Leadership and Administration

January 28, 2018 | Author: United States Militia | Category: Non Commissioned Officer, United States Marine Corps, Leadership & Mentoring, Leadership, Profession
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MCI 8101

MARINE CORPS INSTITUTE STAFF NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS CAREER DISTANCE EDUCATION PROGRAM

LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATION

MARINE BARRACKS WASHINGTON, DC

LEADERSHIP ANDADMINISTRATION (8101) Course Introduction

Scope

The responsibilities of SNCOs increase with every rank reached. As an NCO, you will need continuing education on a variety of subjects to master these additional responsibilities. Technical and tactical proficiency is the hallmark of the Marine Gunnery Sergeant. This course covers a wide range of subjects that will enhance your abilities in maintaining the high standards expected of the senior noncommissioned officer ranks.

References

The following references were used in the writing of this course: • MCRP 6-11B w/ch1, Marine Corps Values: A User's Guide For Discussion Leaders. • MCO P1070.12K w/ch1, Individual Records Admin Manual (IRAM). • MCCS, http://www.usmc.mccs.org. • Key Volunteer Network, HQ Bn. Volunteer Program, Henderson Hall. • Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, http://nmcrs.org. • Employee/ Member Self Service, http://emss.dfas.mil. • MCO 1740.13B, Family Care Plans. • Internal Revenue Service, IRS, http://www.irs.gov. • Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. • United Service Organizations, USO, www.uso.org/ • Marine Corps Command Center, MCCC. HQMC. Arlington, VA. • Tricare, http://www.tricareonline.com/ • United Concordia, www.ucci.com. • American Red Cross, www.redcross.org. • DOD FMR Department of Defense Financial Management Regulations • Navy Mutual Aid Association • www.navymutual.org • Navy Federal Credit Union Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

i

Course Introduction

Course Introduction, Continued

References, continued

• MCO 6100.12, Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test and Body Composition Program Manual. • MCO P1900.16F, Separation and Retirement Manual. • MCO 1080.35F, Personnel Reporting Instructions Manual. • MCO 5000.12D, Pregnancy and Parenthood. • MCO P10110.17C W/CH 1 & 2, Marine Corps Nutrition and Menu Planning Manual. • NSCA, Quick Series Guide to Basic Weight Training Guide. • NSCA, Quick Series Guide to Performance Nutrition. • NSCA, Quick Series Guide to Aerobic Training. • MCO P1610.7E w/erratum and ch 1-8, Performance Evaluation System (PES). • SECNAVINST 5210.11D, Department of the Navy File Maintenance. Procedures and Standard Subject Identification Codes (SSIC). • SECNAVINST 5215.1C, Directives Issuance System. • SECNAVINST 5216.5D, Department of the Navy Correspondence Manual. • MCO 5210.11D, Records Management Program for the Marine Corps. • MCO 5215.1H, Marine Corps Directives. • MCO 5600.20M w/ch1, Marine Corps Warfighting Publications System. • MCO 5600.49, Marine Corps Doctrinal Proponency. • MCBUL 5600, i, canc: Nov 03. • UM-MCPDS 5605, Marine Corps Publications Distribution System (MCPDS) Users Manual. • TBS Student Handout, B0142, The Marine Corps Directives System. • PERSONNEL ADMIN SCHOOL • Lesson Plan A0301 Prepare File Folder • Lesson Plan A0302 Files Outline • Student Outline Directives • Covey, Stephen R., The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People: Simon and Schuster, 1989. • AR 25-50, Preparing and Managing Correspondence. • DA Pamphlet 600-67, i. • Effective Army Writing Subcourse Number IS1460 Edition A, Center for Army Leadership, Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Edition Date: June 1999. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Course Introduction

Course Introduction, Continued

Table of Contents

The following is the table of contents for this course. Study Unit -1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Estimated Study Time

Title Course Introduction Introduction to Leadership Proficiency and Conduct Marks Evaluating Personal and Family Readiness Financial Planning Weight Control and Military Appearance Personnel Records Files, Directives, and Publications Effective Communications Review Lesson Exercise

Page i 1-1 2-1 3-1 4-1 5-1 6-1 7-1 8-1 R-1

You will spend about 21 hours, 40 minutes completing this course. This includes the time you will need to study the text, complete the exercises, and take the final examination. Continued on next page

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Course Introduction

Course Introduction, Continued

Reserve Retirement Credits

You earn 7 retirement credits for completing this course. You earn reserve retirement credits at the rate of one credit for each 3 hours of estimated study time. Note: Reserve retirement credits are not awarded for the MCI study you do during drill periods if awarded credits for drill attendance.

Summary

The table below summarizes all-important “gateways” needed to successfully complete this course. Step

When you…

Then you will…

1

Enroll in the program

2

Complete the selfpaced text Pass the final examination

Receive your program material Arrange to take the final examination Receive a course completion certificate

3

MCI Course 8101

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For more information… Refer to the Program Introduction Refer to the Program Introduction Refer to the Program Introduction

Course Introduction

STUDY UNIT 1 INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP Overview

Estimated Study Time

1 hour, 10 minutes

Unit Scope

This study unit discusses the philosophy, foundation, and ethics of leadership. It also outlines the differences in leadership styles. This unit then reviews the role of the staff noncommissioned officer (SNCO) relative to seniors and subordinates.

Learning Objectives

After completing this study unit, you should be able to

In This Study Unit



Identify characteristics of leadership.



Identify the role of the SNCO.

This study unit contains the following lessons: Topic Lesson 1 Leadership Characteristics Lesson 2 Role of Staff Noncommissioned Officers (SNCOs)

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Study Unit 1

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Study Unit 1

LESSON 1 LEADERSHIP CHARACTERISTICS Introduction

Estimated Study Time

20 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson discusses the characteristics and foundations of leadership. Leadership has two objectives: mission accomplishment and troop welfare. As a leader, you must have some tools to evaluate the climate of leadership in your unit.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to

Lesson



Identify the four indicators of leadership.



Identify the Marine Corps leadership traits.



Identify the Marine Corps leadership principles.



Identify the Marine Corps leadership styles.

This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Leadership Indicators Leadership Traits Leadership Principles Leadership Styles Lesson 1 Exercise

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See Page 1-3 1-4 1-5 1-7 1-9 1-10

Study Unit 1, Lesson 1

Leadership Indicators

Four Indicators

The four indicators of leadership are • • • •

Morale Esprit de corps Discipline Proficiency

Morale

Morale is the individual’s state of mind. It depends on the Marine’s attitude toward everything.

Esprit de Corps

Factors that constitute morale are loyalty to, pride in, and enthusiasm for the unit shown by its members. Whereas, morale refers to the Marine’s attitude, esprit de corps is the unit spirit.

Discipline

Discipline is the individual or group attitude that ensures prompt obedience to orders and the initiation of appropriate action in the absence of orders.

Proficiency

Proficiency is the technical, tactical, and physical ability of the Marine and the unit to perform the assigned mission.

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 1

Leadership Traits

Traits

The Marine Corps recognizes 14 leadership traits: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Bearing Courage Decisiveness Dependability Endurance Enthusiasm Initiative Integrity Judgment Justice Knowledge Loyalty Tact Unselfishness

Bearing

Bearing is presenting a favorable impression at all times in carriage, appearance, and personal conduct.

Courage

Courage is recognizing fear, danger, or criticism and despite them, proceeding with calmness and firmness.

Decisiveness

Decisiveness is the ability to promptly decide and to communicate your decisions in a clear and forceful manner.

Dependability

Dependability is the certainty of proper performance of duty. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 1

Leadership Traits, Continued

Endurance

Endurance is mental and physical stamina measured by the ability to withstand pain, fatigue, stress, and hardship.

Enthusiasm

Enthusiasm is the display of sincere interest and exuberance in the performance of duty.

Initiative

Initiative is the ability to act in the absence of orders.

Integrity

Integrity is characterized by uprightness of character, soundness of moral principles, and honesty.

Judgment

Judgment is the ability to weigh facts to reach sound decisions.

Justice

Justice is rewarding and punishing according to the merits of the case in question.

Knowledge

Knowledge is the understanding of a science or an art and includes the Marine’s range of information, professional knowledge, and understanding of your Marines.

Loyalty

Loyalty is faithfulness to yourself, your peers, subordinates, and seniors and to your unit, the Corps, and your country.

Tact

Tact is the ability to deal with others without creating offense.

Unselfishness

Unselfishness is characterized by avoiding to provide for your own comfort and personal advancement at the expense of others.

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 1

Leadership Principles

Principles

Leadership principles are the guidelines a leader uses when selecting appropriate actions and orders. As a leader, you must use and reinforce these principles at all times. • • • • • • • • • • •

Proficiency

SelfImprovement

Proficiency Self-improvement Caring for others Communication Example Confirmation Teamwork Decisiveness Developing subordinates Knowing capabilities Initiative and responsibility

Be technically and tactically proficient. Leaders must know their job thoroughly and have a wide range of knowledge.

Know yourself and seek self-improvement. Leaders must know their weaknesses and strengths and must continually strive to increase their technical and tactical knowledge.

Caring for Others

Know your Marines and look out for their welfare. Leaders must know their Marines both personally and professionally. Daily interaction gives some indication of how their subordinates will function in a combat environment.

Communication

Keep your personnel informed. The Marine who is well informed about the mission, situation, and purpose of a particular task is more effective than one who is not informed. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 1

Leadership Principles, Continued

Example

Leaders must convey good examples to their Marines and actively display integrity, courage, physical fitness, discipline, professional competence, good personal appearance, and exemplary personal conduct.

Confirmation

Leaders must give clear and concise orders. Make sure the task is understood, supervised, and accomplished. By proper supervision, leaders make sure their orders are properly carried out.

Teamwork

Train your Marines as a team. Before participating in an operation, ensure that your Marines know their job and then train them to work together as a team.

Decisiveness

Make sound and timely decisions. The ability to make a rapid estimate of the situation and to arrive at a sound decision is essential for all leaders.

Developing Subordinates

Develop a sense of responsibility among subordinates. Delegate authority and give your subordinates greater responsibilities.

Knowing Capabilities

Employ your command in line with its capabilities. Leaders must know the limitations and capabilities of their unit and employ it in accordance with those capabilities.

Initiative and Responsibility

Seek and take responsibility for your actions and the actions of your unit. As a leader, you must be willing to take the initiative and take on added responsibilities without receiving instructions from your superiors. Once you take this initiative, you are responsible for the failure or success of your unit.

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 1

Leadership Styles

Definition

Leadership style is the leader’s behavioral pattern as perceived by the Marines who the leader is attempting to influence, guide, or direct.

Continuum of Styles

Leadership styles fall along a continuum; this continuum depicts two extreme leadership approaches:

Variation

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Autocratic - the leader makes all decisions for subordinates and tells them what to do, how, when, where, etc.



Democratic - the leader allows subordinates to decide within general or mission type guidelines set by the senior.

Between these two extremes are variations. These leadership style variations depend on how much authority and direction is either kept by the leader or is delegated to the subordinate. We can divide the continuum into four basic styles. •

Telling - the leader makes the decision and announces it.



Selling - the leader presents decision and invites questions.



Participating - the leader presents problem, gets suggestions, and makes decision.



Delegating - the leader defines limits and permits subordinates to make decisions.

1-9

Study Unit 1, Lesson 1

Lesson 1 Exercise Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 11 performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

Which of the following lists the four indicators of leadership? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Esprit de corps is best described as a. b. c. d.

Items 3 Through 7

Dedicated, competent, responsible, knowledgeable Competent, discipline, esprit de corps, knowledgeable Proficiency, morale, esprit de corps, discipline Proficiency, morale, leadership, decisiveness

guidelines for leadership principles. a realistic approach to leadership. enthusiasm and loyalty to the unit. the projection of the leaders personality.

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the definition from column 2 that best describes the leadership trait in column 1. The answers in column 2 may not be used more than once. Column 1

Column 2

Leadership traits

Definitions

___3. ___4. ___5. ___6. ___7.

a. b. c. d. e.

Bearing Loyalty Initiative Unselfishness Judgment

Action in the absence of orders Faithfulness to country Favorable impressions Ability to reach sound decisions Avoiding to provide for your own comfort Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Item 8

Keeping your personnel informed is which leadership principle? a. b. c. d.

Item 9

Knowing your Marines and looking out for their welfare is which leadership principle? a. b. c. d.

Item 10

Teamwork Caring for others Knowing capabilities Self-improvement

Leadership style can be defined as the leader’s _____ pattern as _____ by the Marine who the leader is attempting to influence, guide, or direct. a. b. c. d.

Item 11

Caring for others Developing subordinates Communication Confirmation

physical, determined behavioral, perceived perception, acknowledged behavioral, determined

The leader defines limits and permits subordinates to make decisions can be described as which leadership style? a. b. c. d.

Democratic Telling Autocratic Delegating Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the correct answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

MCI Course 8101

Answer c c c b a e d c b b d

1-12

Reference 1-4 1-4 1-5 1-6 1-6 1-6 1-6 1-7 1-7 1-9 1-9

Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Exercise

LESSON 2 ROLE OF STAFF NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS (SNCOS) Introduction

Estimated Study Time

30 minutes

Lesson Scope

The SNCOs are frequently referred to as the backbone of the Marine Corps. In many respects, this is true, for the SNCO handles most of the day-to-day, close supervision of the Marines in their platoons. This lesson describes the professionalism and ethics SNCOs demonstrate in the conduct of day-to-day operations with subordinates and seniors.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to

In This Lesson



Identify the characteristics of a professional.



Identify the documents in which the military code of ethics may appear.



Identify proper conduct of day-to-day supervision of subordinates.



Identify SNCO responsibilities to seniors.

This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Professionalism and Ethics Responsibilities to Subordinates Responsibilities to Senior SNCOs and Officers Lesson 2 Exercise

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See Page 1-13 1-14 1-16 1-20 1-21

Study Unit 1, Lesson 2

Professionalism and Ethics

Definition of a Professional

Military professionals are people who have undergone special preparation and training. They have the knowledge on which professional actions are based and the ability to apply that knowledge in a practical way. Their profession is a means of earning a living, but wages do not become the primary purpose of their work. The professional Marine must be competent, responsible, and dedicated.

Why Is Professionalism Important?

A Marine is a public servant who is responsible for the defense of the nation. A leader is responsible for the lives of their Marines. In combat, they may have to take risks, which endanger their lives to accomplish a mission. If leaders are careless and have not conditioned themselves and trained their followers to act professionally, a unit may suffer needless casualties. A Marine, like other members of the armed services, must follow a unique value system that sets them apart from the rest of society. This value system is based upon obedience, courage, discipline, selflessness, and honor.

Careerists

Careerists are Marines who seek advancement for their own sake and who see it exclusively as a goal rather than an opportunity to do something of greater value for their nation and the Marine Corps.

Occupation Versus Profession

Marines for whom being a Marine is an occupation rather than a profession are motivated by money instead of the nature of the profession and its associated responsibilities. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 2

Professionalism and Ethics, Continued

Problems

Careerists and Marines who view their position as an occupation are hurting the professional image Marines have developed in more than 220 years of service to this country. These two types of Marines are harmful to unit readiness and the individual’s ability to perform in combat. Leaders must aggressively attack both problems by •

Objectively evaluating subordinates and counseling them accordingly



Setting the example for subordinates and living a life according to the military ethic



Continually emphasizing the important and essential function of Marines: keeping the nation secure



Setting and enforcing standards that will not tolerate or support the actions of careerists or those for whom being a Marine is just an occupation

Definition

Ethics, generally interchangeable with morality, has been described as the science that deals with conduct insofar as what is considered right or wrong, good or bad. Webster defines ethics as the principles of conduct governing an individual, profession, or group.

The Military Code of Ethics

The Marine Corps does not have a specific code written as one document. The Corps’ code or military ethic exists in many forms and documents. It is primarily the ethical practices that society accepts and the legal system supports. The following documents contain Marine Corps ethical practices: • • • •

MCI Course 8101

Oath of Office Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) Code of Conduct Code of Ethics for Government Service

1-15

Study Unit 1, Lesson 2

Responsibilities to Subordinates

Set the Example

The SNCO is responsible for creating an environment that eliminates poor performance of duty. The SNCO should continuously set the standard and maintain an even temper. The phrase do as I say, not as I do simply does not work. SNCOs following such a philosophy only come across as hypocrites or phony to their subordinates. The best subordinates will ignore them; the worst subordinates will take license for their wrongdoings and multiply the problem. The SNCO exhibits and demands professionalism by • • • • • •

Boundaries

Knowing the boundaries of the SNCO position Providing continuous training, instructions, and counseling Supervising with an eye for matching subordinates with equivalent tasks Encouraging initiative Using the chain of command in two directions (up and down) Demonstrating integrity and fairness when dealing with others

In addition to setting the standard and the example, SNCOs must know the boundaries of their positions. SNCOs should be sure they always work with seniors in a professional manner and clearly understand their own limits of position relative to their seniors. SNCOs will not issue orders for which they do not have the authority to enforce. By issuing an order without the authority to enforce it, the SNCO can lose a great deal of respect from subordinates and seniors when forced to withdraw the order. SNCOs must know what degree of authority has been granted to them and what they are allowed to use as rewards and incentives. If you do not have the authority to say when liberty is granted, when a person is going to be promoted, or when a Marine is going to be selected to perform a highly sought after task, be careful not to imply that you have this power. You should make it clear to your subordinates that you do not have this authority, but that your recommendations are generally accepted in these areas. When a subordinate has accomplished an especially creditable piece of work, make sure they get the proper reward in a timely fashion. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 2

Responsibilities to Subordinates, Continued

Training, Instructions, and Counseling

SNCOs must mold subordinates by providing constructive training, clear instructions, and continuous counseling. These three elements are essential to improve subordinates’ performance of duty and growth. Training builds teamwork, confidence and enhances knowledge and skills. Clear instructions ensure that requirements are easily understood and completed. Counseling establishes communication with subordinates and provides detailed explanation of what is required and expected in the performance of duty standards.

Supervision

The SNCO should observe all subordinates performing assigned duties and evaluate subordinates daily to be sure they all are productive in their assignment. The SNCO can then make changes when necessary. Motivation and challenge are positive incentives to build and keep high morale in the ranks of subordinates. Therefore, do not place Marines in jobs for which they lack knowledge and skill or they will lose motivation. Nor should you place Marines in jobs for which their ability, knowledge, and skill far exceed the requirement to perform the job. Doing so removes the challenge and deteriorates motivation. The point is to match the Marine’s knowledge and skill with the required tasks to provide challenging, but attainable jobs to each Marine.

Initiative

For subordinates to reach their maximum potential, they must have the opportunity to exercise their skills. The NCOs, especially, must be given the opportunity to use their own initiative even though mistakes due to lack of knowledge and experience as well as errors in judgment may occur. SNCOs must provide opportunities for subordinates, NCOs in particular, to demonstrate initiative instead of doing the job for the subordinate. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 2

Responsibilities to Subordinates, Continued

Chain of Command

Environment

For a Marine organization to work at maximum efficiency, the chain of command must operate in two directions: •

Up – small problems can be brought to the attention of the command without fear of consequences or a perception of seniors being unapproachable or uncaring.



Down – information flows openly all the way from the top of the chain to the bottom.

SNCOs must conduct day-to-day operations in an environment that • • •

Integrity

Encourages subordinates to seek advice and counsel. Provides fair and impartial treatment. Accepts subordinates’ suggestion for improved performance.

SNCOs should be as good as their word at all times and in any circumstances. On many occasions, subordinates will try to get you to compromise your integrity. If you do so, they will be quick to take advantage of the situation and tempt you repeatedly. Eventually their true feelings of disrespect and contempt will appear. Once this occurs, it will be almost impossible for you to regain your self-respect and your authority over them. Your subordinates want you to do what is right, and they must know without a doubt that they can depend on you to be consistent with your words in all that you do. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 2

Responsibilities to Subordinates, Continued

Fairness

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Fairness is another element necessary to build and maintain good leadership. To relate to subordinates fairly, you must •

Treat people justly. This does not mean that you treat all Marines alike. Instead, you must study your subordinates carefully. When you are certain you have discovered all the factors that apply to the case, you apply an appropriate corrective action. That action must neither be too harsh nor too easy. It must be tailored to the situation and the individuals involved and still be fair to all parties involved.



Handle mistakes appropriately. When a subordinate makes a mistake, examine the incident to determine the seriousness and the actions of the individual Marine. If the Marine’s intentions were good and no signs indicate that the mistake was the result of laziness or indifference, the incident should be used as a training experience and not as an opportunity to chastise or belittle that Marine.



Exercise the privileges of rank with respect and dignity. When you desire respect from Marines, be sure you treat them with equal respect. Build up their self-respect. Overbearing and insulting treatment of subordinates are signs of cowardly leadership. Consideration, courtesy, and respect from leaders toward juniors are integral parts of discipline and good leadership.

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 2

Responsibilities to Senior SNCOs and Officers

SeniorSubordinate Relationship

As with the information, responsibilities flow up and down the chain of command. SNCOs, senior SNCOs, and officers must establish a mutually supporting relationship. They must exhibit a large degree of trust, confidence, and professional camaraderie between themselves. When this exists, the strong points of each can be exploited for the good of the organization, and shortcomings can be minimized.

Advisory Role

SNCOs at all levels must provide seniors with essential feedback and advice concerning problems within the unit and help seniors by supervising and counseling enlisted personnel. If the SNCO withholds advice for any reason or the senior perceives that his position is being undermined, the command is prone to be negatively impacted.

Professional Bearing

If the SNCO and senior demonstrate any indication that they are not working closely together, the other members of the unit will quickly sense it and may try to play one person against the other to the detriment of all. You must develop a mature, professional relationship based on mutual respect and a regard for human dignity with your seniors. Above all, present subordinates with a united front in all matters of concern to the organization.

Support

Leaders make decisions every day involving not only the service, but the morale and welfare of their subordinates. To demonstrate support for leaders and successful mission accomplishment, SNCOs should express their • • •

MCI Course 8101

Understanding of the decision-making process Understanding of their position in carrying out the senior’s policy Enthusiasm when communicating the information down the chain.

1-20

Study Unit 1, Lesson 2

Lesson 2 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 6 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

A military professional must have which three characteristics? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Readiness and the individual’s ability to perform in combat is affected negatively by a. b. c. d.

Item 3

Expertise, careerism, hard charging Careerism, occupationalist, enforcer Competent, responsible, dedicated Expertise, ethics, thoughtful

careerism and professionalism. professionalism and occupationalism. careerism and occupationalism. selfishness and individualism.

Which documents contain Military Code of Ethics? a. b. c. d.

UCMJ, Code of Conduct, Oath of Office DD214, FM 20-01, Military Leadership Profession of arms, philosophy of leadership, command management Civil disorders, combat training, conduct or inquiry Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Item 4

SNCOs have the responsibility for molding subordinates into Marines. Which of the following is a method that SNCOs use to mold their subordinate Marines? a. b. c. d.

Item 5

SNCOs must conduct day-to-day operations in an environment that a. b. c. d.

Item 6

Promise of promotion Displaying anger Clear instructions Showing favoritism

encourages subordinates to seek advice and counsel. clearly provides fair and impartial treatment. accepts subordinates’ suggestions for improved performance. all of the above.

Which of the following describes the relationship between SNCO and senior? a. b. c. d.

Selfish and withholding Informal and familiar Supporting and trusting Constructive and assuming Continued on next page

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6

MCI course 8101

Answer c c a c d c

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Reference 1-14 1-14 1-15 1-17 1-18 1-20

Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Exercise

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Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Exercise

STUDY UNIT 2 PROFICIENCY AND CONDUCT MARKS Overview

Estimated Study Time

50 minutes

Unit Scope

This study unit introduces the Marine Corps counseling program. It also discusses the procedures for advising Marines on recommending proficiency and conduct marks.

Learning Objectives

After completing this study unit, you should be able to

In This Study Unit



Identify the references that apply to proficiency and conduct mark assignment.



Identify standard of proficiency.



Identify the steps for recommending proficiency and conduct marks.



Identify standard of conduct.

This study unit contains the following lessons: Topic Lesson 1 Evaluating Marines Lesson 2 Standards for Proficiency and Conduct Marks

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Study Unit 2

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Study Unit 2

LESSON 1 EVALUATING MARINES Introduction

Estimated Study Time

15 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson discusses proficiency and conduct marks that play a prominent role in determining the type of discharge an enlisted Marine will receive. As an evaluation of our qualities and value to the Corps, comments and recommendations have significant impact in promotion, assignment, and career development. Therefore, it is imperative for any Marine in a leadership role to be able to recommend or write appropriate evaluations, and counsel other Marines concerning their performance. This lesson discusses the reference and occasions for assignment of proficiency and conduct marks for your Marines.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to •

Identify the reference that contains information on proficiency and conduct marks.



Identify the occasions that require proficiency and conduct marks.



Identify the effective dates for the occasions.



Identify the occasion codes.



Identify the filing instructions for occasions. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 2, Lesson 1

Introduction, Continued

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Counseling and Guidance Recommending Proficiency and Conduct Marks Lesson 1 Exercise

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See Page 2-3 2-5 2-6 2-8

Study Unit 2, Lesson 1

Counseling and Guidance

Who

All Marines should be continuously counseled about their overall performance of duty.

Why

Counseling is an inherent part of leadership. It is also an opportunity to guide those who have demonstrated the potential and desire for assignments of increased responsibility toward a career decision.

When

Counseling should begin when Marines first join a unit, continue at frequent intervals during their tour of duty, and terminate only upon detachment.

Initial Session

During the initial counseling sessions, the reporting senior should ensure that the Marine understands the nature and extent of their duties, standards of performance they are expected to achieve, and how the reporting senior will judge their performance.

Subsequent Sessions

In next sessions point out the degree to which the Marine has/has not met established performance standards and any noteworthy achievements or shortcomings to be corrected. All Marines have a vested interest in their standing among their peers and any suggestions or opportunities open to them for further career development.

Reference

Guidelines for the assignment of proficiency and conduct marks are contained in the MCO P1070.12_Individual Records Administration Manual (IRAM).

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Study Unit 2, Lesson 1

Recommending Proficiency and Conduct Marks

Procedure

The table below lists the steps for recommending proficiency and conduct marks. Step 1 2 3 4 5

Action Determine the Marine’s last proficiency and conduct marks. This gives the evaluator a base to build on. Look at the charts in the IRAM. Refer to counseling sheets on the Marine within the marking period. Recommend proper marks. Counsel the Marine on the recommended marks. Forward the recommended marks up the chain of command.

Note: The commanding officer has the final say on the proficiency and conduct marks the Marine actually receives.

Occasions

The following table lists the occasions for submitting proficiency and conduct marks on regular and reserve Marines. The table also contains the codes for each occasion. Occasion Transfer Temporary Disability Retired List (TDRL) Discharge Promotion to Corporal or Sergeant Reduction Declared Deserter (first day of UA period) Last Day Prior to Declaring Deserter To TAD TAD Complete Change of Primary Duty Service School Completion Semiannual (reported 31 January and 31 July) Annual (reported on 31 December) Completion of Annual Training Recommended (see MCO P1400.32) Active Duty Special Work (ADSW)

Regular Code TR DL DC PR RD DD PD TD TC CD SC SA ----RE ---

Reserve Code TR DL DC PR RD --------CD SC --AN AT RE RT

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

2-6

Study Unit 2, Lesson 1

Recommending Proficiency and Conduct Marks, Continued

Filing Occasions

The table below lists different situations where an occasion will take precedence over another. If… The effective date for transfer coincides with the requirement to report semiannual marks The Marine attends annual training within 90 days of the effective date for reporting annual marks The Marine receives a mark for any other occasion within 90 days of the effective date for reporting annual marks The effective date for annual marks coincides with any reporting occasion other than promotion or transfer

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2-7

Then… Transfer marks take precedence Report annual marks

Report annual marks of Not Applicable Annual marks take precedence

Study Unit 2, Lesson 1

Lesson 1 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 8 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

Which reference contains guidelines and standards for assignment of conduct and proficiency marks? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Which of the following are occasions for submitting proficiency and conduct marks? a. b. c. d.

Item 3

MCO P1080.35 Personnel Reporting Instruction Manual (PRIM) MCO P1070.12 Individual Records Administration Manual (IRAM) MCO 1610.11 Performance Evaluations, appeals Manual (PEAM) MCO P1400.29 Marine Corps Promotion Manual (MARCORPROMAN)

TAD 60 days or more and promotion Enlistment and discharge Company NJP and reduction Completion of service school and discharge

What are the effective dates when assigning semiannual proficiency and conduct marks for regular Marines? a. b. c. d.

31 January and 31 July 1 January and 1 December 1 July and 1 December 1 October and 1 April Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

2-8

Study Unit 2, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Item 4

What is the regular and reserve code for transfer? a. b. c. d.

Items 5 Through 8

TRAN TR TF TD

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the filing instruction from column 2 that best matches the occasion in column 1. The answers in column 2 may not be used more than once. Column 1

Column 2

Occasion

Filing Instruction

___5. If the effective date for transfer coincides with the requirement to report semi-annual marks ___6. If the Marine attends annual training within 90 days of the effective date for reporting annual marks ___7. If the Marine receives a mark for any other occasion within 90 days of the effective date for reporting annual marks ___8. If the effective date for annual marks coincides with any reporting occasion other than promotion or transfer

a. Report annual marks b. Annual marks take precedence c. Transfer marks take precedence d. Report annual marks of Not Applicable

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

2-9

Study Unit 2, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

MCI Course 8101

Answer b d a b c a d b

2-10

Reference 2-5 2-6 2-6 2-6 2-7 2-7 2-7 2-7

Study Unit 2, Lesson 1 Exercise

LESSON 2 STANDARDS FOR PROFICIENCY AND CONDUCT MARKS Introduction

Estimated Study Time

15 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson will provide guidelines that are necessary to properly evaluate Marines on proficiency and conduct. The IRAM sets the qualities and standards for recommending these marks. However, the commanding officer has the discretion to assign marks outside of these standards.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to

In This Lesson



Identify the qualities used to evaluate a Marine’s proficiency.



Identify the qualities used to evaluate a Marine’s conduct.



Identify the standards for proficiency and conduct and its corresponding adjective rating.

The table below lists the topics covered in this lesson. Topic Introduction Proficiency Marks Conduct Marks Lesson 2 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

2-11

See Page 2-11 2-12 2-14 2-17

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2

Proficiency Marks

Qualities

When recommending proficiency marks, all attributes of the Marine should be considered. • • • • • •

Education

Mission accomplishment Leadership Intellect and wisdom Individual character Physical fitness Personal appearance

Completion of professional military education, Marine Corps Institute courses, and off-duty education are evaluated and incorporated into the duty proficiency mark. Proper allowance should be made when a Marine is filling a billet inconsistent with the Marine’s grade.

Evaluation Marks

For an honorable discharge, the Marine must display proficiency marks averaging at least 3.0. Any mark below 3.0 not supported by documentation of a court-martial or non-judicial punishment requires an entry in the Administrative Remarks of the Service Record Book, page 11. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

2-12

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2

Proficiency Marks, Continued

Standards

The table below, guidelines from MCO P1070.12_ Individual Records Administration Manual (IRAM), lists the recommended proficiency marks and their corresponding adjective ratings.

