges right from the start. Like great a

art, a lot of people would say'I know

ter 39.bxa5! bxaS 40.&d3 &fG 41,.&c4 &e7 was forced, as 41...€e5

The Enigmo of Chess lntuition

42.&c5 wins. Then 41.€b5 leads to a win. But it seems to me that 38...axb4!

New ln Chess, 2012

wouldhave savedthe draw- the essential difference is that after 39.axb4 &96

€fO +t.€c4 €e5 t'A/hite cant promotes

just in time.

Besides the catalogue of well chosen examples, there was the odd occasion where I disagreed with Soltis's conclusions. Each chapter ends with. a series

tle Tactics' emphasizes the importance of small tactical operations to achieve short-term strategic goals. It's a good

Valeri Beim's new book The Enigma of Chess Intuition is a very different

*xd5 43.€xb6 f5! Black

appreciate the wisdom of it much more keenly than a less experienced version of myself might have done.

is

Gurevich-Adorion .l988 Akureyri

advance to c5. Instead after 42.&b5

Andrew Soltis Botsford, 2O12

in this book

ripe for misinterpretation should not count as a criticism. A chapter on'Lit-

diet...

Soltis asks'What move should White

40.€ff

Whqt lt Tqkes to Become o Chess Mqsler

On the other hand, the fact that some of the material

Still, the majority of quiz questions, like the examples, struck me as well chosen, and often feature useful echoes of the illustrative examples. I also learned of a few novelties such as the concept of 'priyomesl which is apparently a Russian word used to describe the technique that is appropriate for a particuIar pawn structure. Most players will be familiar with examples of these, such as in a Benoni structure, when White plays e4-e5t. d6xe5 f4-f5!, but the idea of a general label fotr such ideas speaks of a particular approach to the game.

THROUGH THE TUKING GtASS

Voleri Beim

it when I see it', but what really under-

pins it? In this book Beim sets himself the task of trying to understand that better, and indeed how we might make use of that (as hinted at by the

occultist subtitle 'Can you Mobilize Hidden Forces in Your Chess?'). Particularly in the opening chapter, this investigation takes on a rhetorical tone at times, and the style can make for heavy reading. It is a bit unfair of me to take these sentences out of context, but let me do so anyway: 'What-

ever the situation, the approach to it begins with a survey of the position. Then, on the basis of that survey, we can draw a conclusion as to the prop-

erties of the position.' You could be

forgiven for wondering r+,hat that actually means, and it took some per-

NEW iN CHESS

87

severance to persuade myself that this

initially cautious investigation was going somewhere. Let me first point out that whether or not you agree with Beims ideas about chess intuition, there is a lot to enjoy in this book. The meat of the

book sees Beim examining his ideas by looking at a great number of toP level games. Many of the games (by the way, a pleasing blend of old and

new) were familiar to some extent, but the emphasis on intuition brings a fresh angle, and Beim is a passionate annotator. A nice example of his honest approach can be found in his comments to the game Spassky-Tal, where

tion, which partly helps to make sense of those elliptical lines which I highlighted from the introduction. To a sceptic, that might sound hardly more informative, but it leads on to the interesting conclusion that good intuition consists in an accurate examination of the position, which is intertwined with the calculation of short-range tactics. In many ways, that is a surpris-

mate connection with tactics is initialty surprising. Nevertheless, Beim's argument is carefully considered and

I felt, although it is dif-

the more authoritative. (The positions in question are difficult to evaluate, so reaching a definitive conclusion is not

commenting on Smyslov's qualities as a player (and implicitly, an intuitive one), wrote that: 'He possesses a filigree accuracy and

the outward signs of the phenomenon. However, I do not think this is sufficient..l He goes on to try to get at the mechanics of intuition, and takes the view that superior intuition resides in

a superior examination of the posi-

thought, but at the same time, a close

This struck me as a particularly astute observation: 'I suggest that the ability to react well to an opponent's prepared noveltyis to a large extent a function of intuition. Why? Because to replywell to a strong prepared novelty often requires a great deal, if not an impossible amount of

calculation work. And in addition, it requires correct assessments of very complicated positions, arising at the end of the lines calculated, if the player manages to get that far. In other words,

it is a task which is often extremely difficult and virtually impossible to achieve by the "normal" means of cal-

culation and assessment. And then, as we know the heroine of our book steps forward - intuitionl In his final section, 'The Elements of Chess Intuition', Beim writes that 'we have onlybecome acquainted with

88

NEWENCHESS

some frrller notes than I have here: I

E

AE

ll AA AA

THROUGH THE LUKING GTASS

gl

HA

ficult to do it justice by summarizing it. He neatly points out that Kramnik,

his ideas come into bei[g "millimetre by millimetre'l To some extent, Smyslov was the creator of that style,which was then developed brilliantly by Karpov: a gradual increase in the positional pressure, based on the calculation of short variations, performed with the accuracy of an apothecaryt weightsi It is not easy to do justice to Beim's ideas in these few short paragraphs, but this book strikes me as an unusually thoughtful one. The subject is difficult and the book takes some time to get into its stride, but Beim has made a greateffort to come up with a coherent theory of intuition, and there is plenty to enjoy along the way. Can this book help you to mobilize hidden forces in your chess? Beim returns to this question quite late in the book, and makes the following point: 'Given that our researches in this book have established that the basis of intuition is a complex of examining the position and short-range tactics, the only sensible recommendation, in which I am firmly convinced, is to look at how to train these two abilitiesl This ilrlght seem like a bit of an after-

Moreover, Beim makes some

out a feeling of wonder.' Beim offers

closely related to 'feel' and'judgement' (indeed, the words are sometimes used interchangeably), that to claim an inti-

persuasive,

insightful comments along the way.

probablyhave helpedyou along the way. Let me finish with a charming exalnple about which Beim writes: 'I cannot count the number of times I have seen it, but even now, I cannot look at it with-

ing conclusion to reach. Intuition is so

he explains why he disagrees with the view of Kasparov and Tal, while acknowledging that their views are

straightforward.)

study of the games in this book will

Tol-Trifunovic Polmo de Mollorco '1966

position ofter 44...f6

45.e6!l Axe6 We can trust that the bishop or rook endings reached after ' 45...h2 or 45...€xe6 are comfortably winning for White. 46.tra7 + Ad7 E

I

trA& ll A

)<

L 'l

r\B&

/

\

€r

A E

47.*h2ll

For Beim, what makes this

such a powerful intuitive decision from Tal is that he decided to keeP calculating in this position - not giving up on the idea of 45.e6!! just because

it involves

a retreat. Having

heard the 'inner voice' to keep looking, the rest fits into place beauti-

fully. 47...trh5 48.b5! trxcS 49.

Axh3 f5 5o.bxc6 Exc6 51.Axf5 trdG 52.*93! and the pawn endgame is easily won: 52...&eB 53. ExdT ExdT 54.Axd7+ &xd7 55.*g4 €eG 56.€95 €f7 57.€fs Black resigned.

r

lr

A novel queen relreql

EAA EAA

ll

\ili/

1 rh

5-

I

AA AA tr

I

AW€

!4, I

ll I

In this SOS column we will examine a popular line of the French Tarrasch in which top grandmasters have recently discovered a novel queen retreat. Our SOS starts as early as move sixl 7-.e4 eG 2.d4 d5 3.4d2 c5 4.exd5 Here 4.Dlg3 cxd4 5.exd5 Wxd5 is the

)\ q)

alternative move order.

AAA tr

4...Wxd5 5.Agf3 cxd4 6.4c4

EAA EAAE lll ll I \lil/ AT AA

AE

,\ q) AAA

trAWEE 6...wd7!?

A quite astonishing move in a position in which most players would

6lb3 2lc6 9.Ags a6 10.0-0-0 bs 11. - play is more 'Sicilian than 'French'. White has a lead in development, but Blacks position is sound) 7 ...af6 8. Ab3 6rc6 g.hbxda 6xd4 (with the queen on d7 Black has the additional option of playing

Ada Aez

9...4c5 here - as, for example, Shirov did - while he can also take on d4 and play...Ac5later) 10.Axd4 (it is good to know that the endgame after 10.Wxd4 Wxd4 11.Axd4 gd7 is harmless. We will encounter the same ending below) 10...a6 (this is more popular than 10...4a2) 11.Eel (11.c3 and 11.4b3)

EAEAE

games so far. There are earlier examples of 6...Wd2,

AE

Vallejo, Reggio Emilia 2010111. Since

NEWSNCHESS

An exciting line is 7.We2 AfO S.'

automatically retreat Her Majesty to square d6. Indeed, you will find well over 5,000 games in your database with 6...Wd6, whereas the text has been played in only a few dozens of

but I would date the revival |anuary 2011 with the game Movsesian-

90

a few superficial remarks regarding 6...Wd6, to reflect on the merits of our SOS move. The main line after 6...Wd6 is 7.0-0 (note that7.6U: Wb++! is an argument for placing the queen on d6.

