List of Most Common Business Idioms.pdf

June 4, 2018 | Author: Marcelo Chacón | Category: Idiom, English Language, Semantics, Human Communication, Cognition
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List of Most Common Business Idioms No.

1

Idioms

 Yes man

Explanation  A person who always agrees agrees with his boss. boss. E.g. ‘Being  a  a yes man  keeps  keeps me out of trouble, and it might even lead to a promotion!”   To quit work and go home; to say that a day’s work has been completed.

2

Call it a day

E.g. “I’m  “I’m  tired   tired . Let’s  call  call it a day .”  .”   “The  “ The boss was mad because  Bill called it a day at noon .”  .” 

3

4

Hit the nail on the

To identify something exactly; to arrive at exactly the right answer.

head

E.g. “He “He hit the nail on the head  when  when he said the problem was the thermostat”  

Grey area (UK) / Gray area (US)

Means something that is not clearly defined and needs careful judgement. E.g. “It  exists  exists in a grey area  between  between legal and illegal.”   “It’s  a grey area isn’t  area isn’t it?”   it?”   (Meaning the speaker is talking about an unsure concept). To begin; to start some action; to set in motion.

5

Get the ball rolling

E.g. We really need to get the ball rolling  on  on this project. The deadline is in October, and it’s  already   already September.

6

7

Back to the Drawing

Means that a previously established plan isn’t working and that it is time to re -plan.

Board

E.g. “My  job   job interview went horribly! I have to go back to the drawing board.”  

Thumbs Up

Shows that someone or something is good, especially when it comes to a performance or action with good results.

E.g. “That’s  good.  good. You deserve a big thumbs up  for  for such a great presentation!”   Means the overall perspective or objective, not the fine detail. 8

Big picture

E.g. “Although  we  we all have all specific tasks to do, our leader makes sure we don’t  lose  lose sight of the big picture .”   .”  

9

On the ball

10

On the same page

11

Ground-breaking

12

To be Alert, active, or attentive; on top of things. e.g. “If “If I had been more on the ball  I  I would have asked when he called me.”   In broad agreement, or sharing a common general understanding or knowledge E.g. “I “I want to make sure we’re  all  all on the same page  with  with this new project.”   Means innovative, different than other things of its type. E.g. “This product is certainly a ground-breaking  t echnology.”   echnology.”  

Read between the

To infer a meaning that is not stated explicitly

lines

e.g. “If “If you read between the lines  a   a little, you will realize that he has deeper motives”   To put things in the wrong order or with the wrong priorities; to put

13

Put the cart before

something inconsequential inconsequential as more important than something more essential.

the horse

E.g. “There’s  “There’s  no  no point trying to write the report when you haven’t  got  got a clear idea of what to write. You don’t  want  want to put the cart before the horse.”   Means that you understand their reason for having a certain opinion, or for feeling a certain

14

See someone’s someone’s point  point

way. E.g. “Yes, “Yes, I see your point . Let me double-check that and get back with you.”  

E.g. “That’s  good.  good. You deserve a big thumbs up  for  for such a great presentation!”   Means the overall perspective or objective, not the fine detail. 8

Big picture

E.g. “Although  we  we all have all specific tasks to do, our leader makes sure we don’t  lose  lose sight of the big picture .”   .”  

9

On the ball

10

On the same page

11

Ground-breaking

12

To be Alert, active, or attentive; on top of things. e.g. “If “If I had been more on the ball  I  I would have asked when he called me.”   In broad agreement, or sharing a common general understanding or knowledge E.g. “I “I want to make sure we’re  all  all on the same page  with  with this new project.”   Means innovative, different than other things of its type. E.g. “This product is certainly a ground-breaking  t echnology.”   echnology.”  

Read between the

To infer a meaning that is not stated explicitly

lines

e.g. “If “If you read between the lines  a   a little, you will realize that he has deeper motives”   To put things in the wrong order or with the wrong priorities; to put

13

Put the cart before

something inconsequential inconsequential as more important than something more essential.

the horse

E.g. “There’s  “There’s  no  no point trying to write the report when you haven’t  got  got a clear idea of what to write. You don’t  want  want to put the cart before the horse.”   Means that you understand their reason for having a certain opinion, or for feeling a certain

14

See someone’s someone’s point  point

way. E.g. “Yes, “Yes, I see your point . Let me double-check that and get back with you.”  