Mark

0 to 1.9

Corresponding Adjective Rating

Standard of Proficiency • • •

Unacceptable

• 2 to 2.9

Unsatisfactory

3 to 3.9

Below Average

• • • •

4 to 4.4

Average

4.5 to 4.8

Excellent

• • • •

4.9 to 5.0

MCI Course 8101

Outstanding

2-13

Does unacceptable work in most duties Generally undependable Needs considerable assistance and close supervision on even the simplest assignment Does acceptable work in some duties but not dependable Needs assistance and close supervision on all but the simplest assignments Handles routine matters acceptably Needs close supervision when performing duties not of a routine nature Dependable in doing regular duties thoroughly and competently Usually needs assistance in dealing with problems not of a routine nature Does excellent work in all regular duties but needs assistance in dealing with extremely difficult or unusual assignments Does superior work in all duties Extremely difficult or unusual assignments given with full confidence the job will be thoroughly and competently completed

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2

Conduct Marks

Qualities

When recommending conduct marks, the evaluator must consider these qualities: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Evaluation Marks

Bearing Attitude Interest Reliability Courtesy Cooperation Obedience Adaptability Participation Physical fitness Moral fitness Influence on others

For an honorable discharge, the Marine must display conduct marks averaging at least 4.0. Any mark below 4.0 not supported by documentation of a court-martial or non-judicial punishment requires an entry in the Administrative Remarks of the Service Record Book, page 11. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

2-14

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2

Conduct Marks, Continued

Standards

The table below, guidelines from MCO P1070.12_ Individual Records Administration Manual (IRAM), lists the recommended conduct marks and their corresponding adjective ratings.

Mark

Corresponding Adjective Rating

Standard of Conduct • •

0 to 1.9

Unacceptable

• • • • •

2.0 to 2.9

Unsatisfactory

• • • • • •

3 to 3.9

Below average •

Habitual offender Convicted by general, special, or more than one summary court-martial Given a mark of “0” upon declaration of desertion Ordered to confinement pursuant to sentence of court-martial Two or more punitive reductions in grade No special court-martial Not more than one summary courtmartial Not more than one nonjudicial punishment One punitive reduction in grade No court-martial Not more than one nonjudicial punishment No favorable impressions of the qualities listed on 2-14 Failure to make satisfactory progress while assigned to weight control or military appearance Conduct such as not to impair appreciably one’s usefulness or the efficiency of the command, but conduct not sufficient to merit an honorable discharge Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

2-15

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2

Conduct Marks, Continued

Standards, continued

Mark

Standard of Conduct

Corresponding Adjective Rating • •

4 to 4.4

Average

• • 4.5 to 4.8

Excellent • • •

4.9 to 5.0

Outstanding

• •

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2-16

No offenses No unfavorable impressions as to attitude, interest, cooperation, obedience, after-effects of intemperance, courtesy and consideration, and observance of regulations No offenses Positive favorable impressions of the qualities listed on 2-14 Demonstrates reliability, good influence, sobriety, obedience, and industry No offenses Exhibits to an outstanding degree the qualities listed on 2-14 Observes spirit as well as letter of orders and regulations Demonstrated positive effect on others by example and persuasion

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2

Lesson 2 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 4 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

Which of the following qualities are considered when recommending proficiency marks? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Timeliness and leadership Physical fitness and leadership Trustworthiness and participation Bearing and mission accomplishment

Which of the following qualities are considered when recommending conduct marks? a. b. c. d.

Influence on others and interest Adaptability and know how Cooperation and personal appearance Individual character and leadership Continued on next page

MCI course 8101

2-17

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Item 3

Scenario: Lance Corporal White handles routine matters acceptably, but in your opinion, he has not performed to the best of his abilities. He gets the job done; however, both you and the squad leader have often found it necessary to supervise him closely when he is assigned a task, which is not routine. You have encouraged him to take correspondence courses, but to date he has not enrolled himself. Several times during the past 5 months, you have been obliged to counsel him for leaving on liberty when his squad was not squared away. He has received one valid letter of indebtedness from a local merchant during this marking period. He keeps himself in good physical condition. Of your three squad leaders, he is the least effective. Considering this information, which corresponding adjective ratings for proficiency and conduct marks are appropriate? a. b. c. d.

Item 4

Unsatisfactory and unsatisfactory Below average and average Below average and below average Average and unsatisfactory

Scenario: Corporal Black is a real “take-charge” individual. He readily assumes responsibility and uses his authority wisely. He requires only a general outline of what is to be accomplished, then goes out, and completes the assigned task in an expeditious, efficient manner. You have relied heavily on Corporal Black’s ability to instruct in general military subjects. Since making corporal, he has taken two MCI courses, the Marine NCO and the Marine Rifle Platoon. He completed both of these courses with high final grades. His squad usually represents the best appearance and usually is the best in the field, at inspections, and in drill. The members in his squad never create disciplinary problems for you. He keeps himself at the peak of physical condition and ensures that his squad does likewise. His personal appearance and habits are above reproach. Considering this information, which corresponding adjective ratings for proficiency and conduct marks are appropriate? a. b. c. d.

Excellent and average Outstanding and outstanding Average and average Excellent and outstanding Continued on next page

MCI course 8101

2-18

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4

MCI course 8101

Answer b a c b

2-19

Reference 2-12 2-14 2-13,2-15 2-13,2-16

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2 Exercise

(This page intentionally left blank.)

MCI course 8101

2-20

Study Unit 2, Lesson 2 Exercise

STUDY UNIT 3 EVALUATING PERSONAL AND FAMILY READINESS Overview

Estimated Study Time

2 hours, 20 minutes

Unit Scope

This study unit is designed to give you an understanding of how to evaluate personal and family readiness.

Learning Objectives

After completing this study unit, you should be able to • Identify actions to take to prepare a Marine and their spouse for a deployment. • Identify the actions a Marine and their spouse can take to maintain readiness during a deployment. • List helpful tips for a Marine returning from a deployment.

In This Study Unit

This study unit contains the following lessons: Topic Lesson 1 Predeployment Lesson 2 During Deployment Lesson 3 Return and Reunion

MCI Course 8101

3-1

See Page 3-3 3-35 3-67

Study Unit 3

(This page intentionally left blank.)

MCI Course 8101

3-2

Study Unit 3

LESSON 1 PREDEPLOYMENT Introduction

Estimated Study Time

45 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson discusses the measures a Marine and their spouse should take to prepare them before the Marine leaves for a deployment.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to •

Identify family readiness.



State where a Marine can go to obtain information about financial planning.



Identify the means in which a spouse can contact a Marine in an emergency while away from their spouse.



Identify who is responsible for a family care plan.



Identify what type of legal planning a Marine should do before a deployment.



Identify the emotional factors that play in a deployment.



Identify how children can be affected by a deployment. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

3-3

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Introduction, Continued

In this lesson

This lesson contains the following topics:

Topic Introduction Family Readiness Financial Planning Communication Family Care Plan Legal Planning Emotional Planning Myths of Deployment Children and Deployment Lesson 1 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

3-4

See Page 3-3 3-5 3-6 3-11 3-16 3-17 3-24 3-26 3-27 3-31

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Family Readiness

Definition

Family readiness is defined as families who are prepared and equipped with the skills and tools to successfully meet the challenges of the military lifestyle. A successful deployment for the Marine and family requires readiness through planning and advanced preparation.

Importance

Similar to the unit making preparations for their deployment, many steps must be taken by the Marine to ensure his/her family can continue efficiently during his/her absence. Gathering information is but the first step. A successful deployment requires good communication and an understanding of the roles each family member will play during this time.

Support

Many organizations are a part of the support structure available to the Marine and family preparing for a deployment. The installation Marine Corps Community Services (MCCS) can provide information, guidance, and support during the preparation stage and for the family during the deployment. The MCCS web site, (http://www.usmc-mccs.org) also displays information on applicable support programs and links to other military support sites. The unit Key Volunteer Network (KVN), Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS), and the American Red Cross are great resources for Marine families as are the chaplain and his/her staff.

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3-5

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Financial Planning

Working out a Plan

The Marine and spouse should review family financial procedures and ensure all financial matters are resolved prior to departure. There should be a good understanding of the roles and responsibilities of each spouse concerning allocation of pay, payment of bills, and a household budget. The Financial Specialist with your installation Marine Corps Community Services Personal Services Financial Management Program, the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, and many credit unions and banks can provide assistance with budget planning. Each unit has a command financial specialist. The Marine should ensure the family has enough money each pay period for basic living expenses such as rent, food, and utilities.

Direct Deposit Distribution

Direct Deposit to a joint account can lead to confusion and problems if both spouses are writing checks and making withdrawals on the same account. Bounced checks and letters of indebtedness can result. Most banks will set up separate accounts and distribute the direct deposit funds between the accounts as requested. Transfer of funds between accounts can easily be made if one person falls short of cash. Contact your bank or credit union for more information regarding direct deposit.

Type “D” Allotment

The Marine can initiate an allotment to family members to cover basic living expenses. All or part of a Marine’s basic pay or BAH can be allotted.

Type “S” Allotment

Savings allotment to a joint account can allow the spouse to draw out the needed amount of money.

How to Start/Stop an Allotment

Only the Marine, not the spouse, can start, stop, or change an allotment. Should an allotment need to be changed, the Marine can change it through the unit G-1 (S-1 or Admin Office) or via the E/MSS (Employee/Member Self Service, website: http://emss.dfas.mil, phone: 1-877-363-3677 in CONUS). The LES (Leave and Earnings Statement) can also be viewed on the E/MSS website with a user p.i.n (personal identification number). It can take up to 45 days (three pay periods) for implementation of an allotment. Once the Marine is deployed there can be a 60-day lag. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

3-6

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Financial Planning, Continued

Quantity of Allotment

A Marine may allot part or all of his/her pay, with the exception of COMRATS (commuted rations) and clothing allowance. When individuals start an allotment, it is wise to have money set aside, particularly if allotting a large amount of total pay. The money for an allotment is taken out of both checks, the 1st and 15th of the month. The first allotment check is issued on the first of the following month. If there is a pressing need for the funds when an allotment is started or delayed, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) can often assist with an interest-free loan until the money arrives. A Marine can sign a pre-authorization form at NMCRS to enable his/her family members to receive assistance. If the family member is not preauthorized, permission via Red Cross message can be a long process. A General Power of Attorney can also be used as authorization for assistance from NMCRS.

Split Pay

This option allows Marines enrolled in the direct deposit program to receive a portion of their pay at their duty locality each payday. This requested split pay amount must be a whole dollar amount less than or equal to the Marine’s normal pay. The remainder of pay will be transmitted to the Marine’s financial institution.

Family Separation Allowance (FSA)

All deployed Marines with family members are eligible for Family Separation Allowance (FSA) $100.00 per month. This allowance will be reported on day 31 of the deployment. It can take several paychecks before the money is received, but it will be dated back to include payment from the first day of deployment to the end of deployment. There are reasons that can cause termination of the allowance such as extended social or permanent visits of family members.

Rations

Basic Allowance for Subsistence (BAS) (sometimes referred to as COMRATS or Pro/Sep Rations) is a continuous entitlement for all Marines. Enlisted Marines will have deduction for meals taken from their pay account when they are issued a meal card or being provided with meals, such as MREs when in the field. The amount deducted is slightly less than the full BAS for each day. As with FSA, it can take several pay periods for the initial deduction to occur, but the full amount will be deducted at some point. Continued on next page

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3-7

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Financial Planning, Continued

Temporary Additional Duty (TAD)

All personnel will receive temporary additional duty pay while deployed for over 30 days or more than 50 miles away. The amount varies with rank and deployment site.

Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH)

Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) payment or stay in base housing will continue through the deployment.

Additional Pay Entitlements

Other possible additions to pay are imminent danger pay, COLA (Cost of Living Allowance), flight deck duty pay, and sea pay. Specific pay issues will be dependent upon the type, length, and location of the deployment.

Safeguarding

Keep all important documents safeguarded from potential destruction of fire or theft. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

3-8

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Financial Planning, Continued

Family Budget Plan

The following is a good form to use when finding your family budget. MONTHLY EXPENSES ********(List here monthly expenses which are not paid by allotment)********* PAYMENT FOR

PAY TO

1ST PAYDAY

15TH PAYDAY

HOUSING

_______________

$___________

$____________

FOOD

_______________

$___________

$____________

ELECTRIC WATER

_______________ _______________

$___________ $___________

$____________ $____________

CLOTHING

_______________

$___________

$____________

GASOLINE

_______________

$___________

$____________

TELEPHONE

_______________

$___________

$____________

HOUSEHOLD SUPPLIES SCHOOL SUPPLIES (LUNCHES, ETC.)

_______________

$___________

$____________

_____________

$___________

$____________

CAR LOAN (1) CAR LOAN (2)

_______________ _______________

$___________ $___________

$____________ $____________

OTHER LOANS

_______________ _______________ _______________

$___________ $___________ $___________

$____________ $____________ $____________

ENTERTAINMENT

_____________

$___________

$____________

CREDIT CARDS

_______________ _______________ _______________

$___________ $___________ $___________

$____________ $____________ $____________

POSTAGE/MAILING

$___________

$____________

INSURANCE: LIFE HOMEOWNER’S VEHICLE

$___________ $___________ $___________

$____________ $____________ $____________

$____________ $____________ $____________

$____________ $____________ $____________

________________________ _______________ _____________________

OTHER EXPENSES (SPECIFY) ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ TOTAL EXPENSES NOT PAID BY ALLOTMENT

$_____________

$___________

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

3-9

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Financial Planning, Continued

Family Budget Plan, continued

********(List here monthly expenses paid by allotment)*********** PAYMENT FOR

PAY TO

AMOUNT 1ST PAYDAY

ALLOTMENT FOR___________ ALLOTMENT FOR___________ ALLOTMENT FOR___________ ALLOTMENT FOR___________ ALLOTMENT FOR___________

$______________ $______________ $______________ $______________ $______________

TOTAL EXPENSES PAID BY ALLOTMENT

$______________

15TH PAYDAY $_____________ $_____________ $_____________ $_____________ $_____________ (+) $_____________

(=) $___________________ TOTAL EXPENSES NOT PAID BY ALLOTMENT *(See previous page for amounts.)

$____________

(+) $__________ (=) $___________________

TOTAL MONTHLY EXPENSES (=) $___________________ *(Add total expenses not paid by allotment with total expenses paid by allotment to arrive at total monthly expenses). MONTHLY INCOME SERVICE MEMBER’S BASE MONTHLY PAY

MCI Course 8101

$____________________

BASIC ALLOWANCE FOR SUBSISTENCE (BAS)

(+) $____________________

BASIC ALLOWANCE FOR HOUSING (BAH)

(+) $____________________

CLOTHING ALLOWANCE

(+) $____________________

FAMILY SEPARATION ALLOWANCE (FSA)

(+) $____________________

OTHER ALLOWANCE(S)

(+) $____________________

TOTAL MONTHLY PAY/ALLOWANCES

(+) $____________________

TOTAL MONTHLY DEDUCTIONS (ALLOTMENTS, ETC.)

(-) $ ____________________

NET MONTHLY PAY

(=) $___________________

SPOUSE'S MONTHLY PAY

(+) $___________________

OTHER INCOME

(+) $___________________

TOTAL MONTHLY FAMILY INCOME

(=) $__________________

TOTAL MONTHLY EXPENSES (NON-ALLOTMENT)

(-) $__________________

REMAINING (Net) MONTHLY FAMILY INCOME

(=) $_________________

3-10

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Communication

Emergency

Family members can contact their Marines to inform them of family emergencies (i.e., death, illness, or injury) through •

The Command via the Key Volunteer Network



Local Red Cross Chapter or Station during normal working hours or at the Chapter emergency number



American Red Cross Armed Forces Emergency Services toll free in the United States at 1-877-272-7337



Duty Officer of the Installation or Officer of the Day

Casualty

A Casualty Assistance Calls Officer (CACO) notifies the next of kin in the event of serious injury, illness, or death of a Marine. A uniformed Marine representative will make notification in person. In most cases a Chaplain will accompany the CACO. This may not be possible in some cases such as in a Marine Corps Reserve unit or when next of kin do not reside near an installation.

Routine

The Key Volunteer Network provides official communication within the unit. Any official message will be passed via the Key Volunteer phone tree, verbatim from the Commander, or his/her designee to each family. Official messages may include schedules for return dates and port calls, changes in those schedules, mishap reports, etc. All Marine Expeditionary Units (MEUs) have official web sites accessible through http://www.usmc.mil; some will have telephone numbers with automated update messages. Unit family readiness personnel will provide details and information about these services at the unit predeployment briefs. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

3-11

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Communication, Continued

Spouses Emergency Data Sheet

The following is a form for the spouse to complete that will indicate her/his preferences in the event of an emergency. This form should be kept with the spouse.

EMERGENCY DATA FORM Today’s Date: Your Name:

Home Phone:

Address: City, State, Zip: Your Employer and Address: Work phone:

Work Days:

Work Hours:

Volunteer organizations you work with, their phone numbers, and the days/hours you volunteer:

CHILDREN Name:

DOB:

School:

Name:

DOB:

School:

Name:

DOB:

School:

Name:

DOB:

School:

Who is authorized to pick up your children? Name:

Phone:

Address:

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

3-12

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Communication, Continued

Spouses Emergency Data Sheet, continued Do they have power of attorney if your child needs medical treatment? Sitter’s Name:

Phone:

Doctor’s Name:

Phone:

Yes:

No:

Spouses Name / Rank: Specific office / workplace:

SSN:

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY INVOLVING YOUR SPOUSE

Name of a friend or relative you would like with you: Name:

Phone:

Name of clergyman you would like with you: Do you want your parents notified?

Yes:

No:

By Whom:

In order of preference, please list local friends you would like notified Would you want these people notified personally? Name #1:

Yes:

No: Phone:

Address: Name #2:

Phone:

Address: Name #3

Phone:

Address: In case of an emergency involving your spouse, please give us any information you think might be relevant. In order of preference, who should care for your children? (If name, address and phone number were not listed earlier in the form, please include this information. Also, please indicate if these people have power of attorney for medical treatment.) Are these people aware you have given their names to care for your children? Yes:

No:

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

3-13

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Communication, Continued

Spouses Emergency Data Sheet, continued Do you have any pets that need to be cared for if Yes: something were to happen to you or your spouse? Please indicate who you would like to care for your pet. Name:

No:

Pet’s Name:

Phone:

Address:

Any special instructions for feeding, walking, etc.

Is the pet on any medications?

No:

Yes:

If yes, give details:

I give my permission allowing the Key Volunteer Coordinator or the Key Volunteer Advisor to utilize this information should an emergency occur involving my spouse or involving myself when my spouse is away. Signature: Date: YOUR PARENTS OR CLOSEST RELATIVE Name #1:

Relationship:

Address:

Home Phone:

City, State, Zip:

Work Phone:

Name #2:

Relationship:

Address:

Home Phone:

City, State, Zip:

Work Phone: SPOUSE’S PARENTS OR CLOSEST RELATIVE

Name #1:

Relationship:

Address:

Home phone:

City, State, Zip:

Work phone:

Name #2:

Relationship:

Address:

Home phone:

City, State, Zip:

Work phone:

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

3-14

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Communication, Continued

Spouses Emergency Data Sheet, continued ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Special needs, health problems involving you, your spouse or your children, allergies, pregnant, etc.

WRITE DIRECTIONS OR DRAW A DETAILED MAP In the space provided below, give clear directions to your house so that we can find you in case of an emergency.

MCI Course 8101

3-15

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Family Care Plan

Responsibility

A Family Care Plan is the responsibility of Marines who are single parents; dual military couples; Marines who otherwise bear sole responsibility for the care of minor children; or Marines with family members who are unable to care for themselves in the Marine’s absence.

Guidance

A Family Care Plan provides guidance and procedures to the person(s) who provide care for the Marine’s children, disabled, elderly, and/or other family member(s) in the absence of the Marine due to military duty (training exercises, temporary duty, deployments, etc.). The plan outlines the legal, health care (medical and dental), logistical, educational, monetary, and religious arrangements for the care of the Marine’s family member(s) or ward to include Wills, Power(s) of Attorney, Certificates of Guardianship or Escort, family contacts, Special Letters of Instruction, and any other documentation reasonably necessary for the caregiver’s use.

In Absence of Marine

The plan must be sufficiently detailed and systematic to provide for a smooth, rapid transfer of responsibilities to the caregiver upon the absence of the Marine. Marine Corps Order 1740.13B provides guidance for Family Care Plans. The Plan must be reviewed for accuracy and validity each year and is a part of the Marine’s service record. Family Care Plans for those Marines who are required to have them are also included as a part of the unit family readiness program.

MCI Course 8101

3-16

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Legal Planning

Available Services

Services available at the Legal Assistance Office are free. They include, but are not limited to, general estate planning, wills, insurance review and general property matters. Advice is available on such matters as credit purchasing, state and federal taxation, state motor vehicle laws, landlord-tenant relationships, laws involving domestic issues (divorce, adoption, etc.), state residency matters, immigration laws and commercial contract laws. Check with your installation Legal Assistance Office for information specific to your area.

Limitations

The Marine lawyers cannot represent clients in civilian court, but they can advise and assist active duty and retired service members that have personal legal problems. The Legal Assistance Officer is required to treat all such problems confidentially and may not lawfully be ordered to disclose such information by any superior authority. When a legal problem is not within the scope of the Legal Assistance Program, referral can be made to local civilian counsel.

Action

Act immediately when a legal issue is discovered. Immediate action will often resolve small problems before they become more serious. For example, the best time to ask questions is before signing a contract rather than when the terms of the contract come into dispute. Never sign a blank contract!! Utilization of Legal Assistance services is both advised and encouraged when a legal problem is first identified.

Powers of Attorney

One of the most important matters to consider during predeployment planning is a Power of Attorney. A Legal Assistance officer should be contacted to help you prepare one. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Legal Planning, Continued

General Power of Attorney

A General Power of Attorney allows the holder of that legal document the right to sell personal property and to use the grantor’s credit. A General Power of Attorney grants virtually unlimited ability to act for another person. General Powers of Attorney often create more difficulties than they cure and are generally not advised. It is an extremely powerful legal instrument and can be a dangerous instrument in the hands of someone inexperienced in business matters, a person of unstable temperament, or a spouse when the marriage relationship is in a state of discord. A General Power of Attorney should not be executed unless the individual making it is fully aware of the risks associated with such a document. Always consider whether a Special Power of Attorney would serve the immediate purpose.

Special Power of Attorney

A Special Power of Attorney allows the holder of that legal document to act for the grantor only when conducting business that is delineated in the document. This power of attorney will list in writing the actions you want conducted on your behalf. A Special Power of Attorney can be very useful for such matters as moving of household goods, settling insurance claims, and managing financial accounts or funds not jointly held. Care should be taken in determining who will hold the power of attorney and what actions will be authorized in the document. Remember without the power of attorney, the spouse at home could be significantly hampered in dealing with matters that may arise during deployment

Wills

This document is very important for every Marine, particularly those with family members. The primary purpose of a will is to ensure that minor children are cared for and property distributed as the writer desires. Without a will, state laws decide how personal property is distributed and, if there are children involved, they can become wards of the state. The state’s wishes generally do not follow those of the deceased. It is important that an individual’s will reflect his/her current state of affairs so keeping it up to date is critical. Overlooking the execution of this important document could directly affect the security of your family. Your banking institution or a responsible adult should be named executor of your will. A will does not cover life insurance distribution. Insurance is a separate contract between the insured and the insurance company. Verify that your beneficiary designations on insurance policies are accurate and current. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Legal Planning, Continued

In Loco Parentis

This phrase means standing in place of parents. If children are in the care of someone other than a parent or legal guardian, that person is considered in “loco parentis.” Some states will appoint children as wards of the state when the parents are injured and/or unconscious unless there is an original notarized document authorizing a specific person to act as guardian. It is possible that children in the care of someone other than the legal guardians or parents will not be seen for medical emergencies without the original notarized form. A separate form must be filled out and notarized for every person caring for the child or children. For more information, DEERS dependency information is available from the MCCS web site at http://www.usmc-mccs.org/.

Notarization

Notary public service is available at the Legal Assistance Office, most banks and credit unions, and usually through Marine Corps Community Services. There may be a small fee for the service depending upon where it is obtained.

Taxes

Federal and state tax returns (when required) must be filed even though the service member is deployed, unless an extension is granted. Problems in preparing and submitting tax forms or improper tax assessment may be directed to the Legal Assistance Office. Marine Corps installations will normally have a VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) office to assist with preparing a return. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) refund check will generally require the signatures of both parties in a joint filed form. Electronic filing will require payment via direct deposit to joint account. A special power of attorney is recommended to facilitate filing and access to refunds. The required filing time period for Federal income tax is between January 1 and April 15 of the year following the taxable year.

Filing Taxes Outside the United States

If you are outside the continental United States (CONUS) on April 15th you have until June 15th to file provided you are on official orders, not on leave. You can extend the June 15th filing date up two more months after your return to CONUS if you file an IRS Form 4868 prior to June 15th. Detailed information may be obtained from the IRS toll free at 1-800-829-1040. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Legal Planning, Continued

Record of Personal Affairs

The following sample will provide a gathering of all personal information that will be helpful during the deployment. RECORD OF PERSONAL AFFAIRS LAST NAME, FIRST NAME, MIDDLE INITIAL SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER RANK, BRANCH OF SERVICE, ORGANIZATION/UNIT COMPLETE LOCAL ADDRESS, TOWN, COUNTY, STATE, ZIP COMPLETE PERMANENT ADDRESS, TOWN, COUNTY, STATE, ZIP PERSONAL DATA 1. BIRTH: (MONTH, DAY, YEAR, TOWN, COUNTY, AND STATE) 2.

NATURALIZATION:

3.

PARENTS: FATHER (NAME & ADDRESS) MOTHER (NAME & ADDRESS)

4.

MARRIAGE: WIFE: HUSBAND: WHERE & WHEN:

5.

CHILDREN: FULL NAMES, PLACE, AND DATE OF BIRTH

6.

PERSONAL LAWYERS OR TRUSTED FRIEND WHO MAY BE CONSULTED REGARDING MY PERSONAL OR BUSINESS AFFAIRS

7.

DEPENDENTS OTHER THAN SPOUSE AND CHILDREN

LOCATION OF FAMILY RECORDS 1. BIRTH CERTIFICATES: WIFE: HUSBAND: CHILD: CHILD: CHILD: 2.

NATURALIZATION PAPERS: WIFE: HUSBAND: CHILD: CHILD: CHILD:

3.

CERTIFICATES: MARRIAGE: DIVORCE PAPERS: DEATH CERTIFICATES: ADOPTION PAPERS:

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Legal Planning, Continued

Record of Personal Affairs, continued

MILITARY SERVICE PAPERS OTHER IMPORTANT PAPERS 1. WILL: NAME: WITNESSES: EXECUTOR'S NAME: SUBSTITUTE EXECUTOR: 2.

RESIDENT OF

POWER OF ATTORNEY: AGENT: INCOME TAX: FEDERAL RETURNS: STATE RETURNS: CITY: PERSONAL PROPERTY:

INSURANCE 1. LIFE: INSURANCE CO: INSURANCE CO: INSURANCE CO:

POLICY NO: POLICY NO: POLICY NO:

2.

HOMEOWNERS/RENTERS/PROPERTY: DEDUCTIBLES, EFFECTIVE DATES:

3.

AUTO: CITY/COUNTY/STATE REGISTRATION: INSPECTION CERTIFICATES: AUTO CLUB/TOWING SERVICE:

4.

MEDICAL, LIABILITY, OR OTHER INSURANCE:

SOCIAL SECURITY 1. SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER: HUSBAND: WIFE: CHILD: CHILD: CHILD: 2.

PAYMENT AMT: PAYMENT AMT: PAYMENT AMT:

CARD/STUB LOCATED AT: CARD/STUB LOCATED AT: CARD/STUB LOCATED AT: CARD/STUB LOCATED AT: CARD/STUB LOCATED AT:

LOCATION OF UP-TO-DATE EMPLOYMENT RECORDS:

PROPERTY OWNERSHIP OR INTEREST HEREIN 1. REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS: LOCATED: THE PROPERTY IS ENCUMBERED BY A: HELD BY: TAXES PAID THROUGH (YEAR): 2.

OTHER PERSONAL PROPERTY:

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Legal Planning, Continued

Record of Personal Affairs, continued

BANK ACCOUNTS 1. CHECKING: 2.

SAVINGS:

3.

OTHER (SPECIFY):

SAFE DEPOSIT BOX 1. BANK/TRUST COMPANY: 2.

LOCATED AT:

STOCKS BONDS & SECURITIES 1. LOCATED AT: 2.

BENEFICIARY:

3.

LIST OF WAR OR SAVINGS BONDS BY DENOMINATION AND SERIAL NUMBERS:

DESIGNATED BENEFICIARY NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF PERSONS DESIGNATED ON SERVICEMAN'S OFFICIAL RECORD OF EMERGENCY DATA FORM TO RECEIVE SETTLEMENT OF UNPAID EARNINGS AND ALLOWANCES IN THE EVENT OF HIS DEATH: DEBTS AND PAYMENTS FOR EACH ITEM INCLUDE • CREDIT AGENCY, STORE, OR BANK: • AMOUNT DUE: • DATE OF MONTHLY PAYMENT: ENTER ANY ADDITIONAL DATA REGARDING INSURANCE, ALLOTMENTS, MILITARY Y RECORDS, INSTRUCTIONS TO FAMILY MEMBERS, VETERANS ADMINISTRATION CLAIM NUMBER, ANY OTHER SERVICE NUMBER, ETC.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Legal Planning, Continued

Record of Personal Affairs continued

HOUSEHOLD: (NOTE WARRANTY INFORMATION ALSO) 1. APPLIANCES a. WASHER: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE) b. DRYER: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE) c. REFRIGERATOR: MAKE: MODEL:

2.

PURCHASED WHERE WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE) c. OTHER APPLIANCES: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE) ELECTRONICS a. TELEVISION: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE) b. STEREO: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE) c. COMPUTER: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE) d. OTHER ELECTRONICS: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE)

3.

AUTOMOBILE(S) AND OTHER VEHICLES a. VEHICLE #1: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE: WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE) b. VEHICLE #2: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE: WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE) d. VEHICLE #3: MAKE: MODEL: PURCHASED WHERE: WHEN: IF SERVICING REQUIRED CALL: (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE)

2.

TROUBLE CALLS a. PLUMBER:

b.

c.

d.

MCI Course 8101

NAME: ADDRESS: PHONE: ELECTRICIAN: NAME: ADDRESS: PHONE: HEATING/AC: NAME: ADDRESS: PHONE: MECHANIC NAME: ADDRESS: PHONE:

3-23

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Emotional Planning

Communication is the Key

Often, family members don’t talk about deployments because the possibility of separation makes them feel uncomfortable. Honest discussion is usually the best way to deal with anxiety and minimize potential problems. Agree how often you will write and what type of information will be shared. Discuss alternate ways to communicate such as email, video and cassette tapes, letters and phone calls. It is a good idea to plan in advance for length and frequency of phone calls. Establishing a few ground rules and making a list of the “need to know” items before a call will help to keep phone bills under control. Plan ways to keep the connection with relatives and decide who will write/send gifts to parents and other family members for special occasions.