I

I

gralll

AAA AAA tr AWtr *

that game, players of the stature of Shirou Ni Hua, and Fridman have given itan occasional outing.

11...Wc7 12.Ab3, and now the tac-

Before we start our investigation, just

tical main line 12...Aa6 (n...A:d7)

SECRETS OF OPENING SURPRISES

.

B.afs Axhz+ t+.€ht o-o ts.Axgz

6bxda 6xd+ B.q\d4

trds to.WR &xg7 tz.Ahe+ €96 18. has been analysed down to a draw. For some reason, Black often prefers other lines these days (like

14.Exd6!? Wxd6 15.b3 is an interesting exchange sacrifice that should not worry Black unduly - 13...We7 was completely

6xd+ 9.6xd4 a6 10.4f+ (ttre main line of our SOS arises after 10.0-0 af6) 10...4c5 (10...af6) 11.4b3 Wxdl+ 12.Exdl Ab6, and White had

t2...g:d7).

Caen zOlL) 1 1...0-0 (1 1... Wc7 was inter-

verylittle in Palac-Tratar, Bol 2011. 7...kc$ 7...6f6 8.4b3 6c6 amounts

As an afterthought, o...Wd8 is not stupid either, but with some 500 games played it could still be called a 'theo-

esting, according to Adams) 12.Axf6 gxf6 13.6bxd4 6:xd+ ru.6xd4 Axh2+ 15.&xh2 Wxd4 16.Ea3! (an excellent rook lift) 16...&hs t7.trg3.

c: 6hs

retical line'.

&

EA

13.Exd4 We7

sound for Black in Abergel-Cornette,

HA

AE

g I ll

ll

-

E

I

[email protected]

ll I AAg

I

AT ,\ ul) AAAA A AA E AW€ tr

AA AA

L l

12...Wxd4 13.6xd4 fudt t+.Efdl EcS 15.Abe &eZ, and a draw was soon agreed in Movsesian-Vallejo, Reggio Emilia 20l0lll. White can circumvent line A by tak-

H

WA A€

7.0-0

We have been following the

The most natural reply. White continues as he would after 6...Wd6. Nevertheless, it makes sense to look at two

Adams-Fridman, Gibraltar 2012. If this looks familiar, then your memoiy still serves you! The whole game may be found in New In Chess 201212, p.87 ff as

r

7.We2 6c6 8.0-0 6fe g.A$Z

ae

(this position may also be reached via the move order 7.0-O 610 S.6b3 6lf6 9.We2 a6)

EAE g I lll lrA rA E I ,\ ,\

:HA

-

rN

q)

AAA

trA

q)

WAAA

Eg

game

analysed by Michael Adams. I would just like to repeat his suggestion that 17 ...Wf4 (17...9h4+ t8.Eh3 Wf++ was the game, when after 19.g3 White's game was to be

Adl tg.trht trgs 20.&91 WfS is completely OK for Black. - White could also consider tO.Edt bS

preferred) 1B.Wh5

ing with the other knight on d4: 9. atxd4 D-xd+ lo.Aixd4 a6, but in that case Black might refuse to exchange knights on d4 and just leave White's knight standing rather awkwardly on b3:9,a610.Ee1 Ae7. 9.Eel is interesting, but White has to consider 9...4b4 in that case. Please note that 9.We2 a6 transposes to our note on 7.We2.

EEE g lll ll A rA HA

EIL

AE

11.4&

AbT,which has not been tested in practice. Black is fine after 12.6:bxd4

6)xd4 r3.Q)xd4 Ac5 14.4e3 (note that the trick 14.6xUSi rebounds after 14...Wc6! 15.9f1 6)g4, and Black has taken over) 14...0-0, although it is important to note that Black will not lose after the tactic 1 5. 6xe6 ! ?. Black has 1 5... Wxe6

(15...Wc6) 16.Axc5 Wc6, when after

lo.Ags bs 11.4d: Abz 12.Ead1 (or l2.Axf6 gxf6 13.4e4 Ae7 14. 6bxda 4\d+ ls.Axd4 Ed8 and the

In the stem game, Black equalized quickly after 9.Af+ Aao! 10.Axd6 pieces, and thus no attacking chances)

ll

LI

alternatives.

8.4rc Af6 9.6bxd4 Wxd6 1l.hbxd4 6xd+ t2.Wxda 02. 6txd+0-0leaves White too few minor

Et

-

to the same thing.

17. Wf3 the subtle 17 ...W c7l? is even better than 17...Wxf3.

I

AAA

trAg

,\ q)

AAA

tr&

Black is at a crossroads. The purpose of o...Wdz is that it leaves the king's

bishop room to go to the active

c5

square. Black can profit from his move order with 9...4c5 (line A), or with 9...

Axd+ 10.Akd4 a6 1l.Eel Acs (line g).

dynamics appear to balance White's slight structural advantage) L2...W c7

Another sensible move is 7.6b3 (after all, with the queen on d6 Black

Line A

now has 7...Wb4+,which clearly isnt the

9...4c5 This is the most audacious continuation. Black (briefly) grabs the initiative by attacking the knight on d4. White has to respond forcefulll,, s1

13.Abxd4 He7 r4.trfel 6xd4 rs.

case here) 7...A)c6 (7...Wc7

Axd+ 0-0 16.c3 Efe8, and Black was fully equal in Kanovsky-Figura, Olo-

8.Wxd4 A)c6;8.Wez Ab++ - g...Ad7 9. AxdT + D:xdt 10. hbxd4 6gf6 1 1.0-0

mouc 2011.

Ac5 12.We2 was {rawn in A.KovacevicTratar, Nova Goiica 2Ol2) 8.Abxd4

ro.a4 Aao

tl.Ags (11.trdl

e5 t2.

s.Abs+ -

SECRETS OF OPENING SURPRISES

Blackwill have an easy game.

NEWiNCHES6

9I

-

EABg lll ll

A A

E

TA

g

AA

a

AAA

AAA

EAgtr€

10.AxcG Wxc6 11.6e5 tt.Wez o-o tz.6ts We+ (Blacktakes advantage

of White's move order;

12...Wb6leads back into the next diagrammedposition) 13.Ee1 Wxe2 14. Hxe2 b6

ls.ags h6 16.4h4 EdS tZ.

I

Hb7, and Black was slightly better in Kevorkov-Luthec Dresden 2AII.

11...9bG L2.We2 Instead, l2.Ag5 can be met by 12...0-0, not fearing 13.Axf6 gxf6, as \Mhite cannot deployhis rooks. Geske-

Luther, Wiesbaden 2011, ended in perpetual check after l4.Wfrs (t+.

6ldz Aet) la...fxe5 ts.Wgs+ €h8 16.Wf6+, since 16...€g8 17.Eadl is met by 17...e4,when White has to settle for a perpetual after all.

L2...O-O

E?6

HI

[email protected]

lrl

E

ll \ill/

-

A

rA ,\

(-L

-E A.

a+\

AAA WAAA E&

trA

The critical position. Black's pieces are well placed (but so are White's). His main problems are: the development of his queenside and the defence of his

king, which has been left somewhat in the lurch by both its queen and its

see

Shirov's response to such unveiled

aggression.

13.Edl has not been played yet, although it makes sense to grab the d-file and to try and prevent Black

from developin g: 13...6dstl (13... Aa+ti looks risky after 14.h3 - L4.c3? Axe5 15.Wxe5 Wxfz+t;14.4f31? Ac5 - 14...8c5 15.Afl, but 15...b5! appears to be adequate: 16.Axb5 Aast) t+. Ab3 (if White takes the pawn with 14.Axd5 exd5 15.Exd5 then Black obtains more than enough compen-

sation with 15...4e6 16.Ed1 EaeS 17.Wf3 Ad4) andnow 14...a5t?. 13.495 is not as dangerous as it

may appear: 13...6d2 (worthy of attention is 13...6d5!?, but 13...Wxb2 is quite dangerous, as Black is still

undeveloped)

t4.6$ Ad+ (t+...