15

Get down to work 

To get serious and focus on what you need to do to accomplish a challenging goal E.g. “You  know  know what, Harry? You just need to get down to work !”   !”  

18 Essential American Slang Words for English Learners For many international students, moving to the United States can be daunting. Not only are they exposed to a myriad of unfamiliar customs, they are also bombarded with a myriad of unfamiliar American slang words. Because these words are often not included in a formal English education, it can be grueling for international students to grow accustomed to their widespread, and arguably excessive, use. Here’s a run down on some of the most common slang.  It will help you understand your friends better, it will help you fit in and of course it will help you avoid any more embarrassing situations.

18 Essential American Slang Words for ESL Students No

1

Slang Words

Cool (adj) 

Meaning

Example

Cool (adj) means ‘great’ or ‘fantastic’.

“Okay, cool! “Okay,  cool! I’ll  be  be there at 7:00”  (okay with

It also shows that you’re okay with an

an idea)

idea.

To be beat (adj) If (adj) If you hear a friend 2

To be beat (adj)

saying I’m  beat, it  beat, it means he or she is very tired or exhausted.

“He  passed   passed the exam, Cool!”  (means “great!”) “Will  you  you attend the football match with Tiger School?”   “Sorry, I “Sorry,  I can’t. I’m  beat   beat . I did not sleep last night”  

 Awesome (adj) like “Cool”, it means 3

 Awesome (adj)

 “excellent”, “great” “great” or “remarkable”. “remarkable”. It can be used in a sentence or it could be used in a one word reply.

“That  was  was awesome!”   “Awesome,  dude!”  

“After  this  this is over, do you want to go hang 4

To hang out (verb) 

To hang out (verb) means to spend time doing nothing in particular.

out ?”   ?”   “He  hung out  with  with his friends all day yesterday.”  

To Chill Out (verb) simply means to 5

To Chill Out (verb)

relax. Usually it can be used with or

“Since I’m  between projects, I think I’ll   just chill out .”  

without the word ‘out’. It also means to

“I   wish I could chill out   about the

calm down.

neighbor’s  barking dog, but it wakes me up every night.”  

Wheels (noun) When somebody 6

Wheels (noun) 

refers to their wheels  they are talking about their car.

“Sorry  Honey, I can’t  pick up you now. I don’t  have my wheels at the moment?”   “Do  you like my new Wheels? ”  

Babe (noun) means an attractive person, especially a young woman. If 7

Babe (noun) 

you refer to someone as a babe, it means that you think they’re hot and

“She’s  a real babe !”   “Agreed!”  

attractive.

Busted (adjective/verb) means being 8

Busted (adjective/verb) 

caught in the act of doing something they shouldn’t do.

To have a blast (verb) means that 9

To have a blast (verb) 

something is great or having an amazing and fun time.

“I   saw you take that cookie from the cookie  jar! Y ou’re  busted!”  

“How  was the Fast & Furious 7?”   “It   was awesome. Everyone had a blast.”  

To have a crush (on somebody) 10

To have a crush (on

(verb) means being attracted to

crush  is the feeling that you have a million

somebody) (verb)

somebody and would like them to be

butterflies flying around inside you when that

more than just a friend.

special someone is around …” 

To dump somebody (verb) means to 11

 “…The most common sign of having a

To dump somebody (verb) 

stop having a romantic relationship with someone.

“Didn’t  you hear? David dumped Sophia last night”   “Wow, I’m  surprised. They always looked so happy together!”  

Ex (noun) usually refers to an old boyfriend or girlfriend of 12

Ex (noun) 

someone. It can be used with another noun, for example ‘boss’ ex-boss  it means your boss from before.

Geek (noun) refers a person who is 13

Geek (noun) 

intensely interested in a particular field or hobby.

14

To be hooked on something (verb)

To be hooked on something (verb) means being addicted to something.

“She  broke up with her ex ”   “I   met my ex-boss yesterday at Pho Restaurant”  

“I   was a complete computer geek  in high school, but I get out a lot more now.”  

“I’m  really hooked  on the Coffee at Plus Bar”  

15

To be in (adjective) 

16

Epic Fail (noun) 

17

Dunno (verb) 

To be in (adjective) means to be in

“Hey  do you like my haircut? It’s  the in

fashion or trending at the moment.

thing now!”  