Varied Feelings

Couples preparing for deployment and separation go through many emotions. At first, they may feel excited. Later, they may start to withdraw from each other in an attempt to deal with powerful feelings. After separation and reunion, they may be disappointed that things did not go as they hoped. Intense feelings are normal. Recognize your feelings and expectations and talk to your partner about them.

Coping with Feelings

Have special photos taken of you and your family together and of your spouse or loved one alone. Give your special someone a keepsake for the deployment that will act as an emotional tie to keep you connected when you feel a since of loneliness. Be romantic before the deployment and create special moments to cherish. Recognize that many couples argue right before a deployment. Talking about your feelings ahead of time can help minimize this. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Emotional Planning, Continued

Plan Ahead

Try to anticipate what will happen after deployment and separation. Plan how to handle practical problems. For example, decide what to do if the furnace or car breaks down. Discuss how you want to share bad news. Try to write about solutions and plans, not focusing on the problems. For the spouse at home, once you find a comfortable routine, stay with it. Many people find that routine and ritual can be comforting. Identify your support systems: • • • • •

Key Volunteer Network Family Friends Navy Marine Corps Relief Society Place of worship

Plan Special Days

Discuss and plan how you will spend the day of departure as well as starting homecoming plans that can be discussed and refined throughout the separation. Indicate special events, birthdays, and school activities on a calendar and duplicate so that each spouse has a copy. For special occasions, cards can be purchased and flowers and gifts can be ordered in advance for family members at home. Discuss special items the deploying spouse wants and needs and develop a list of suggestions for care packages.

The Shock

Be prepared for a shock. No matter how well you prepare for separation, no matter how much you talk it through, when the day finally arrives, you will still feel surprised that it is really happening.

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Myths of Deployment

Deployment

Many people assume that one “gets used to” separation, and therefore, each deployment and separation is less difficult and hurtful. The first deployment requires the greatest adaption because everything is new. The next several deployments are somewhat easier because of lessons learned. However, if the deployment cycle is frequent and continuous, families find that the effect is cumulative and the strain is great. Knowing that there are others with the same feelings and experiences during this time may make you feel less alone.

Return and Reunion

After the service member returns home, you cannot pick up right where you left off before the deployment. Each partner has been changed by the experience and the physical, mental, financial, and emotional challenges they have faced. A wife and husband are different after separation and must learn to be flexible as they adapt to each other’s and the children’s growth.

Illnesses

Some of your friends and even your doctor may think all of your illnesses suffered during deployment are a figment of your imagination or due to your spouse’s absence. Many spouses feel there is a tendency by doctors to attribute very real pain or illness to the absence of the deployed partner. Their suffering may be inaccurately diagnosed as childish attention-getting behavior. Stress can bring on medical problems and it is important to have those addressed.

MCI Course 8101

3-26

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Children and Deployment

Dealing with Deployment

A deployment can be emotionally challenging for those left behind, especially children. Although children’s reactions will vary with their personalities, ages and coping skills, changes of the magnitude of a deployment will almost always be puzzling to children.

Before Deployment

Make sure children know they are loved unconditionally. Often young children see themselves as the cause of separation. Make sure children know this isn’t the case. Spend time with each child individually before leaving. Suggestions for dealing with young children include: • • • • • •

During Deployment

Be truthful, children can sense when they are being lied to. Let children know it’s Okay to talk about feelings, even negative ones. Tell children when you are leaving and how long you will be gone. If possible, give the children a tour of the place you’re going. Ensure that each child is left with a picture of the deploying parent. Visit your child’s school before deployment and talk with the teacher(s).

Suggestions for dealing with your children while on deployment may include: • • • • • • •

Maintain routines; regular mealtimes and bedtimes can help children cope. Don’t let the separation mean a free rein, discipline consistently. Let children know they are making a valuable contribution by doing their chores. Families find it helpful to mark days off a calendar till the return of a Marine. Encourage each child to send their own letters and pictures to parent. Constantly talk about the deployed parent in daily conversations. Post a large world map and help the children track where the parent is. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Children and Deployment, Continued

Return and Reunion

Suggestions for dealing with your children for the return of the deployed Marine may include: • • • • •

Infants (Birth12 Months)

The following are some examples of what you may see for infants: • • •

Toddlers (Ages 1 to 3 Years)

Returning parents need to remember it’s hard for children to get use to having them back around. Be patient; let your children know how much you love them. Be prepared for the adjustment period, for both parents towards the child. Returning parent should remember not to disturb a family set up. If there is a new baby that has arrived since the beginning of the deployment, returning parents should introduce themselves slowly.

Changes in eating and sleeping patterns May want to be held more May seem fussier than usual

The following are some examples of what you may see for toddlers: • • •

Show regression in walking or potty training Cry for no apparent reason Whine and cling to you Continued on next page

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Children and Deployment, Continued

PreSchool/Kindergarden Age

The following are some examples of what you may see for pre-school children: • • • • • • •

School Age

The following are some examples of what you may see for school age children: • • • • •

Adolescents

Clinging to people or favorite toy/blanket Unexplained crying or tearfulness Increased acts of anger or frustration Sleep difficulties, nightmares, frequent waking Worry about the safety of everyone Loss of appetite Fear of new people or situations

Change in school performance Increase in complaints of headaches, stomachaches, or other illnesses when nothing seems physically wrong More irritable or crabby Fascination with the military and news about it Worry about family and finances

The following are some examples of what you may see for adolescents: • • • • •

Any of the aforementioned signs Acting out behaviors such as getting into trouble at school, at home, or with the law Low self-esteem and self-criticism Misdirected anger Loss of interest in usual hobbies or activities Continued on next page

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Children and Deployment, Continued

Relationship

Children who have a good relationship with parents usually cope well with separation. They have an understanding of the parent’s job and why deployment is an important part of it.

The Key

Frequent and dependable communication between the deployed parent and the family plays a key role in a child’s security and ability to cope with separation. All children adjust differently to deployment.

MCI Course 8101

3-30

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1

Lesson 1 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 7 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

A family who is prepared and equipped with the skills and tools to successfully meet the challenges of the military lifestyle is defined as a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Where should a Marine go to obtain information about financial planning? a. b. c. d.

Item 3

family preparedness. family readiness. Marine Corps values. key family planning.

The commanding officer The Marines platoon sergeant Many credit unions and banks Any financial institution

Which of the following is a means of contacting the Marine in an emergency while they’re away on deployment? a. b. c. d.

Email Letter mail MARS Local Red Cross Chapter Continued on next page

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Item 4

Who is responsible for a family care plan? a. b. c. d.

Item 5

What type of planning should a Marine do before a deployment? a. b. c. d.

Item 6

Legal planning Sensible planning Corrective planning Mandatory planning

What is the key emotional factor when planning for a deployment? a. b. c. d.

Item 7

Individual Marine Platoon sergeant Platoon commander Company commander

Money problems Communication Shock Loneliness

What are some of the examples of how a pre-school child may be affected by a parent being absent due to a deployment? a. b. c. d.

Misdirected anger Worry about family and finances Eating difficulties Low self-esteem Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

MCI Course 8101

Answer b c d a a d c

3-33

Reference 3-5 3-6 3-11 3-16 3-17 3-24 3-29

Study Unit 3, Lesson 1 Exercise

(This page intentionally left blank.)

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Study Unit 3, Lesson 1 Exercise

LESSON 2 DURING DEPLOYMENT Introduction

Estimated Study Time

45 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson discusses the principles involved in evaluating personal and family readiness while a Marine is on deployment.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to •

Identify tips in communication during a deployment.



Identify the dental benefits you and your spouse have available.



Identify key family organizations afforded to Marines and their spouses.



Identify measures taken to ensure operational and personal security for Marines and their spouses.



Identify who is authorized to grant emergency leave for more than 60 days.



State the documents required when traveling and taking leave overseas.



Explain the general regulations dealing with government housing. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

3-35

Study Unit 3, Lesson 2

STUDY UNIT 4 ADVISING MARINES ON FINANCIAL PLANNING Overview

Estimated Study Time

2 hours, 10 minutes

Unit Scope

The key to sound financial planning of personal finances depends on you knowing your income and planning your expenditures accordingly. You should establish a sound financial system according to your own particular needs and circumstances. This study unit will give you the basic tools and the confidence to plan your financial success.

Learning Objectives

After completing this study unit, you should be able to • Identify your current financial status. • Identify your financial goals and establish a financial plan. • Identify the tools that will help you to reach your financial goals.

In This Study Unit

This study unit contains the following lessons. Topic Lesson 1 Financial Status Lesson 2 Establishing A Financial Plan Lesson 3 Achieving Financial Goals

MCI Course 8101

4-1

See Page 4-3 4-13 4-27

Study Unit 4

(This page intentionally left blank.)

MCI Course 8101

4-2

Study Unit 4

LESSON 1 FINANCIAL STATUS Introduction

Estimated Study Time

20 minutes

Lesson Scope

Regardless of age, gender, and ethnicity, you should establish a sound financial system according to your particular needs and circumstances. This lesson will teach you the fundamentals for determining your current financial status and defining your budget limits.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to • Identify how a lender will compute debt-to-income ratio. • List the basic elements to determine debt-to-income ratio. • Identify the information necessary to set up a budget.

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics. Topic Introduction Debt-to-Income Ratio Setting-Up a Budget Lesson 1 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

4-3

See Page 4-3 4-4 4-7 4-11

Study Unit 4, Lesson 1

Debt-to-Income Ratio

Definition

One way a lender determines how much debt you can handle is to compute your debt-to-income ratio. This involves measuring your current obligations against your current income. The industry standard is that no more than 37 percent of your income should be required to meet your debt obligations.

Worksheet

The following table is a debt-to-income ratio worksheet. Use the table to determine your debt-to-income ratio. Fill in relevant data as it is gathered and write in calculations and/or decisions directly on the sheet itself.

Step

Action

1 2

Write in your current monthly gross income. Multiply the amount in step 1 by .37 (the industry standard for manageable debt). Write the result of the calculation. This is the portion of monthly gross income available for debt payments. Write in your monthly rent or mortgage payment. Write in your monthly car payment. Write in your total minimum monthly payments on all installment loans. Write in your total minimum monthly payments on all credit cards. Add steps 4 through 7 to get your total monthly payments. Write in 37% of your monthly gross (Step 3). Write in the answer from step 8 and subtract from step 9. Write the result here. This is the amount available for additional monthly debt payment.

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Calculation $ x .37 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-4

Study Unit 4, Lesson 1

Debt-to-Income Ratio, Continued

Worksheet

The worksheet below is an example of what it would be like when it is filled out.

Step

Action

1 2

Write in your current monthly gross income. Multiply the amount in step 1 by .37 (the industry standard for manageable debt). Write the result of the calculation. This is the portion of monthly gross income available for debt payments. Write in your monthly rent or mortgage payment. Write in your monthly car payment. Write in your total minimum monthly payments on all installment loans. Write in your total minimum monthly payments on all credit cards. Add steps 4 through 7 to get your total monthly payments. Write in 37% of your monthly gross (Step 3). Subtract the total monthly payments (Step 8). Write the result here. This is the amount available for additional monthly debt payment.

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Calculation $4,205.00 x .37 $1,555.85 $850.00 $350.00 $120.00 $35.00 $1,355.00 $1,555.85 $1,355.00 $200.85

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-5

Study Unit 4, Lesson 1

Debt-to-Income Ratio, Continued

Application

Ask your lender how much your minimum monthly payment will be for the supplemental loan you are considering. If that amount is larger than the amount remaining at the end of Step 11, you and your lender may have reason to be concerned about your ability to manage the additional debt.

MCI Course 8101

4-6

Study Unit 4, Lesson 1

Setting Up a Budget

Definition

A budget is a master plan for sound financial management. Your budget helps you set goals for spending and saving your money. Budgeting actually brings you face-to-face with reality and makes you think about alternatives in spending.

Budget Worksheet

A budget worksheet lists three elements: • Net income. List all monthly sources of income. Be sure you use your net pay (income minus social security, taxes, etc.). Do not use gross pay. • Fixed expenses. List those expenses that are the same or almost the same every month. These expenses are rent, utilities, car payments, and insurance, etc. Not paying these bills would cause legal problems. • Variable expenses. List those expenses that vary from month-to-month. Variable expenses allow you to make changes that will balance your budget. Such expenses are food, clothing, travel, entertainment, etc. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 1

Setting Up a Budget, Continued

Sample Budget Worksheet

Listed below is a sample budget worksheet.

Category Net Income

Fixed Expenses • Rent/mortgage • Utilities • Gas • Electric • Water • Telephone • Automobile payment • Furniture/appliance • Other (identify and list each separately) Variable Expenses

Monetary Record Total Record the total of all sources of income minus $ social security, taxes, etc. to get the total net income. $ 1,096 Record the amount you spend each month on each item. Add them together to get your total monthly fixed expenses. $ 525 $ 34 $ 101 $ 18 $ 45 $ 310 $ 38 Cable TV $ 25 Record the amount you spend each week on each item. Add everything together to get your total monthly variable expenses. Week 1

• • • • • • •

Food Auto expenses Clothing Necessities Entertainment Savings Other (identify and list each separately)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

75 21 49 28 25

Week 2 $ 48 $ 30 $ 12 $ 12 $ 10 $ 100 $

Week 3 $ $ $ $ $ $ $

43 29 21 37 16

Week 4 $ 39 $ 25 $ 16 $ 23 $ 40 $ 100 $

$

799

Monthly Total $ 205 $ 105 $ 98 $ 100 $ 91 $ 200 $

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-8

Study Unit 4, Lesson 1

Setting Up a Budget, Continued

Determining Expenditure Percentage of Income

Use the following table to determine the percentage of income you are spending on each expense category. To compute the percentage, divide the amount you spend on that item by your net income. Monthly Expenditure

Computation (Total amount spent divided by net income)

Percentage of Income

Clothing Food (Groceries and eating out) Housing (Rent/mortgage, utilities, telephone) Medical Savings/Investment Transportation (Automobile payment, gas, maintenance) Other

Expenditure Percentages Per Person

The following expenditure table shows the average percentage of income that should be spent for one person on each item. Expenditure Clothing Food Housing Medical Savings/Investment Transportation Other

Comparison

Percentage of Income 5% 15% 30% 5% 5% to 10% 15% to 20% 15%

Compare the percentages you spend with the average percentages to see where you might be overspending and where you can cut back to add to your savings. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 1

Setting Up a Budget, Continued

Accurate Records

Part of planning your budget is to get realistic figures. The key to proper budgeting is keeping complete and accurate records that considers all known and foreseeable expenses. You can identify your monthly expenses by keeping an accurate record of your income and expenses for at least three consecutive months.

MCI Course 8101

4-10

Study Unit 4, Lesson 1

Lesson 1 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 3 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

How would a lender compute your debt-to-income ratio? a. The lender would measure your current monthly expenditure against your current percentage of income. b. The lender would measure your current debt against your current credit report. c. The lender would measure your current obligations against your current income. d. The lender would measure your current fixed expenses against your current variable expenses.

Item 2

Which of the following lists the three basic elements used to set up a budget? a. b. c. d.

Item 3

Classification expenses, net income, and variable expenses Fixed expenses, expenditures, and net income Net income, fixed expenses, and variable expenses Expenditures, taxes, and net income

The key to proper budgeting is keeping a. b. c. d.

complete and accurate records. percentages per person. record of income. debt-to-income ratio. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-11

Study Unit 4, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3

MCI Course 8101

Answer c c a

4-12

Reference Page 4-4 4-7 4-10

Study Unit 4, Lesson 1 Exercise

LESSON 2 ESTABLISHING A FINANCIAL PLAN Introduction

Estimated Study Time

45 minutes

Lesson Scope

A financial plan is like a road map. First you find out where you are. Then you find the best way to get where you want to go. This lesson will teach you to identify your financial goals and determine the role credit plays in your financial status.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to • Identify the three terms for financial goals. • Match definitions of various credit terminology. • Identify credit advantages. • Identify credit disadvantages. • List guidelines for using credit wisely.

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Financial Goals Achieving Financial Goals Definitions Types of Credit Using Credit Lesson 2 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

4-13

See Page 4-13 4-14 4-16 4-18 4-20 4-21 4-23

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Financial Goals

Short-Term

Short-term financial goals are the building blocks for attaining long-term financial security. Short-term goals are the small steps taken that will eventually lead you to the long-term objective. Three critical short-term financial goals are to • Obtain employment (get an income) • Establish a budget (determine your expenses) • Plan to save money (savings are key to financial planning)

Mid-Term

Once you have obtained the three basic short-term goals (getting an income, determining your expenses, and planning to save money), you can strive to reach mid-term financial goals. Mid-term financial goals include • Saving for emergencies • Taking a trip or vacation • Purchasing major necessary items (a car, major appliance, etc.) or luxury or unnecessary items (jewelry, new television, stereo, etc.) In addition, mid-term goals are the means by which you strive to reach longterm goals: • Establish credit to enable you to purchase necessary items and manage financial budget • Invest to increase savings through stocks, mutual funds, and individual retirement accounts • Purchase insurance to prepare for emergencies and care for your loved ones in the event of your death Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Financial Goals, Continued

Long-Term

Long-term financial goals are things you hope to achieve. Some long-term financial objectives are to • • • • •

MCI Course 8101

Purchase a home Purchase a new car Establish a business Attend college (yourself or your children) Afford an active retirement

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Achieving Financial Goals

Work Backwards

Suppose your long-term objective was to buy a house. What steps would you take to reach that goal? That is, what would be your short-term objectives? One way to uncover these short-term goals is to work backwards. Thinking backwards in terms of time, what do you need to consider? These become your short-term goals. The table below is an example of working backward from the long-term objective of buying a house to the short-term objective of enrolling in courses or training. Stage 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Plan

Description You would need savings (a healthy bank account) to buy a house. How would you get a healthy bank account? You would have to get a steady job with a steady income. How would you get a steady job with a steady income? You would have to get education/training/certification/skills. What is the first step toward getting qualified? Take a realistic look at your abilities and background with a career planner. After you evaluated your abilities and background against careers, what would be your next step? Enroll in courses or training.

You do not need a crystal ball to plan for your future. You must always be guided by your plans and be prepared to adjust. Take time to figure out the details as much as possible. Remember, whenever you do not have enough money, extend your timeframe for obtaining a goal.

Commit

Once you have made realistic plans, then commit yourself to fulfilling them. Your decision is directly related to the degree of success that you will have reaching your goals. Your commitment is the edge you need to succeed! Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-16

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Achieving Financial Goals, Continued

Reviewing

Financial planning is an on-going process. You should review your income, expenditures, short-, mid-, and long-term goals frequently. Your life situation may affect your financial planning. Review your financial plans when you experience a life-changing event such as • • • • • •

Changing jobs Promotions Attending college Getting married Having a child Inheriting substantial items of value

Remember, your goals can be achieved if you plan, commit, review, and adjust. However, without a financial plan, you are trusting luck to provide for your future and success.

MCI Course 8101

4-17

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Definitions

Credit

Credit means, "buy now pay later." Credit permits you to purchase goods or services as you need them, but pay for them over time. Uses range from credit card shopping to arranging loans from financial institutions for very expensive items. Borrowing with credit is so popular in today's society that many of us could not imagine a world without credit--a world in which we would have to wait until we had saved the cash for such things as going to school or buying furniture, automobiles, houses, or other items. Our national and global economies are very dependent upon the availability of credit to consumers. Lenders extend credit because, in return, they expect the original loan amount plus a finance charge for the use of the money. The amount of credit you can obtain depends on your net worth, your income, and your credit rating.

Credit Line

A credit line is the amount of credit a lender will extend to you. For example, a new credit card may come with a credit line of $1,000.

Credit Rating

Your credit rating or credit history is a summary of your bill-paying behavior over a number of years. All creditors may submit bill-paying information to a credit agency. The credit agency then produces a credit report. Whenever you apply for credit, the lender can access your credit report. If you are denied credit, you should be able to obtain a copy of the credit report the lender saw. You can pay to obtain a copy of your credit report from credit agencies. You should periodically review your credit report to be sure the information is accurate. If it is not, contact the credit agency immediately and provide the information necessary to clear up discrepancies. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-18

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Definitions, Continued

Principle

The principle is the original loan amount. Interest is calculated on the principle.

Interest

Interest is a charge for a financial loan, usually a percentage of the amount loaned. When using credit to make a purchase, always add the interest costs to determine the true cost of what you are purchasing.

Finance Charge

The finance charge is usually expressed as interest. The finance charge is a percentage of the original loan amount (the principle).

Annual Percentage Rate (APR)

The annual percentage rate (APR) indicates the actual cost of a loan per year. It combines the interest charged and any fees. When comparing the cost of loans, compare the annual percentage rate of each loan.

MCI Course 8101

4-19

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Types of Credit

Installment

Installment credit allows a buyer to pay for a purchased item in regular installments, usually monthly payments. Since the goods purchased are used as security for the loan, the seller owns the goods until all payments are made.

Open-End

Open-end credit is when you promise to repay the full balance owed each month so no finance charge is added. Of course, if you do not pay the bill in full when it is due, you will suffer credit problems. Some credit situations that are open-end credit are: • Credit cards, such as American Express or Diner's Club • Utility and telephone bills • Medical bills

Revolving

Revolving credit is a line of credit that may be used over and over again. With a revolving credit agreement, you have the option of paying the balance in full each month or making a minimum payment. Although some loan institutions provide revolving credit accounts, the most common form of revolving credit are credit cards such as: • Visa • MasterCard • Most department store charge accounts

MCI Course 8101

4-20

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Using Credit

Advantages

The advantages of using credit are, that credit • • • • • •

Disadvantages

Is convenient May be used to meet emergencies Helps you establish a credit rating Provides better service on a purchase Provides quicker receipt of an item Allows you to take advantage of bargains (Remember it is only a bargain if you need the item and you do not pay more in interest than you save on the item.).

The two main disadvantages to using credit are that you • Pay extra in interest • May make unnecessary purchases because it is so easy to use Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-21

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Using Credit, Continued

Guidelines

If you decide to use credit, follow the guidelines in the table below to use it wisely. Guideline Shop around Evaluate the purchase and pay cash

Be sure the purchase is a wise investment

Action Find the lowest interest rate. • Consider paying cash. • Delay the purchase; maybe the investment is not really necessary right now. • Save up and purchase it when you have the money to pay cash. • Research to be sure your purchase is a wise investment.

Set a monthly credit limit

• Do not purchase items on credit that will be outdated or worn out before you finish paying for it. The larger your down payment, the lower your payments will be or the fewer number of months you must make payments, or both. • Set monthly credit spending limits.

Reduce debt

• Make sure the payment will fit into your budget. • Always try to reduce debt.

Put as much down as you can

• Resist the temptation to keep buying the most you can on credit! • Try to pay off debt in advance and then save the amount in your budget allotted to credit payments.

MCI Course 8101

4-22

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2

Lesson 2 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

15 minutes

Directions

Complete the following items. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item.

Items 1 Through 5

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the type of financial goal in column 2 that best identifies the financial transaction identified in column 1. You may use the answers in column 2 more than once. Column 1

Column 2

Financial Transaction

Financial Goal

___ 1. ___ 2. ___ 3. ___ 4. ___ 5.

a. Short-term b. Mid-term c. Long-term

Taking a trip or vacation Purchasing a home Obtaining employment Establishing a budget Establishing a business

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-23

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Items 6 Through 9

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the credit term in column 2 that is defined in column 1. You may use the answers in column 2 only once. Column 1

Column 2

Definition

Credit Term

___ 6.

a. b. c. d. e.

___ 7. ___ 8. ___ 9.

Item 10

Actual cost of a loan per year Amount of credit a lender will extend to you The original loan amount Summary of your billpaying behavior over several years

Credit Line Principle Annual Percentage Rate Credit Credit Rating

What are two major disadvantages of using credit? a. Paying extra in interest and make unnecessary purchases b. Complicates your bookkeeping, and becomes easy to make mistakes in computation c. Is expensive to write a lot of checks and mail a lot of checks d. Pay a higher interest and pay an additional charge for using credit

Item 11

What is an advantage of using credit? a. b. c. d.

Allows you to pay a high interest on your purchases Helps you establish a credit rating Helps you get more into financial debt It can be used against you if payment is not made Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-24

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Item 12

Use the five credit guidelines listed below to answer the following question. • • • • •

Shop around. Evaluate the purchase and pay cash. Be sure the purchase is a wise investment. Put as much down as you can. Set a monthly credit .

What is the sixth guideline? a. Reduce debt. b. Consolidate your loans into one big loan with one credit payment per month. c. Use credit to save your cash and postpone paying. d. Renegotiate new and longer terms for credit loans.

MCI Course 8101

4-25

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, continued

Answers

The table below provides the correct answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

MCI Course 8101

Answer b c a a c c a b e a b a

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Reference Page 4-14 4-15 4-14 4-14 4-15 4-19 4-18 4-18 4-18 4-21 4-21 4-22

Study Unit 4, Lesson 2 Exercise

LESSON 3 ACHIEVING FINANCIAL GOALS Introduction

Estimated Study Time

30 minutes

Lesson Scope

Having a financial plan is essential, but a commitment to saving is the key to your plan. A key part to successful saving is starting early. The earlier you start, the bigger the payoff will be down the road. The principle vehicle that actually takes you to your financial goal or destination is saving. Savings enable you to achieve your personal financial objectives and provide you and your family with a financial security blanket. This lesson will teach you about some saving tools to help you reach your financial goals. Specifically, this lesson will explain the uses of a savings account, information about individual retirement accounts, and insurance you can purchase to help provide financial security for your future.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to • Determine how to start a savings account. • Identify the three types of individual retirement accounts (IRAs). • Identify criteria for using an IRA. • Identify the different types of life insurance. • Identify the criteria for choosing the best life insurance policy. • Identify the three methods to determine the amount of insurance needed. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-27

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Introduction, Continued

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Selecting a Financial Institution Open a Savings Account Using Your Savings Account Individual Retirement Account Setting Up an IRA IRA Withdrawals Thrift Savings Plan Insurance Types of Insurance Comparison Between Whole and Term Life Insurance Choosing the Best Policy Determining the Amount of Insurance You Need Multiple Earnings Approach Needs Approach Needs Approach Worksheet Common Sense Approach Common Sense Approach Worksheet Lesson 3 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

4-28

See Page 4-27 4-29 4-30 4-31 4-32 4-34 4-36 4-37 4-40 4-41 4-45 4-46 4-47 4-48 4-49 4-50 4-58 4-59 4-61

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Selecting a Financial Institution

Three Factors to Consider

The first thing you must do to open a savings account is to select a bank. Your decision on which bank to use should depend on the bank’s • Location and service • Interest rate • Insurance as a financial institution

Location and Service

Obviously, you will want to choose a bank that has • • • • • • • •

Branches that are convenient for you Functional services Evening and weekend hours Automated teller machines (ATMs) Loans Checking accounts Savings accounts Safety deposit boxes

Interest Rate

An interest rate is the rate of money you get or the percentage amount the bank pays you for keeping your money. You want to find a bank with the highest interest rate. The higher your interest rates, the more money you make on your saved money.

Financial Insurance

Lastly, you want to choose a bank that is federally insured against losses that may occur in a stock market crash. Financial institutions should tell you whether they are insured or not. If they are insured, they usually have a limit they are liable to pay. You also want to make sure the bank is federally insured up to an amount higher than what you expect to save.

MCI Course 8101

4-29

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Open a Savings Account

Request Service

Once you choose a bank, tell someone who works there that you want to open a savings account.

Bank Form

Once you tell the bank personnel you want to open a savings account, they will ask you to fill out a savings account bank form that lists your • Name • Social security number • Address

Sample Bank Form

The table below is a sample bank form you may have to complete. Primary Applicant Information Last Name, First Name, Middle Initial

Secondary Applicant Information Last Name, First Name, Middle Initial

Date of Birth Home Address (Number and Street)

Date of Birth Home Address (Number and Street)

City State Zip Code Home Phone

City State Zip Code Home Phone

Note: The secondary application information is filled out if you are opening a joint account. A joint account means that a parent, spouse, or child will share your account with you.

Minimum Deposit

MCI Course 8101

Once you complete the bank form, you will need to deposit a minimum amount of money into your new account. Check with the bank personnel to find out what your minimum deposit will be before you open the account.

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Using Your Savings Account

Electronic Deposit

Once you have established a savings account, a good way to use it wisely for your financial planning is through an electronic deposit system. This system allows the bank to automatically withhold a specified savings allotment from your paycheck and deposit it into your savings account. You can set up an electronic savings deposit in three ways: • “A” (savings) allotment • “B” (bond) allotment • Direct deposit

“A” (Savings) Allotment

If you decide to use an “A” (savings) allotment, a set amount of money will be withheld from your paycheck at the mid-month and the beginning-of-themonth paydays. This amount is automatically deposited to your savings account at the end of the month.

“B” (Bond) Allotment

If you decide to use a “B” (bond) allotment, you will purchase a U. S. savings bond with the deduction from your paycheck. The amounts and types of savings bond deduction plans are numerous. Obtain information about them at your administrative or disbursing office or from your savings bond representative.

Direct Deposit

Direct deposit is the U.S. Treasury's name for an electronic funds transfer system that transfers your salary directly to your checking and/or savings accounts. The direct deposit system is fast and reliable because it uses the Federal Reserve Distribution System. With direct deposit, your paycheck goes directly into your bank account.

MCI Course 8101

4-31

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Individual Retirement Account

Definition

Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) have been around since 1974. An IRA is your investment in a retirement fund for yourself. Generally the money you invest in an IRA is deducted from your taxable income (before taxes are assessed). In addition, interest you earn on the IRA is deferred until you withdraw funds from the account; that means you do not pay taxes on interest you earn until you start collecting from the IRA.

Basic Types

You can set up different kinds of IRAs with a variety of organizations: • Through a traditional source • Mutual fund • Life insurance company • Stock broker • As part of a simplified employee pension (SEP) • In a Roth IRA

Traditional IRA

The traditional IRA allows you to contribute and defer taxes on up to $3,000 ($4,000 in 2004 and $5,000 in 2005) of earned income to a qualified retirement account. To be deductible, contributions to traditional IRAs require • Single taxpayers’ adjusted gross income not to exceed $33,000 • The combined adjusted gross income for married couples to be $53,000 Traditional IRA earnings accumulate on a tax-deferred basis. Minimum distributions must be taken beginning at the age of 70 ½.