AdO!, and Black has equalized fully. White's pieces dont look so harmonious now) 15.trad1 (15.c3 Afo to.Af+ would have been awkward for Black) 15...Wc6 16.4b3 b5 t7.Ae7 EeS 18.

6u+ Wuo te.We4 Abz zo.Wxd4 ExeT - Black has equalized, and White now blundered in this raPid game:

EB st

rAgl AEIII I

ag E AAA AAA trtrg /fi

Antoms-D.Fridman, |urmala 2012. 13.c3 is simply a useful move. Now 13... Ad6 ( 13... 6asti Yz-Yz Paljasai-

Kuljasevic, Sibenik 2}ll) 14.4d3 (1a.EeI Wc7) 14...Wc7 1s.Af4 b6 16.Eadl Abz tZ.Hfel Ead8 demonstrates that with sensible (but non-

13.4d3 White immediately regroups to set up threats along the b1-h7 diagonal. This is admirably direct play. It is useful to

Zadar20ll. 13...4d5!? Shirov removes his sole defender!

cz nrwincuEss

White slightlybetter.

L4..i5

As intended.

Sedlak,

SECRETS OF OPENING SURPRISES

15.We2Wc7 El

E

[email protected]

E

I rg

ll

I

AAE T rt .E

AAA gAAA

trA

trg

Blackis alreadyequal. He soon gained an edge after 16.Ac+?t Ado 17.hfi Adz ts.Axds exd5 19.4e:lt f4t.20. Ad+ Afs 2r.Ad (2t.c3 Eaeg) 21... Eae8 2LWd2 HeaB.HadL (n.kgs f3) 23...h6 24.Efet wf7 zs. w d4b6+,

Caruana-Shirov, Biel 201

1.

Line B 9...6xd4 1o.6xd4 In our comments to move 6 we already noted that 10.Wxd4 Wxd4 11.clxd4 Adz is harmless.Indeed, the only scary-looking move 12.4b5?! is hitting thin air after 12...Hc8!, while the normaIl2.Af4 Ec8 1:.Ab3 Ac5 is just equal.

10...a6

&

HA

I g I ll IA I

E-

EI

A)\

HUl)

21. gd6? Wxd6 22.Exd6 a5-+,

critical) play from both sides these positions are just equal, Kuljasevic-

bishop.

Possible is 13...8c7 l4.Eelb6. 14.We4 The prophyl actic 14.a3 leaves

AAA

trAg

aa itil E€ A

L ]

LL.He7. This is most popular in the 6...Wd6 variation, so it is natural to consider it as the main move now too. Let's look at some alternatives, based on the ited practice with 6,.Wd7 so far.

lim-

11.c3 White prophylactically covers the

d4-knight, which renders 11...

-

Ac5 less useful now. After 11...Wc7 we have transposed into a fairly

:HA

innocuous line normally reached via

I

6...9d6. An example from our SOS move order was 12.Ada Ado t3.g Ad7 la.Ags Aes ts.Wf3 h6 16.4e3 Ads L7.Ad2 Axd+ 18.cxd4 Ac6 19.We2 WUo 20.We5 0-0 and the isolated pawn gave Black the slightly better chances in Lu Yijie-Zhou Weiqi, Hefei

20tt. 11.9b3 Ac5! (again 11...Wc7 transposes to a well-known theoretical position) 12.c3 0-0 13.4g5 fu4

EIA

E

I

I

El

[email protected]

uv

-

6

-

gA AA

tr

E

AAA

tr&

14...

He7 l5.Axe7 WxeT 16.Eel af6

17.9f3 Wc7 18.Wg3 Wxg3 19.hxg3 Ad7, with an equal endgame that Black won rather instructively in Tischbierek-Ni Hua, Biel 201 1. 11.4f4 does not look critical after 11...b5 12.4b3 Abz. The game Womacka-D.Fridman, Gibraltar 2012, went 13.c3 Ae7 (13...4c51? 14.4e5

0-0) 14.9e2 0-015.8ad1 Aas (ts... 6as) 16.Ae5 Efe8 17.trd3 Wb7 18. Axd5 6xds 19.Wf3 Ead8 2o.trfdt AfS, with perhaps a slight initiative for White.

11.4g5 is not very accurate after 11...Wc7! 12.Afi (12.4xf6 leaves Black with a pleasant choice between

Ab3 AS7) r2...Ad6 13.h3 Adt t+.Eer AhZ+ Wxc4 and t2...gxf6

1

I ll

13.4f3

And not 13.6xe6, due to 13...Wxd1 14.Eaxd1 Axe6 15.Axc5

A

Axc4 16.Axf8 €xf8T. 13...Wc7 14.4d3

AA

AAA

Nothing is achieved by 14.Axc5 Wxc5 15.4d3 (the endgame after ls.wd4 wxd4 rc.6xd4 bs 17.4b3

AAA

trawtr€

Abz is also equal) 15...b5.

14...b5

11...4c5!

Here 14...b6 is also possible, not allowing White any play on the queenside.

This is the wayto take advantage of our

Still, the text is equally good.

sixth move. Instead, 11...Wc7 actually transposes to the main line after 6...9d6. It certainly makes you think

L5.a4 Ab7! Et

ll

Perhaps L2.c3 is slightly more accurate, as the queen's bishop does not lose any time, since it wants to go to 95 anyway : 12...b5 13. Ab3 Axd4 (this is not forced, but we already saw Black go for the isolated pawn in the note on 11.c3 as well. It can be a good strategy to go for something tangible) 14.cxd4 Abz ts.Wd: (White would not be worse either after 15.4f4 0-0 16.4e5)

White's king with tempo) 15.*hl Ae5 16.c3 h6t7.Axf6 Axf6 18.9f3 0-0, and White was already slightly worse in Herman-Perelshteyn, Lubbock 2011.

A A

lll

A illli .,i8. E

A

rA

AAA

AA

AAA

tr wtrg 16.Axc5 White

cannot win the b-

pawn, for after 16.axb5 axb5 17.Exa8

15...0-0 16.4g5 Ad5, with equal-

Exa8 18.AxbS Black has 18... 6lga! 19.Axc5 Wxc5 20.We2 6xf2!, with

ity in Gu Xiaobrng-Zhang Xiaowen,

slightlybetter play.

Ningbo 2011. L2...O-O Equally good is 12...Wc7 13.4b3 0-0 La.Ags (t4.c3 Ado t s.n: h6 is equal) 14...e5!? (a good move but it is somewhat atypical, and it requires an accurate follow-up)

16...Wxc5 17.axb5 axbS 18.We2

EIA

E

I

18.Ee5 then 18...4d5 (rather than 18...4xf3 19.Exc5 Axat 20.Exd1 b4

21.trbs).

18...b4 19.We5 Ad5 20.Exa8 ExaS 21,.w d4 wxd4 22.6xd4 tra2

& :

rll

[email protected]

rg

lll

A 6

/h

a

AAA

I

a

A Jt-

I

-a--

AAA

wtr g

15.4f3 and now rather than 0)g42. ! (LambrechtS5

15...

Geurink, Gronin-

gen 2OLl ) Black has 1 5... A 94 16.

rA

I a,\

Erh

laaao

E

tr

If

El

-

3.

(a well-known manoeuvre to worsen

[email protected]

ET

This will yield nothing in the end.

14.4h4 (if 14.4e3 then 14...bs!)

12...

I

he is doing well.

12.4e3 A

AA

tlli

gxf6 L7.h3 Ead8 18.We2 Ah5 when

ET

-

about the merits of O...WdZ, doesnt it?

lll

I

I-

&

Axf6

SECRETS OF OPENING SURPRISES

H

_rl'\ /atl \

ir

q,IA

21ll2l

tre

Black is more active in the endgame, butWhitet position is solid. The game

Alavi-Zhou Weiqi, Mashhad 20L1, was drawn after 53 moves.l

xrwincurss gg

ownwry Dick Yon Geet, who died on April 29 ot the oge of 80, wos much more thon the mon who gove his nome to on

opening. His tocticol ocumen tended to obscure the foct thot he wos on originol strotegic thinker, whose experiments stood the test of correspondence chess ot the highest level. ore than 20 years ago I wrote an article in this magazine - No loy with the Dutch - about the sad lack ofjoyous eccentricity in Dutch chess life. It was based on conversations during an Open in Ostend with the Dutch IM

GerardWelling. Welling is a connoisseur and a mod-

erate practitioner of unusual openings. Before the rounds he showed us we"ird things like this: Kadas-Arkhipov,

cl

Nnwlx

Kecskemet 1984: 1.h4 e5 2.d4 exd4 36R c5 4.c4 d5 5.e3 dxe3 6.cxd5 ex0+ l.&xfz Afo s.Abs+, and White is al-

readywinning. Strangely enoufh, I found a game in my database: Gabor Kadas-SergeY Arkhipov, Kecskemet 1983: l.h4 d5 2. d4 c5 3.6R cxd4 4.c3 dxc3 5.e4 dxe4

6.Wxd8+ €xd8 t.Dl95 cxb2 8.Axb2 6:t'te g.fu3 f6 1o.o-o-o+ &e8 11.4)d5, and Blackresigned. Could it be the same ArkhiPov, suffering two quick losses in the same place against t.h4?.I am not sure, because there are many players

with this

name.