Epic Fail (noun) means a ‘total failure’

“ManU   lost 6-1, can you believe it?”  

or a “big disaster” 

Dunno simply means ‘I don’t know’.

“Yeah, epic fail !”   “Where’d  he go?”   “ Dunno.“ 

To be ripped (adjective) means having 18

To be ripped (adjective)

great muscles and bodies – probably due to working out.

“John, You are so ripped . How long you been training and what is your diet like?”  

How to give your opinions in English? [English Conversation] When we give our opinion, we say what we think, feel or believe about something or somebody. Below are some phrases that you can use to help express opinions. Some of these phrases are more appropriate for written English such as giving your opinion in an essay whereas some can also be used in spoken English.

How to give your opinions in English? Personal Point of View We use these words and phrases to express a personal point of view:  “In my experience…”   “As far as I’m concerned…”   “I’m absolutely convinced…”   “Speaking for myself…”   “In my opinion…”   “Personally, I think…”   “I’d say that…”   “I’d suggest that…”   “I’d like to point out that…”   “I believe that…” 

 “What I mean is…”   “It’s obvious to me…” 

There are at least 3 ways to give a personal opinion. 1. We can express a strong opinion Some people are very opinionated, which means they are certain about what they think and believe and express their ideas and opinions strongly and frequently. They love and can’t stop themselves expressing their opinions, even when they know nothing about the topic. I’m sure you know this type of person. We use these words and phrases to express a strong opinion.  “I’m absolutely convinced that…”   “I’m sure that…”   “I strongly believe that…”   “I have no doubt that…”   “There’s no doubt in my mind that…”  For Example:

“I’m  absolutely convinced   that the best way to improve your English is to live in an English-speaking country such as the US.”   “It’s  obvious to me   that the best way to improve your English is by using English, not studying English.”  

2. We can express our opinion neutrally Many people are more cautious and careful when asked to give their opinions. They prefer not to be so certain about their own ideas and opinions and try to keep an open mind. So, we can express a cautious or reluctant opinion when we show that we are not certain about what we think or we are reluctant to express what we believe.  “I think…”   “I feel that…”   “In my opinion…”   “As far as I’m concerned…”   “In my view…”   “I tend to think that…”   “I suppose that…”   “It seems to me that…” 

 “I must admit that I’m not sure…”  For Example: “   As far as I understand it   , you need to practice on a regular basis if you want to improve your English.”   “It  seems to me that  there is no best way to learn English. Each person has to find a strategy or method that works for them.”  

3. We can express a subjective opinion We can express our opinion based ONLY on our own personal experience.  “In my experience…”   “I don’t know about other people, but I can say…”   “What I’ve found is…”   “As I see it…”  For Example “I  don’t  know about other people, but I can say   that taking English classes helped me to improve my English.”   “In  my experience, watching and listening to films and TV in English can really help.”  

General Point of View We can express an objective opinion, based on research or what we have heard or read. In this way, we distance ourselves from the opinion to show that maybe it’s not what we personally believe. We use these words and phrases to express a point of view that is generally thought by people:

 “It is thought that…”   “Some people say that…”   “It is considered…”   “It is generally accepted that…”   “The research seems to suggest…”   “Apparently…”  I’ve heard that…”  For Example: “Some  people say that   watching and listening to films and TV in English can really help ”   “It  is generally accepted that   going to an English-speaking country is the best way to improve your English”  

How to ask for someone’s opinion in English? We use these words and phrases to ask for someone’s opinion.  “What do you think?”   “What’s your view?” 

 “How do you see the situation?”   “What’s your opinion?” 

 Agreeing with an opinion We use these words and phrases to agree with someone else’s point of view: Of course.  You’re absolutely right.  Yes, I agree. I think so too. That’s a good point. Exactly. I don’t think so either. So do I. I’d go along with that.

That’s true. Neither do I. I agree with you entirely. That’s just what I was thinking. I couldn’t agree more.

 Disagreeing with an opinion We use these words and phrases to disagree with someone else’s point of view: That’s different. I don’t agree with you. However… That’s not entirely true. On the contrary… I’m sorry to disagree with you, but…

 Yes, but don’t you think… That’s not the same thing at all. I’m afraid I have to disagree. I’m not so sure about that. I must take issue with you on that. It’s unjustifiable to say that…

Talking About Facts, Opinions and Experiences [Speaking English]  You are out to eat with some of your friends from the United States. They are talking about a topic you know a lot about, but you aren’t sure how to jump into the conversation. Here are some phrases to help you talk about the facts you know (or think you know), your opinions and even your experiences.