SEP

A simplified employee pension (SEP) is a written arrangement (a plan) that allows an employer who’s self-employed to contribute, without becoming involved in more complex arrangements, to • His or her own (if self-employed) retirement plans • Employees’ retirement plans Each participant under the SEP may establish his or her IRA accounts at the institution of his or her choice. SEP contributions are limited to 15 percent of compensation to a maximum of $24,000. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Individual Retirement Account, Continued

Roth IRA

The Roth IRA, named after Senator Roth from Delaware, offers an attractive alternative to the ordinary IRA. Roth IRAs are not eligible for SEPs. You cannot deduct your contributions to a Roth IRA, but you receive all qualified distributions tax-free. Under certain conditions, this factor could work out to be a huge advantage for you. Contributions are post-tax and are not tax-deductible, but earnings on the account are tax deductible and accumulate tax-free. Qualified withdrawals may be made tax-free with no annual limits. No minimum distributions are required at 70 ½years of age. A single person may open a Roth IRA with an adjusted gross income of up to $110,000; for a married couple, up to $160,000 in the year of commencement. Subsequent years have no income requirements.

MCI Course 8101

4-33

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Setting Up an IRA

Who is Eligible

An individual who • Earned income (a salary) • Is under 70 ½years of age • Wishes to defer or eliminate the payment of taxes on income funds set aside for retirement

Creation

An IRA account is created by • A written document • The trustee or custodian who must be a/an • • • •

Disclosure Statement

Bank Federally insured credit union Savings and loan association Entity approved by the IRS to act as trustee or custodian

The disclosure statement given to you by the plan trustee or issuer (sometimes called the sponsor) must contain plain-language explanations of certain items such as • Information on when and how you can revoke the IRA • The name, address, and telephone number of the person to receive the notice cancellation This explanation must appear at the beginning of the disclosure statement. The sponsor of the traditional IRA you choose must give you a disclosure statement about your arrangement at least 7 days before you set up your IRA. However, the sponsor can give you the statement by the date you set up (or purchase, if earlier) your IRA, if you are given at least 7 days from the date to revoke the IRA. If you revoke your IRA within the revocation period, the sponsor must return the entire amount you paid.

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-34

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Setting Up an IRA, Continued

Contributions

MCI Course 8101

Contributions must be deposited to the account either during the calendar year or no later than April 15th of the following year. Such contributions may be fully or partially deductible from a person’s taxes depending on their income level and whether or not they are a participant under an employer-sponsored plan. Distributions may be taken from age 59 ½years without penalty.

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

IRA Withdrawals

Guidelines

IRA withdrawal guidelines vary by type of IRA.

Traditional IRAs

With traditional IRAs, withdrawals made prior to age 59 ½are subject to income tax plus an additional 10-percent penalty unless an exception applies for • Permanent disability • Death • Substantially equal periodic payments

Roth IRAs

Earnings from a Roth IRA may be withdrawn tax free if the Roth IRA has a 5-year holding period and one of the following criteria is met: • • • •

MCI Course 8101

Person withdrawing is age 59 ½ Money is to purchase a first home ($10,000 lifetime cap) Person withdrawing is permanently disabled Owner dies

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Thrift Savings Plan

What Is The Thrift Savings Plan (TSP)

The Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) is a retirement savings and investment plan that has been available to civilian employees of the Federal Government since 1987. On October 30, 2000, President Clinton signed the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001. One provision of the law extended participation in the TSP, which was originally only for Federal civilian employees, to members of the uniformed services. Uniformed service members were first able to enroll in the TSP during a special open season from October 9, 2001 to January 31, 2002.

Purpose

The purpose of the TSP is to provide retirement income. It offers participants the same type of savings and tax benefits that many private corporations offer their employees under so-called 401(k) plans. The TSP allows participants to save a portion of their pay in a special retirement account administered by the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board. The money that participants invest in the TSP generally comes from pre-tax dollars and reduces their current taxable income. Members who serve in a combat zone can also contribute from tax-exempt dollars. Such contributions are tax-free when withdrawn; however, earnings on such contributions are taxed when they are withdrawn.

Getting Started

While you are a member of the uniformed services, your service is your primary TSP contact. Your service will provide you with TSP forms and informational materials and answer your questions about the TSP. You will submit the Election Form (TSP-U-1) to your service to enroll in the TSP. (Your service may use an electronic version of the Election Form, e.g., on the Employee/Member Self-Service System. Your service will advise you regarding the availability of this method.) Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Thrift Savings Plan, Continued

How much May I contribute?

In 2003, you can contribute up to 8 percent of the basic pay you earn each month. Note: Your contribution limit will increase by 1% in December of each year until December 2005, when contributions will be limited only by the elective deferral amount ($15,000 in 2006). You may also contribute all or any whole percentage of any incentive or special pay (including reenlistment or other bonuses) you receive. However, the total amount you contribute each year cannot exceed the Internal Revenue Code's elective deferral limit (26 U.S.C. 402(g)) for the year. Please refer to the Defense Finance and Accounting System (DFAS) Web site at www.dfas.gov or talk to your service TSP representative for information about the uniformed services elements of pay. If you are a member of the Ready Reserve or National Guard and have a civilian TSP account, the total of all your contributions to all of your plans cannot exceed the Internal Revenue Code's elective deferral limit. However, if you also participate in a Section 457 plan, your contributions to the TSP are not limited by any of your contributions to your section 457 plan. In addition, if you contribute tax-exempt dollars from combat zone pay, your contributions are subject to another Internal Revenue Code section (26 U.S.C. 415(c)) which limits your contributions to the TSP and other qualified plans in 2002 to $40,000 or 100 percent of your compensation, whichever is less. This includes pre-tax and tax-exempt contributions to the TSP for the year. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Thrift Savings Plan, Continued

Features of The TSP

You can contribute up to 8 percent of your basic pay each pay period to your TSP account as soon as you become a member of the uniformed service. If you contribute to the TSP from your basic pay, you may also contribute from one to 100 percent of any incentive pay or special pay (including bonus pay) you receive, up to the limits established by the Internal Revenue Code. The TSP also offers the following: • • • • •

• • • • • • •



MCI Course 8101

Immediate member contributions Before-tax and tax deferred investment earnings Low administrative and investment expenses Transfers into the TSP from other qualified retirement plans A choice of five investment funds: • Government Securities Investment (G) Fund • Fixed Income Index Investment (F) Fund • Common Stock Index Investment (C) Fund • Small Capitalization Stock Index Investment (S) Fund • International Stock Index Investment (I) Fund Interfund transfers Loans from your own contributions and attributable earnings while you are in service In-service withdrawals for financial hardship or after you reach age 59 ½ Portable benefits and a choice of withdrawal options after you separate from service The ability to designate beneficiaries for your account balance Spouse’s rights protection for loans and withdrawals and recognition of qualifying court orders A web site with general account information, capability for requesting contribution allocations and interfund transfers, up-to-date TSP materials and information, and calculators to estimate account growth and annuity amounts An automated telephone service (the ThriftLine) for Plan and account information and certain transactions

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Insurance

Purpose

Arranging for life insurance coverage now may seem unimportant. However, think about those who rely on you financially. Your death would deprive your family of your income, yet they would still have to pay rent, car payments, credit card bills, and medical expenses. Life insurance provides the financial cushion that allows your loved ones to adjust financially to life without you. Most people buy life insurance to provide financial protection for their dependents in the event of their death. For those in the military, maintaining adequate insurance is especially important. As a responsible, thoughtful person, you will want to carefully provide for your family in the event of your death, no matter how remote it may seem today.

Part of Financial Planning

Most people jump into an insurance policy without having enough information about insurance. Learning as much as you can about the insurance will help you make appropriate choices when buying life insurance. Your decision should be based on your life needs and circumstances. In addition, you should reevaluate your insurance coverage as your circumstances and needs change. As part of your financial planning, you should review your insurance coverage and needs whenever you have a life change such as • • • • • •

Promotion Marriage Birth of child Death of family member College (yourself or a family member) Purchase of a home

Doing so will help you make appropriate choices when buying life insurance and ensure you are financially stable for your specific circumstances.

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Types of Insurance

Service Group Life Insurance (SGLI)

All members of the uniformed services, including service adademy cadets are automatically insured under Servicemember’s Group Life Insurance (SGLI) for $250,000, unless they elect in writing to be covered for a lesser amount, or not to be covered at all. Full-time coverage is also provided, under certain conditions, for (1) persons who volunteer for assignment to the Ready Reserve of a uniformed service, and (2) persons assigned to or who, upon application, would be eligible for assignment to the Retired Reserve of a uniformed service and have completed at least 20 years of satisfactory service creditable for retirement purposes but have not begun receiving retired pay. • Part-time coverage is provided, under certain conditions, to members of the Reserves who do not qualify for full-time coverage. • SGLI has no loan, cash, paid-up or extended values. • SGLI is provided at no cost for 120 days following an individual’s separation or retirement from active duty.

Dependent SGLI Insurance

The Veteran’s Opportunities Act of 2001 extended life insurance coverage to spouses and children of service members under the SGLI program effective November 1, 2001. Family coverage is available for the spouses and children of • Active duty service members • Members of the Ready Reserve of a uniformed service Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Types of Insurance, Continued

Veterans Group Life Insurance (VGLI)

Veterans Group Life Insurance (VGLI) is a 5-year term insurance policy available, upon application, to all members being separated or released from active duty, active duty for training, initial active duty for training or upon separation from the Ready Reserve. VGLI is renewable for life in 5-year term periods and may be converted to a commercial insurance policy at any time. VGLI may not be issued in an amount greater than the amount of SGLI carried at the time of separation from service. Members wishing to continue group coverage under the VGLI program must submit application and payment of first premium within 120 days of separation. If application (unless totally disabled) is not made within the 120day period, application may be made within 1 year after SGLI coverage terminates provided evidence of good health is provided. If the member is totally disabled on the date of separation, application for VGLI may be made anytime during the one year extended SGLI coverage period. The effective date of VGLI will be the day following the end of the 1-yar period or the day following the date disability ends, whichever is earlier. Evidence of continuing disability may be required in such cases. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Types of Insurance, Continued

Whole Life

Your whole life policy provides the maximum amount of protection against your death for an indefinite amount of time, throughout your "whole life." For whole life insurance, • Premiums remain at a fixed rate. • The period between payments stays the same. • The amount of insurance coverage for the entire lifespan of the policyholder does not change no matter what happens to you. • Companies also include a savings element called cash value. You may borrow against the cash value of your policy.

Term Life

Term life insurance provides protection for only a specific period of time (number of years) at a certain cost. The face amount of the policy is only payable if death occurs. The two general types of term insurance are • Level term - The amount of insurance coverage remains the same over each renewal period; however, at the start of each renewal period, insurance cost increases. • Decreasing term - Provides a reduced amount of coverage for the same premium cost each renewal. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Types of Insurance, Continued

Term or Whole Life Insurance Combinations

The table below describes general types of life insurance policies that are either term policies or combinations of term and whole life policies. Type Universal

Description • Cash reserves build from the amount you pay over the premium. The increase can be borrowed against or paid to the beneficiary. • Policyholder can pay premiums at any time in any amount (with limitations).

Ordinary

Permanent

Adjustment

Variable Annuity and Endowments

MCI Course 8101

• Income tax is deferred until the cash is withdrawn. The policyholder usually pays the same premium throughout the life of the policy (although sometimes he/she can arrange to pay a specified amount for a specified period of time). • Covers whole life span. • Premium can be borrowed with interest or paid to the policyholder upon surrender of the policy. Policyholder can "adjust" coverage to meet his/her needs by increasing or decreasing the premium amount or period covered. What "varies" could be the amount of death benefit or profits from the portion of the premium invested. Pay a lump sum or income to policyholder that lives to a certain age or after a certain amount is paid (or pays a beneficiary).

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Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Comparison Between Whole and Term Life Insurance

Benefits of Whole Life

The comparison is easiest to understand when you first look at the way whole life works. When you buy a certain amount of whole life at a certain price, there generally will be no change in the • Amount of premium • Period between payments • Amount of insurance coverage you will have for the rest of your life

Disadvantages of Term Life

If you were to buy that same amount of coverage as term insurance, as you get older • You would pay more for that coverage. • The coverage would be for a shorter period. • The insurance company could decide you are no longer eligible for their coverage.

Decision Based on Life’s Situation

MCI Course 8101

Although term insurance looks great at the beginning because it is cheaper, you should now understand that whole life coverage has specific benefits too. Choosing which type of insurance to buy should be based on why you are buying the insurance and on your financial goals.

4-45

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Choosing the Best Policy

Read

Before buying insurance, read the policy and understand the coverage you are buying.

Know Your Insurance Rights

Make sure your insurance company is licensed with the state. If it is, the insurance commission can be helpful if a misunderstanding or dispute occurs between you and the insurance company. Insurance professionals can give you general guidelines about your rights when buying insurance. You can cancel or lapse a policy at any time, but you must pay the premium for the time the policy was in force. If your insurance company collects personal information about you, ask how it will be used. If your insurance company has incorrect information about you in their files that resulted in your being turned down for insurance, make sure it is corrected.

Know the Insurance Company’s Rating

Insurance companies are rated by independent rating services, such as Best's Insurance Reports (available in most libraries).

Evaluate Your Needs

The amount of insurance you need depends on how old you are, your situation, marital status, number of dependents, income, etc. Purchase insurance that meets your needs and financial plan.

Read Free Government Information

"What You Should Know About Life Insurance" is a free publication available quarterly. You can obtain a copy by contacting Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, CO 81009.

MCI Course 8101

A rating of "A" or better (A+ or A++) indicates financial stability and that the company is good on paying claims. Your insurance broker or state insurance commissioner can give you the rating. Use "A-rated" companies only!

4-46

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Determining the Amount of Insurance You Need

Three Methods

Picking a life insurance policy is a multifaceted problem. Because many factors are involved in projecting the future economy (like inflation and recession) and your future employment, no single, fixed formula exists to determine the amount of life insurance a person should have. The three approaches to determining the amount of insurance you need to purchase are • Multiple earnings • Needs • Common sense

MCI Course 8101

4-47

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Multiple Earnings Approach

Definition

Under the multiple earnings model, the required amount of life insurance is a direct function of the insured’s annual income. One version of this approach multiplies current earnings by a factor of 5 times 12 months and increases that amount by the value of the unpaid home mortgage plus $50,000 for each child living at home.

Example Procedure

A member with a spouse, two children in high school, and $125,000 outstanding mortgage has a monthly gross income (base pay plus basic allowance for housing [BAH]) of $5,100. Using the multiple earnings approach described above, the amount of insurance this member should purchase is 1. 2. 3. 4.

Salary multiplied by 5: $ 5,100 x 5 = $ 25,500 Result of step 1 multiplied by 12 months: $ 25,500 x 12 = $ 306,000 Add outstanding mortgage balance: $ 306,000 + $ 125,000 = $ 431,000 Multiply number of children at home by $50, 000: $50,000 x 2 = $ 100,000 5. Add results of step 3 and 4 together to get total insurance requirement: $ 431,000 + $ 100,000 = $ 531,000 The amount of insurance this member should purchase is $ 531,000.

MCI Course 8101

4-48

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Needs Approach

Definition

This technique of estimating insurance requirements examines the financial situation of the insured and considers other resources that may be available. While it takes more effort than the multiple earnings method, it produces an estimate specifically tailored to an individual's situation.

Eight Steps

The table below list the eight steps for the needs approach. Step 1 2 3

Action Determine amount of income available to survivors when you die. Determine amount of expenses that must be paid (not continuing financial needs) upon your death. Subtract amount of expenses from step 2 from the amount of income from step 1. If the amount of expenses is •

4

5 6 7

Less than the income, the difference results in excess income available to survivors. • Greater than the income, the difference results in a shortage and should be placed in brackets to indicate the shortage amount Identify family insurance policies currently purchased by • Policy number • Type of insurance • Name of insurance company • Beneficiary • Face value Determine family’s projected monthly income from all sources. Determine family’s projected monthly expenses (continuing financial needs) for all items. Subtract the amount of expenses from step 5 from the amount of income from step 6. If the amount of expenses is •

8

Less than the income, the difference results in excess income available to survivors. • Greater than the income, the difference results in a shortage and should be placed in brackets to indicate the shortage amount. Determine the amount (if any) of insurance you need to make up for any shortages. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-49

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Needs Approach Worksheet

Step 1

Determine amount of income available to survivors when you die. Add all sources together. Source of Income Military Death Gratuity Pay Back Pay and Allowances VA Death Benefit Payment Social Security Death Benefit Proceeds of SGLI/VGLI Insurance Policy Number Policy Number Other Sources of Income (Explain) From From From From Total Income Available to Survivors

Amount

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-50

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Needs Approach Worksheet, Continued

Step 2

Determine amount of expenses that must be paid (not continuing financial needs) upon your death. Add all expenses together. Reason for Expense Executor’s Fund (count on $ 5,000) Home Mortgage Payoff (1st mortgage) Home Mortgage Payoff (2nd mortgage) Funeral Expenses (count on $ 5,000) Emergency Expenses (count on $ 5,000) Automobile Loans to be Paid Off 1st vehicle 2nd vehicle 3rd vehicle Other Loans to be Paid Off (Explain) For For For For Other Expenses (Explain) For For For Total Expenses Upon Your Death

Amount

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-51

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Needs Approach Worksheet, Continued

Step 3

Subtract amount of expenses from step 2 from the amount of income from step 1. If the amount of expenses is • Less than the income, the difference results in excess income available to survivors. • Greater than the income, the difference results in a shortage and should be placed in brackets to indicate the shortage amount. Step Result Amount of Income from Step 1 Amount of Expenses from Step 2 Difference (Excess Income or Shortage)

Amount

Notes: If the difference in step 3 indicates that your family’s income is enough to cover the immediate expenses they will face, your first concern about their financial well-being is satisfied. But, remember, this only covers their immediate expenses; it does not provide for a continued source of income for their day-to-day, month-to-month living expenses. These living expenses are the next greatest concern you will face. If the difference in step 3 shows that your survivors will not have enough immediate cash available to cover their expenses, they will be in deep trouble. You need to take immediate action to ensure their financial security. Remember, insurance benefits only cover a source of immediate funds. Other investments (stocks, mutual funds, IRAs, etc.) may be a source of ongoing income. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-52

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Needs Approach Worksheet, Continued

Step 4

Identify family insurance policies currently purchased by • • • • • Policy Number

Policy number Type of insurance Name of insurance company Beneficiary Face value Type of Insurance

Name of Insurance Company

Beneficiary

Face Value

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-53

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Needs Approach Worksheet, Continued

Step 5

Determine family’s projected monthly income from all sources. Add all amounts together. Source Surviving Spouse’s Salary Survivor Benefit Plan Payments Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Payments VA Pension VA Benefits (Explain) For Spouse For Children For Parents Social Security Benefits (Explain) For Spouse For Children For Parents Other Income (Explain) For For For Total Monthly Income for Family

Amount

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-54

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Needs Approach Worksheet, Continued

Step 6

Determine family’s projected monthly expenses (continuing financial needs) for all items. Add all monthly expenses together. Reason for Expense Rent or Mortgage Payment Utilities Electricity Gas Water Telephone Cable Television Food Clothing Entertainment Transportation Loan Payments (Explain) For For For Other Expenses (Explain) For For For Total Monthly Living Expenses

Amount

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-55

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Needs Approach Worksheet, Continued

Step 7

Subtract the amount of expenses from step 5 from the amount of income from step 6. If the amount of expenses is • Less than the income, the difference results in excess income available to survivors. • Greater than the income, the difference results in a shortage and should be placed in brackets to indicate the shortage amount. Step Result Amount of Income from Step 6 Amount of Expenses from Step 5 Difference (Excess Income or Shortage)

Amount

Notes: If the difference in step 7 indicates that your family’s monthly income after your death is enough to cover their anticipated monthly expenses, your immediate concern regarding their financial security should be at ease. Although it appears they will be provided for, they should have an income “cushion” to guard against emergencies, inflation, disasters, and the death of other family members. On the other hand, if the difference in step 7 indicates that your survivors will not have enough monthly income to cover their expenses, you should take immediate action to preclude them from experiencing major financial difficulties. The quickest and least expensive action you can take is to immediately increase your life insurance. Little can be done to protect your family after you are gone, and you could be “gone” tomorrow. Other steps you can take now to protect your family are to invest in relatively safe stocks, mutual funds, or IRAs and to save, save, and save some more. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-56

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Needs Approach Worksheet, Continued

Step 8

Determine the amount (if any) of insurance you need to make up for any shortages. After you have completed the computations in the previous seven steps, you might find yourself fortunate enough to have sufficient insurance to satisfy your present financial needs as well as the needs of your survivors after you are gone. By the same token, you may have determined that the amount of life insurance protection you are presently carrying will be insufficient to provide your family with the financial protection they will need and deserve. As your income level increases, and you are able to place more money into sound investments that provide the financial security you seek, your insurance needs may decline. But until you reach that “safety net,” it is better to be safe than sorry.

MCI Course 8101

4-57

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Common Sense Approach

Definition

The common sense approach calculates the future financial expenses of your family (like car, house, and education) to determine the amount of life insurance you need.

Procedure

In the common sense approach, you • Determine your family’s financial need • Immediate expenses • Long-term expenses • Determine your family’s financial assets • Determine the life insurance needed by subtracting the total assets from the total needs

MCI Course 8101

4-58

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Common Sense Approach Worksheet

Needs

List the reason for immediate and long-term expenses and each cost. Add the amount of expenses together to determine your family’s financial needs. Reason for Expense Immediate Expenses Funeral Expenses Uninsured Medical Expenses Estate Settlement Expenses Long-Term Expenses Emergency Fund Repayment of Debts Family Living Expenses Homemaking Expenses (child care, house and lawn care, etc.) Education Fund Retirement Fund All Other Expenses Total Needs

Assets

Amount

To determine your family’s financial assets, list the source and amount of all income. Add all income together. Source of Income Current Life Insurance (All policies) All Pension Benefits Cash and Savings Equity in Real Estate (If it were to be sold) All Investments (Stocks, bonds, mutual funds, IRAs, Keogh plans, etc.) Social Security Survivor Benefits (Monthly amount times Number of months) All Other Income Total Assets

Amount

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-59

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Common Sense Approach Worksheet, Continued

Insurance Required

Subtract the total assets from the total needs to determine the amount of insurance you need. The result would be the amount of insurance you need. Insurance Calculation

Amount

Total Needs Total Assets Life Insurance Needed

MCI Course 8101

4-60

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3

Lesson 3 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete the following items. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item.

Item 1

What are the three factors to consider when choosing a financial institution to start a savings account? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Bank’s location, interest rate, and insurance Credit card interest rates, bank location, or time attendance Shop around, credit ratings, or interest rates Credit line, interest rates, or credit ratings

What are the three different kinds of IRAs? a. b. c. d.

Roth, trustee, and SEP Traditional, Roth, and individual Tax free, withdrawals, and rollovers SEP, traditional, and Roth Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

4-61

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3 Exercise

Lesson 3 Exercise, Continued

Item 3

Under what age are you eligible to set up an IRA? a. b. c. d.

Item 4

The minimum age at which you can draw funds from your IRA without penalty is a. b. c. d.

Items 5 Through 8

21 45 59 ½ 70 ½

21 45 59 ½ 70 ½

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the type of insurance from column 2 that is defined in column 1. You may use the answers in column 2 only once. Column 1

Column 2

Definition

Type of Insurance

___ 5.

a. b. c. d. e.

___ 6.

___ 7.

___ 8.

Cash reserves build from amount you pay over the premium and can be borrowed against Provides protection for a specified period of time at a certain cost Covers whole life span and premium can be borrowed with interest paid to policyholder upon surrender of the policy Policyholder usually pays the same premium through the life of the policy

Whole life Term life Ordinary Universal Permanent

Continued on next page MCI Course 8101

4-62

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3 Exercise

Lesson 3 Exercise, Continued

Item 9

What does an insurance rating tell you about the insurance company? a. b. c. d.

Item 10

Which of the following lists the three approaches to determine insurance needs? a. b. c. d.

Items 11 Through 13

MCI Course 8101

The company is licensed with the state in which it is operating. The company has reasonable rates and is good on paying claims. The company satisfies customers with the amount paid on claims. The company is financially stable and good on paying claims.

Multiple household, needs, and assets Multiple earnings, needs, and common sense Multiple earnings, wants, and assets Multiple policies, desires, and common sense

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the type of approach to determine insurance needs from column 2 that best fits the description in column 1. You may use the answers in column 2 only once. Column 1

Column 2

Description

Type of Approach to Determine Insurance Needs

___ 11. Examines financial situation and considers resources available ___ 12. Determines required amount of insurance as a direct function of the annual income ___ 13. Calculates future immediate and long-term expenses to determine amount of insurance required

a. b. c. d. e.

4-63

Multiple household Multiple earnings Needs Common sense Assets

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3 Exercise

Lesson 3 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the correct answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

MCI Course 8101

Answer a d d c a b e c d b c b d

4-64

Reference Page 4-29 4-32 4-34 4-35 4-43 4-43 4-44 4-44 4-46 4-47 4-49 4-48 4-58

Study Unit 4, Lesson 3 Exercise

STUDY UNIT 5 WEIGHT CONTROL AND MILITARY APPEARANCE Overview

Estimated Study Time

2 hours, 55 minutes

Unit Scope

This study unit will give you the required information for evaluating a Marine’s physical fitness level. This unit will provide the SNCO with the appropriate references for remedial and personal appearance programs.

Learning Objectives

After completing this study unit, you will be able to •

List the objectives of the Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test and Body Composition Manual.



Define physical fitness.



Identify the Marine Corps Order that states the objectives and purpose of the Marine Corps physical fitness program.



Identify the applicable references for weight control.



Identify the applicable references for the remedial programs.



Identify the applicable references for the personal appearance programs. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-1

Study Unit 5

Overview, Continued

In this Study Unit

This study unit contains the following lessons: Topic Lesson 1 Importance of Physical Fitness Lesson 2 Basic Concepts of Physical Fitness Lesson 3 Maintaining a Military Appearance Lesson 4 Remedial Physical Training Program

MCI Course 8101

5-2

See Page 5-3 5-9 5-17 5-33

Study Unit 5

LESSON 1 IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL FITNESS Introduction

Estimated Study Time

30 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson is designed to provide easy to use practical information. Further it will provide guidelines to help you design and execute an optimal physical fitness training program and nutrition programs. This guide is not about “quick fixes.” It is about lifestyle changes. It is important to identify early those who will have trouble meeting standards so that they may begin a comprehensive program. This lesson discusses federal government statistics on physical fitness, what the Marine Corps policy on physical fitness is, and what benefits physical fitness brings.

Learning Objectives

In This Lesson

After completion of this lesson, you should be able to •

Select the percentage of men and women who are overweight.



Select, from a list, the order for the Marine Corps physical fitness program.



List the benefits of fitness.

This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Marine Corps Policy Ineffective Physical Fitness Programs Benefits of Physical Fitness Lesson 1 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

5-3

See Page 5-3 5-4 5-5 5-6 5-7

Study Unit 5, Lesson 1

Marine Corps Policy

General

An effective physical conditioning program must have command support. It is essential for leaders to understand the importance and the goals of the Marine Corps physical conditioning program. Leaders should be visible and active participants in physical conditioning programs. This is most effectively done if leaders lead physical training (PT). Physical fitness must be an integral part of a unit’s training mission.

Essential for Battlefield Performance

The term “physical fitness” means different things to different people. To the Marine Corps it is an indispensable part of leadership and self-discipline and is necessary for performance on the battlefield.

Lack of Fitness Widespread in Society

According to recent federal government statistics, over 30 percent of men and women of all races are overweight or obese. A survey by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services indicated that only 42 percent of adults participate in exercise on a regular basis.

Marine Corps Physical Conditioning Program

Thankfully, the lack of fitness just discussed is not the case in the Marine Corps. Physical fitness has always been a vital part of Marine Corps life. Marine Corps Order 6100.12 states the physical conditioning program scope as follows: Every Marine must be physically fit, regardless of age, grade, or duty assignment. Fitness is essential to the day-to-day effectiveness and combat readiness of the Marine Corps. Further, physical fitness is an indispensable aspect of leadership. The habits of self-discipline required to gain and maintain a high level of physical fitness are inherent in the Marine Corps way of life and must be a part of the character of every Marine. Marines who are not physically fit can be a detriment to the readiness and combat efficiency of their unit. Accordingly, every Marine will engage in an effective Physical Conditioning Program (PCP) on a continuing and progressive basis.

MCI Course 8101

5-4

Study Unit 5, Lesson 1

Ineffective Physical Fitness Programs

General

Commanders must ensure that the time spent participating in physical fitness activities is used effectively. PT should support the unit’s mission as well as enhance unit cohesion, morale and physical fitness and health. Ineffective PT programs can lead to • • • •

Factors

Factors that may lead to an ineffective PT session are listed below: • • • • • •

MCI Course 8101

lack of progress injuries poor morale wasted time

Unmotivated PT leaders Group too large for number of assigned leaders Workout too hard or too easy Poor exercise choice Failure to motivate participants Too many (or too long) rest breaks

5-5

Study Unit 5, Lesson 1

Benefits of Physical Fitness

General

Having a physically fit fighting force is a tremendous advantage for the military commander both in peacetime and war. There are considerable benefits to the individual Marine as well.

Commander’s Perspective

The Commander's perspective on the benefits of fitness are listed below: • • • • • • • • •

Individual Marine’s Perspective

MCI Course 8101

Less sick time Increased combat readiness More motivated Marines Increased morale Increased productivity More confidence in troops Better image for the Marine Corps Inspires public confidence in the Marine Corps More options on the battlefield

The individual Marine's perspective on the benefits of fitness are listed below: • • • • • •

More energy and confidence Better health Improved appearance Improved performance on physical fitness test (PFT) Increased combat readiness Personal satisfaction

5-6

Study Unit 5, Lesson 1

Lesson 1 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 3 by performing the action required. Check your answer against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

According to recent federal government statistics, what is the percentage of men and women who are over weight? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

What Marine Corps Order states the scope of the Marine Corps physical fitness program? a. b. c. d.

Item 3

32 33 38 39

6100.12 6110.34 2030.3J 1020.2B

List four benefits of fitness. (1) ___________________________________________________________ (2) ___________________________________________________________ (3) ___________________________________________________________ (4) ___________________________________________________________

MCI Course 8101

5-7

Study Unit 5, Lesson 1

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below lists the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions about these items, refer to the reference page. Item Number 1 2 3

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)

Summary

Answer b a more energy and confidence better health improved appearance improved performance on PFT increased combat readiness personal satisfaction

Reference 5-4 5-4 5-6

In this lesson, you learned about the importance of physical fitness, Marine Corps policy, and the benefits of fitness. In the next lesson, you will learn about the concepts and physical conditions of fitness.

MCI Course 8101

5-8

Study Unit 5, Lesson 1

LESSON 2 BASIC CONCEPTS OF PHYSICAL FITNESS Introduction

Estimated Study Time

30 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson discusses the physical fitness terms, conditioning principles, and states the goals of the Marine Corps physical conditioning program.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this lesson, you should be able to

In This Lesson



Define physical fitness.



List the five components of physical fitness.



Identify the physical conditioning principles.



List the goals of the Marine Corps physical conditioning program as listed in MCO 6100.12.