Kadas' 1.h4 went far beYond anYthing that Welling would find acceptable in his own Practice. In fact he claimed that Dutch players were only pseudo-originals, who after a loss with abizarue opening always fell back on the safety of the good old 1.e4. Michael Basman, the English torchbearer of eccentricity, had told him that

Eorly independence Dick van Geet, who died on APril 29, not an extremist in the spirit of Kadas, but he did go his own way. His name is connectedwith 1.6x3, an opening that goes under many dif80 years old, was

ferent names, but considering the wealth of ideas that Dick contributed to it, Van Geet Opening seems the right name.

Apart from that one, there are many off-beat systems on which he Put his marh such as l.d4 N6 2.c4 D-rc6,which might be called the black Van Geet, or 1.b3, which he often played before Bent

Larsen made the move PoPular. The Dutch IM Gert Ligterink Wrote '

in an obituarythat ayoung chess player had totd him that he had been surprised to learn that Van Geet had been an IM.'I thought that people who played moves like 1.hc3 wouldnt become IMs. Quite a feat thenl The youngster might have been even more surprised if he had known that Van Geet was a GM

it was no fun plaFng unusual openings against Dutch players' An English opponent would join the fun and try to do

in correspondence chess. Well, in itself there is nothing wrong with 1.6c3, but You might saY that

something original himself. A Dutch player would soberly take a sacrificed pawn and solidlY sit on it. I remember a game I PlaYed at the Olympiad in Haifa in1976. As White I occupied the centre with two pawns.

ued the element of surprise, which was one reason to take up his opening, but also a reason not to play it invariably.

My knights came to c3 and f3 and then my bishops to c4 and f$. EverYthing just as the textbooks had taught me20 years earlier. I won quicklY' Raymond Keene had followed the game and said:'Congratulations, Hans. A typical Dutch game. The classical style of Max Euwe. How simPle chess can lookl I thought I noted a touch of

condescendenc

were saying: cl from inspired.

is Praise, as if he l maYbe, but far

people who play 1.4c3 all the time confine themselves too much. But that is not what Van Geet did. He val-

Certainly not after l994,when he pub-

lished a booklet on it, chock-full of sharp ideas that before that time had onlybeen known to him and some defeated opponents. Subsequently, his main weapon as White became 1.b3, a move he had been practicing since the early sixties. In 1952 he became the U-20 champion of the Netherlands. I thinkhis first important international event was the

Student Olympiad

HANS

REE

'

in Varna in

1958,

where he scored 6lz otttof 10 at Board 3. The same fine score was made at Board 4 by )oop van Oosterom, the later chess

patron and correspondence World Champion. These Student Olympiads were taken quite seriously, especially in Eastern Europe. In Varna the Soviet Union had Thl and Spassly on the first two boards.

Van Geet opened with 1.4c3 four times in Varna. In his other game as White he used the Trompowsky Open-

ing. As Black his main weapon was

l.e4

Dlc6.

In retrospect his choices

seem quite reasonable: he was playrng sensible openings on which there was very little theory at the time. But some commentators seem to have been half shocked, half in awe.

The Golden Age is never now At the PAM tournament of 1961, an invitational international round robin in Utrecht, Van Geet beat the American grandmaster Arthur Bisguier. One

of the organizers, Eduard Spanjaard, a strong player himself, wrote at the time: 'It is of course "impossible" to dispatch a bearer of the highest FIDE title with 1.6c3, but nevertheless the fearless Van Geet did it. Van Geet is an enfant terrible in the respectable chess community, a chessplayer-cumguerilla fighter; he plays rugby chess, with a cheerful negligence of the subtle opening systems which he never had time enough to studyi By the way, my database has this game start with l.e4 6-lf6 z.Zk3,btttl dont believe this can be true. Further on Spanjaard quotes Van Geet on his prospects as a player: 'I find

it definitely wrong to give up an academic study (economics) when it appears that one can achieve something as a chess player. It's nice until you're about 30, but then you must stop. It's too improductivel And Van Geet adds

to this: A grandmaster from the past had some standing. He was honoured and came into contact with the greatest celebrities. These Schachnovelle types no longer exist. In the past the playwas subject to the personality. There was

interpersonal contact. Chess used to be a way to get to know one another. Not anymore. It's all about the board and the moves. So it's better to stay an amateur!' To me this harsh dismissal of the world of 1961 seems quaint. I would say that he was living in a golden age of chess, which would last for decades. For me the golden age ended when chess computers became good; let's call it a silver age nowachess

days. But whatever the objective mer-

its of Van Geet's nostalgia for the time when chess masters were supposed to be honoured and meet with celebrities, his complaint suggests that he had, at some stage, considered the possibility of becoming a professional player. He remained an amateur, with unpredictable moves and unpredictable results.

Originolity gone berserk All tricks and traps, and briginality' for its own sake, I used to think when I spent some thought at all on Van Geet's way of playing. But I was wrong. One

doesnt become a correspondence GM with just tricks and traps. Here is an example of his originality gone berserk, from a tournament that must have been the low point of his chess career: the IBM tournament of 1964, in which ttre only scored half a point in nine games.

HANS

REE

EO 65.9

- Al0

Gedeon Bqrczq Dick vqn Geet Amsterdom 1964 7,.c4 g5 Well, OK. Much later Michael Basman would write that 1.c4 guarantees White a difficult game after 1...g5, but of cour se Bar czawas blissfully unaware of

this.2.d4 Ag7 3.6,c3 6c6

& : AE

I

ll I I I rAr A I

H

,{

A )\ q)

AA tr

,.

l{

L

]

A

AAA

AAtr

But this is going too far. Black combines a touch of basmania with his own predilection for the early knight move. From Basman's games we know that the immediate 3...c5 or the more

subtle 3...h6 would be, let's say, 'interestingi 4.d5 6e5 5.Axg5 6xc4 6.Ec1 cG 7.e4 b5 Tricks and traps. One can vaguely discern a tactical idea here: takingonb2, then giving up the

knight and winning one backwith ...b4. A triumph of the long diagonal that would be a frequent motif in Van Geeti later games, but not this time. 8.dxc6

dxb2 9.c7 WxcT 1o.6xb5 Ba5+

NEWIN

95

11.9d2 Wxd2+ L2.Axd2 trb813. Ae3 Ab7 L4.Axa7 trdB 15.f3 f5 16.Eb1fxe4 L7.9;d4 e5 18.Axb2 d5 19.Aa3 AcG 20.Ec1 1-0. Kick Langeweg, who like me was

a

spectator during that round, told me that after the game Barcza had asked

Van Geet why he had PlaYed the strange move 1...g5,and that Van Geet had answered: 'Because I was afraid of your expertise in the endgamel Remarkable. But at least you can say that he was ahead of his time. In my database this is the first game

and only in

with

1.c4 95

1968, four years later, did

the second one folIow. If only he had been able to keep his hands offthe Van Geet knight at move three... In fact, there was method in this madness: clearing the long diagonal by putting pressure on d4, but still in an

to be cleared; d2-d4 against Pawn e5 can be more easily arranged than the corresponding move e2- e4 against d5. All in all, Van Geet found that 1.b3 was at least as logical as 1.g3. An opposite opinion was expressed in the pre-

vious issue of New In Chess bY Anish Giri: As I had noticed many times before, the relations between bishops g2l b7 andb2t g7 arealways in favour ofthe kingside bishopsl Anyway, 1.b3 served Van Geet well, as it would serve Bent Larsen, who introduced the move in his international

behind the tactical variations. One motif dear to Van Geet was the long diagonal, which had to be occupied andthen cleared of units thatwere blocking it. In an article that aPPeared in 1970 in the Dutch magazine Schaakbulletin andwas exPanded in the German magazine Kaissiber2l (2005), he won-

dered which move was better, 1.g3 or 1.b3. Against 1.g3 speaks the fact that an obstructing black pawn on d5 is better protected than one on e5 that would obstruct the diagonal of AbZ' But there is another side to it: attacking d5 with c2-c4is much easier than attacking e5 withf2-f4, which is always risky. Then again, the other attack on the obstructing pawn, from the centre, is easier when it is the diagonal al-h8 that has

go NswlncHEss

3...e4 4.ad4 WfG 5.e3 AcS A principled choice, as the Russians would

say.