Talking about a fact (100% sure that it is true)

It has been established that… It has been established that the Earth is round. It is true that… It is true that when ice melts it turns to into water. Research has proven that…, in fact, … Research has proven that a hippopotamus is, in fact, very dangerous.

Expressing a supposed fact (85-99% sure that it is true) I recently read/saw in the news that… I recently saw in the news that the presidential primary race is very close. Research seems to show that… Research seems to show that vaccines do not cause autism.

I’ve heard that… I’ve heard you shouldn’t drink alcohol when you are taking an tibiotics.

Expressing a supposed fact (not very sure that it is true)

Isn’t it true that….? Isn’t it true that black widow spiders are very deadly?  Apparently, …  Apparently, the water in southern Vermont is unsafe to drink.

Expressing your strong opinion I’m absolutely sure…. I’m absolutely sure that you shouldn’t go swimming in a hurricane. I am convinced that… I am convinced that he is not telling the truth. It’s clear to me that… It’s clear to me that this is the wrong plan of action.

It is obvious that… It is obvious that this man doesn’t know what he is doing.  As far as I’m concerned,…

 As far as I’m concerned, you should never call anyone past 8 pm.

Expressing your opinion (not very strongly) I suppose… I suppose that you are right. I guess… I guess that this is the best option. I think… I think that we should probably follow his lead. It seems to me that… It seems to me that the president knows what he is doing.

My understanding is that… My understanding is that you shouldn’t go swimming if you have  a fever. I am not sure, but I think that… I am not sure, but I think that you should probably buy renter’s insurance.

Talking about your opinion based on your experience In my experience,… In my experience, you should never walk in that neighborhood after dark. I have found from my experience that… I have found from my experience that wearing sun block at the beach is a must. What I have found is… What I have found is that people here are just as nice as people from my home country. Judging from my personal experience, I can say that… Judging from my personal experience, I can say that traveling is well worth the expense and effort!

(From my website and blog at www.laurasenglishclass.com) 

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Top 10 Most Common Expressions to Say “Thank You” in English We have a great variety of ways to thank people and showing appreciation for a gift or an act of kindness. Here are ten of the most common phrases.

Saying “Thank You” in English –  Top 10 Expressions o

Thanks.

o

Cheers.

These phrases are fairly informal. People often say them without really thinking about it. We use them when somebody does something small to help you.

o

Thank you very much.

o

I really appreciate it.

o

You’ve  made my day.

These ones are more formal. We use these when somebody has done something quite large or important to help you.

o

How thoughtful.

We use this phrase when somebody gives you a present. We are saying thank you to the other person for thinking about you and deciding to give a present.

o

You shouldn’t  have.

This is also for receiving a present. You are saying that the other person is too generous. It does NOT mean that the person speaking is angry or annoyed.

o

That’s  so kind of you.

o

I am most grateful.

o

We would like to express our gratitude.

These phrases are more formal. The last one is especially formal and is only used in business letters and formal speeches

45 Essential British Slang Words for English Learners For people outside of the UK even the word  ‘slang’ , might be unusual, so to clarify, ‘slang’ refers to the casual use of words that have been newly created and are usually spoken only by select groups of people. Slang in Britain flourishes, from North to South or East to West you’ll find an intere sting mix of English and regional dialects, sometimes heavily influenced by international culture ( heighted by internet culture).

 You can easily find yourself puzzled by the quick retorts of youth, or the savvy lingo expressed by the professional and even by the old pensioners outdated observations. Thankfully, we’ve devised a guide to popular slang, the following table reveals the meaning behind the words:

45 Essential British Slang Words for English Learners No.

1

Slang Words

 Any road

Explanation

 “Any road” is another way of saying ”anyway”. It is commonly used up North. Instead of saying anyway, they say “any road”!

This is technically a form of greeting. It is used a lot in London and the south to mean “Hello, how are you”. It is usually said as a question. 2

 All right

Sometimes it gets expanded to “All right mate“? You would say it to someone you knew or a complete stranger. The normal response would be to say “All right” back to speaker.

3

 Ace

This is used a lot in Liverpool. If something is ace, i t means it is awesome!