This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Physical Fitness Terms Physical Conditioning Principles The Marine Corps Physical Conditioning Program Lesson 2 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

5-9

See Page 5-9 5-10 5-11 5-12 5-13

Study Unit 5, Lesson 2

Physical Fitness Terms

Definition

Physical fitness can be defined as a state of good physical health. A physically fit body is functioning properly and beyond that, functioning well.

Components

The definitions of the components of physical fitness are listed in the table below: Component Cardiorespiratory Fitness

Muscular Strength

Muscular Endurance

Flexibility Leanness (low body fat)

MCI Course 8101

Definition The body’s ability to deliver oxygen to working muscle and the ability of the working muscles to utilize oxygen and remove waste products. Cardiorespiratory fitness is directly related to the health and function of the respiratory system, the lungs, heart, and circulatory system. The amount of force that a muscle can produce. We generally measure muscular strength by performing specific exercises with weights or with body weight (pull-ups or push-ups). The ability to perform repeated actions or movements over an extended period of time. You measure muscular endurance when you conduct the timed sit-up portion of the PFT. The ability to move a body part through a complete range of motion with no pain. A measure of the percentage of a person’s body mass that is lean tissue and not body fat.

5-10

Study Unit 5, Lesson 2

Physical Conditioning Principles

Progression

There must be a gradual increase in difficulty and duration or both of a physical fitness program for continual progress to be made. If there is no progression in difficulty and/or duration of your physical training sessions, your body eventually adapts to it and no further physiological changes take place.

Specificity

The adaptations that occur are highly specific to the activity that produced those adaptations. In other words, you get better at what you do regularly. For example, although swimming is a good exercise, it will not improve three-mile run times as much as running will.

Overload

The workload or intensity must be greater than that normally encountered by the body to stimulate physiological changes. There must be a gradual increase in difficulty or duration of a physical fitness program in order for continual progress to be made.

Intensity

Intensity refers to how hard or how difficult a physical fitness program is in terms of physical exertion. Physical exertion meaning the degree of strength, force, or energy used.

Recovery

Adaptations to physical training programs do not occur during the course of an exercise session. They occur during the recovery period. It may take days to recover from a hard training session. Over training and injuries are inevitable unless adequate recovery is a part of the physical fitness program.

MCI Course 8101

5-11

Study Unit 5, Lesson 2

The Marine Corps Physical Conditioning Program

General

A good physical fitness program is aimed at improving all of the components of physical fitness. The Marine Corps physical fitness test (PFT) is designed to test all of these components and a good score on the PFT indicates that a Marine is physically fit.

Goals

The goals of the Marine Corps physical conditioning program (PCP) are listed below:

MCI Course 8101



Contribute to the health and well-being of every Marine through regular exercise and health education.



Develop Marines who are physically capable of performing their duties in garrison and in combat.



Develop in Marines a reserve level of physical fitness that will enhance their chances of winning in a combat situation.



Provide a medium for developing the self-confidence of the individual Marine and therefore enhances overall discipline, morale, esprit-de-corps, unit efficiency, and the desire to excel within the Marine Corps.

5-12

Study Unit 5, Lesson 2

Lesson 2 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 8 by performing the action required. Check your answer against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

What is the definition of physical fitness? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

A state of good physical health A state of negative physical health Muscular strength Leanness

List the five components of physical fitness. (1) ___________________________________________________________ (2) ___________________________________________________________ (3) ___________________________________________________________ (4) ___________________________________________________________ (5) ___________________________________________________________

Item 3

For continual progress to be made, ________ must be incorporated in your physical fitness program. a. b. c. d.

specificity overload progression intensity Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-13

Study Unit 5, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Item 4

What is specificity? a. The gradual increase in difficulty or duration of a physical fitness program. b. Adaptations that occur are highly specific to the activity that produced those adaptations. c. The difficulty of the physical fitness program. d. The intensity of the workout.

Item 5

What must you include in a workout to force the body to make physiological changes? a. b. c. d.

Item 6

What determines how difficult your workout is during a physical fitness program? a. b. c. d.

Item 7

Overload Specificity Recovery Intensity

Overload Specificity Recovery Intensity

Adaptations to physical training programs do not occur during the course of an exercise session, they occur during the ______________________ period. a. b. c. d.

progression overload intensity recovery Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-14

Study Unit 5, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Item 8

List the goals of the Marine Corps physical conditioning program. (1) ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ (2) ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ (3) ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ (4) ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-15

Study Unit 5, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued Answers

The table below lists the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions about these items, refer to the reference page. Item Number 1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

a.

b.

c.

d.

MCI Course 8101

Answer a Cardiorespiratory fitness Muscular strength Muscular endurance Flexibility Leanness (low body fat) c b a d d Contribute to health and wellbeing of every Marine through regular exercise and health education. Develop Marines who are physically capable of performing their duties in garrison and in combat. Develop in Marines a reserve level of physical fitness that will enhance their chances of winning in a combat situation. Provide a medium for developing the self-confidence of the individual Marine and thereby enhance overall discipline, moral, esprit-decorps, unit efficiency, and the desire to excel within the Marine Corps.

5-16

Reference 5-10 5-10

5-11 5-11 5-11 5-11 5-11 5-12

Study Unit 5, Lesson 2 Exercise

LESSON 3 MAINTAINING A MILITARY APPEARANCE Introduction

Estimated Study Time

45 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson discusses the knowledge needed for maintaining a military appearance by utilizing healthy nutrition.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this lesson, you should be able to •

Identify the seven basic categories of nutrients.



Identify the role of protein.



Identify the role of carbohydrates.



Identify the fate of excess protein or carbohydrates.



Identify the role of fat.



Identify the food guide pyramid. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-17

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Introduction, Continued

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics. Topic Introduction Seven Basic Nutrients Calories Vitamins Minerals Metabolic Putting the Weight Control Plan Together The Food Guide Pyramid Lesson 3 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

5-18

See Page 5-17 5-19 5-21 5-22 5-23 5-24 5-25 5-27 5-30

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Seven Basic Nutrients

Introduction

What follows is a sound nutritional program based on the best information we have today. It is the basic approach recommended by organizations like the American Heart Association, the American Dietetics Association, and the National Institutes of Health.

Basic Concepts

Foods contain combinations of nutrients and no single food contains all of the nutrients in the amounts that are necessary for optimum health. For example, oranges contain vitamin C but not B12.

The Basic Nutrients

The seven basic categories of nutrients are protein, carbohydrates, fat vitamins, minerals, fiber, and water.

Protein

Good sources of protein are meats, fish, eggs, dairy products, beans, and peanut butter. Protein serves primarily a structural role in the body. It is used to make structures like skin, hair, fingernails, cartilage, tendons, and muscle to name a few. Protein is also used to make some hormones and enzymes. Because of these roles, protein is necessary for survival.

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are used primarily as an energy source. The body can actually store carbohydrates in muscle and the liver in a form called glycogen. There are no established recommended daily allowances for carbohydrates. An adequate intake is the amount that is necessary to support your daily activities and keep body glycogen stores replenished. Sources of carbohydrates are fruits, vegetables, rice, pasta, bread, grains, beans, and sugars.

Excess

Excess protein is simply converted to fat. Excess carbohydrates are stored as glycogen. When glycogen stores are full, excess carbohydrates are converted to fat. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-19

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Seven Basic Nutrients, Continued

Fat and its Role

Fat is used primarily as a source of energy for the body. A small amount of fat is used to make hormones and cell membranes. Most of the fat in the body is subcutaneous fat. Subcutaneous fat is the fat stored underneath the skin. This is the fat that you can see on the hips, stomach, legs etc. If it is loose and jiggles it is not water retention or a muscle that needs “toning,” it is fat.

Good Examples of Fat

A few good examples of fat are listed in the table below: Name Polyunsaturated

Example • • • • • • • • • • • •

Monounsaturated

Saturated Cholesterol

MCI Course 8101

5-20

Corn Flour Certain fish Nuts Vegetable and nut oils Olive oil Peanut oil Canola oil Meats and dairy products Tropical oils (coconut and palm) Meats Animal products

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Calories

Definition

A calorie is a measure of the energy content of a food. Our bodies require a certain number of calories (energy) to function. The number of calories that we require each day to function is our metabolic rate.

Blood Triglycerides

Saturated fat is most likely to elevate blood triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol). Saturated fats are solid at room temperature. Elevated levels of these structural components are considered a risk factor for heart disease.

One Pound of Fat

Fat contains nine calories per gram. One pound of fat contains 3,500 calories (this is how many calories you must burn to lose one pound of fat). Some high fat foods are red meats, fried foods, potato chips, butter, eggs, bacon, and many “junk” foods.

MCI Course 8101

5-21

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Vitamins

Definition

Vitamins are various organic substances that have no caloric value and are essential to nutrition.

Fruits and Vegetables

A diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables and contains all of the major food groups will supply the recommended daily allowance of vitamins and minerals.

Fat-Soluble

Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble vitamins. A good source of vitamin A and D can be found in animal products such as egg yolk, milk, or fish-liver oil. Vitamin E can be found in leaves and seed germ oils. Vitamin K is essential for the clotting of the blood and can be found in such foods as spinach, broccoli, lettuce, and cabbage.

Water-Soluble

The B and C vitamins are water-soluble. Vitamin B is essential to normal blood formation. Vitamin C is found in fruits and leafy vegetables.

MCI Course 8101

5-22

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Minerals

Purpose

Minerals are elements that are necessary for life. Many act as co-factors that help enzymes and hormones function properly. Some minerals are heavy metals and are toxic at high doses.

Fiber

Fiber is a substance that cannot be digested or absorbed by the body. Plants are our major source of fiber. High fiber foods are typically low in fat, a high fiber diet is associated with a lower risk of heart disease.

Water

Water is the most abundant substance in the human body. It accounts for one half to four fifths of our bodyweight. Water is essential for the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients and excretion of metabolic wastes. Water is vital for the regulation of body temperature, which becomes especially important if you PT in warm weather. We lose water through the lungs, the skin, by sweating and in the urine. The recommended intake is eight to ten cups of water daily.

What Does Not Help

You can hydrate the body by drinking coffee and sodas as they do contain water. However, due to high levels of caffeine you may have to drink twice as much to achieve the same degree of hydration. Caffeine is a diuretic meaning it tends to increase the flow of urine. Alcoholic drinks can actually be dehydrating. In other words you lose more water than you gain.

Thirst

Thirst is a poor indicator of hydration status in a hot environment. If you only drink when you are thirsty in a hot environment, you will get dehydrated.

MCI Course 8101

5-23

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Metabolic

Metabolic Rate

Our metabolic rate is made up of two components, our resting metabolism and our active metabolism • •

Keeping Track

Our resting metabolism is simply how many calories our bodies burn at rest. Active metabolism refers to the calories burned by activity (like exercise).

To determine metabolic rate, multiply your bodyweight (in lbs.) times: • • •

10 if you are sedentary 15 if you are active 18 if you are very active and lean

This formula will give you the required amount of calories needed each day to function.

Record

MCI Course 8101

One way to get a good estimate of your metabolic rate is to record your caloric intake for two to three weeks. If your bodyweight has not changed during the two to three week period, you simply take the daily average and use this average as your metabolic rate. Your metabolic rate represents the number of calories that you need to maintain your bodyweight at your current level of activity.

5-24

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Putting the Weight Control Plan Together

First

The first step in putting together a nutritional program is to determine your present caloric requirements or metabolic rate as described on page 2-25.

Second

Next, you should determine your weight loss goals. Remember, weight loss exceeding two pounds per week can be dangerous and are not recommended.

Your Goal

Your goal should be to consume no more than 30 percent of your calories from fat and no more than 10 percent of your calories from saturated fat. Approximately 20 percent of your calories should come from protein and 50 percent from carbohydrates.

Tracking

If you are serious about losing some weight, it is important to write down everything you eat and drink (if it contains calories). Your tracking method can be as complex or as simple as you want it to be. The key thing is that it is functional and you understand it. Time 0600 0600 0600 0630

Multiply Them

Item Eggs, boiled Orange Juice Grits Apple

Quantity

Calories

2 8 ozs 1 bowl/ 10 ozs 1

215 15 180 10

Next, you multiply the total grams of carbohydrates and protein by four and the grams of fat by nine to determine the calories from each nutrient. Then you divide the calories from each by the total calories to determine the percentage of calories from each nutrient. Item Fat Carbohydrates Protein

Grams 10g 15g 15g

Multiply by 9 4 4

Equals 90 calories 60 calories 60 calories 210 calories total Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-25

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Putting the Weight Control Plan Together, Continued

Percentage of Calories

The table below shows how to compute the percentage of calories from each nutrient. Item Fat Carbohydrates Protein

Calories 90 60 60

Divide by total calories 210 210 210

% of calories 43 26 26

Where to Receive the Information

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires nutrition labels on most of the foods that you eat. The new nutrition label provides all of the information that is necessary to make wise choices about what to eat. You can determine the total calories from fats, carbohydrates, and protein and the amount of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat in a product.

Meals

Now that you have determined how many calories needed to achieve your weight loss goal, you should try to spread out your caloric intake over as many meals as possible. Six meals per day are recommended.

MCI Course 8101

5-26

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

The Food Guide Pyramid

Bread, Cereal, Rice, and Pasta

These foods provide complex carbohydrates an important source of energy. They also provide B vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Starchy foods are not fattening if you do not add butter, cheese, or cream sauces. Select whole grain products to maximize fiber and other nutrients.

Fruits

Fruits are rich sources of vitamins, most notably vitamin C. They are low in fat and calories. Select fresh fruits and fruit juices, and frozen, canned, or dried fruits. Avoid fruit processed with heavy syrups and sugar-sweetened juices.

Vegetables

Vegetables provide vitamins (especially A and C), are excellent sources of fiber, and are naturally low in fat. For maximum nutrients, select dark leafy greens, deep-yellow or orange vegetables, and starchy vegetables like potatoes and yams.

Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts

Meat and fish are excellent sources of protein, iron, zinc, and B vitamins, as are beans, nuts, and seeds. Tofu (made from soybeans) and white beans also supply calcium. Some seeds, like almonds, are good sources of vitamin E.

Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese

Milk products are the richest sources of calcium. They also provide protein and vitamin B12. Choose low-fat varieties to keep calories, cholesterol, and saturated fat at a minimum. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-27

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

The Food Guide Pyramid, Continued

Fats, Oils, and Sweets

Used sparingly, these foods provide calories, but little else nutritionally. Exceptions are vegetable oil, which is a rich source of vitamin E (one tablespoon is all you need), and molasses, an excellent source of iron.

Review the Process

Lastly, review the process of setting up a nutritional program

Benefits



Determine your daily calorie intake (metabolic rate).



Subtract 500 calories a day, for a one-pound per week weight loss and 1,000 calories a day, for a two-pound per week weight loss.



Determine the percentage of your calories from fats, carbohydrates, and protein.



Adjust total calories and the amount of fats, carbohydrates, and protein to obtain the appropriate levels.



Spread your calories over five to six small meals instead of one to two big meals.

Eating several meals a day helps to prevent hunger and stimulates your metabolism. Research indicates that people actually eat less if they eat more often (provided that the snacks are not junk food). It may also help to prevent some muscle mass loss associated with reducing caloric intake. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-28

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

The Food Guide Pyramid, Continued

Food Guide Pyramid

MCI Course 8101

Use the food guide pyramid below to get your recommended servings of each food group a day.

5-29

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3

Lesson 3 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 6 by performing the action required. Check your answer against those at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

Vitamins, minerals, water, fiber, protein, carbohydrates, and fat are the seven basic categories of a. b. c. d.

Item 2

What is the role of protein? a. b. c. d.

Item 3

A source of energy A source nutrients A structural role in the body Supports the daily routine

The role of carbohydrates is a a. b. c. d.

Item 4

nutrients. supplements. energy. strength.

source of energy. structural role in the body. source of nutrients. source of cartilage.

What does excess protein and carbohydrates turn into? a. b. c. d.

Sugars Protein Nutrients Fat Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-30

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3 Exercise

Lesson 3 Exercise, Continued

Item 5

The role of fat is a. b. c. d.

Item 6

structural role. source of energy that the body uses. daily supplement. source of strength.

How many groups comprise the food guide pyramid? a. b. c. d.

Five Six Seven Eight Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-31

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3 Exercise

Lesson 3 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below lists the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions about these items, refer to the reference page. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6

Summary

Answer a c a d b b

Reference 5-19 5-19 5-19 5-19 5-20 5-29

In this lesson, you have learned about the seven basic nutrients and the food guide pyramid. In the next lesson, you will learn about the remedial physical training program.

MCI Course 8101

5-32

Study Unit 5, Lesson 3 Exercise

LESSON 4 REMEDIAL PHYSICAL TRAINING PROGRAM Introduction

Estimated Study Time

30 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson discusses the knowledge needed to complete a remedial program to loose weight, and to properly keep track of your process.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this lesson, you should be able to •

Identify the applicable references for the remedial programs.



Identify the applicable references for the personal appearance program.



State the maximum recommended weight loss (in pounds) per week.



State the minimum recommended caloric intake for normal adults.



State three undesirable effects of starvation diets and fasting.



State the daily caloric deficit necessary to produce a one to two-pound weight loss per week.



List the four important components of a weight loss program.



State the primary determinant of your resting metabolic rate. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-33

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4

Introduction, Continued

Learning Objectives, continued

• Identify the effectiveness of using sweat suits or sauna suits to loose weight. • Identify the concept of “spot reduction.” • Identify the effectiveness of “spot reduction.” • Identify the disadvantage of using only the scale to determine weight loss progress. • Identify the basic principle behind body circumference measurement, skin fold calipers, hydrostatic weighing, bioelectrical impedance, and near infrared interacted as methods of estimating body fat percentage.

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction References Losing Pounds Four Components Ineffective Methods of Losing Weight How to Measure Your Weight Loss Lesson 4 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

5-34

See Page 5-33 5-35 5-36 5-37 5-38 5-39 5-41

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4

References

General

Applicable references for remedial and personal appearance programs are listed in the table below: Reference MCO 6100.12 MCO P1900.16F MCO P1610.7E MCO P1070.12K MCO P1080.35F MCO 5000.12D

MCI Course 8101

Description Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test And Body Composition Program Manual Separation and Retirement Manual Performance Evaluation System Individual Records Administration Manual Personnel Reporting Instructions Manual Pregnancy and Parenthood

5-35

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4

Losing Pounds

Weight Loss

The American College of Sports Medicine recommends a calorie deficit of no more than 500 to 1,000 calories daily. This would produce a weight loss of approximately one to two pounds per week.

Minimum

Daily caloric intake of less than 1,200 for normal adults may lead to excessive weight loss from tissues other than adipose (fat) tissue. These losses may include a significant loss of muscle mass, muscle, and liver glycogen and a reduction in blood volume and body fluids.

Starvation

Starvation diets (diets that have insufficient calories to sustain life) and fasting has been associated with weakness, fainting, and also congestive heart failure and death.

MCI Course 8101

5-36

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4

Four Components

Moderate Caloric Reduction

Once you have determined your daily caloric requirements at your current body weight, you should reduce your daily caloric intake by 500 to 1,000 calories per day.

Aerobic Exercise

Since aerobic exercises are continuous in nature they tend to burn more calories per unit of time than other types of exercise.

Strength Training

The biggest variable component of lean body mass is muscle mass. When people try to lose weight by dieting alone, they tend to lose lean body mass. In fact, if you lose weight too rapidly (more than two pounds per week), 50 percent or more of the weight loss can come from lean body mass.

Low-Fat Diet

When you eat low-fat foods, you can eat more and consume fewer calories. Since it is total calories that will determine whether you lose weight or not, this is an important consideration. High-fat foods are very calorically dense. In other words, they contain lots of calories for very little food.

Resting Heart Rate

Your total lean body mass is the primary determinant of your resting metabolic rate. Remember, heart rate is beats per minute and the average resting heart rate is 60-70 beats per minute.

MCI Course 8101

5-37

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4

Ineffective Methods of Losing Weight

Sweat Suits and Saunas

The only thing you accomplish when you wear heavy sweat suits to induce sweating during exercise is a decrease in your exercise capacity. As a result, you exercise less and burn fewer calories. In addition, heavy sweat suits and sauna suits can cause heat stress injuries and dehydration.

Spot Reduction

Spot reduction refers to the concept of working a specific area of the body in an attempt to remove fat from that area. Spot reduction does not work. The problem is that depletion of fat stores is controlled by hormones and has nothing to do with which part of the body is being worked.

Eating Meals

Eating smaller meals more often than not prevents hunger and preserves energy levels and metabolism. People who skip meals often compensate by eating more later.

MCI Course 8101

5-38

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4

How to Measure Your Weight Loss

Scale

While it would be easy to just jump on the scale and weigh yourself everyday, this approach is not very productive. This is because you may be gaining muscle while losing fat. Your body weight will fluctuate by several pounds during the day. Weighing in first thing in the morning will give you the most consistent and most accurate results.

Body Circumference Measurement

A greater neck circumference is indicative of a more muscle mass while a greater abdominal circumference is indicative of more fat. The average error rate for body circumference method is 3.5 percent.

Skin Fold Calipers

This technique involves measuring skin fold thickness in several locations by pinching the skin with your fingers and using a set of calipers to measure the thickness of the fold. The average error for this technique is estimated to be 3 percent.

Hydrostatic Weighing

A body when immersed in water will be buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the volume of water displaced. In practical terms, fat floats, lean mass sinks. A person with a high percentage of body fat will be heavy on land but light in the water because fat floats and gives him extra buoyancy. The average error for hydrostatic weighing is estimated to be plus or minus 1.5 percent.

Near Infrared Interactance

Infrared methods of determining body composition are based on light absorption and reflectance. A near infrared light probe is placed on specific body sites. Some of the infrared light is absorbed and some is reflected, based on light absorption, body composition can be determined. This method is not considered to be very accurate, it has been shown to under and over predict body fat percentage in some individuals by over 4 percent.

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-39

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4

How to Measure Your Weight Loss, Continued

Bioelectrical Impedance

There are several types of bioelectrical impedance devices available. The principle use is that of electrical current resistance. Fat is a poor conductor of electricity while lean mass is a good conductor. Therefore, the higher the impedance values, the higher the percentage of body fat. If done properly bioelectrical impedance has an average error of plus or minus 3 percent.

Bioelectrical Reading for Accuracy

To obtain an accurate reading, you must

MCI Course 8101

• • • • •

Abstain from eating and drinking within 4 hours of the test. Avoid exercising within 12 hours of the test. Urinate completely prior to testing. Do not drink alcohol within 48 hours of the test. Avoid taking diuretics prior to testing unless instructed by your physician.

5-40

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4

Lesson 4 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 23 by performing the action required. Check your answer against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

Select the applicable order for Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test and Body Composition Program Manual. a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Select the applicable order for pregnancy and parenthood. a. b. c. d.

Item 3

MCO 6100.12 MCO 6100.3K MCO P1900.16F MCO P1610.7E

MCO 6100.10B MCO 6100.12 MCO 5000.12D MCO P1080.35F

Select the applicable order for the separation and retirement manual. a. b. c. d.

MCO 6100.10B MCO 6100.12 MCO P1900.16F MCO P1610.7E Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-41

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4 Exercise

Lesson 4 Exercise, Continued

Item 4

What is the maximum amount of pounds recommended to lose per week? a. b. c. d.

Item 5

Identify the minimum recommended caloric intake for normal adults. a. b. c. d.

Item 6

1,400 1,300 1,200 1,100

Identify one of the three undesirable effects of starvation diets and fasting. a. b. c. d.

Item 7

One Two Three Four

Weight gain Strength gain Endurance gain Congestive heart failure

What is the daily caloric deficit necessary to produce a one to two pound weight loss per week? a. b. c. d.

100 to 200 250 to 750 500 to 1,000 1,000 to 2,000 Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-42

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4 Exercise

Lesson 4 Exercise, Continued

Item 8

What is one of the four important components of a weight loss program? a. b. c. d.

Item 9

What is the primary determinant of your resting heart rate? a. b. c. d.

Item 10

produces weight loss. produces strength. decreases sweat. decreases your exercise capacity.

What is spot reduction? a. b. c. d.

Item 12

Body endurance Strength Lean body mass High-fat foods

The only effective thing heavy sweat suits and sauna does to induce weight loss is a. b. c. d.

Item 11

High-fat diet Low-fat diet High carbohydrates High protein

Working out at a specific facility Working a specific area of the body Ceasing to eat specific foods Skipping meals

What is the effectiveness of spot reduction? a. b. c. d.

Nothing Lose weight fast Tone the area Lose fat from the area Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-43

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4 Exercise

Lesson 4 Exercise, Continued

Item 13

What is an advantage of eating frequent small meals? a. b. c. d.

Item 14

What is one of the disadvantages of using only the scale to weigh yourself? a. b. c. d.

Item 15

Measuring the body by immersing it in water Measuring the thickness of the skin by pinching it Measuring the body’s fat using light absorption Measuring the body’s neck and abdomen

What is the principle of hydrostatic weighing? a. b. c. d.

Item 17

You cannot find one You may be gaining muscle while losing fat You get one reading only There is no height measurement

What is the principle of body circumference measurement? a. b. c. d.

Item 16

Creates more strength Causes weight gain Lose energy Prevents hunger

Measuring the body by immersing it in water Measuring the thickness of the skin by pinching it Measuring the body’s fat using light absorption Measuring the body’s neck and abdomen

What is the principle of skin fold calipers? a. b. c. d.

Measuring the body by immersing it in water Measuring the thickness of the skin by pinching it Measuring the body’s fat using light absorption Measuring the body’s neck and abdomen Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-44

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4 Exercise

Lesson 4 Exercise, Continued

Item 18

What is the principle of near infrared interactance? a. b. c. d.

Item 19

What is the principle of bioelectrical impedance? a. b. c. d.

Item 20

1.5 percent 3 percent 3.5 percent 4 percent

What is the percentage amount of accuracy for the body circumference measurement? a. b. c. d.

Item 22

Measuring the body by immersing it in water Measuring the thickness of the skin by pinching it Measuring the bodies fat using light absorption Measuring the bodies weight through electrical current resistance

What is the percentage amount of accuracy for skin fold measurement? a. b. c. d.

Item 21

Measuring the body by immersing it in water Measuring the thickness of the skin by pinching it Measuring the bodies fat using light absorption Measuring the bodies neck and abdomen

1.5 percent 3 percent 3.5 percent 4 percent

What is the percentage amount of accuracy for the near infrared interactance? a. b. c. d.

1.5 percent 3 percent 3.5 percent 4 percent Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

5-45

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4 Exercise

Lesson 4 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below lists the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

Summary

MCI Course 8101

Answer a c c b c d c b c d b a d b d a b c d b c d

Reference 5-35 5-35 5-35 5-36 5-36 5-36 5-37 5-37 5-37 5-38 5-38 5-38 5-38 5-39 5-39 5-39 5-39 5-39 5-40 5-39 5-39 5-39

In this lesson, you learned about remedial physical training programs, personal appearance, dieting, weight loss, and how to properly track your progress.

5-46

Study Unit 5, Lesson 4 Exercise

STUDY UNIT 6 PERSONNEL RECORDS Overview

Estimated Study Time

1 hour, 45 minutes

Unit Scope

This study unit discusses the evaluation of an individual Marine’s performance records. It also outlines methods to audit and correct these important documents.

Learning Objectives

After completing this study unit, you should be able to

In This Study Unit



Identify documents that are used to audit performance evaluation records.



Identify methods to correct fitness reports.



Identify Service Record accountability and audit requirements.

This study unit contains the following lessons: Topic Lesson 1 Performance Evaluation System (PES) Audit Procedures Lesson 2 Correcting Fitness Reports Lesson 3 Personnel Record Accountability and Audit Procedures

MCI Course 8101

6-1

See Page 6-3 6-19 6-29

Study Unit 6

(This page intentionally left blank.)

MCI Course 8101

6-2

Study Unit 6

LESSON 1 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION SYSTEM (PES) AUDIT PROCEDURES Introduction

Estimated Study Time

35 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson discusses the Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP), which entails the evaluation of two key documents: the Master Brief Sheet (MBS) and the Official Military Personnel File (OMPF).

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to •

Explain the purpose of the Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP).



Identify references that contain information on Performance Records.



State the purpose of the Master Brief Sheet.



Identify the two sections of the Master Brief Sheet.



Identify correcting authorities of the Master Brief Sheet header data.



Identify the Fitness Report Listing section of the Master Brief Sheet.



State the purpose of the Official Military Personnel File (OMPF).



Identify different folders of the OMPF.



Identify the procedure to audit and correct OMPF folders. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-3

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Introduction, Continued

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP) Auditing the Master Brief Sheet (MBS) Auditing the Official Military Personnel File (OMPF) Lesson Exercise 1

MCI Course 8101

6-4

See Page 6-3 6-5 6-8 6-12 6-14

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP)

Introduction

The Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP) is the Marine Corps program to ensure accuracy of Marines' performance records. There are two related performance records maintained by Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC): • Master Brief Sheet (MBS) • Official Military Personnel File (OMPF) These important records must be kept current and correct in every detail because they become pillars of good personnel management decisions made at HQMC.

Purpose of the FRAP

The Marine Corps developed the Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP) to provide a process for Marines. It ensures accuracy and completeness of performance records by periodically placing them in the hands of individual Marines. The FRAP process ensures continual reliability of the MBS and OMPF.

Support Functions of the FRAP

The following are support functions of the FRAP: •

Reports date gaps via the command’s Unit Diary advisory date gap notification process.



Provides opportunity for Marines to periodically request and audit performance records.



Informs Marines of any action required to correct records or recover missing reports. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-5

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP), Continued

MBS Mail Out

Sergeants and above receive a mailing of the MBS annually based on the last digit of their social security number. Marines on active duty will have their MBS sent to their military address. Marines not on active duty will have their MBS mailed to their homes of record. Accurate and up-to-date information in the Marine Corps Total Force System (MCTFS) is essential for timely receipt of MBS.

Example

Marines whose social security number ends with • • •

Two receive their MBS in February Six receive their MBS in June Zero receive their MBS in October

OMPF Mail Out

Upon completion of a selection board, HQMC (MMSB-33) mails the OMPFs of Marines in the eligibility or below zone for that board. This is the only scheduled time HQMC automatically sends OMPFs to Marines. Marines should order their OMPFs and review them every 2 years. Marines planning to apply for such programs as the Warrant Officer, MECEP, or Active Reserve (AR), should order their OMPF at least 12 months in advance of the program to allow for any needed correction.

MBS and OMPF Request

Written requests can be submitted to the following address: Commandant of the Marine Corps (MMSB 10) Headquarters U.S. Marine Corps 2008 Elliot Road Quantico, VA 22134-5030 Submit FAX requests to: Commandant of the Marine Corps (MMSB-10) Headquarters U.S. Marine Corps DSN: 278-5792 or Comm (703) 784-5792 Note: Be sure to include name, grade, SSN, signature, and mailing address. Additionally, visit the Personnel Management Support Branch (MMSB) web site for additional information. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-6

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP), Continued

References

MCI Course 8101

Provided below is a list of references that pertains to performance records and audit procedures. •

MCO P1070.12_ Marine Corps Individual Records Administration Manual (IRAM)



MCO P1080.40_ Marine Corps Total Force System Personnel Reporting Instructions Manual (MCTFSPRIM)



MCO P1610.7_ Performance Evaluation System (PES)



MCO P1610.11_ Performance Evaluation Appeals

6-7

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Auditing the Master Brief Sheet (MBS)

Purpose of the MBS

The MBS is a ready reference document used in the personnel management process. The purpose of the MBS is to provide key personal data and a summary of a Marine’s performance evaluation record. The MBS has two sections: • •

Header Data Fitness Report Listing

MBS Header Data

The header data provides service information extracted directly from the Marine Corps Total Force System (MCTFS).