Now 5.hxc6 is not correct,

and 5.c3 would be miserable.

6.6b5

'During the game Bent Larsen played at

I had often been showered with scorn

investigated. He pointed outthatVan Geethad always been in search of what he called 'a philosophyi a grand strategic scheme

White nothing.

In Kaissiber Van Geet, referring to his victory over Lubosh Kavalek at the Hoogovens tournament in 1967, wrote:

Originolity, but more sobel

with Van Geet and had kePt manY files on the opening variations theY had

even though he concludes that it yields

Vindicoted by Bent Lqrsen

unsophisticated manner.

ling, who had often worked together

3.aR. Odessky concentrates on 3.e3,

practice in 1968.

the board next to me and showed himself quite interested. Later he asked me about it. I gladly told him about my ideas, for

When I was preparing this article I got much information from Gerard Wel-

his view that e5 should be attacked at all cost. Larsen used to play 3.c4 ot 3. e3. Strangely enough, in IIya Odesslcy's book Play 1.b3! Van Geet, the most persistent practitioner of that move, isn't even mentioned, nor is his move

and mockery since around 1960, when I had started to ptay 1.b3. "Dear DicK' it was said, "if onlyyouwould spend some

time to learn a real opening and finally stop with nonsense moves like 1.b3 or l.fu3,you might perhaps become a decent chess player!" Even Donner wrote as a comment on my 1.b3: "Giving up all hope of an opening advantagel'

'That's why

I

was very glad when

The move that saves the variation.

6...Wxb2 7.6Lc3 ab4 8.trb1 Wxc2 9.6xc7+ €d8 10.6xa8 Another possibility is 10.9h5, which would lead to a draw after t}.,Drlra2 (but 10...b6 seems better) 11.Wxc5

6xc3. 1O...AfG 11.a3 Wxdl+ L2.&xdL 6c6 13.b4 AdG 14. b5 heS 15.bG White has saved his stranded knight on a8 and went on

Larsen asked me about it and later even

to win.

took up the move himself - and with great success. About my "nonsense"

Tiger clows

people could laugh, but when the great Larsen (and later even Fischer) started

was Van Geet's greatest success in over-

playing it - well, that was something different. That should shut them up a bit. That gave me some satisfaction. That's howman isl As always with his off-beat openings, strategic plans had to be supported by sharp tactics.

The Hoogovens tournament

of 1967

the-board play. His victory over me in the first round maY not have caused great ripples, but he went on to beat Kavalek, Ciric, Donner, Pomar and Robatsch in what the tournament bulletin called'Van Geet gangster style'. In the Dutch press he was called The Tiger.

Halfway the tournament, with 5 out

YO 8.7 - A0l

of 7, he was trailing the leaders Spassky and Lutikovbyhalf a point, while being a point ahead of Larsen and Gligoric.

Dick von Geel

Tim Krqbb6 Netherlonds

l98l 1.b3 e5 2.Abt 6c6 3.6f3 Geet's invariable choice,

HANS

Van

in line with

REE

He finished with 7Yz outof 15; six wins, sixlosses and onlythree draws.

vo r8.7-A50

ly, but White's position is hopeless any-

Arturo Pomqr Dick von Geel

way.

Beverwiik (Hoogovensl

19

67

L.d4 oltB 2.c4 6cG Later, when 3. hf3 became popular, Van Geet had to the position afe6 would have been too nor-

give up this opening, ter

3.6R

as

mal for him. 3.d5 But this, or 3.W3, is what he liked to meet. 3...6e5 4. e4 e6 5,f4 Ambitious, but White is weakening his position. 5...696 6.

Ad3 exds 7.cxd5 Ab4+ 8.6c3 0'0 9.4e2 Better seems 9.6lB,when Van Geet surely would not have been tempted by the dubious pawn snatch

9...Ee8 10.0-0 Axc3 11.bxc3 6xe4. 9...dG 10.f5 he511.Ag5 cG L2.a3 Axc3+ 13.6xc3 gb614.Ae2 Ee8 15.Axf6 gxfo 16.9d2 white seems to have consolidated, but nowVan Geet sharpens the struggle with a promising

16...4xf5 17.exf5 6c418.Wd3 Axb2 19.Wg3+ €h8

piece sacrifice.

20.trb1treS

White can still defend, but it is not easy. 2l.6a4would probably lead to a draw after 2 1... Ex e2+ 22.&xe2 Ee8+ n.&fl Wa6+ za.&gl Na425.Wxd6. Another possibility is 2 1. 6dl Exe2+ 22.&xe2 Wbs+ n.&d2 Wxds+ 24.€cl Eg8,

with an unclear position. 2L.trtL EaeS 22.trt9 Wgt+ 23.trtL Wd4 24.tr13 Ee3 Black regains his piece and keeps a strong attack. 25.Exe3 Exe3 26.Wxd6 Threatening mate, but Black comes first. 26...4d3 + 27 .&d2 AcS+ 28.€e1 Wxc3+ 29.&?L &97

3O.dxc6 6e4 31.cxb7 6xd0 32. b8W o,e4 33.trd1 Wc2 34.9b5

Ac3 35.Wc4 Wxe2+

35...Wxf5+

would have decided much more quick-

Blackwon after 57 moves.

He kept playing in tournaments occasionally, but never came close to his performance of 1967 - until 1997, when at the age of 65, probably retired from his professional duties, he took part in his first World Senior Championship and finished shared second be-

hind |anis Klovans.

Curse

your own brain and treat the computer as a servant, not a master.

of the compuler

Long before this, his serious love had become correspondence chess. His first big success as a correspondence player had been his victory in the '40 |ahre BDF'tournament, a jubilee tournament of the German corrgspondence federation played from 1986 to 1992. There, his opening as White was still

r.fu3. With black he played t.d4 N6 2.c4 N6 or 2...b6, or 1.e4 6a6. As a shocking surprise weapon he once met 1.e4 with 1...e5. His openings worked well, even in this high-level corresPondence tournament. Gerard Welling sent me a copy of an article by Van Geet that appeared first in Tim Harding's magazine Chess Mail (2004) and later in his book The Write move (2005). The article had the provocative title'Without a computer I might have won the Von Massowtournamentl The Hans-Werner von Massow Memorial Tournament, played from 1996 to 2001, was extremely strong. OnlY correspondence GMs took part, among them all living World Champions, with the exception of Hans Berliner. It was won by the German Volker-Michael Anton and the Dutchman Gert Timmerman with 10 points out of 14 games. Van Geet scored TYzpoints. As White he had switched to 1.b3

and as Black he was still playlng systems based on ...6a6, but against 1.d4 he had

added a new weapon to his armoury: the Leningrad Dutch with ...41h6. In an early stage of the tournament

he had bought a computer, which seemed to serve him well for a time. But in his article \e showed six positions in which, agaihst his better judge-

HANS

ment, he had let the computer direct him onto the wrong path. So, without a computer he might (might, might...) have scored three points more. On the other hand, Van Geet conceded that'what if'stories are always dubious. What if his opponents had also done without a comPuter? They might also have fared better... I thinkthis was all a bit tongue-incheeh buthis main message stands: use

REE

Some things I did nol know Early this year, Van Geet announced that he had played his last corresPondence game. For him, computers had taken the fun out of it. The Dutch correspondence chess federation reacted by proposing a tournament without the use of computers, but there were very few entries.

Indeed, to enter such a tournament would demand an almost superhuman trust, not only in one's opponents, but also in oneself. The temptation to switch

on the computer (bnly a blunder-check of course..l) wouldbe almost irresistible. Soon afterwards it became clear that there had been another reason for Van

Geet to announce his retirement. He was

terminally

i11.