When someone is being anal about something, he is choosing to be an 4

 Anal

asshole. He is choosing to be tight and strong minded like the anal sphincter. Therefore, you tell him: ”Don’t be anal”.

5

 Ass

This means your buttocks, your backside, but mostly a donkey!

This word means the same as ass, but is much ruder. It is used in phrases 6

 Arse

like “pain in the arse” (a nuisance) or I “can’t be arsed” (I can’t be bothered) or you might hear someone say “a half arsed attempt” meaning that it was not done properly.

7

 Aye

8

Bladdered

9

Ballistic

10

Bloke

It means yes. It is commonly used in Scotland. It was used in the film ”Brave Heart” 

When a Brit say you are Bladdered, they mean you are drunk.

It is used in informal settings to describe anger and rage. E.g. He went ballistic ( meaning he went mad)

Another word for male

If someone tells you that you’re barmy they mean you have gone mad or 11

Barmy

crazy. For example you’d have to be barmy to visit England without trying black pudding!

 You would call something or somebody beastly if they were really nasty or 12

Beastly

unpleasant. Most people would consider you a snob if you used this word. People like Fergie can get away with it though.

13

Blinding

14

Blinkered

If something is a blinding success  – it means it’s a great success!

Someone who is blinkered is narrow minded or narrow sighted  – they only see one view on a subject.

One of the most useful swear words in English. It is used for emphasis. 15

Bloody

E.g.  “bloody awful” or “bloody hell”. “bloody brilliant “. It is used to emphasize almost anything!

This is a great English word with many excellent uses. Technically speaking 16

Bollocks

it means testicles but is typically used to describe something that is no good (that’s bollocks) or that someone is talking rubbish (he’s talking bollocks).

17

Bugger all

If something costs bugger all, it means that it costs nothing. Meaning it is cheap. If you have bugger all, it means you have nothing.

This word is obviously used when drinking with friends. However, it also 18

Cheers

has other colloquial meanings. For example when saying goodbye you could say “cheers”, or “cheers then”. It also means thank you.

French fries. it is basically a deep fried finger length potatoes eaten in the 19

Chips

UK not to be confused with American potato chips- these are known a crisps in the UK

To be flirtatious, that is, to speak to someone with the intent of eventually 20

Chat up

engaging in sexual intercourse with them. Generally conducted in a relaxed, playful and outstandingly obvious manner.

21

Cracking

22

Dear

23

Dodgy

 Another word for good. Usually said without pronouncing the last “G”. If a girl is cracking it means she is stunning.

If something is dear it means it is expensive. E.g. Don’t you think flights to Nigeria is are dear.

Bad quality and untrustworthy. If someone or something is a bit dodgy, it is not to be trusted.

24

DIY 

It is Commonly used in Britain as a short for do it yourself.

Technically, it is used when addressing a stranger, when interrupting or 25

Excuse me

disagreeing with someone, or to request repetition of what has just been said.

Like or desire. In America it means to like someone in a sexual way, to want to be with them, to want to go out with them. In Britain, fancy 26

Fancy

means the same but it also means ‘want’ E.g. Do you fancy a cake? Technically, fancy is used for both people and food. Geezer  – old man

27

Grub

Food. E.g. I’m hungry, Let’s get some grub

28

Gutted

29

Jolly Good

Very good. E.g. a Jolly good fellow

30

Daft

Basically means stupid, insane, nuts, moronic, asinine

31

Knackered

Tired or sleepy; exhausted. E.g. I am feeling a bit knackered today.

This is a very common slang in Britain. It means to be sad or upset. E.g. like when you fail your driving test!

This has nothing to do with loading a van. It simply means ‘rich‘. When a

32

Loaded

33

Loony

Mad, crazy

34

On about

This is a very handy one to know. It means what are you talking about?

35

One off 

A one off is used to describe a one-time event that is never to be repeated.

Piece of

When something is exceptionally easy. E.g. He makes that dance look like

Cake

a piece of cake

37

Pissed

Another word for Drunk Posh – High class, sophisticated.

38

Puke

Vomit Quid – A pound in English money.

39

Smashing

If something is smashing, it means it is terrific.

40

Ta

A slang word for Thank you.

41

Taking a Piss

36

Brit says that guy is loaded, it means he is rich!

This has nothing to do with Urine. It basically means making fun of someone.

 A word used to insult someone who has offended you. It means a person 42

Twat

who is a stupid and lacks good sense of judgement. It is also a slang for female genitals.