Auditing the MBS Header Data

An audit of the MBS header data consists of comparing the information listed in each block against that of its source document. The block “Correcting MBS Header Data” gives a description of each item and the respective correcting authority.

Correcting MBS Header Data

Each of the items on the MBS is corrected via certain authorities. An illustration of the MBS header along with the MBS listing and correcting authorities are provided below:

MBS Listing

Correcting Authority Unit Diary Unit Diary Enlisted Unit Diary Unit Diary

1. Name 2. Social Security Number 3. Grade 4. Rank Description

Continued on next page MCI Course 8101

6-8

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Auditing the Master Brief Sheet (MBS), Continued

Correcting MBS Header Data, continued

MBS Listing 5. Date of Rank 6. Component 7. Lineal No 8. Primary MOS 9. Additional MOS 10. GT/GCT 11. Permanent Grade 12. Permanent Date of Rank 13. Date of Birth 14. Date of Original Entry into the Armed Forces 15. Pay Entry Base Date 16. Armed Forces Active Duty Base Date 17. Active Naval Service Base Date 18. ACC 1st Marine Corps Commission 19. Date of Rank 1st Commission 20. Date of Rank 1st Commission as an LDO 21. Date Designated a Military Pilot 22. Date Current Active Duty Began 23. Service Date 24. Expiration of Active Service 25. Date Current Tour Began 26. Overseas Control Date 27. Contract/Legal Agreement 28. Decorations 29. Military Education 30. Civilian Education 31. Languages 32. Special Information

MCI Course 8101

6-9

Correcting Authority Enlisted Unit Diary Enlisted Unit Diary CMC (MMPR) Unit Diary Enlisted Unit Diary CMC (MA) CMC (MMPR) CMC (MMPR) Unit Diary Unit Diary Enlisted Unit Diary Unit Diary CMC (MMPR) Unit Diary Active CMC (MMPR) Reserve Unit Diary CMC (MMPR) Reserve CMC (RAM) Unit Diary CMC (MMPR) Enlisted Unit Diary Unit Diary Unit Diary Active CMC (MMOA) Unit Diary Unit Diary Unit Diary CMC (MA) N/A

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Auditing the Master Brief Sheet (MBS), Continued

Fitness Report Listing

This portion of the Master Brief Sheet (MBS) lists the Marine’s fitness reports starting from the rank of sergeant. This format makes it simple to view, analyze, and compare fitness report information. Provided below is an illustration of the Fitness Report Listing.

Breakdown of the Fitness Report Listing

The illustration and table below describes the breakdown of the Fitness Report Listing.

Section A

B

C D

Listing Description Monitored Command Marine’s assigned command Organization/School Specific command or unit to which the Marine is assigned for duty Reporting Senior Name of the Marine’s Reporting Senior Duty Assignment Primary duty to which the Marine Reported On (MRO) has been assigned Grade Marine’s grade on the fitness report Type Duty Type of the Marine’s duty on the fitness report BILMOS Billet MOS of the duty to which the Marine has been assigned Reviewing Officer Name of Marine’s Reviewing Officer OCC Occasion for submitting the report Begin Date Beginning date of the reporting period Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-10

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Auditing the Master Brief Sheet (MBS), Continued

Breakdown of the Fitness Report Listing, continued

Section E

F

G

Listing End Date Mission/Character/ Leadership/Intellect/ Eval Responsibility Promotion

Report Summary COM

ADV

# RPTS @ PROC

REL VAL @ PROC

# RPTS CUM

REL VAL CUM

RO Concurs

MCI Course 8101

6-11

Description Ending date of the reporting period Markings from the Performance Anchored Rating Scales per sections D, E, F, G, and H of the fitness report Reflects the RS promotion recommendation for the Marine Reported on (an X in the ACC column indicates recommendation for accelerated promotion) Reflects whether or not the Marine has been subject to commendatory material during reporting period Reflects whether or not the contents of the report constitute a derogatory evaluation of the Marine (an X indicates the report is adverse) Reflects the number of fitness reports written by the RS on Marines of the same grade as the MRO as of the time of processing the MROs report Relative value of the MRO fitness report based on the RSs rating history for Marines of the same grade as the MRO as of the time of processing of the MROs report Number of fitness reports written by the RS on Marines of the same grade as the MRO at the time the MROs MBS is printed Relative value of the MROs fitness report based on the RSs rating history for Marines of the same grade as the MRO at the time the MROs MBS is printed Whether the Reviewing Officer (RO) concurs or does not concur with the RS’s evaluation of the MRO

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Auditing the Official Military Personnel File (OMPF)

Purpose of the OMPF

The OMPF provides a history of the Marine’s career from entrance into the Marine Corps until the present. Administrative materials or documents to support the chronology of events for the Marine’s history are incorporated in the OMPF.

Structure of OMPF

The OMPF is structured into the following areas: • • • • •

Service Folder (S Folder) Commendatory/Derogatory Folder (C Folder) Performance Folder (P Folder) Field Folder/OQR/SRB (F Folder) Health/Dental Folder (H Folder)

S Folder (Service)

Consists of contract information, discharge documents, reserve documents, orders to active duty, and general administrative, and service documents used to compute service time for benefits, programs, or retirement.

C Folder (Commendatory/Derogatory)

This folder contains documents on civilian and military education, personal awards information, courts-martial/non-judicial punishments, and other material reflecting personal achievement or adversity that is pertinent to making decisions for purposes of selection, assignment, and retention.

P Folder (Performance)

Contains fitness reports and standard addendum pages for all sergeants and above.

F Folder (Field OQR/ SRB)

Upon separation from the Marine Corps, documents contained in the Service Record Book/Officer Qualification Record (SRB/OQR) are filed in the Service Folder. If a Marine has periods of broken service, documents from previous OQR/SRBs will be contained in the Field Folder. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-12

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Auditing the Official Military Personnel File (OMPF), Continued

H Folder

(Health/ Dental)

Unless a Marine had broken service, which ended before 1994, or is presently on the Temporary Disability Retired List (TDRL), no health folder is maintained. Following discharge, health and dental records are sent to Department of Veteran Affairs P.O. Box 150950 St. Louis, MO 63115

Incorporating Material into OMPF

All material forwarded to the CMC (MMSB) for inclusion in the OMPF must contain the grade, full name, and SSN. The mailing address is CMC (MMSB-20) 1008 Elliot Road, Quantico, VA 22134-5030

Audit of the OMPF

The OMPF is the primary record used by selection boards. The section on the “FRAP” provides information on when OMPF’s are automatically provided to Marines. However Marines should request a copy of their OMPF for review and correction under the following circumstances: • • •

At least once every 2 years At least 12 months prior to the convening of a selection board, when eligible At least 12 months prior to applying for programs such as Warrant Officer, Marine Corps Enlisted Commissioning Education Program, etc.

Correcting the OMPF

If information not pertaining to the Marine is found in the OMPF during the audit, the Marine should request removal of the information by submitting a written request to CMC (MMSB-10).

Board for Correction of Naval Records (BCNR)

Marines may petition the Board for Correction of Naval Records (BCNR) to remove documents on file in the OMPF, which they consider adverse, unjust, and inaccurate.

MCI Course 8101

6-13

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1

Lesson 1 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 17 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

What is the purpose of the Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP)? a. Gives Marines an opportunity to vent b. Provides insight on the Marine Corps Total Force System (MCTFS) c. Provides a process for Marines to ensure the accuracy and completeness of performance records d. Places performance records in the hands of the Responsible Officer (RS)

Item 2

Which of the following are references that contain information on performance records? a. MCO P1070.12_ Marine Corps Individual Records Administration Manual (IRAM) b. MCO P1610.7_ Performance Evaluation System (PES) c. MCO P1080.40_ Marine Corps Total Force System Personnel Reporting Instructions Manual (MCTFSPRIM) d. All of the above

Item 3

The purpose of the Master Brief Sheet (MBS) is to a. provide key personal data and a summary of a Marine’s performance evaluation record. b. provide a listing of a Marine’s fitness report from most recent to oldest. c. explain in detail all responsible officer remarks. d. provide statistical data of a Marine’s proficiency and conduct. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-14

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Item 4

Which are two sections of the Master Brief Sheet? a. b. c. d.

Item 5

Name, social security number, and rank description on the Master Brief Sheet are corrected via a. b. c. d.

Items 6 Through 10

Top and bottom section Header data and responsible officer remarks Header data and fitness report listing Correcting authority and master brief sheet listing

CMC (MMPR) CMC (MA) Active CMC (MMOA) The unit diary

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the description from column 2 that best describes the listing in column 1. The answers in column 2 may not be used more than once. Column 1

Column 2

Listing

Description

___ 6. OCC ___ 7. Organization/School ___ 8. Promotion ___ 9. #RPTS @ PROC ___ 10. REL VAL @ PROC

a. Number of fitness reports written by RS on Marines of same grade as MRO as of time of processing report b. RS promotion recommendation c. Command or unit to which the Marine was assigned for duty d. Occasion for submitting report e. Relative value of the MRO fitness report based on the RSs rating history for Marines of the same grade as the MRO Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-15

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Item 11

The OMPF provides a(n) ______ of the Marine’s ______ from entrance into the Marine Corps until the present. a. b. c. d.

Items 12 Through 16

analysis, statistics snapshot, data history, career report, production

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the description from column 2 that best describes the folder in column 1. The answers in column 2 may not be used more than once. Column 1

Column 2

Folder

Description

___12. ___13. ___14. ___15. ___16.

Commendatory/Derogatory a. Documents on civilian and military Performance education, personal awards, and other Field material pertinent to selection, Service assignment, and retention decisions Health/Dental b. Unless broken service, no records are held c. Contract information, discharge documents, reserve documents, orders to active duty, and general administrativeand service documents to compute or service time for benefits program or retirement d. Fitness reports and standard addendum pages for sergeants and above e. Contains documents from previous OQR/SRBs if a Marine has periods of broken service Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-16

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Item 17

Marines should request a copy of their OMPF for review and correction under which circumstance? a. At least once every two years b. At least 12 months prior to the convening board c. At least 12 months prior to applying for programs such as Warrant Officer and Marine Corps Enlisted Commissioning Education Program d. All of the above Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-17

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

MCI Course 8101

Answer c d a c d d c b a e c a d e c b d

6-18

Reference 6-5 6-7 6-8 6-8 6-8 6-10 6-10 6-11 6-11 6-11 6-12 6-12 6-12 6-12 6-12 6-13 6-13

Study Unit 6, Lesson 1 Exercise

LESSON 2 CORRECTING FITNESS REPORTS Introduction

Estimated Study Time

30 minutes

Lesson Scope

The purpose of this lesson is to identify the role of Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC) in the Performance Evaluation System (PES). We will also discuss actions to take in order to correct fitness report records.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to

In This Lesson



Identify the role of the Performance Evaluation Section (PES) of the Personnel Management Support Branch.



Identify steps taken to request administrative corrections of fitness reports.



Identify steps taken to correct date gaps caused by missing fitness reports.

The lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Headquarters Marine Corps Functions Correction of Fitness Report Records Lesson 2 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

6-19

See Page 6-19 6-20 6-22 6-25

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2

Headquarters Marine Corps Functions

Performance Evaluation Section (MMSB) Role

The Performance Evaluation Section (MMSB 30) of the Personnel Management Support Branch (MMSB) HQMC implements performance evaluation policy and procedures, and collects, maintains, and provides essential data to support CMC’s personnel management responsibilities (including assignment, retention, and promotion of Marines).

Organization

The Performance Evaluation Section is organized into the primary functional units of Policy and Research, Fitness Report Processing, and Reserve Matters. The descriptions of these units in the following blocks provide a better understanding of available support.

Policy and Research Unit (MMSB 31)

This unit is responsible for fitness report policy, research, correction, and accountability for all active duty personnel.

Fitness Report Processing Unit (MMSB 32)

This unit is responsible for initial screening and processing of all fitness reports into the automated system, forwarding correct reports to the CMC (MMSB 20) for inclusion in the Official Military Personnel File (OMPF), and providing liaison for MMSB board support.

Reserve Matters Unit (MMSB 34)

This unit specifically monitors Reserve Component issues and manages fitness report matters that are unique to Reserve organizations and functions.

USMC Fitness Report Processing

Throughout the Marine Corps, performance evaluation responsibilities include ensuring fitness reports are administratively, procedurally correct, and processed into the automated system by the Fitness Report Processing Unit (MMSB 32). Some specific tasks include the following: • • • • •

Ensuring reports are administratively correct. Auditing fitness reports for adherence to policy. Entering fitness reports into the database and ensuring their accuracy. Reconstructing those reports which are missing from the OMPF. Preparing the correspondence necessary for follow-up action to correct erroneous reports. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-20

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2

Headquarters Marine Corps Functions, Continued

Fitness Report Accountability

Furthermore, the Fitness Report Processing Unit is responsible to help Marines ensure their fitness report records are complete, current, and preparing correspondence as necessary to obtain any missing reports. Specific tasks include the following: •

Supervising policies regarding accountability of required fitness reports and audits of fitness report records



Providing unit diary notification to reporting units concerning date gaps for all Marines

Identifying Mistakes

When performance evaluation mistakes are found, the Fitness Report Processing Unit is responsible to correct all identified errors on fitness reports prior to processing the report or upon identification of errors in existing performance evaluation records.

Making Corrections

Finally, whenever they occur, the Fitness Report Processing Unit is responsible to correct all identified errors on fitness reports before processing the report. Specific tasks include the following: • •

Correcting administrative errors at HQMC if possible Returning reports to the field for correction • The Performance Evaluation section will return these reports to the Reviewing Officer (RO) for distribution. • All returned reports will include a notation sheet with an explanation of why the report is being returned.

MCI Course 8101

6-21

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2

Correction of Fitness Report Records

Authority

The Commandant of the Marine Corps (CMC) has the authority to correct fitness report records when the errors are limited solely to factual matters and when documentary evidence indicates that the record contains erroneous information. Requests to correct these reports are forwarded through a specific process.

Administrative Corrections

CMC has the authority to correct section A information and statements of fact in sections B, C, I, and K that are completely devoid of thought and significance.

Requesting Administrative Corrections

Requests for administrative corrections should be submitted as follows:

Step 1

2 3

Note:

Substantive Corrections

Action The Marine must submit the request via one of the reporting officials identified on the original report (preferably the Reporting Senior). The RS or RO must endorse the request indicating only those changes, which are valid and provide documentation as applicable. Forward the endorsed correspondence to the CMC (MMSB 31) for Active component Marines or (MMSB 34) for Reserve Component Marines. Anticipate at least 120 days from the time of receipt at HQMC for completion of the requested corrections.

All other corrections are inherently judgmental. The Secretary of the Navy, acting through the Board for Correction of Naval Records (BCNR), can approve a revised assessment of a Marine’s conduct or performance based entirely on facts about the Marine that were unknown when the original report was prepared. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-22

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2

Correction of Fitness Report Records, Continued

Supplemental Comments

Missing Fitness Reports

Late Fitness Reports

Situations may occur after submission of a fitness report in which the RS or RO is subsequently made aware of new facts that reflect upon the performance of the Marine during a specific reporting period. Reporting officials may forward a request for inclusion of supplemental comments into official records. To make such a request, the RS or RO must •

Submit the comments on an addendum page; include a cover letter that identifies the new information and provides justification for its inclusion into the report.



Limit requests solely to factual matters with the documentary evidence as appropriate, indicating the previously missing information.

To ensure each sergeant and above has a complete fitness report record on file is a shared responsibility. •

CMC will notify reporting units via unit diary advisories to identify date gaps for all Marines.



Commanding officers, senior enlisted advisors, and reporting officials, must assist Marines in correcting incomplete fitness reports.



Individual Marines have a responsibility to periodically audit their records especially in advance of eligibility before a particular selection board and prior to reenlistment.



Date gaps of 30 days or less are not significant and do not require correction.

Fitness reports are due to the CMC (MMSB 32) within 30 days of the end of the reporting period. Although late submission is not recommended, it does not render a fitness report invalid. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-23

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2

Correction of Fitness Report Records, Continued

Problem of Date Gaps In Fitness Reports

Date gaps occur when there is a lapse in the reporting period. These gaps may occur for any number of reasons. Nonetheless, it is the responsibility of the Marine to take action to get the discrepancy corrected. Failure to correct date gaps in the reporting period may delay a Marine’s promotion to the next rank.

Correcting Date Gaps

To warrant correction of date gaps, the date gap must be 31 days or longer. The table below illustrates the steps to be taken in order to correct date gaps between fitness reports. Step 1 2 3 4 5

6

Note:

MCI Course 8101

Action Exhaust all means to locate the RS. Complete section A of a fitness report form with the exception of items 5 through 8. Send the completed section A attached with cover letter, to the RS requesting he or she complete the fitness report. The RS must forward the completed report to the CMC (MMSB31) or (MMSB-34) and provide a copy to the Marine. If the RS fails to respond within 30 days, forward a copy of the correspondence originally sent to the RS soliciting the fitness report and an original fitness report with items 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, and 11 of section A completed to the CMC (MMSB-31) or (MMSB34). If you cannot locate the RS, forward an original fitness report with items 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, and 11 of section A completed to the CMC (MMSB-31 or MMSB-34). Include in the letter any known information that may help locate the RS or RO. Different actions are required based on the length of time: - If the report is over 1 year old, only the RS signature is needed. - If the report is less than 1 year old, RS and RO signature (certified true copy) of original report are needed.

6-24

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2

Lesson 2 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

5 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 4 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

The Performance Evaluation Section (PES) of the Personnel Management Support Branch (MMSB) provides essential data to _____ CMC’s personnel management responsibilities. a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Policy and Research Unit (MMSB-31) is responsible for fitness report policy, research, correction, and accountability for all a. b. c. d.

Item 3

enhance influence support maximize

officers only. reserve Marines. enlisted Marines. active duty personnel.

Which of the personnel listed below are authorized to endorse fitness reports that require administrative corrections? a. b. c. d. e.

Reporting Senior (RS) Reviewing Officer (RO) Administrative Officer (AO) a and b a, b, and c Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-25

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Item 4

To warrant a correction of a date gap, the date gap must be how many days delinquent? a. b. c. d.

31 days or longer 31 days or less 30 days or more 30 days or less Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-26

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4

MCI Course 8101

Answer c d d a

6-27

Reference 6-20 6-20 6-22 6-24

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2 Exercise

(This page intentionally left blank.)

MCI Course 8101

6-28

Study Unit 6, Lesson 2 Exercise

LESSON 3 PERSONNEL RECORD ACCOUNTABILITY AND AUDIT PROCEDURES Introduction

Estimated Study Time

20 minutes

Lesson Scope

This lesson will discuss the importance of conducting an audit for the Basic Individual Record (BIR) and Basic Training Record (BTR). It will also discuss the occasions to conduct an audit and action taken to incorporate changes.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to

In This Lesson



Identify components of the Basic Individual Record (BIR).



Identify components of the Basic Training Record (BTR).



Identify occasions to audit the BIR and BTR.



Explain action to correct the BIR and BTR.

The lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Personnel Records Maintaining Personnel Records Lesson 3 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

6-29

See Page 6-29 6-30 6-32 6-34

Study Unit 6, Lesson 3

Personnel Records

Marine Corps Total Force System (MCTFS)

The Marine Corps Total Force System (MCTFS) is the single, integrated, personnel and pay system supporting both active and reserve components of the Marine Corps, and personnel management for all Marines. The MCTFS maintains more than 500,000 active, reserve and retiree records that are available to be processed for pay purposes, personnel management, or for the production of necessary management reports.

Reporting Purposes

The data collection of the MCTFS is based on the principle of singular reporting. An item of information is entered into the system only once; thereafter, only updates, deletions, or corrections to this information are reported.

MCTFS Database

The MCTFS central database is maintained by Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS), Kansas City Center and contains all data elements resident in the MCTFS. Records containing specified data elements for all military personnel (active and reserve components, to include retirees) comprise the Central Master File (CMF).

Manpower Information System (MIS)

The Manpower Information System (MIS) encompasses the tasks and functions required to maintain and utilize accurate records in the MCTFS databases. These tasks and functions include verifying records through the audit of • • • • • • • • • •

Basic Individual Record (BIR) Basic Training Record (BTR) Daily Retrieval System (DRS) Record of Emergency Data (RED) Record of Service (ROS) MOS Record (TMOS) Education Record (EDU) Awards Record (AWDS) Career Retirement Credit Report (CRCR) Performance Evaluation Record

For the purpose of this lesson, we will discuss audit procedures of the BIR and BTR, the two most important and comprehensive records in the system. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-30

Study Unit 6, Lesson 3

Personnel Records, Continued

Significance of BIR and BTR

The BIR and BTR consist of personal information about the individual Marine. The significance of these records is that the information is collected from the initial enlistment to the present. It is important to maintain correct information. Incorrect information may delay a Marine’s promotion, or deny benefits to a dependent. For this reason, Marines are required to conduct audits of their records to prevent this from happening.

Components of BIR

The BIR is a listing of administrative information contained in the Central Master File (CMF) computer record of an individual Marine. The BIR is used to ensure that certain important data elements in the Marine’s record are correct. Components of the BIR include the following: • • • • • •

Components of BTR

The format of the BTR is similar to the BIR; components of the BTR include the following: • • • •

MCI Course 8101

Header - SSN, Name, Present-Grade, etc. Contract - Expiration of Active Service (EAS), Expiration of Current Contract (ECC), Expiration of Obligated Service (EOS) etc. Service – Present Grade Date of Rank, Select Grade/Date, T/O number/Line number, etc. Personal – Date of Birth, Citizenship, Religion, etc. Record – Record Status, Reserve Record Status, Disputed Date/Data, etc. Dependents – Marital Status, Dependent Certification Code, Service Spouse SSN, etc.

Unit training –scores for the PFT, BST/EST, current rifle qualification, current pistol qualification, etc. Service training – security investigation date/type, level of security clearance held, place of birth/state/county, etc Service schools/Special Skills – service schools code/year, local schools Test scores – classification/assignment test-type/date/raw scores, army radio code, electrical/DP test, foreign language

6-31

Study Unit 6, Lesson 3

Maintaining Personnel Records

Significance

Personnel records are the cornerstone of a Marine’s career. These records give a current in-depth reflection of the Marine. They provide personal and training information that is crucial when analyzing a Marine’s career for promotion or retention. This is why it is important to ensure the accuracy and completeness of these files.

Audit Process

Accuracy and completeness of both types of personnel records (audit) can best be determined through personal interview with the individual Marine. Therefore, whenever practical, the audit will be conducted during an interview with the Marine and a designated auditor.

Assigning Auditors

The Reporting Unit (RU) will designate in writing Marines authorized to conduct audits. This designation shall be based upon the auditor’s knowledge of personnel records and familiarity with the audit process. Designation of auditors shall not be accomplished based upon billet assignment alone. Marines in the rank of Lance Corporal and above, and civilian personnel GS04 and above may be assigned to conduct audits.

Occasions for Audit of BIR and BTR

Audit occasions are no longer based on the last digit of the Marine’s SSN or, for reserve personnel, the anniversary date. The following audit occasions are established as the minimum occasions for auditing personnel records. • • • • •

Join Process Audit. Whenever joined by a Reporting Unit (RU) Triennial Audit. At least once every three years from the date of the last join process audit or triennial audit Mobilization/Deployment Readiness Audit. For a deployment which is anticipated to be 31 days or more in duration Administrative Review. This is required for reserve personnel to include those individuals serving on the Active Reserve Program or extended active duty Whenever the commander considers that an additional audit is necessary

The Marine will acknowledge the audit/interview by signing the BIR and BTR. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-32

Study Unit 6, Lesson 3

Maintaining Personnel Records, Continued

Annotations

The audit official will annotate audit items with the correct information whenever an error is detected. Auditors will also insert information for blank items and annotate items for which “none” is an appropriate response. If an item is “not applicable” to the Marine being audited, the auditor will insert “N/A.”

Corrective Action

Information on the printed BIR/BTR represents data in the Central Master File (CMF). Unit Diary entries will be used to report additions, deletions, and change missing or erroneous data. Some data cannot be corrected at the RU level. In this case, the RU will submit a request with supporting documentation to the required office for corrections.

Filing Status

Upon completion of the audit, and after discrepancies have been corrected, the updated BIR and BTR will be filed in the Service Record Book/Officer Qualification Record (SRB/OQR).

MCI Course 8101

6-33

Study Unit 6, Lesson 3

Lesson 3 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

5 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 4 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

Which of the following are components of the Basic Individual Record (BIR)? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Which of the following are components of the Basic Training Record (BTR)? a. b. c. d.

Item 3

Name, SSN, EAS, and Record Status SSN, Marital Status, and Current Rifle Qualification Foreign Language, Record Status, and Date of Birth Army Radio Code, Service Spouse SSN, and Name

PFT, Service Schools Code/Year, and Dependent Certification Code BST/EST, Security Clearance Held, Citizenship, and Religion Current Pistol Qualification, Local Schools, and PFT T/O number/Line Number, Date of Birth, and Security Investigation/Type

What are the occasions for conducting an audit of the BIR and BTR? a. b. c. d.

Based on the last digit of the Marine’s SSN When a Marine joins a unit and triennially When a Marine reenlists During an annual inspection Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-34

Study Unit 6, Lesson 3 Exercise

Lesson 3 Exercise, Continued

Item 4

To report additions and deletions, and change missing or erroneous data on the BIR or BTR, __________ entries are made. a. b. c. d.

historical data administrative central master file unit diary Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

6-35

Study Unit 6, Lesson 3 Exercise

Lesson 3 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4

MCI Course 8101

Answer a c b d

6-36

Reference 6-31 6-31 6-32 6-33

Study Unit 6, Lesson 3 Exercise

STUDY UNIT 7 FILES, DIRECTIVES, AND PUBLICATIONS Overview

Estimated Study Time

3 hours, 30 minutes

Scope

This study unit will familiarize the staff noncommissioned officer (SNCO) with an overview of the files and directives system. It describes how the files and directives system works and where these tools are located. As the resident expert, a SNCO is responsible for accessing and utilizing files and directives to assist in daily problem solving.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this study unit, you should be able to • Identify the requirements of the files and directives system. • Identify correspondence standards and procedures. • Identify the procedures for the distribution and maintenance of publications.

In This Study Unit

This study unit contains the following lessons. Topic Lesson 1 Files and Directives Lesson 2 Correspondence Lesson 3 Publications

See Page 7-3 7-21 7-55 Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

7-1

Study Unit 7

(This page intentionally left blank)

MCI Course 8101

7-2

Study Unit 7

LESSON 1 FILES AND DIRECTIVES Introduction

Estimated Study Time

1 hour

Scope

The lesson will familiarize the SNCO with how to use, organize, maintain, and manage correspondence, files, and directives.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to • Identify the definition of a file. • Identify two types of file folders. • Identify the definition for standard subject identification codes (SSIC). • Identify the purpose of SECNAVINST 5210.11D. • Identify the standard subject identification codes code groups. • Identify the definition of a directive. • Identify the type of directives. • Identify the criteria for identifying directives.

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics. Topic Introduction Files Management System Standard Subject Identification Codes (SSIC) Directives Lesson 1 Exercise

MCI Course 8101

7-3

See Page 7-3 7-4 7-6 7-13 7-17

Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

File Management System

Definition

A file is a collection of all correspondence in the form of standard letters, endorsements, administrative action forms, naval messages, directive, and other government forms.

File Folders

There are two types of folders used to file correspondence. • Kraft “brown” folder is used for filing correspondence. • Manila folder is used for routing purposes or as a temporary case file.

Labels

Each file folder has three labels: • File identification label • Date label • Disposal action label

File Identification Label

The file identification label is placed in the top left corner of the file folder. It consists of the Standard Subject Identification code (SSIC) and subject title. • SSIC identifies the general or specific pieces of correspondence filed inside the folder (1000-1999). •

Date Label

Subject title is the corresponding title of the SSIC (MILITARY PERSONNEL).

The date label is placed in the top center of the file folder. It records the date the file was opened and closed. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

File Management System, Continued

Open Date

The opening date for a file is dated the day a file is established. • All correspondence files, except for those dealing with money (fiscal), are opened on a calendar year basis, for example: 1 January of each year. •

Close Date

Files pertaining to “money” or fiscal matters are opened on a fiscal year basis, for example: 1 October of each year.

The closing date for a file is dated the day a file is closed. • Closing dates are normally 31 December for files opened on a calendar year basis. •

Expansion Files

Disposal Action Label

MCI Course 8101

Closing dates are normally 30 September for files opened on a fiscal year basis.

Expansion files are opened when the •

Files accumulate ten or more pieces of correspondence with the same SSIC



Files reach 3/4 of an inch capacity and must be closed



Open date for that specific SSIC folder reflects the date of the earliest dated document in the new file



Open date for a new folder after a closed file reflects the date after the previous file is closed

The disposal action label is placed in the top right corner of the file folder. It records the retention period, disposal action, and the authority.

7-5

Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Standard Subject Identification Codes

Definition

A standard subject identification code (SSIC) is a four- or five-digit number assigned to the subject of a document. Each number within the digit represents a particular subject category or element. Personnel working with files, correspondence, and directives most commonly use the acronym SSIC.

Major Subject Groups

The Navy’s SSIC system is broken down into 13 major subject groups or categories. The following table identifies the major subject groups. • • • • • • •

SECNAVINST 5210.11D

Major Subject Groups • Ordnance Material Military Personnel • Ships Design and Material Telecommunications • General Material Operations and Readiness • Facilities and Activities Ashore Logistics • Civilian Personnel General Administration and Management • Aeronautical and Astronautical Material Medicine and Dentistry Financial Management

Secretary of the Navy Instruction (SECNAVIST) 5210.11D is the Navy’s File Maintenance Procedures and SSIC manual. Its purpose is to revise the Navy’s SSIC and file maintenance procedures. This instruction outlines the process for segregating and filing Navy and Marine Corps records and the single standard system of numbers and or letter symbols. This filing system is also used throughout the Navy for categorizing the subject classifying Navy and Marine Corps information. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Standard Subject Identification Codes, Continued

Designators and Subject Matter

There are 13 major SSIC groups assigned, content descriptions, and numerical designator groups as described in the following table.

Standard Subject Identification Code Designators and Subject Matter Designators

General Category and Subject Matter Military Personnel Subjects relating solely to the administration of military personnel.