While preparing this article I have learned more about Dickvan Geet than

in the almost 50 years that I used to meet him personally. I learned that he was not a tactical opportunist, but an

independent strategical thinker who stood his ground against the best correspondence players. I learned that in France he could give alecture in French,

which even for a Dutchman from his generation is a rare feat. And most surprisingly, I found that he had written not only a small book on the Van Geet Opening, but a much bigger book in Dutch about God: De meest essentiiile zaken zijn onzichtbaar (the most essential things are invisible),2006. A collection of 365 aphorisms with comments, it is an erudite and thoughtfrrl defence of Christianity and an exhortation to the imitation of Christ. r

mu,ln

97

he previous issue

ever, went for the Sveshnikov and got

contained a quote

nowhere.

Now youd think that Anand's star

from Gata Kamsky

that I reproduce

seconds could have done either of two

here in its entirety:

things: make a thorough study of the Sveshnikov or fall back on the repertoire with 1.d4. Instead they went for a third option: they went and studied the Rossolimo Variation. Talk about

'It has nothing

really to do with chess (...) It used to be just a game of intelligent people, they play against each other and it was just pure chess: Who is strong on the board? But right now chess, as you can

from the matches for the world championship, it becomes more and more of a team effort. Basically your whole team is studying for a year. The seclusion, all they do is chess chess chess, analyse lines, prepare. And then the candidates, both of them - the opponents - all theyhave to do is simply memorize those preparations, get to the board and just show that preparation. There is no chess skill involved in that! It's just all memory and that's itl

topsy-turvyl

Anand's preparation often falling short, both players were quickly.

see

(New In Chess 20lll4,p. 51) In 1996, Kamsky played a world championship match against Karpov in Elista. His preparation was impressive. He withdrew for months with a team of grandmasters to work on his

put his trust in his intuition, his chess intelligence. This partly explains his statements

on modern-day chess in relation to that of the past. Yet his proposition that the current world championship matches are all about memory is debatable. It's true that both Anand and

Gelfand had impressive and hard-

working teams of seconds, but how did this affect the actual over-theboard play? Gelfand was armed to the teeth with opening theory. Aryone playing the Sveshnikov and the Griinfeld Indian is bound to have

had ever been seen in the pre-computer area. Kamsky lost the match, and after another disastrous tournament in Amsterdam, he retired from chess for almost 10 years.

a vast amount of knowledge. But Anand was a bitter disappointment in the area of opening theory. When he played the Nimzo-Indian for the first time, in Game 9, he'made a serious error in a well-known theoretical position in the early middlegame. In Game 8, Anand played 1.e4 for the

After his comeback the computer ruled supreme. Now Kamsky decided to stop working so hard on his preparation and instead to play systems in which knowledge wasn't so paramount - and with success. Kamsky

by the Sveshnikov. In the same position, Kamsky would have gone for the Rossolimo as White - an ad hoc choice to sidestep the extensive theory of the Sveshnikov. Anand, how-

opening repertoire. Nothing like this

ga NEwincHrss

first time and was caught unawares

JAN TIMMAN

thrown back on their own brain power. If Anand had been as well prepared as his challenger, Kamsky's words might have come true.

In the Tal Memorial, too, you couldnt help noticing that opening preparationwasrit quite as important a factor as you'd have expected. Carlsen didnt win a single game as White. He has been known to say that he isnt all that interested in opening preparation; his main forte is the middlegame, in which he manages to outplay many of his opponents with positional means. Youd wonder if his results would be even better if he were to build a sharp opening repertoire as White. This is not entirely certain. Carlsen's repertoire is aimed at avoiding an early crisis in the game. He invariably aims for middlegames that lend themselves to a strategic approach. Sharp lines do not really fit in with this. It wasnt until Round 5 that Carlsen

scored his first win. Interestingly enough, Radjabov, the new number 4 in the world rankings, also went for an opening that failed to yield him the slightest advantage.

so5.r3-c45

L4...tG Strengthening his grip on the

Teimour Rodiobov Mognus Cqrlsen

centre. Black already has slightly more

Moscow 2O12

15.trad1 h516.Ae2 Ae6

7..e4 e5

elbow room.

(51

2.4f3 Ac6 3.d4

Not such a surprising choice, you'd often plays the Scotch. But during the press conference Carlsen said that he had hardly taken it into account. A good friend of his had told him that Radjabov would probably not play the Scotch. say. Radjabov

3...exd4 4.il)xd4 Ac5 5.Axc6 gf6 6.Wf3 bxc6 7.Wg3 d6 8.6c3 wge 9.4d3 af6 1O.aa4 ad4 L1,.

EtE

'ir"

=

::E

ll

AT TAT

AAA A AA AA AAA

Arr

17.Axb6 The

E

tr

l&l

r& I

()

ll

Atr AA AA& A H

20...b5

B.Af4 f6 L4.Ac4 6le5 15.Wxg6+

been

draw was agreed. Not exactly an eRcouraging example, but Radjabov was probably huppy with a draw, as he was leading the tournament. 12.Wxg6 hxg6 13.h3 might have been White's best chance to play for an advantage.

12...Wxg3 13.hxg3 6:g+ L4.At4

position ofter 30...h5

I

The set-up is virtually the same, except that the white g3-pawn is on h3 and there are no bishops on the board. Capablanca played the advance ...g594, the h-pawns were swapped and

Blacks rook penetrated decisively along the opened h-file. The game, with comments by Capablanca, may be found in Edward Winter's book

trtr

not very well placed on the kingside. In Radjabov-Aronian, Wijk aan Zee 2009, there followed l2.R,and after 12.N7 a

T

A A AA A AgA

opening advantage. The white king is

trtr€

I

ll

E

AA

L2.O-O After this move White certainly has no

AAA A AA A AA AA

Er :U rn

collapse of White's

llrAra

AAW AAA AA

Arr

I

Kon-Copoblonco, Moscow I 936 I

lll

E E

17...axb6 18.a3 &e7 19.f3 6e5 20.&t2

AA

EAB I I

I

opening strategy.

Ag

EA€

=

trtr*

c3 Ab6

[email protected] lll I I

I

had already used up a lot of time, remains strikingly passive. Carlsen, incidentally, had interesting things to say about this position. It had made him think of 'some old game of Capablanca'. The game referred to was played in the same city 76 years ago. This is the position after Blackt 30th move:

about Capablanca.

Afterwards Carlsen said he had not

22...h4

tntirely sure' of this move, and it's true that 20...4b: looks even stronger. Now Black can meet 21. Edel with 21...c5. White is entirely

Carlsen also opens the h-fiIe. This is

bereft of activity.

the best way to make progress.

23.Exh4 Exh4 24.trh1, EahS 25. trxh4 Exh4 26.trc7. trh2 27.&t2 trh8

21.Axe5 fxeS 22.&e3 E

I H

E

l&l I

rrA

ll A

U

A

,\

21

A gAA rtn

trtr 5=A

The alteqnative was 22.f4 in order to create some activity. Radjabov, who

JAN T!MMAN

E

l&l

H

ll

rrA ,I t1 l ]

A AA A AgA Ei

28.€e3

Radjabov persists in his wait-andsee approach. Carlsen said that he

nrwix

99

il

had been certain of 28.c4, after which Black has an interesting way to play

it anything but

easy to play the rook

ments on el. If the white rook were

for a win: 2}...bxc429.Axc4 Eb8 30. b4 d5, and Black takes his king to d6. It is possible that White was afraid of

29...&d7 3O.Ea1 Ab3 Preventing

to leave the e-file, Black has the strong ...d6-ds.

ending. the a-pawn from advancing.

31.Ec1€c8 32.&t2 Eb7 33.€93

this possibility.

Ae6

28...9s

again to prevent the white king from penetrating. g

E

l&

rrEI I I

Black withdraws the bishop

34.tra1- €b6 35.trc1c5 And finally Black sets his pawn steamroller in motion.

JT

H 29.4d3 But now there was no direct drawback to 29.c4. Carlsen had intended 29...

bxc4 30.Axc4 Axc4 31.Exc4 &d7, with some practical chances. The computer assesses this position as dead equal, yet White would find

t

oo xnw in cnrss

advance his d-pawn. This makes it hard for White to continue to wait.

r

laa H

60e,

!!a I E

JT

A €A g A A

Blacks plan is becoming clear: he wants to take his king to f6 and then

36.Ea1c4 37.4c2 €c5 38.Ee1c6

21

A

39...€bG 4O.Ac2 &c7 4L.&t2 €d7

rrE r& I I

IA A A A€ A AA tr

39.4b1 White's rook has to await develop-

JAN TIMMAN

I A

rrAll

IA AA AA n.

&A

LI

42.a4

The correct moment for this advance.

42...bxa4 43.traL Another accurate move. White wants to cover the b-pawnfroma2.