To be available. When a Brit say they are up for it, it means you are willing 43

Up for it

to come along. E.g.  You up for going down the pub?” “Yeah mate, i’m up for it” Uni : short word for university

This is a derogatory term used to describe someone who is a bit of a jerk. 44

Wanker

It actually means someone who masturbates and also has a hand signal that can be done with one hand at people that cannot see you shouting  “wanker” at them. This is particularly useful when driving.

This has a couple of meanings. If something you do is a “wind up” it means 45

Wind up

you are making fun of someone. However it you are “wound up” it means you are annoyed.

15 Essential English Idioms for Sounding Like a  Native  An idiom is a phrase or a fixed expression that has a figurative, or sometimes literal, meaning. An idiom’s figurative meaning is different from the literal meaning. There are thousands of idioms, and they occur frequently in all languages. It is estimated that there are at least twenty-five thousand idiomatic expressions in the English language. Here’s a run down on some of the most common English Idioms used by native teenagers and young adults.  It will help you understand your friends better in daily situations such as hanging out with your friends in a Bar.

15 Essential English Idioms for ESL Students No.

1

Idioms

Up in the air

Meaning

Example

 “(to be) up in the air” is and English Idiom meaning

“I   think I can do it quickly, but the

that something has not been resolved, finished or

exact schedule is still up in the

answered yet. It usually refers to a plan or a decision

air .”  

that has not been decided or being uncertain.

This idiom simply means to study, especially with 2

Hit the books

particular intensity. It is used as a verb – hit the books.

3

Hit the sack 

5

6

arm

Stab someone in the back 

Lose touch

then they wonder why they get bad grades”  

“…A   soldier gets tired feet and is

 You can also say “hit the hay” which has the same

eager to hit the sack .”  

The idiom “twist someone’s arm” generally means Twist someone’s

should be hitting the books and

 “(to) hit the sack ” generally means to go to bed. meaning.

4

“They  go to the beach when they

to persuade someone to do something. If someone twisted your arm , it means that someone

“Tim e to hit the hay”  

“They  had to twist his arm   , but they got him to join the project”  

has done a great job of convincing you to do

“Uhm, you’ve twisted my arm . Ok

something you might not have wanted to do.

John, I’ll  go with you”  

The saying “stab someone in the back ” simply means to betray someone. It is used as a verb – stab someone in the back.

“He  was stabbed in the back by his friends.”  

The idiom “(to) lose touch” means to cease to be

“Suddenly,  friends found me again

familiar with someone or something (e.g. some

that I had lost touch  with years

certain skills or talent). This also refers to the lost in

ago”  

the ability to communicate or have contact with

“It  looks like you’ve lost your

others. To make it simple, if you lose your touch,

touch with the girls in class”  

you lose your ability or skills you once had when working with things/situations, or dealing/communicating with people.

The saying “(to) sit tight” means to wait patiently or 7

Sit tight

to remain quiet or relatively motionless. If somebody

“I’ll  be back in a few minutes,

tells you to sit tight , they would like you to wait and

so sit tight  while I go find her”  

take no action until they say otherwise.

8

Pitch in

The saying “pitch in” is an English idiom simply

“If   we all pitch in   , we can raise

meaning to help out, to lend assistance; or to

enough money for the renovation

contribute. It is used as a verb – pitch in.

of the church”  

The saying “pull someone’s leg” means to tease someone, to lead someone on or to goad someone 9

Pull someone’s leg

into overreacting. The term usually implies teasing or goading by jokingly lying. A brief translation of this saying could be to “fool or trick someone”.

10

Face the music

“I  hadn’t  pulled Ms Jane’s  leg  for any of that stuff, she had just handed it to me on a platter, and that wasn’t  my fault”  

The idiom “(to) face the music” means to accept or

“He  failed the exam as he was so

confront the unpleasant consequences of one’s

lazy. So he’s  going to have to face

actions. It is used as a verb – face the music.

the music ”  

The saying “(to be) on the ball”  is typically used to reference someone that is alert, active, or attentive. A 11

On the ball

brief translation of this idiom would be “ on top of

“If   I had been more on the ball  I

thing s”.

would have asked when he called

If you say someone is “on the ball”, you mean that he

me”  

or she understands the situation well.