1000 - 1999

2000 - 2999

• • •

The following restrictions apply Civilian personnel are included in the 12000 series General personnel subjects relating to both civilian and military personnel are included in the 5000 series Telecommunications Subjects relating to • General communication matters • Communication systems and equipment Operations and Readiness Subjects relating to such matters as

3000 - 3999

• • • • • • •

Operational plans Fleet readiness Operational training and readiness Warfare techniques Operational intelligence Research and development Geophysical and hydrographic support Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Standard Subject Identification Codes, Continued

Designators and Subject Matter, continued Designators

General Category and Subject Matter Logistics Subjects relating to logistical support of the Navy and Marine Corps including

4000 - 4999

• • • • • •

Procurement Supply control Property redistribution Disposal Travel Transportation

• • • • • •

Maintenance Construction Conversion Production Mobilization planning Foreign military assistance

General Administration and Management Subjects relating to the administration, organization, and management of the Department of the Navy, including 5000 - 5999

• General personnel matter (Military and civilian) • Records management programs • Security • External services • Office automation • Publication and printing matters Medicine and Dentistry Subjects relating to medical matters such

6000 - 6999

• • • • •

Physical fitness General medicine Special or preventative medicine Dentistry Medical equipment and supplies Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Standard Subject Identification Codes, Continued

Designators and Subject Matter, continued Designators

General Category and Subject Matter Financial Management Subjects relating to the financial administration of the Department of the Navy, including

7000 - 7999

• Budgeting • Disbursing • Accounting • Auditing • Contract auditing • Industrial and other special financing matters • Statistical reporting Ordnance Material Subjects relating to all types of ordnance material and weapons including

8000 - 8999

9000 - 9999

• Ammunition • Explosives • Guided missiles of all types • Nuclear weapons • Fire control and optics • Combat vehicles • Underwater ordnance materials • Miscellaneous ordnance equipment Ships Design and Material Subjects relating to such matters as • •

The design and characteristics of ships Ships material and equipment Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Standard Subject Identification Codes, Continued

Designators and Subject Matter, continued Designators

General Category and Subject Matter General Material Sujects relating to general categories of materials not included in the specialized material groups. For example

1000 - 10999



Audiovisual / graphic arts / photographic / television / video equipment and accessories • General machinery • Tools • Materials personnel • Miscellaneous categories Facilities and Activities Ashore Subjects relating to

11000 - 11999

• Ashore structures and facilities • Fleet facilities • Transportation facilities • Heavy equipment • Utilities and services • Other similar subjects Civilian Personnel

12000 - 12999 Subjects relating solely to the administration of civilian personnel. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Standard Subject Identification Codes, Continued

Designators and Subject Matter, continued Designators

General Category and Subject Matter Aeronautical and Astronautical Material Subjects relating to aeronautical and astronautical material such as

13000 - 13999

Construction

• • • • • • • • •

Parts Accessories Instruments Special Devices Armament Aerological equipment Weapons systems Types of aircraft Astronautical vehicles

The table shows one of the 13 major subject groups broken down into primary, secondary, and tertiary subdivisions. 5000 General Administration and Management 5200 Management Programs and Techniques 5210 Records Management 5211 Filing, Maintenance, Protection, Retrieval, and Privacy Act Systems

Assignment

Major Subject Group Code

Primary Subject is designated by the last three digits of the code number Secondary Subject is designated by the last two digits Tertiary Subject is designated by the last digit

When a document is created, include the SSIC that closely describes the document’s subject. Consider the subject, purpose, significance, and the manner in which the documents are requested. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Standard Subject Identification Codes, Continued

Numbering System

The following graphic representation supports SSIC concepts. • Group Category/General Administration and Management

5000

• Management Programs and Techniques

5200

• Manpower/Personnel 5300 • Organizations, Functions, and Status 5400 5500 • Security • Micrographics Publications, Printing, Duplicating 5600 • External and Internal Relations 5700 • Laws and Legal Matters 5800 • Office Services 5909

5210

• Records Management • Workload/Performance Measurement 5220 5230 • Automatic Data Processing & Info. Systems 5240 • Industrial Methods 5250 • Management Sciences 5270 • Office Information Systems Management 5280 • Operational Analysis 5290 • Audiovisual

Management 5211

• Filing, Maintenance, Retrieval, and Privacy Act

5212 • Records Disposal Systems • Forms Management 5213 • Reports Management 5214 • Issuance Systems 5215 • Correspondence Management 5216 • Effective Writing 5217 • Mail Management 5218 5219 • Publications Management

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Directives

Definition

A directive is a formal written communication from the unit commander that • • • • • • •

Establishes or revises policy Delegates authority or assigns responsibility Assigns a mission, function, or task Issues plans or programs Directs courses of action or conduct Regulates administrative practices Establishes a procedure, standard, or method of performing a duty, function, or task • Modifies, changes, or cancels another directive

Directive Formats

In accordance with MCO 5215.1H, Marine Corps Directives, HQMC staff agencies and authorized field commanders shall write directives in the “Five Paragraph Order format,” wherever and whenever feasible, to adhere to the Commandant’s Policy memorandum number 3-00 dated 25 June 2000. This policy memorandum is an enclosure in MCO 5215.1H.

Types of Directives

The different types of directive are • Orders • Bulletins • Messages Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Directives, Continued

Orders

Orders are directives of continuing authority or reference value. It is directed at overall functions and is effective for 9 years unless it is superseded or canceled. An order is assigned a consecutive point number that follows the SSIC. There are two types of orders, letter-type and manual-type.

Letter-Type

Letter-type is an instruction or notice prepared in a format similar to that of the naval letter. It may contain a cancellation date to reduce its effective period to less than 9 years.

Manual-Type

Manual-type is referred to frequently; it has a promulgation page, a change page, and a locator page. In addition to a consecutive point number following the SSIC, the letter “P” will precede the SSIC of a manual-type order.

Bulletins

Bulletins are directives with the same force and effect as an order. It is used to publish material that is either primarily informative or otherwise directive in nature. Bulletins are not of a continuing authority or reference; it has a self-cancellation date, which limits its effectiveness to one year.

Messages

Message directives are used when promulgation and transmittal of an order, bulletin, or change to either is so urgent that it must be disseminated through the Naval Telecommunications System (radio teletype). An example is the All Marine (ALMAR) message. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Directives, Continued

Identification of Orders

Orders are identified by the following criteria: • The originating echelon of command is abbreviated. For example, Headquarters Marine Corps is MC, battalion is Bn, regiment is Regt. • The letter “O” follows the issuing command to distinguish an order from a bulletin. For example, MCO, BnO, RegtO. • A “P” may follow next to indicate that the directive is a manual-type order instead of a letter-type order. • A directive classified as confidential will have a zero “0” preceding the SSIC code. Directives classified, as secret will have a double zero “00” preceding the SSIC code. For example, MCOP0 or MCOP00. • Every order is assigned a four- or five-digit SSIC code that identifies the primary focus of the directive. • An “R” after the SSIC indicates that the directive is applicable only to the Marine Corps Reserves. For example, MCO P1070R.2. • Consecutive point numbers are assigned to distinguish between orders issued by the same echelon of command with the same SSIC. These numbers follow the SSIC code or the reserve designation.

Identification of Bulletins

The criteria for identifying bulletins is similar to those for orders. Listed below are identifying criteria for bulletins. • The originating echelon of command is abbreviate. • “Bul,” follows the abbreviated echelon of command to designate the directive a bulletin. • A “0” or “00” preceding the SSIC indicates if the bulletin is classified. • The assigned SSIC code is determined by the subject matter. • An “R” designates as applicable to only the reserve. • Bulletins are not issued a consecutive point number, but are given an issued date. For example, MCBul 01210R of 7 April 02. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Directives, Continued

Identification of Messages

Message directives are identified by serial numbers assigned throughout a calendar year by HQMC. The most common message directives are addressed to all Marines worldwide (ALMAR). For example ALMAR 20/02 would identify the 20th ALMAR message directive issued in 2002. Message directives are prepared in accordance with the Naval Telecommunications Publication. Directives issued by commands other than HQMC and HQMC issued directives other than ALMARs are identified by the issuing command Date-Time Group (DTG). For example, a DTG of a message directive issued by the First Marine Air Wing on 31 Mar 02 at 1200 would look like this, “FIRST MAW CAMP BUTLER JA, 311200Z MAR 02.

MCI Course 8101

7-16

Study Unit 7, Lesson 1

Lesson 1 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Direction

Complete items 1 through 8 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

What is a file? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Which type of folder is used to establish a correspondence file? a. b. c. d.

Item 3

Manila Pocket Kraft Sectional

What does the acronym SSIC mean? a. b. c. d.

Item 4

A collection of folders and correspondence in a square metal casing A collection of all correspondence in the form of standard letters A collection of objects in a row A tool of hardened steel with cutting ridges for forming or smoothing

Standard Subject Identification Codes Subject Source Identification Codes Simple Standard Identification Codes Standard Summary Identification Codes

The purpose of SECNAVINST 5210.11D is to a. identify files and directives used in the department of the Navy. b. ensure the accurate designation of files and directives within the department of the Navy. c. standardize the Naval correspondence and file maintenance procedures. d. revise the department of the Navy SSICs and department of the Navy file maintenance procedures. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Item 5

What is the general category for designator 2000-2999? a. b. c. d.

Item 6

A directive is a formal written communication from the unit commander that a. b. c. d.

Item 7

regulates administrative practices. informs the public. protects the property. designs structures and policy.

The different types of directives are orders, bulletins, and a. b. c. d.

Item 8

General Administration and Management Telecommunications Ordnance Material Operations and Readiness

memorandums. letters. messages. endorsements.

Which item is one of the identifying criteria for an order? a. b. c. d.

The letter “S” after the SSIC indicating a classification of “secret” An issued date A cancellation date The letter “R” indicates as applicable to the reserves only Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1 Exercise

Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued

Solutions

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

MCI Course 8101

Answer b c a d b a c d

7-19

Reference Page 7-4 7-4 7-6 7-6 7-7 7-13 7-13 7-15

Study Unit 7, Lesson 1 Exercise

(This page intentionally left blank.)

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 1 Exercise

LESSON 2 CORRESPONDENCE Introduction

Estimated Study Time

1 hour, 15 minutes

Scope

This lesson is designed to familiarize the staff noncommissioned officer (SNCO) with correspondence standards, procedures, and formats.

Learning Objectives

After completing this lesson, you should be able to • Identify the definition of correspondence. • Identify the purpose of SECNAVINST 5216.5D. • Identify the guidelines for writing correspondence. • Identify the types of correspondence formats.

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics. Topic Introduction Naval Correspondence Paragraphs Standard Letters Multiple Address Letters Endorsements Memorandums Point Papers Business Letters Lesson 2 Exercise

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See Page 7-21 7-22 7-23 7-26 7-34 7-38 7-41 7-45 7-47 7-51

Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Naval Correspondence

Overview

The Navy Department uses various types of correspondence for an array of administrative and operational tasks. The SNCO will experience an increased administrative responsibility over a broad spectrum of operational and organizational tasks.

Definition

Correspondence refers to the types of communications used to transmit written ideas and messages. The types of correspondence include letters, postcards, memoranda, notes, telecommunications, and any other form of addressed, written communications sent or received. Naval correspondence is the term often used by Navy and Marine Corps personnel to describe correspondence used within the respective organizations.

SECNAVINST 5216.5D

Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5216.5D is the Navy Correspondence manual. It prescribes uniform standards for the management and preparation of correspondence.

Writing Guidelines

The tone, quality, and responsiveness of correspondence is important. The command’s image and effectiveness is impaired if written correspondence is sloppy, difficult to understand, unresponsive, cold, impersonal, or incomplete. Correspondence should incorporate • Neat appearance • Correct format • Organized and rational flow of information to adequately support or discuss a topic, view, or proposal • Concise and easy to understand language • Error free writing • Grammatically correct writing • Neutral gender without detracting from the intent of the document • Other means of communication when necessary • A point of contact and return phone number when a reply may be necessary • Automated office equipment to increase efficiency; i.e. facsimile machine and other electronic advances

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Paragraphs

Introduction

Writing professional correspondence and developing presentations requires the author to write, meeting the organizational expectation. The Marine Corps generally uses brief and concise statements to communicate information. Paragraph content and format are the essential building blocks used to develop documents for professional correspondence.

Content

Content is the information contained within a paragraph. It should be organized in a logical manner that allows the paragraph to project a concept, point of view, or idea.

Parts of a Paragraph

A paragraph has three parts: • Topic sentence • Supporting details • Closing sentence

Topic Sentence

The topic sentence is the first sentence in a paragraph. It introduces the main idea of the paragraph.

Supporting Details

Supporting details come after the topic sentence. They give details to develop and support the main idea of the paragraph.

Closing Sentence

The closing sentence is the last sentence in a paragraph. It restates the main idea of the paragraph using different words.

Format

Standard paragraph formatting is used to keep the document organized and neat, and increases understanding.

Identifying Paragraphs and Subparagraphs

Main paragraphs are numbered in sequence 1, 2 ,3, etc. Subparagraphs are identified in the following sequence: a., (1), (a), (1), (a). Indent each new subparagraph by four spaces and start typing on the fifth space. Single space within main paragraphs and subparagraphs and double space between them. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Paragraphs, Continued

Limits Subparagraphs

Subparagraphs clearly display levels of importance and encourage the use of lists for easy reading. They clutter writing when carried too far. Subparagraphs should not divide past the second level, (a), until all reparagraphing alternatives have been used first. As illustrated in the paragraph formatting diagram on page 7-25.

Headings

Use brief but informative paragraph headings in long correspondence with widely varying topics. Underline any heading and capitalize its key words. Be consistent across main paragraphs and subparagraphs; if paragraph 1 has a heading, paragraph 2 would need a heading; if 1a has a heading, 1b would need a heading.

Citing

When referencing a paragraph or subparagraph, write the numbers and letters without period or spaces, for example 2b(4)(a). Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Paragraphs, Continued

Paragraph Formatting

The illustration below is an example of paragraph and subparagraph formatting. 1.**Numbering for main paragraph. % 2. If subparagraphs are needed, use at least two; e.g., a (1) must have a (2). % ****a. Indent each new subdivision four spaces and start typing at the fifth space. % ****b.**Text. % *********(1)*Documents rarely require subdividing to the extent shown below. % *********(2)*Text. % *************(a)*Do not subparagraph past this level until you have exhausted all reparagraphing. % *************(b)*Text. % *****************1.**Text. % *********************a.**Text. % *************************(1)*Text. % ***************************** (a)*Never subparagraph beyond this level. % ***************************** (b)*Text. % *************************(2)*Text. % *********************b.**Text. % *****************2.**Text. % 10.**When using two digits, continue to indent each new subdivision four spaces and start typing on the fifth space (paragraphs will not line up). % **** a.**Text. % ********* (9)*Text. % ********* (10)*Text. % *************** (a) Text. % *************** (b) Text. % ********* (11)*Text. % **** b.**Text. % NOTE: * An asterisk (*) indicates a single blank space. 11

% A percent sign (%) indicates a single blank line.

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Standard Letters

General

The format of the standard letter, with slight variations, sets the pattern for joint letters, multiple address letters, endorsements, directives, and memoranda. The standard letter is used to correspond officially with addressees within the Department of Defense (DoD). It may be used when writing to addressees outside DoD only if they have adopted this format.

Standard Letter Format Guidelines

When drafting a standard letter, the author should pay attention to the following format guidelines, which correspond to the format on the preceding page. While the naval correspondence was written for use with a typewriter, the author will have to adjust the formats for use with a personal computer (PC). The table below explains the guidelines to use for each item in a standard letter. The numbers on each item correspond to the diagram on page 7-29. Item

(1) Margins

(2) Letterhead

(3) Identification Symbols

Guideline Margins are set at 1 inch from the top, bottom, and sides of each page. The exceptions to this are on letterhead paper, typing starts more than 1 inch from the top when the letterhead is printed and less if it is typed. Typing may end more than 1 inch from the bottom that has a signature. Computer applications require the top margin to be set at ½ inch. Do not right justify margins or use proportional spacing. Whether typing or stamping a letterhead, begin with “UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS,” centered on the fourth line from the top of the page. Center the activity’s name, address, and nine-digit zip code on succeeding lines. If “in reply refer to,” is printed on the activity’s letterhead paper, type the SSIC on the next line. If “in reply refer to,” is not printed, type the SSIC on the second line below the letterhead, starting 2 inches or more from the right edge of the paper. There are three parts of the identification symbols: • Standard Subject Identification Code (SSIC) • Originator’s code (with or without serial numbers) • Date (typed in day-month-year order without punctuation) Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Standard Letters, Continued

Standard Letter Format Guidelines, continued

Item (4) “From:” Line

(5) “To:” and “Via:” Lines

(6) Subject Line

(7) Reference Line

Guideline The “From:” line identifies the originator’s title, name and location of the command (without the state or zip code). Type “From:”, at the left margin on the second line below the date line. Two spaces follow the colon, and continuation lines start under the first word after the heading. A comma separates the title of the originator from the title of the command. The “To:” line identifies the recipients of the document. Type “To:” at the left margin on the first line under the “From:” line (don’t skip a line). Four spaces follow the colon, and continuation lines start under the first word after the heading. The “Via:” line is used when one or more commands outside your own should see a letter before it reaches the action addressee. Type the “Via:” at the left margin on the first line below the “To:” line. Three spaces follow the colon, and continuation lines start under the first word after the heading. Number “Via:” addresses if you list two or more. The subject line consists of a sentence fragment that tells readers what the letter is about (no more than 10 words). Phrase the subject to make it genuinely informative and capitalize every letter after the colon. Type “Subj:” at the left margin on the second line under the last line of the previous heading. Two spaces follow the colon. The reference line identifies any resources the document cites or uses in the content. Type “Ref:” at the left margin on the second line below the subject line. Use a lowercase letter (beginning with the letter a) in parentheses before the description of every reference. Three spaces follow the colon, and one space follows the closing parentheses. Continuation lines start under the first word after the heading. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Standard Letters, Continued Standard Letter Format Guidelines, continued

Item (8) Enclosure Line

(9) Text (10) Margin

Guideline Enclosures are listed in the order they appear in the text. Type “Encl:”, at the left margin on the second line below the last line of the previous heading. Use a number in parentheses (beginning with the number 1) before the description of every enclosure. Two spaces follow the colon, and one space follows the closing parenthesis. Continuation lines start under the first word after the heading. Skip a line before starting the text. Paragraphs should be formatted as described in the Paragraph and Subparagraph Formatting section of this lesson. The right, left, and bottom margins should be one (1) inch.

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Standard Letters, Continued

Standard Letter

The illustration below is an example of the standard letter format. 1 2 3 4

% % %

1 2

%

1 2

%

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS NAME OF ACTIVITY ADDRESS LOCATION, STATE 12345-1234

2 3 SSIC Code/Serial Date

From:**Title of activity head, name of activity, location when needed To: ****Title of activity, name of activity, location when needed (Code) Via: ****(1) Title of activity head location when needed (Code) ********(2) Pattern of line (1) repeated for next endorser

1 2 1 2

%

1 2

%

]

5

Subj:** NORMAL WORD ORDER WITH ALL LETTERS CAPITALIZED

6

]

Ref: ***(a)*Communication or Document that gears directly on the subject at hand Encl: ** (1)*Title of material enclosed with letter (2)*Title of material separately (sep. cover)

]

]

4

%

1 2

1 2

1

7

8

% 1. This example shows the first page of a two page standard letter. We have used many of the elements that might appear on a standard letter. Mention reference (a) and enclosures (1) and (2) in the text.

9

% 2.**Start the “From:” line on the second line below the date line. The date may be typed or stamped in date, month, and last two year digit format. % 3.**Arrange paragraphs as shown in Drafting Correspondence section.

1 2

% ****a.**Do not start a paragraph at the bottom of a page unless you can carry at least two lines over to another page. % ****b.**Do not number the first page; number only second and later pages. % ****c.**Other full-page examples in this chapter and later ones shoe the spacing to correspondence that variously omits “Via:,” “Ref:,” and “Encl:” lines.

1” Margin 10

1” Margin

NOTE: * An asterisk (*) indicates a single blank space. A percent sign (%) indicates a single blank line.

10

1” Margin Minimum 10

Continued on next page MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Standard Letters, Continued

Second and Later Pages

Second pages are typed in the following format: • Start typing at the left margin on the sixth line from the top of the page. • Repeat the subject line as it appears on the first page. Type text on the second line below the subject. • Standard letters do not use complementary closes, for example, Sincerely, or With Regards). • The signature block starts at the center of the page on the fourth line below the text. • The “Copy to” block lists the addresses outside your command that need to know a letter’s content but don’t need to act on it. Type, “Copy to,” at the left margin on the second line below the signature block. • The “Blind Copy to:” block is used to show internal distribution. This is printed on internal copies, never on the original document. Type “Blind Copy to:” at the left margin on the second line below the previous block. • The drafter’s identification is typed on the first or last page of the file copy. • This includes the name of the writer, writer’s office code, writer’s phone extension or room number, typist’s identification, date of typing, and word processing symbols. • Page numbers are centered ½ inch from the bottom of the page starting with the number 2. Single page letters and the first page of multiple-page letters are not numbered. An example of the format for second pages is on the next page. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Standard Letters, Continued

Standard Letter Page 2

The illustration below is an example of a standard letter page 2 format. 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 1 2 1 2

1 2 3 4

1 2

1 2 1 2

% % % % % SUBJECT BLOCK % ****d.**Second and succeeding pages of a standard letter look like this: % ********(1)*Start typing on the sixth line. Repeat the subject line. ********(2) Start the text on the second line below the date or subject line. % % 4.**”Copy to:” addresses appear on all copies. “Blind copy to:” addresses as well as the identity of the writer and typist appear on internal copies only. % 5.**A standard letter uses no complimentary close. % % % NAME OF SIGNER By Direction % % Copy to: SNDL number and/or short title of information addressee SNDL number and/or short title of information addressee % Blind Copy to: List blind copy addresses % Writer: Name, organization, room # or telephone # Typist: Name, date, word processing symbols

]

]

]

]

]

1” Margin

1” Margin

1” Margin Minimum ½” from bottom and centered

Continued on next page MCI Course 8101

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Standard Letters, Continued

Standard Letter With Classification Markings

The illustration below is an example of a standard letter with classification markings.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Standard Letters, Continued

Second Page of Standard Letter With Classification Markings

The illustration below is an example of the second page of a standard letter with classification markings.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Multiple Address Letters

General

. Multiple address letters are used when you have more than one addressee. The multiple address letter has the same format as the standard letter, except in handling addressees. There are three ways to list addresses: • “To:” line only • “Distribution:’ block only • Both the “To:” line and “Distribution:” block

“To:” Line

Use the “To:” line only if you have four addresses or less.

“Distribution” Block

Use the “Distribution:” block when you have more than four addressees.

“To:” Line and “Distribution:” Block

Use both the “To:” line and “Distribution:” block in the same letter when you show a group title whose distribution is unknown Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Multiple Address Letters, Continued

MultipleAddress Letter Using “To:” Line

The illustration below is an example of a multiple address letter using the “To:".

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Multiple Address Letters, Continued

MultipleAddress Letter Using a “Distribution:” Block

The illustration below is an example of a multiple address letter using a “Distribution:” block.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Multiple Address Letters, Continued

MultipleAddress Letters Using a “To:” Line and a “Distribution:” Block

The illustration below is an example of a multiple-address letter using a “To:” line and a “Distribution:” block.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Endorsements

General

When a letter is transmitted “Via:” your command, use an endorsement to forward comments, recommendations, or information. Start the endorsement number line at the left margin on the second line below the date line. If the correspondence is classified, start on the second line below the line carrying this designation.

Endorsements

There are two types of endorsements: • Same-page • New-page The length of the endorsement and the amount of space available determines which type is used.

Number Sequence

Each endorsement is numbered in the sequence in which it is added to the basic letter. Indicate the numbers of the endorsement by using ordinal numbers such as FIRST, SECOND, THIRD, followed by typing “Endorsement on” and identify the basic letter using the same style as a reference line. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Endorsements, Continued

Same Page Endorsement

The illustration below is an example of a same-page endorsement.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Endorsements, Continued

New-Page Endorsement

The illustration is an example of a new-page endorsement.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Memorandums

Definition

Memorandums are used as informal ways to correspond within a command or between Department of the Navy activities. Subordinate commands may use it to correspond directly with each other on routine official business.

Formats

There are seven memorandum formats to choose from that suit different subjects, occasions, and audiences. • • • • • • •

Memorandum For the Record (MFR) “From-To” Memorandum Plain-paper Memorandum Letterhead Memorandum “Memorandum For” Memorandum Memorandum of Agreement Memorandum of Understanding

Memorandum For The Record

The MFR is as internal document used to record supporting information in the record that is not recorded elsewhere.

“From-To” Memorandum

The “from-to” memorandum may be directed to one or more addressees. If very informal, it may be handwritten.

Plain-Paper Memorandum

Plain-paper memorandums are used for informal communications within a command. It is no more formal than the memorandum form, but it is more flexible when there are multiple addressees, via addressees or both.

Letterhead Memorandum

Letterhead memoranda are used when direct liaison with individuals outside of your command is authorized, the letterhead memorandum may be used to correspond on routine matters that neither make a commitment nor take an official stand.

“Memorandum For” Memorandum

The “memorandum for” is the most formal memorandum. It is used for communications between high level officials such as the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Navy, and Assistant Secretaries. It is prepared on letterhead stationary and follows standard letter practice. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Memorandums, Continued

Memorandum of Agreement or Understanding

The memorandum of agreements may be used to document mutual agreements of facts, intentions, procedures, limits on future actions, and areas of present or future coordination, or commitments.

Examples

The following illustrations are some examples of the different memorandum formats. The illustration below is an example of a memorandum for the record.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Memorandums, Continued

Plain-Paper “From-To” Memorandum

The illustration below is an example of a plain-paper memorandum.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Memorandums, Continued

Letterhead Memorandum

The illustration below is an example of a letterhead memorandum.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Point Papers

Point (Talking) Papers

Point papers are referred to as “talking papers.” They provide a standalone document that presents the essential elements of a subject. It serves as a readily available source of condensed, factual information on topical subjects.

Format

The point paper’s format is very specific to provide uniformity throughout the Navy Department. The paper is confined to a single 8 ½by 11-inch page. Allow 1-inch margins for the top, bottom and sides. If unable to get the entire text on one page, margins may be adjusted to accommodate the entire text on one page. Eliminate unnecessary words like “the” and “that.”

Section Headers And Paragraphs

The section headers and paragraphs will be written in the following format: • The paper will have a title of point paper. • Each section will begin with a header for example: Background, Discussion, Recommendation. • Headers are centered on the page and typed in all capital letters. • Double space between paragraphs and bullets. • Put main points first with supporting information following. Use short phrases and bullets. • Indent subordinate points in cascading style. • Continuation lines start directly under the first word of the paragraph. • Data should be presented in graphics rather than words when possible. • Abbreviations and acronyms may be used if spelled out on initial use. • Technical terms, phrases, and code names should be explained in plain language. • Classification markings must be included on the page except when paper is unclassified. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Point Papers, Continued

Point (Talking) Paper Example

The illustration below is an example of a point (talking) paper.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Business Letters

Description

Business letters are used to correspond with agencies, businesses, or individuals outside the Department of Defense (DoD), who are not familiar with the standard letter. It may also be used for official correspondence between individuals within DoD, when the occasion calls for a personal approach.

Margins

Adjust margins from 1 to 2 inches to achieve maximum balance; never use less than a 1-inch margin.

Parts of a Business Letter

A business letter is formatted differently than in the standard letter. Listed below are the parts of a business letter. The numbers on each item correspond to the diagram on page 7-49. Part (1) Identification Symbols

(2) Inside Address

(3) Attention Line (4) Salutation Line

Description The following three symbols are written in the upper right corner of the letter: • SSIC • Originator’s code • Date (written in month-day-year order) Placed 2 to 8 lines below the date, blocked and flush with the left margin. An optional line used to direct the letter to a business in general and to bring it to the attention of a particular person or department. Start typing two lines below the inside address, block and flush with the left margin, and two lines above the salutation line. Capitalize the first letter of the first word of the salutation as well as the first letter of the addressee’s courtesy title and surname such as, Dear Mr. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Business Letters, Continued

Parts of a Business Letter, continued

Part (5) Subject Line

(6) Body of the Letter

(7) Margin (8) Complimentary Close (9) Signature Block (10) Enclosure (11) Separate Mailing (12) Copy To Line

Description Use of the subject line is optional and may replace the salutation. The subject line should be very brief and to the point with more than one line in length. Capitalize all letters of the subject line. Single-space within paragraphs and double-space between paragraphs. Indent main paragraphs four spaces and start typing on the fifth space. Do not number main paragraphs. The first lines of subparagraphs should be indented, lettered, or numbered in standard letter fashion. The right, left, and bottom margins should be one (1) inch. Use “sincerely” followed by a comma for the complimentary close of a business letter. Start the complimentary close at the center of the page on the second line below the text. Start all lines of the “signature” block at the center of the page, beginning on the fourth line below “sincerely.” Type “enclosure:” on the second line below the “signature” block, number and describe them briefly. Note: References and enclosures are addressed in the body of the letter. When an enclosure is to be sent separately, type “Separate Mailing:” and a brief description. Type “Copy To:” at the left margin on the second line below the enclosure line if any, or the signature block.

Identifying Second and Succeeding Pages

Repeat the identification symbols, from the first page, on the sixth line from the top at the right margin. Continue the text beginning on the second line below the identification symbols.

Numbering Pages

Single-page letters or the first page of a multiple-page letter are not numbered. Center page numbers ½inch from the bottom of the page, starting with the number 2. No punctuation accompanies a page number. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Business Letters, Continued

Two Page Business Letter (1st Page)

The illustration below is an example of the first page of a business letter.

Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Business Letters, Continued

Two Page Business Letter (2nd Page)

MCI Course 8101

The illustration below is an example of the second page of a business letter.

7-50

Study Unit 7, Lesson 2

Lesson 2 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Direction

Complete items 1 through 10 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson

Item 1

What is the definition of correspondence? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

The types of communications used to transmit written ideas and messages Any type of communication used to transmit an idea or message The types of communications used to transmit verbal ideas and messages Any idea or message used for communication

The purpose of SECNAVINST 5216.5D is to a. establish policy and procedures for submitting correspondence. b. prescribe uniform standards for the management and preparations correspondence. c. prescribe dates and timelines for transmitting correspondence. d. prescribe the amount of correspondence allowed within a command.

Item 3

Which is a guideline for writing correspondence? a. b. c. d.

Item 4

Specific gender identification Block paragraphs with left justification Optional point of contact and return phone number Correct format

Which item is a part of a paragraph? a. b. c. d.

Salutation Supporting details Introduction Verbal bridge Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Item 5

Which item is part of the identification symbols in a standard letter? a. b. c. d.

Item 6

Which item is one of the three ways to list addressees on a multiple address letter? a. b. c. d.

Item 7

Double-page Second-page Half-page New-page

Which item is one of the memorandum formats? a. b. c. d.

Item 9

“Greetings” line “Salutations” line “Distribution” block “Enclosure” block

Which item is one of the types of endorsements? a. b. c. d.