43...Eb8 I

& =

rrAll

lla AA AA H

€A

Black had been keeping his rook on the h-file. Now that the queenside has been opened, the half-open b-file has become a better base.

44.tra2 d5 45.exd5 cxds 46. Axa4+ €d6 47.4c2 d4 E

EE

II

50.fxg4

ll

in certain

A

A

t/\

g

saz1,

*A

H

Strategically risky, because circumstances Black may get two connected passed pawns. Yet despite the swap, White remains in drawing territory, although he will have to continue to play extremely accurately. The alternative was 50.&n, preventing the further advance ofthe g-pawn.

Ads. After 53.Axd5 €xd5 54.cxd4 exd4 a rook ending arises that at first sight looks like winning for Black. Carlsen thought the same, although he wasnt quite sure. With 55.Ea5+

progress. But his advantage is not de-

50...Axg4+ 51.€d2 Ae6

€e4 56.Eh5! White will just manage to hold, because he has the'long side' with his rook. The g-pawn no longer plays apartand he might as well get rid of it as quickly as possible.

cisive yet.

Preventingthe swap on d4. Thebishop is on its way to the central d5-square.

52...4d5 53.Axd5 d3+! An important intermediate check to

21

Slowly but surely, Black is making

48.Ae4 Eb6 49.&e2

prevent White from swapping on d4. Now the rook ending with two con-

White's play during the entire game has been characteri zedby indecisiveness. 49.94 was the correct move here,

preventing Black from gaining too much territory. But even after the text White is still not lost.

I

EA

r

H

EA

@A

I I rrA AA Cb E

nected passed pawns is an easywin.

a

L.!{ ]

49...94 Carlsen pounces immediately.

EA

I

rrA A

&A

52.&c2 The decisive error. Afterwards Radj abov indicated that he could have saved the draw with 52.€c1!, in-

tending to meet 52...d3 with 53.Ea5. Black will not be able to swap bishops then and can makqno further progress, which is why he is force d to play 52...

JAN TIMMAN

54.&d2 €xd5 55.€e3 trgG 56. Ea5+ €e6 57.€e4 trg4+ 58.€f3 Ef4+ 59.€e3 Ef1

trt I A

6{e,

-

arg

A I

White resigned.

NEWENCHESS

TOI

McShane's performance in Moscow was spectacular. After beating Aronian he went on to dismiss Kramnik and the other ace Morozevich. His win over Kramnik must have been especially sweet. Thus far, he had been White against Kramnik four times, scoring only half a point - an angstgegner. But if such an opponent always has to playblack, it is not easy for him. This was borne out in Moscow. McShane didnt achieve much, but when the Englishman found himself in time-trouble, Kramnik suddenly seemed to wax ambitious. He didnt get very faa though. RL7.4

-

Not very ambitious, yet an approach that contains some venom, as recent

Principled play. With 13.c3 White could still have gone for some tame

practical examples have shown.

line or other.

5...4d6 6.hxe5 Ae7 7.4f1 6xe5 8.trxeS O-O 9.d4 AfG 10.tre1Ee8 Virtually the only move that used to be played here was 10...4f5, but it seems that Black still ends up with problems then. However this may

13...Axd4 L4.ad5

e5 2.4f3 6c6 3.4b5 Af6 4.0-0 hxe4 5.tre1

A

15...4f6

The only move. After 15...f6

16.4e3 AxUz 17.Eb1c6 18.4c4!Black would have been in serious trouble.

16.hxf6+ 6xf6 17.Axf6 Continuing to capture is White's best option. Black was threatening to consolidate with 1 7... Ae6.

AAA

L7...gxt6

:H

lll

L1,.at4 Steinitz played the obvious 11.c3, and

A $li/

- -

covering move almost exclusively. The

A ,\

text boils down to a long-term pawn sacrifice. White gives his central pawn for positional compensation and at-

(rL

lt A An A tr -H- wtr ,!. (+)

:

60a

ll I I

later white players also played this

,I

wAe

tr

E

I

AAA

AAA

EEAWtrAg

-

A

-

lll AA

AAA

,.

Er+)

A E

A

7-.e4

g& 6H I I I I lll

I

,\ q)

EAgE&

C67

I

.a0a

played first in Steinitz-Zukertort, first match game, 1886.

[uke McShqne Vlodimir Krqmnik Moscow 2012 (71

1s.Ag5

E AgA : lll lrl

be, Kramnik and other strong players have started playing this move of late. The rook move is hardly new: it was

llll

dG

AAA

g

tacking chances.

AAA

11...Exe1 12.Wxe1 6e8 13.hc3

H

AAA

wAs

ore not yet o subscriber to New ln Chess (eight issues o yeor)? Give it o try. Toke out on lntro-subscription on the premier chess mogozine in the world todoy, ond receive five issues for o speciol price. An lntro-Subscription is only for new subseribers.

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JAN TIMMAN

18.We4 Najer-Bacrot, Plovdiv 2012, saw 18. Ad3, which is probably slightly rnore accurate. White keeps his options open as to which square to play his queen to. After 18...f5 19.We3 Ae6 20. Wf3 c6 21. 9=xf5White was slightly better.

18...f5 19.We3 This move cost McShane an hour,

a

sign that he was out of his preparation. The computer assesses 19.Wf3, in order to keep an eye on b7, as slightly stronger. But it is much of a muchness.

19...ae6 2o.wg3+ *f8 21.wc3

g : ll lrl rA I E

E

60a

E

$tr EI

AAA

AAA

A€

tr

chance for a late fianchetto:24.g3,fo1-

lowed by 25.A:g2. The white bishop

2L...&e7 Kramnik opts for putting his king in the centre. The alternative was 21...€gB, when White can repeat

is very well placed on the long diagonal. And White retains excellent

moves. But McShane was planning 22. Eel to take the rook to e3. The white

A good move, but 23...Wg8, to provide extra cover for e6, would have

position looks good; he is in no dan-

been more accurate.

ger whatever.

24.Axe6+ fxe6 25.Wb3 Ee8

26...Eb8 27.Wxa7 Wxb2 28.Wa4+

gbs 29.9h4 Going

compensation.

An accurate reply. Both players are going to capture a weak outside pawn.

23...9h8

3O.Wxh7+ &c6 31.trc1 E

E

E

llr&

\ilu

rA

I I AAA

AAA

trA€

I I

Ntr EI

e

I

ll

I

sm

AAA

llr&

I

H

tr

AAA

A

r\n

tr

AAA

square for the rook. White wants to keep his c-pawn, possibly withdraw the queen and then advance the h-pawn.

A temporary

31...Wxa2 32.9h5 Wb2 33.Wd1

&d7 Another option was 33...Wc3, fixing the white c-pawn. But after the

23.A:c4

26.Wxb7

This invitation to swap bishops fails to yield anything. A good alternative was 23.Wb4, in order to continue to

This is how White regains his pawn, after which his king is slightly safer. But Black gets the more compact

disrupt the coordination in the enemy camp. After 23...b6 White has a

pawn structure. Thq chances are

text the position remains balanced, although Whitet safe king and passed hpawn make life slightly easier for him.

equal.

34.93

JAN TIMMAN

L

I

&rr I

22.Hel-&d7

H

for the h-pawn.

29...Wa5

urwincurss tog

t'

lat I

42...&d6 Better was 42...€e6 43.Wg6+ €e7!. Black must keep his king near the

r&

ll

kingside

I A

L_l

{lu :/\ A

trg

AA Cb E'

34...e5 This advance is less accurate, since it blocks the black queen from returningvia the long diagonal. In combination with the passed h-pawn this may cause problems later on. But the position remains equal, provided Black

in order to stop the h-

pawn. After 44.Wxf5 e4!, followed by 45...9f6, he has nothing to fear. Instead, Kramnik is going to take his king to the queenside, where, in principle, it will be safe. The problem, however, is that the h-pawn is getting a clear field now.

43.Wg6+ Giving him a new chance. Stronger

*be +g.Wds+ €bs so.Wbs+ €c+ 51.9f4!, and White is winning. 48.We7+ €b6 49.Wd8+ It is understandable that White continues to give queen checks in order to gain time. But there was nothing against advancing immediately with 49.h6,when Blackhas no defence, e.g. 49...e3 50.fxe3 We2 51.Ecl.

49...&b7 5O.Wd7+ &bG 51.Wd8+ gb7 52.9e7+ €b6 53.We8 €b7 54.h6

& :

43...&c7? Correct was 43... €e7. Now White

will

get a decisive advantage.