12

Rule of thumb

The saying “rule of thumb” refers to a general

“The   usual rule of thumb  says

guideline, rather than a strict rule. Thus “rule of

that to calculate when an

thumb” is a common understanding which is based on

investment will double, divide 70 by

experience or general knowledge.

the interest rate.”  

This idiom is very simple. Particularly, the saying 13

Ring a bell

 “ring a bell” means to seem at least vaguely familiar. It is used as a verb – ring a bell.

The saying “(to be) under the weather” is 14

Under the weather

generally used to reference someone that is somewhat ill or gloomy. So “feeling a bit under the weather ” simply means feeling slightly ill.

“His  face rings a bell . I wonder if I know him from somewhere.”  

“I’m  sorry, I feel a bit under the weather   , I think I cannot join the party tonight”  

The idiom “blow off steam” simply means to rant 15

Blow off steam

(talk loudly and in a way that shows anger ) or shout in order to relieve stress. It is used as a verb – blowoff steam.

“Don’t   take it personally when he shouts like that. He’s  just blowing off steam ”  

Speaking English: 10 Simple Tips for Improving English Speaking Skill Do you want to learn how to improve your English speaking? Do you want to speak English well? For ESL students and English learners, to improve your spoken English, the best thing to do is to talk with a native speaker. However, this is not the only choice we have to be able to master a language like English. Here we’re going to explain how.

10 Simple Tips for Improving Your English Speaking Speaking English Tip 1. Practice to think in English  As a rule of thumb, the most important key to English fluency is the ability to think in English, so you need to practice to think in English as native speakers do. Here are some useful tips to help you improve this typical skill.

o

Stop the habit of translating between languages (if you have)

o

Use an English to English dictionary to look up words

o

Try to think in English anywhere, anytime. A student shared with us that she usually walks in the park and trying to describe people around her in English by using as much adjectives as she can. You can do the same, or create your own method to practice thinking English whenever you have “free time” to think.

 You’ll notice that when you think in English, it’s easier for you to speak in English.

Speaking English Tip 2. Talk to yourself in English Whenever you’re at home, you can practice your English with your favorite person: yourself. The following  tips would help you to talk to yourself in English.

o

Read out loud from your favorite books

o

Speak out loud with your own thoughts in English on certain topics (e.g. sports, family)

o

Use a mirror to practice as you can see your partner J

o

Use a recording device (e.g. your phone) to record what you read/speak (you will be able to hear yourself speaking English and then finding out the pros and cons of your tone, pronunciation and even accent).

The most significant benefit of this method is that you will be more comfortable in speaking English and be aware of your own strengths as well as weaknesses in speaking. Then you can find the right tips to improve the specific weak points in your spoken English.

Speaking English Tip 3. Get a friend or partner to practice It is always easier to improve your English with a friend or a partner especially if he or she is a native speaker. There are many ways to get to know such individuals online. However, you should be careful when talking or making friends with others on the internet. It is suggested that you should join a language exchange website (e.g. fluentland.com) to find native language exchange parners  – it’s a win-win situation.

Speaking English Tip 4. Read English Books, Newspapers Reading English Books can open your mind to brilliant new worlds and take you to a new level of English language learning. The key to success is choosing the right book for you. If you do not know where to begin, you should find something that interests you. Newspapers are also worth reading. Not only you can improve your English but you’ll learn about what’s going on, which can be  handy when talking with native speakers.

Speaking English Tip 5. Watch English TV Shows, Movies Watch TV shows or YouTube videos in English is another great way to help you  – use them to improve your fluency. How will you do it?

o

Pick a short part of your favorite TV shows

o

Repeat what the speakers are saying line by line

o

Try to sound just like them (matching the tone, speed and even the accent) – record yourself speaking if you can.

o

Imagine that you are trying to learn a new song in English and you want to sing as good as the singer.

It doesn’t matter if you miss a few words, the important thing is to keep speaking. By practicing this method many times, you will notice that your spoken English will sound more like a native. If you’re tired of reading books, there’s nothing better than learning English through movies and film. This might be the mos t fun way to learn English. You should choose a film with English subtitles which allow you to check up new words. I would recommend the “Friends” TV Movie for you, watching this series kills two birds with one stone. It makes you laugh you heart out and will help to improve your English in a natural way.

Speaking English Tip 6. Writing Everyday in English Writing is a great way of using new vocabulary and getting your head around grammar. Try and write something every day using new words and grammar that you’ve learned. Even if it’s only a few sentences, it’s very important to get into the habit of doing this.

