Lips of Steel Baldwin Raph

September 29, 2017 | Author: Hemel Juan Pablo Patiño | Category: Trombone, Trumpet, Elementary Organology, Music Production, Hornbostel Sachs
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Un libro complementario al estudio de todo instrumentista de bronce...

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Lips of Steel 22 Endurance Etudes

for Trombone  (and Baritone

)

plus a warm-up and embouchure conditioner

by David Baldwin

Revised and edited for Trombone

by Alan Raph

THEODORE

Cover design: Andy Dowty

PRESSER

COMPANY

HOW AND WHY TO USE THIS BOOK by David Baldwin The Lips of sTeeL “warm-up aND emBouCHure CoNDiTioNer” is a routine i have used for many years for myself, and i recommend it to all my students. These are all ideas i learned from my teacher at Yale university, robert Nagel. i suggest you work on all ten exercises, but in a slightly different way every day. i personally feel that a warmup should not take more than 15 to 20 minutes. sometimes i do a whole series of repetitions of one exercise and sometimes one or two will suffice, depending on how I feel and what level of playing i’ve done the day before. each player must experiment and find the routine that fits best. please read the introductions to the etudes each time you play them. repetition is one of the most important aspects of building good endurance. i also encourage you to read and re-read THe seVeN seCreTs of eNDuraNCe on the facing page. These ideas will help bring you to a more confident attitude toward endurance and bring you closer to having “lips of steel.” Get together with a friend and play these studies, trading phrases. in this way you are resting as much as you play, so you can play a lot longer, which builds strength. play as many as you can in a row with 30 seconds in between them. also, when playing with someone else you have motivation to keep going rather than stopping for a technical problem.

These etudes, for the most part, are based on several previous compositions of mine: Music for Al’s Breakfast for brass quintet (1982); More Music for Al’s Breakfast (1984); Music for Al’s Breakfast III (1987) [all published by Balquhidder music]; Concerto for Seven Trumpets and Timpani (1985) [published by Queen City Brass publications, distributed by manduca music publications]; and Notes for Brass Quintet (1973). etudes 20 and 21 were composed for this book. Thanks to alan raph for his thorough understanding and care in turning the original trumpet book into a trombone book. i would like to thank my wife, Dr. Christine Baldwin for her encouragement, and Daniel Dorff (Theodore presser Company) for his expertise in editing. also i would like to thank Lynn erickson (st. paul Chamber orchestra) and Chuck Lazarus (minnesota orchestra) for their kindness in playing these studies and offering thoughtful suggestions.

- David Baldwin may 2011

i often play an etude with a student, alternating lines so both of us put maximum effort into playing, while resting an equal amount of time. sometimes, i’ll have a student play three lines and i’ll play one. The point is to build in resting points for the embouchure. Here’s another idea: play only the last four lines of an etude; then the last seven lines; then the second page and gradually the whole etude, planning for rest when needed to make it to the end and feel strong. The first two times through an etude, pause at the end of each phrase and count out loud four measures and continue. Then the next time count two measures and concentrate on relaxing the lip completely. Gradually you can train yourself to relax more quickly.

* * * Some material published in this book originally appeared in the International Trumpet Guild Journal under the titles “Warmup and Embouchure Conditioning Routines” (September 1993, Vol. 18, No. 1) and “The Seven Secrets of Endurance” (December 1996, Vol. 21, No. 2). It is used here with the knowledge and permission of the organization. For more information on the ITG, visit their website (www.trumpetguild.org).

FOREWORD TO THE TROMBONIST by Alan Raph We learn from each other. Many of my tromboneplaying abilities were picked up by trying to emulate other instruments. For instance, for pure intense upper register sound I listened to and tried to emulate the French horn. For low register “bite,” the bassoon and contrabassoon; for middle register and intensity and definition, the English horn and cello; for control at a low volume, the clarinet; for brilliance, the trumpet; flexibility and clarity, the trumpet; for sheer excitement, the trumpet. For endurance, who needs to develop it more than the trumpeter? Endurance is our focus, and the main purpose of this book is to help bring it about. In the jazz band, as in the orchestra, the trombone is very often in a supporting role to the trumpet. The trumpet is the leader. Therefore when the brass is playing as a section, the first trombone is often using its extreme upper register to support rather than to lead. The trombonist needs to approach the high notes differently as a supporting player from as a lead player. This often affects the endurance factor. * * * There are many similarities between the trumpet and the trombone, but for the moment we’ll look at a few differences. 1. Slide vs. valves: the main difference is obvious, but trombones have been phrasing with the trumpets for 200 years with very few problems; in fact the valve trombone gave way to the slide trombone rather early in the game. 2. The trombone has a more extensive range than the trumpet, and with the use of the F-attachment it goes places that the trumpet does not. 3. Trumpets play faster using their valves; trombonists need to separate notes with various types of tonguing. 4. Trumpets can change notes by moving about an inch (i.e., pressing a valve); the trombonist sometimes needs to move two feet of tubing between notes. 5. Trombones are heavier (although many trumpets are pretty heavy). 6. Trumpet players blow air, change lip settings and press valves; trombone players blow more air, change lip settings, move the slide, and press the valve(s), very often all at the same time. 7. Trumpets set the style, trombones “fit in.” 8. Trombonists look cooler however!

The trombone endurance factor also involves holding the instrument (especially on F-attachment trombones and bass trombones). A certain amount of rest is needed to build up hand and arm endurance. Taking a short rest before actually becoming fatigued is highly recommended as a good way to build this endurance. Finally we need to consider mental endurance; staying focused, not drifting. Once we start going through the motions of playing a given exercise without actively pursuing a goal, we are in trouble. Short periods of rest, taken often, is the key factor in increasing endurance. SLIDE POSITIONS Trombone slide positions (1-7) are used throughout this book. Altered positions are marked accordingly (such as #2, (4). Baritone horn players should refer to Section 4 on page 5 for valve/slide equivalents. - Alan Raph May 2011

CONTENTS How and Why to Use This Book...............................2 Foreword to the Trombonist.....................................3 Contents ....................................................................4 The Seven Secrets of Endurance..............................5 Warm-up and Embouchure Conditioner..................6 22 ENDURANCE ETUDES 1. Power Through Rest ...........................................10 2. Dynamic Exaggeration .......................................12 3. Chunking .............................................................14 4. Sing from the Heart ............................................16 5. Building the Dynamics .......................................17 6. Mindful Waiting..................................................18 7. Shorten the Long Notes ......................................20 8. The Low Blow......................................................22 9. A Line at a Time .................................................24 10. Time Your Rest .................................................26 11. Tonguing Variety ..............................................28 12. Steady Embouchure..........................................29 13. Count While Resting.........................................30 14. Blast from the Past ...........................................32 15. Release the Pressure.........................................33 16. Breathe Long.....................................................34 17. Twelve-tone Challenges....................................35 18. Breathe Strong ..................................................36 19. Marching Intervals ...........................................38 20. Lip Slur Magic...................................................40 21. Slower Wins the Race .......................................42 22. Romantic Style ..................................................44



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