& =

35.c4 €e7 36.We1trb3 37.c5 d5

El

HQ

AA

the kingside for the second time. This time Blackwill have to be careful.

41...8xc5 42.Wh7+

I Elll A A

AA

I

A t_l

A

tr&

Finally!

54...trf3 55.We7+ €aG 56.Wc5 56.h7 would have won as well, but the text makes more sense. White combines attack and defence.

56...9b7 57.We7+ €a6 58.Wc5 €b7

& : & -

I

rg

E

ue

IA gr

A

I

iIU t-,

A t ]

A

tr

& :

I

A

45...Ec3 46.We5+ &b7 47.hs

trbs 41.9h4 The queen appears on

ron nnwiucnrss

A

The time is ripe to start advancing the passed pawn.

38...c6 39.Wa5 €d7 4O.Wa4

tr

A

A

tr€

White moves his rook one square sideways to give his queen afreehand.

g

I

w

gA LI

F? $ltr .EE|

uu :

I

38.trd1

E

JT

laa I

swap on 93, after which White will not be able to exploit his passed h-pawn.

g

I

44.Wxf5 e4 45.h4

continues to play accurately. A good move was34...f4, intending to

l& alll

ffitr EI

was 43.Wxf5, with a large advantage.

&

I

EA A

tr€ lJ

47...trb3

59.trc1 Not exactly wrong, but with 59.h7 Eff 6o.h8WI white could have won

McShane had expected 47...8c2,

at once.

which is actually the best defence because the rook is more active on c2.If White swaps the queens, he cannot be certain of a win, since the black king will be just in time to stop the white outside kingside p{wns from queen-

s9...trf6 60.h7 Eh6 61.€92? But this is a serious mistake, letting the win slip through White's fingers. After 61.We7+ &a6 62.8d1 Black is by 63.h8W, and all Black has left is

ing. The correct way is 48.We7+

some harmless checks.

JAN TIMMAN

hopelessly lost. 62...Ef6 is simply met

:

rt

!

+

{

t I

&

A

IE .E

wr

I A

gAg

&c7 68.&9+ €d6 6e.f4 trhz d47l.Hfl!, and the white passed

67.95

70.€h3

70.f5

McShane opts for liquidating to a winning queen ending.

pawns are too strong; B) 63...& d7t 6a.Wa7+ &c8 6s.&g1 e3! 66.fxe3 Wg6!, and White cannot

quickly. After 70...Wxf2+ Zt.&h3

win.

Wfi+ 72.&h4 Wht+ n.&gs Wcl+

The fact that, in Variation B, the white king had to return to g1 clearly shows

74.&f5 his king can safely march to

how unfortunate White's 61st move had been.

H

With 70.&h2he couldhavewon more

62.We7+ €bG 63.Wd8+ gb7 64.8d7+ gb6

the centre. But it is understandable that McShane did not want to calculate this variation, in which the white

61...wb3?

king ventures into the open. If you see a sound way to victory without complications, you should go for it.

Despite the fact that he had plenty of time, Kramnik fails to exploit White's

72.&94 Wxh6 73.Wxd5

7O...Eh6+ 71.Wxh6 Wlrt+

SUA

mistake. With 61...9f6! he could have held the game. But the situa-

&r

tion is different from what people thought afterwards. After 62.Wb4+ *c8 63.Wa3 Black has the following

I

65.Exc6+l After some checks White finally deals the deathblow.

I

65...trxc6 66.9d8+ *a7

A

tr

&

I Ag

tr

gE A

E A

.e0a .-l

I

I

tli/

possibilities:

t_-l

Ea

Ag

ANATYSIS D!AGRAM

A)

63...9f3+? After the game this was considered the drawing move.

But the rook ending is a narrow win for White after 64.Wxf3 exf3+ 65.€xf3 *al 65...&c7 is no better in view of 66.Ea1!, and the king has

67.Wd7+ €bG 68.9d8+ &a7 69. h8W Wf3+

73...9f6 74.wfs wd4 7s.wf4 €b7 76.9f5 WdS+ 77.We5 Wf7+

sm E 60a

-

H

E

l

This is the position McShane had been aiming for. The black e-pawn willfall, after which the win will be elementary.

I gA

Ag

to go to the b-file anyway) 66.94 ExhZ

78.Wf6 Wds+ 79.*14 WdZ+ 80.€xe4 We2+ 81.€d5 Wa2+ 82.€dG Wa3+ 83.€e6 Wa2+ 84.*e7 We2+ 85.9f7 Whs+ 86.€97 wg++ 87.9g6 wd4+ 88.wf6 wg++ 89.€h6 we2 90.€g5 &c7 91,.14 Bf3 92.We5+ &d7 93.fs wf1 94.f6 Black resigned.

JAN TIMMAN

r

mwinomss tos

.

Evgeny Tomashevsky CURRENT ELO: 2733 DATE OF BIRTH:

I July 1987

PI.ACE OF B!RTH: Engels, Sqrqlov region, Russiq PTACE OF RESIDENCE:

Whot is your fovouriie colour? Dark colours in the range of darkblue to black, but sometimes I prefer milder ones like green. Whot kind of food mokes you hoppy? Mainly Russian, Ukrainian and Caucasian cuisine.

And whqt drinldl Lemonades and cocktails like mojito. Who is your fovouriie oulhor? If I were to pick one my choice is Alexandre Dumas (father). Childhood emotions are strongest O, and his ro-

Sqrqlov Russiq looks like the ideal of professionalism and sporting nobility.

And your fqvouriie footboll ployer? Hmm... How to choose between Pe16, Maradona, Messi and CriRo? I dont want to prefer one of these greats, so mychoice isZizouloWhot is your fovouriie footbollteom? 'spartak' Moscow forever! Whqt do you see os your besl resuh ever?

By PR

-

Do chess ployers hove typicol shortcomings? No, I dont think so. We are completely different from each other and have

individual

sets of shortcomings @.

Which lhree people would you like

to inviie for dinner? The three wisest men I know: GM Yury Razuvaev (my coach from2007 till his untimely death in 2012), Dr.

Vladimir Dines (the Rector of my university), Dr. Yury Tomashevsky (my father).

victory in the European

championship, Budva2009; by quality of play - 2ndplace in Saratov 20ll; by difficulty - 6 times (from 6!) qualification to the Russian Super Final.

Whot is your greoiesl feor? I'm not so brave, so I dont want to check only one of my multiple fears @.

movie?

Who is your fovouriie chess ployer

chess world, whot would ir be?

Lord of the Rings in the humorous

of olllime? I admire all the great chess players, but my favourite player must have

I would want to stop the short time-

mantic heroes from French history impressed me

a

lot.

Whot is your qll-time fovouriie

Russian translation made by'Goblin1

Whqt music do you like to lisien to? Russian rock, disco of the 1980s, classical rock of the '70s and '80s, modern pop - different sty'es! I agree with the opinion t\at it's not the genres that are good or bad but the music @.

lf you could chonge one lhing in the

the hypothetical combination of Capa's intuition, Alekhine's feeling of dynamics, Botvinnikt will, Tal's fantasy, Petrosian's feeling of danger, etc... Probably Fischer, Karpov and Kasparov are much closer to this ideal than anyone else.

controls. Long classical games are our prestige trademark, and if we reject them in a chase for cheap attractiveness, we shall not

win anything.

Whot notionolity will the 2O5O chess World Chompion be? I hope Russian. But will chess save its charm and prestige till that time?

Do you hove o fovourile poinier?

I'm not an expert on painting, but

ls lhere o chess book thqt hqd o

!s q knowledge

some great pictures impressed me a lot. E.g. the Sistine Madonna by Raffaello Santi. I also like the paintings of the masters of the Northern Renaissance: Albrecht Di.irer, Pieter

profound influence on you?

everydoy life?

I

Definitely yes, but only up to the level at which chess hasnt become a profession yet. After this things are not so clear O.

Brueghel etc. Who is your fovourilie sporlsmon?

Roger Federer. There are plenty of great sportsmen, but the Swiss king of tennis, apart from everl.thing else,

I

06

NEW

EN

CHESS

remember my first serious chess

book, a biography of David |anowski by S. Voronkov and D. Plisetsky. Do you hove ony superstilions concerning chess? I think all players have at least some superstitions, but I try not to believe in them or befieve only in the good of them O.

JUST CHECKING

of chess useful in

Whqt is the best thing thql wos ever sqid qboul chess? 'Chess is for people who want to make an intellectual effort, who have respect

for the game.'- Boris Gelfand.

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