Speaking English Tip 7. Learn with English songs.

Singing along to your favorite English songs is a great method for you to become more fluent. You will get familiar with the sound of English and have better understanding of the English language’s rhythm, tone and beat. Moreover, singing along to your favori te English songs will help you to remember new words easier as you are singing with your emotion.

Speaking English Tip 8. Learn phrases and English Idioms  As a rule of thumb, you should learn word phrases, not just words in English. For example, you can say “ how do you feel today?”   (the same way with your native language) but an English native speaker might say “ how’re  you doing? ” or “what’s  up? ” instead. So one of the key to become more fluent in spoken English is to master English phrases.  You should learn English phrases, not individual words. English idioms and slang are also used so often in everyday English, if you don’t know them, it’s almost impossible to understand the context. Learning common everyday English idioms will help you fit in with most situations and your spoken English will sound more like a native. It is recommended to use idiomsandslang.com which is an easy site to learn common idioms and slang in English.

Speaking English Tip 9. The most common sayings in daily English There are many common phrases which native speakers use in daily specific situations. For example, there are a great variety of ways to thank people in English, such as “you’ve  made my day ”, “that’s  so kind of you ”, etc. So, you should learn how to say your most commonly used phrases and words in English. Knowing them in English will help you speak as well in English as you do in your native language.

Speaking English Tip 10. Prepare for specific situations and don’t be afraid of making mistakes

People learn English for many specific reasons. One learns English so he or she can get a job in an English-speaking company. In that case, they should focus on practicing English for an interview. The others might just want to learn English so they can make more friends in  America. Then they would need a different kind of English. So the point here is to focus on your purpose of learning English, you will find the suitable preparation methods for your spoken English.  You’ll feel more confident if you’re prepared!  You should also remember that making mistakes when learning English is Good! Making mistakes is a natural part of learning English and they are only bad if you allow them to be, and if you don’t learn by them. If you really want to be able to speak English, yo u really need to practice speaking English anywhere anytime. So, don’t be afraid of making mistakes. Practice makes perfect!

Let's keep practicing your english skills, if you wish to improve your fluency try to do this: watch movies in english using CC (Closed Caption) in english as well, try to listen to music and check the spealling of the song, in that way you can increase the opportunities to enrich your english vocabulary and how you can pronunce the words!

“No hay malos estudiantes, sólo malos profesores” es el mantra de English Evolved. Al recibir un nuevo grupo de

clientes en su Curso de Iniciación, ellos miran al instructor con cara de sorpresa cuando éste dice, “En este curso, no tomarán notas ni harán tareas – porque su aprendizaje es nuestra responsabilidad”.

COMO APRENDER SIN TOMAR NOTAS. Tal vez pensarás: ¿Cómo se puede aprender

sin tomar notas o hacer tareas?

Daremos un ejemplo con el verbo

"hacer", "to do" . (la primera vez que lo enseñamos)

I nstructor: E studiante:

“¿Cómo se dice “hacer”?” “To do”.

I nstructor:

“¿Hacerlo?”

E studiante:

“To do it”.

Sabemos que olvidarán "to do" rápidamente. Entonces, inmediatamente, lo integramos con otros temas que ellos ya han aprendido.

I nstructor : “Quiero hacerlo” E studiante: “I want to do it”. I nstructor : “Quiero hacerlo hoy, pero no tengo el tiempo." E studiante: “I want to do it today, but I don’t have the time”.

Y luego, para desarrollar la confianza de los estudiantes, les hacemos una pregunta difícil:

I nstructor : “Quiero hacerlo hoy, pero no tengo el tiempo de hacerlo porque estoy demasiado ocupado para hacerlo.”

E studiante: “I want to do it today, but I don’t have the time to do it because I’m too busy to do it”. ( 10 M I N U T O S M Á S TA R D E ) Diez minutos más tarde, sabemos que han olvidado "hacer". No hay problema, esperamos esto. Les preguntamos otra vez.

I nstructor: E studiante:

“¿Cómo se dice “hacer”? “To do”.

( 30 M I N U T O S M Á S TA R D E )

I nstructor: E studiante:

“¿Cómo se dice “hacer”? “To do”.

(1 HORA MÁS TARDE )

I nstructor: E studiante:

“¿Cómo se dice “hacer”? “To do”.

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