Item 8

Originator’s code Reporting Unit code Individual Activity code Local Area code

“Memorandum For” memorandum “Memorandum To The Files” memorandum “Memorandum of Misunderstanding” memorandum “Memorandum For All” memorandum

How are headers placed and typed in a point paper? a. b. c. d.

Aligned to the left of the page and typed in capital and lower case letters Centered on the page and typed in all capital letters Indented five spaces on the page and typed in all lower case letters Centered on the page and typed in capital and lower case letters Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Item 10

The purpose of a business letter is to a. b. c. d.

correspond with other federal government agencies. correspond with government agencies outside the Marine Corps. correspond with Marine Corps subordinate commands. correspond with agencies and businesses outside DoD. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 2 Exercise

Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

MCI Course 8101

Answer a b d b a c d a b d

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Reference Page 7-22 7-22 7-22 7-23 7-26 7-34 7-38 7-41 7-45 7-47

Study Unit 7, Lesson 2 Exercise

LESSON 3 PUBLICATIONS Introduction

Estimated Study Time

45 minutes

Scope

This lesson will familiarize the staff noncommissioned officer (SNCO) with the procedures for distribution, maintenance, and the status of doctrinal publications within the Marine Corps Doctrinal publications program to include service, multi-service, joint, multinational, and associated publications.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this lesson, you should be able to • Identify the types of publications. • Identify where to obtain electronic copies of publications. • Identify how to requisition publications. • Identify how to maintain publications. • Identify the Marine Corps Publication and Distribution System (MCPDs). • Identify the functions of the Directives Control Point (DCP). Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Introduction, Continued

In This Lesson

This lesson contains the following topics. Topic Introduction Types of Publications Electronic Distribution of Publications Requisition Maintenance Directives Control Point (DCP) Lesson 3 Exercise

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See Page 7-55 7-57 7-61 7-62 7-63 7-64 7-66

Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Types of Publications

General

The Marine Corps publication hierarchy is comprised of Marine Corps Service doctrinal publications, dual-designated publications, and multiservice designated publications.

Marine Corps Service Doctrine

Marine Corps Service doctrine consists of publications created to describe the warfighting doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP) of the Marine Corps. The Fleet Marine Force Manuals (FMFM), Fleet Marine Force Reference Publications (FMRP), and Operational Handbooks (OH) are being phased out as doctrinal publications. These publications are being revised, rewritten, and designated as one of the following: • Marine Corps Doctrinal Publications (MCDP) • Marine Corps Warfighting Publications (MCWP) • Marine Corps Reference Publications (MCRP)

MCDP

MCDPs are higher order doctrine publications containing the fundamental and enduring beliefs of warfighting (capstone) and the guiding doctrine for the conduct of major warfighting activities (keystone). MCDPs supersede selected FMFMs. The table below lists the currently published MCDPs. Marine Corps Doctrinal Publications Capstone Publications Keystone Publications MCDP 1 Warfighting MCDP 1-0 Marine Corps Operations MCDP 1-1 Strategy MCDP 1-0.1 Componency MCDP 1-2 Campaigning MCDP 2 Intelligence MCDP 1-3 Tactics MCDP 3 Expeditionary Operations MCDP 4 Logistics MCDP 5 Planning MCDP 6 Command and Control Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Types of Publications, Continued

MCWP

MCWPs have a narrower focus detailing TTP used in the prosecution of war and other assigned tasks. MCWPs supersede FMFMs, FMFRPs, and OHs. The table below lists some examples of MCWPs.

MCWP 2-1 MCWP 3-0 MCWP 3-1 MCWP 3-2 MCWP 3-3 MCWP 3-4 MCWP 4-1 MCWP 5-1 MCWP 6-1

MCRP

MCRPs contain general reference and historical material and more specific and detailed TTP than MCWPs. MCRPs are given the same number as the parent MCWP with an alpha designator added to the number. MCRPs supersede FMFRPs and OHs. The table below list some examples of MCRPs.

MCRP 2-15.3B MCRP 3-0A MCRP 3-11.1A MCRP 4-11C MCRP 5-1A MCRP 6-11B

DualDesignated And Multi-Service Publications

Marine Corps Warfighting Publication Intelligence Operations Training Series Ground Combat Operations (FMFM 6) Aviation Operations (FMFM 5-1) Type Operations Series MAGTF Operations Series Logistics Operations (FMFM 4-1) Marine Corps Planning Process Command Series

Marine Corps Reference Publications Reconnaissance Reports Guide Unit Training Management Guide Commander’s Tactical Handbook Combat Cargo Operations Handbook Doctrine References For Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare Discussion Guide For Marine Corps Values

Each military service is authorized to use other service’s doctrinal publications and to effect necessary modifications to align each with their own mission, roles, and functions. These publications identified as dualdesignated or multi-service publications, contain TTP that two or more services use. Every publication must be approved by and bear the designation of each participating military service. Publications approved by the Marine Corps are designated as MCWPs or MCRPs. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Types of Publications, Continued

Air, Land, Sea Application (ALSA) Publications

The ALSA center is chartered by the four service’s doctrine commands and tasked to rapidly develop publications that fill interoperability voids between services, joint forces, and staffs. These publications take on the form of multi-service TTP (MTTP) and address operational details often not included in our joint publications. Upon approval, ALSA publication are given an MCWP or MCRP designator and placed into the Marine Corps’ publication hierarchy.

Naval Doctrine Publications

These publications provide the fundamental concepts that govern the employment of Naval forces at all levels. They form the seamless fusion of Navy and Marine Corps doctrine, and form the naval characteristic of joint operations.

Joint Publications

These publications are developed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff and are promulgated as a distinct family of publications. Joint publications (JP) and Joint TTPs (JTTP) provide guidelines for the coordinated employment of forces from two or more military departments conducting joint operations. Listed in the table below are some examples of joint publications and joint TTP:

JP 3-02 JP 3-02.1 JP 3-07.5 JP 3-09.3 JP 4-02.1 JP 4-06

Joint Munitions Effectiveness Manuals (JMEM)

Joint Publications/Joint TTPs Joint Doctrine for Amphibious Operations Joint Doctrine for Landing Force Operations JTTP for Noncombatant Evacuation Operations (NEO) JTTP for Close Air Support (CAS) Public Affairs in Joint Operations JTTP for Shipboard Helicopter Operations

JMEMs provide in-depth descriptions of specific weapon system characteristics and effectiveness. JMEMs are reference documents detailing friendly weapon system capabilities and limitations, and are primarily used for weaponeering. JMEMs are designated as MCRPs but are not posted in the doctrine hierarchy. Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Types of Publications, Continued

Technical Publications

Official documents used by the Marine Corps that support material and equipment are called Technical publications.

Approved Allied Publications

Approved allied publications contain doctrine and TTP that the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) member nations have subscribed. When approved by the United States, these publications are the senior doctrinal guide for forces conducting NATO operations.

“Other” Service Publications

The Army, Navy, and Air Force have produced a large number of publications detailing TTPs for the many aspects of warfighting. Though not Marine Corps doctrine, these publications provide a wealth of information, and can be referenced to supplement Marine Corps TTP.

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Electronic Distribution Of Publications

Purpose

To provide information on the electronic distribution of doctrinal publications. The Doctrine Division has developed an internet website to supplement and enhance the Marine Corps Publications Distribution System (MCPDS). The website provides electronic copies of current and draft doctrinal publications. Paper copies of doctrinal publications will still be available for ordering and distribution.

USMC Internet Website

The Marine Corps has developed an official website that lists unclassified publications, orders, directives, and technical publications. You can access this website at (http://www.usmc.mil) This website is open to internet users, however the technical publication site is restricted to military personnel only.

Doctrine Division Internet Website

The Doctrine Division has developed a NIPRNET (Non-secure Internet Protocol Routed Network) and SIPRNET (Secure Internet Protocol Routed Network) for hosting both unclassified and classified doctrinal publications. They are: • (https://www.doctrine.usmc.mil) NIPRNET unclassified publications • (http://www.doctrine.mccdc.usmc.smil.mil) SIPRNET classified publications

Other Websites

Listed below are some joint and other service websites that can be used to access publications: • • • • •

MCI Course 8101

Joint Publication (http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine) Multi-Service Publications (http://www.dtic.mil/alsa) Air Force Publications (http://www.doctrine.af.mil/atdls/htm) Army Publications (http://www.adtdl.army.mil) Navy Publications (http://www.nwdc.navy.smil.mil)

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Requisitioning

Introduction

Doctrinal publications facilitate mission accomplishment; therefore, commanders must take a personal interest in publications ordering and maintenance. All Marine Corps units shall maintain doctrinal publications appropriate to the mission of the organization.

Marine Corps Publication Distribution System

The Marine Corps Publication Distribution System (MCPDS) is an on-line interactive system that facilitates continuing distribution of changes and revisions for basic publications held by a command or activity that has been assigned as Individual Activity Code (IAC). It also provides the capability to order publications if stocked at Marine Corps Logistics Base (MCLB), Albany GA, display PCN information, create backorders, and maintain internal distribution locations.

Publication Listing (PL)

The publication listing is an electronic display in the Marine Corps Publication Distribution System (MCPDS). MCPDS lists every publication that is to be distributed to a unit automatically. Traditionally MCPDS users reside in the Adjutant, S-1, or administrative section of a unit.

Establishing Publication Requirements

Every unit that receives publications has an Individual Activity Code (IAC) assigned. Commanders must determine the publications requirements for their individual units since every unit is unique. This determination is derived for a variety factors such as • Mission • Geographic location • Experience of the members of the unit Publication requirements should be realistic and based on mission-essential criteria.

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Maintenance Maintaining a PL

Supervision is the most important action taken in maintaining and revising a PL and ordering publications. PL managers should aggressively review and follow-up on the status of all publication requests, as well as closely tracking unit requirements for additional or replacement publications.

Requisitioning Publications

Most Marine Corps publications are stocked at the Marine Corps Logistics Base (MCLB), Albany GA, and can be ordered electronically by publication control number (PCN) through MCPDS.

Requesting Non-stocked Publications

Publications not stocked in MCPDS will be ordered by submitting a written request in standard naval format to the Commandant of the Marine Corps CMC (ARD) Administration and Resources Management Division and include the following information: • • • • • • • • • • •

Classified Marine Corps Publications

Marine Corps activities with a requirement for classified Marine Corps publications will requisition by PCN through MCPDS. Services outside the Marine Corps will submit a written request to CMC (ARDE) Publishing and Logistics Systems Management Section in standard Naval format to include: • • • • • •

MCI Course 8101

Complete identification of the publication Title Stock number (if known) The source document (in which identified) Equipment item designator number (if applicable) Source of supply (if known) Justification for publication Point of contact Telephone/FAX number and E-mail address Individual Activity Code (IAC) State if requisition is a one-time issue or continuing distribution

Statement attesting that classified storage capabilities exist Publication short title and subject (if known) Number of copies required Justification Point of contact (including name and telephone number) Complete military mailing address

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Directives Control Point (DCP)

Purpose

The directives control point evaluates the system’s operations within the individual organization on a continuing basis, and analyzes directives, making recommendations for improvement when appropriate.

Function

The DCP functions under the guidelines set forth in MCO P5215.1 Marine Corps Publications. Under consolidated administration, it publishes all required publications at the organizational level. Subordinate units will not maintain a separate DCP. The following functions fall under the responsibility of the DCP: • Controlling the issuance of command-issued publications • Coordinating the organization’s requirements for publications • Determining and effecting internal distribution of authorized inventories of publications and their maintenance • Organizing and maintaining the DCP • Maintaining, storing, accounting for, and controlling the organization’s classified material • Conducting daily operation of the CMCC (Classified Materials Control Center)

Distribution of Authorized Publication Inventories

Distribution of authorized publications inventories is based strictly upon a “need to know.” Commanders, officers in charge, or department heads should strictly adhere to the “need to know” criterion. A “yes” answer to one or more of the following questions would indicate a “need to know”: • • • • • •

Is the publication applicable to the specific mission of the user? Is the publication applicable to the user’s administrative functions? Is the publication applicable to the unit’s organic equipment, or maintenance functions? Is the publication applicable to the user’s support functions designated, or inherent to the user? Is the dissemination of the publication for command information of action? If the publication is desired for reference purposes, how frequently will it be used? Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Directives Control Point (DCP), Continued

Distribution Statements

To facilitate information security, dissemination of Marine Corps publications was formally restricted only by designating a publication either “controlled” or “non-controlled.” DoD 5200.1R states, “certain information that would be designated unclassified may require classification when combined or associated with other unclassified information.” Sponsors shall identify the degree of restriction of distribution for each of their non-technical and technical publications based on distribution statements. The table below lists the seven distribution statements: Designator A B C D E F X

Command Correspondence File

MCI Course 8101

Distribution Statement Approved for public release, distribution unlimited Authorized to U.S. Government agencies only Authorized to U.S. Government agencies and their contractors Authorized to DoD and DoD contractors only Authorized to DoD components only Further dissemination only as directed by DoD or higher authority Authorized to U.S. Government agencies and private individuals or enterprises eligible to obtain export-controlled technical data in accordance with OPNAVINST 5510.161

The DCP will establish and maintain the command’s official correspondence file, per SECNAVINST 5210.11 and MCO 5210.11. Staff-sections may be authorized to hold copies of command correspondence that they originate and sign “by direction,” file the official file copy within the DCP.

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3

Lesson 3 Exercise

Estimated Study Time

10 minutes

Directions

Complete items 1 through 6 by performing the action required. Check your answers against those listed at the end of this lesson.

Item 1

Which publications contain general reference and historical material? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Which internet website lists unclassified publications, orders, directives and technical publications? a. b. c. d.

Item 3

www.doctrine.usmc.mil www.dtic.mil/doctrine www.usmc.mil www.mbw.usmc.mil

What is a capability of the Marine Corps Publication Distribution System? a. b. c. d.

Item 4

MCDP MCWP MTTP MCRP

Assign individual activity codes Maintain internal distribution locations Create publication control numbers Inventory stock at the Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany

Which is one of the factors for determining publication requirements? a. b. c. d.

Experience of the members of the unit Type of organic equipment possessed by the unit Size of the unit Command structure Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3 Exercise

Lesson 3 Exercise, Continued

Item 5

Which is a function of the directives control point? a. b. c. d.

Item 6

Ensure compliance to all orders and directives Establish section directives control points Control the issuance of command-issued publications Establish individual activity codes

Distribution Statement “C” authorizes dissemination of Marine Corps publications to ___________________. a. b. c. d.

DoD components only U.S. Government agencies and their contractors DoD and DoD contractors only U.S. Government agencies only Continued on next page

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Study Unit 7, Lesson 3 Exercise

Lesson 3 Exercise, Continued

Answers

The table below provides the answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6

MCI Course 8101

Answer d c b a c b

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Reference Page 7-58 7-61 7-62 7-62 7-64 7-65

Study Unit 7, Lesson 3 Exercise

LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATION REVIEW LESSON EXAMINATION Review Lesson

Introduction

The purpose of the review lesson examination is to prepare you for the final examination. We recommend that you try to complete your review lesson examination without referring to the text, but for those items (questions) you are unsure of, restudy the text. When you finish your review lesson and are satisfied with your responses, check your responses against the answers provided at the end of this review lesson examination.

Directions

Select the ONE answer that BEST completes the statement or that answers the item. Each question will be in the form of multiple choice, so circle your response.

Item 1

Which of the following lists the four indicators of leadership? a. b. c. d.

Item 2

Proficiency, morale, esprit de corps, discipline Dedicated, competent, responsible, knowledgeable Competent, discipline, esprit de corps, knowledgeable Proficiency, morale, leadership, decisiveness

Esprit de corps is best described as a. b. c. d.

guidelines for leadership principles. a realistic approach to leadership. the projection of the leader’s personality. enthusiasm and loyalty to the unit. Continued on next page

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R-1

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Items 3 Through 7

Item 8

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the definition from column 2 that best describes the leadership trait in column 1. The answers in column 2 may not be used more than once. Column 1

Column 2

Leadership Trait

Definition

___ 3. ___ 4. ___ 5. ___ 6. ___ 7.

a. b. c. d. e.

Action in the absence of orders Faithfulness to country Favorable impressions Ability to reach sound decisions Avoiding to provide for your own comfort at the expense of others

Keeping your personnel informed is which leadership principle? a. b. c. d.

Item 9

Initiative Loyalty Bearing Judgment Unselfishness

Caring for others Communication Developing subordinates Confirmation

Knowing your Marines and looking out for their welfare is which leadership principle? a. b. c. d.

Caring for others Teamwork Knowing capabilities Self-improvement Continued on next page

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R-2

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 10

Leadership style can be defined as the leader’s _________ pattern as _________ by the Marines who the leader is attempting to influence, guide, or direct. a. b. c. d.

Item 11

The leader defines limits and permits subordinates to make decisions can be described as which leadership style? a. b. c. d.

Item 12

Democratic Delegating Telling Autocratic

A military professional must have which three characteristics? a. b. c. d.

Item 13

physical; determined behavioral; determined perception; acknowledged behavioral; perceived

Competent, responsible, and dedicated Expertise, careerism, and hard charging Careerism, occupationalist, and enforcer Expertise, ethics, and thoughtful

Readiness and the individual’s ability to perform in combat is affected negatively by a. b. c. d.

careerism and professionalism. professionalism and occupationalism. selfishness and individualism. careerism and occupationalism. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-3

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 14

Which documents contain Military Code of Ethics? a. b. c. d.

Item 15

SNCOs have the responsibility for molding subordinates into Marines. Which of the following is a method that SNCOs use to mold their subordinate Marines? a. b. c. d.

Item 16

Promise of promotion Clear instructions Displaying anger Showing favoritism

SNCOs must conduct day-to-day operations in an environment that a. b. c. d.

Item 17

Civil Disorders, Combat Training, Conduct or Inquiry Profession of Arms, Philosophy of Leadership, Command Management UCMJ, Code of Conduct, Oath of Office DD214, FM 20-01, Military Leadership

encourages subordinates to seek advice and counsel. provides fair and impartial treatment. accepts subordinates’ suggestions for improved performance. all of the above.

Which of the following describes the relationship between a SNCO and senior officer? a. b. c. d.

Supporting and trusting Selfish and withholding Informal and familiar Constructive and assuming Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-4

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 18

Which reference contains guidelines and standards for assignment of conduct and proficiency marks? a. b. c. d.

Item 19

Which of the following are occasions for submitting proficiency and conduct marks? a. b. c. d.

Item 20

TAD 60 days or more and promotion Enlistment and discharge Completion of service school and discharge Company NJP and reduction

What are the effective dates when assigning semiannual proficiency and conduct marks for regular Marines? a. b. c. d.

Item 21

MCO P1070.12 Individual Records Administration Manual (IRAM) MCO P1080.35 Personnel Reporting Instruction Manual (PRIM) MCO 1610.11 Performance Evaluations, Appeals Manual (PEAM) MCO P1400.29 Marine Corps Promotion Manual (MARCORPROMAN)

1 January and 1 December 1 July and 1 December 1 October and 1 April 31 January and 31 July

What is the regular and reserve code for transfer? a. b. c. d.

TR TRAN TF TD Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-5

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Items 22 Through 25

Item 26

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the filing instruction from column 2 that best matches the occasion in column 1. The answers in column 2 may not be used more than once. Column 1

Column 2

Occasion

Filing Instruction

___ 22. If the effective date for transfer coincides with the requirement to report semiannual marks ___ 23. If the Marine attends annual training within 90 days of the effective date for reporting annual marks ___ 24. If the Marine receives a mark for any other occasion within 90 days of the effective date for reporting annual marks ___ 25. If the effective date for annual marks coincides with any reporting occasion other than promotion or transfer

a. Report annual marks of Not Applicable b. Transfer marks take precedence c. Report annual marks d. Annual marks take precedence

Which of the following qualities are considered when recommending proficiency marks? a. b. c. d.

Item 27

Physical fitness and leadership Timeliness and leadership Trustworthiness and participation Bearing and mission accomplishment

Which of the following qualities are considered when recommending conduct marks? a. b. c. d.

Cooperation and personal appearance Adaptability and know how Influence on others and interest Individual character and leadership Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-6

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 28

Scenario: Lance Corporal White handles routine matters acceptably, but in your opinion, he has not performed to the best of his abilities. Lance Corporal White gets the job done; however, both you and the squad leader have often found it necessary to supervise him closely when he is assigned a task, which is not routine. You have encouraged Lance Corporal White to take correspondence courses, but to date he has not enrolled himself. Several times during the past 5 months, you have been obliged to counsel him for leaving on liberty when his squad was not squared away. Lance Corporal White has received one valid letter of indebtedness from a local merchant during this marking period. He keeps himself in good physical condition. Of your three squad leaders, Lance Corporal White is the least effective. Considering this information, which corresponding adjective ratings for proficiency and conduct marks are appropriate? a. b. c. d.

Unsatisfactory and unsatisfactory Below average and below average Below average and average Average and unsatisfactory Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-7

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 29

Scenario: Corporal Black is a real take-charge individual. He readily assumes responsibility and uses his authority wisely. He requires only a general outline of what is to be accomplished, then goes out, and completes the assigned task in an expeditious, efficient manner. You have relied heavily on Corporal Black’s ability to instruct in general military subjects. Since making corporal, he has taken two MCI courses, The Marine NCO and The Marine Rifle Platoon. Corporal Black completed both of these courses with high final grades. His squad usually represents the best appearance and is the best in the field at inspections and in drill. The members in his squad never create disciplinary problems. Corporal Black keeps himself at the peak of physical condition and ensures that his squad does likewise. His personal appearance and habits are above reproach. Considering this information, which corresponding adjective ratings for proficiency and conduct marks are appropriate? a. b. c. d.

Item 30

Families who are prepared and equipped with the skills and tools to successfully meet the challenges of the military lifestyle is the definition of a. b. c. d.

Item 31

Excellent and average Excellent and outstanding Average and average Outstanding and outstanding

family preparedness. family readiness. Marine Corps values. key family planning.

Where should a Marine go to obtain information about financial planning? a. b. c. d.

The commanding officer The Marines platoon sergeant Several credit unions and banks Any financial institution Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-8

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 32

Which of the following is a means of contacting the Marine in an emergency while they are away on deployment? a. b. c. d.

Item 33

Who is responsible for a family care plan? a. b. c. d.

Item 34

Legal Sensible Corrective Mandatory

What is the key emotional factor when planning for a deployment? a. b. c. d.

Item 36

Individual Marine Platoon sergeant Platoon commander Company commander

What type of planning should a Marine do before a deployment? a. b. c. d.

Item 35

E-mail Letter mail MARS Local Red Cross chapter

Money problems Communication Shock Loneliness

What is an example of how a pre-school child may be affected by a parent’s absence due to a deployment? a. b. c. d.

Misdirected anger Worry about family and finances Eating difficulties Low self-esteem Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-9

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 37

Letters, e-mail, calling cards, MARS calls, and morale calls are all examples of ________________ during a deployment. a. b. c. d.

Item 38

What percentage does the government pay for a Marine who volunteers for the dental coverage? a. b. c. d.

Item 39

communication being aware staying up to date ways of beating boredom

90 80 75 60

The Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, American Red Cross, and the Chaplain Corps are just three examples of a. b. c. d.

services provided by Marine Corps community services. services within the key volunteer network. key family organizations. personal services. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-10

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 40

Who is authorized to approve emergency leave for more than 60 days? a. b. c. d.

Item 41

Which of the following documents are required for family members and Marines if traveling and taking leave overseas? a. b. c. d.

Item 42

only with written permission from the commanding officer. for the entire duration of the Marine’s deployment. if they pay 25 percent of the all amenities. only if the Marine is deployed for less than 90 days.

What are some of the changes to anticipate when returning home from deployment? a. b. c. d.

Item 44

Original orders ID card Birth certificate Passport

When a Marine is deployed, his family can remain in base housing a. b. c. d.

Item 43

The officer in charge Commandant of the Marine Corps Secretary of the Navy Platoon commander

Less family time Over excitement Very little changes in routine Financial hardship

Which of the following is one of the 10 commandments of a good homecoming? a. Thou shalt spend the extra deployment money on your family. b. Thou shalt relax and let the spouse take care of all after deployment expenses. c. Thou shalt confess to a chaplain and not to a spouse. d. Thou shalt confess to a spouse and not to a chaplain. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-11

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 45

What are some helpful Web links for personal and family readiness and deployment preparedness? a. Yahoo and Excite b. Google and Ask Jeeves c. United States Department of State and The United States Department of Justice d. United Servicemen Organizations and The United States Marine Corps

Item 46

What does debt-to-income ratio measure? a. b. c. d.

Items 47 Through 49

Current expenditures against your net income Current obligations against your current income Projected expenses against your expected income Variable expenses against your gross income

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter to determine the debt-toincome ratio in column 2 in the correct sequence in column 1. The answers in column 2 may be used only once. Column 1

Column 2

Correct Sequence

Debt-to-Income Ratio

___47. ___48. ___49.

a. Add the total minimum monthly payments on rent/mortgage, car, installment loans, and credit cards. b. Multiply gross income by .37. c. Compare net income with variable expenses. d. Find the difference between total monthly payments and 37 percent of gross income. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-12

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Items 50 Through 52

Items 53 Through 55

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the budget term in column 2 that best fits the sample in column 1. The answers in column 2 may be used only once. Column 1

Column 2

Sample

Budget Term

___50. Mortgage ___51. Salary minus taxes and social security ___52. Food

a. b. c. d.

Net income Fixed expenses Variable expenses Debt-to-income ratio

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the type of financial goal in column 2 that best matches the example in column 1. The answers in column 2 may be used only once. Column 1

Column 2

Example

Financial Goal

___53. Establish credit, invest, and insure ___54. Buy new car, pay for college, afford retirement ___55. Get a job, create a budget, save money

a. b. c. d.

Short-term Mid-term Long-term Temporary

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-13

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 56 Through 58

Item 59

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the credit term in column 2 that is defined in column 1. You may use the answers in column 2 only once. Column 1

Column 2

Definition

Credit Term

___ 56. Original loan amount ___ 57. Percentage of the original loan amount ___ 58. A charge for a financial loan

a. Finance charge b. Interest c. Principle

Credit lets you _______ now and _______ later and depends on your net worth, income, and a. b. c. d.

Item 60

Which of the following is not a disadvantage to having bad credit? a. b. c. d.

Item 61

buy; pay; principle. save; pay; APR. buy; pay; credit rating. pay; save; credit line.

High interest rates Competitive loan rates Denied credit Bad credit report

The best guideline for lowering monthly payments or reducing the number of payments is to a. b. c. d.

shop around for the best bargain. put as much down as you can afford. set strict credit limits for yourself. reduce your debt to by paying bills off ahead of time. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-14

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 62

What basic items must you have when you open a savings account? a. b. c. d.

Item 63

The traditional IRA requires you to have an adjusted gross income that does not exceed _________ if you are single or _________ combined adjusted gross income for married couples. a. b. c. d.

Item 64

$24,000; $50,000 $33,000; $53,000 $50,000; $110,000 $50,000; $160,000

Withdrawals from ___________ IRAs made prior to age 59½ are subject to income tax plus a 10-percent penalty. a. b. c. d.

Item 65

Source of income, rate of savings, and social security number Social security number, interest rate, and minimum deposit Services you want, interest rate you expect, and social security number Name, address, social security number, and minimum deposit

traditional roth SEP roth and traditional

Service group life insurance provides ________ life insurance to all active duty personnel and ________ build cash value. a. b. c. d.

whole; does not whole; does term; does not term; does Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-15

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Items 66 Through 68

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the type of insurance from column 2 that is defined in column 1. You may use the answers in column 2 only once. Column 1

Column 2

Definition

Type of Insurance

___ 66. Five-year term insurance policy available upon separation. ___ 67. Insurance that pays a lump sum or income to the policyholder that lives to a certain age or after a certain amount is paid. ___ 68. Insurance where the amount of insurance remains the same over each renewal period, but the cost increases at the start of each renewal.

a. b. c. d.

VGLI Level term Adjustment Endowment

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-16

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 69

When reviewing the criteria for choosing a life insurance policy, what are three insurance rights that you should check before choosing a company policy? a. The company lets you correct mistaken personal information before they turn you down, you can dispute their cancellation of insurance, and you must pay the premium for the time the policy is in force even if you cancel the policy. b. The company is licensed in the state, you can cancel a policy any time, and you can ask how personal information will be used and can correct mistaken information. c. The company is an A-rated company, is licensed in the state, and you read the policy before buying the insurance. d. The company gives you guidelines about your responsibilities, you can cancel the policy any time, and you can correct any information that resulted in you being turned down for insurance.

Items 70 and 71

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the approach to determine the amount of insurance you need in column 2 with the description that best matches it in column 1. You may use the answers in column 2 only once. Column 1

Column 2

Description

Approach

___70. Multiplies current earnings by a factor of 5 times 12 months and adds the amount of unpaid home mortgage, plus $50,000 for each child living at home to determine amount of insurance needed ___71. Calculates future financial expenses of your family (car, house, and education) to determine amount of insurance needed

a. b. c. d.

Multiple earnings Needs Common sense Multiple needs

Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-17

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 72

According to recent federal government statistics, over _____ percent of men and women of all races are overweight or obese. a. b. c. d.

Item 73

From the commander’s perspective, which of the following is not a benefit of physical fitness? a. b. c. d.

Item 74

30 32 34 36

Less sick time Increased combat readiness More motivated marines Personal satisfaction

According to Marine Corps Order 6100.12, every Marine must be a. between the ages of 18 and 45 with a good positive outlook and be physically fit. b. physically fit, regardless of age, grade, or duty assignment. c. physically fit with the exception of assignment to commands in high elevations. d. physically fit between the ages of 17 and 45, no restrictions on grade or duty assignment.

Item 75

Define physical fitness. a. A state of good physical health. A physically fit body that is functioning properly, and beyond that, functioning well. b. A state of reasonably good health. A physically fit body that is functioning well. c. A well conditioned Marine whose body can adapt for variations in climate and terrain. d. A Marine who has a combination of muscular endurance, strength, and flexibility. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-18

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 76

What is the definition of flexibility? a. A measure of the percentage of a person’s body mass that is lean tissue and not body fat b. The ability to move a body part through a complete range of motion with no pain c. The ability to move a body part with little or no pain involved d. The ability to move a body part through a complete range of motion

Item 77

What Marine Corps order states the objective, purpose, and conditioning principles of the Marine Corps physical fitness program? a. b. c. d.

Item 78

MCO P5600.31G MCO P1610.7E MCO P1040.31H MCO P6100.12

Which one of the following goals is a part of the Marine Corps Physical Conditioning Program? a. Develop Marines who are capable of performing their duties anywhere. b. Develop Marines who are physically capable of performing their duties anywhere. c. Contribute to the health and well being of every Marine through regular exercise and health education. d. Contribute to the health of every Marine through regular exercise.

Item 79

Which of the following is not a basic nutrient? a. b. c. d.

Protein and carbohydrates Fat and vitamins Minerals and water Fiber and sugar Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-19

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 80

Which nutrient serves primarily in a structure role? a. b. c. d.

Item 81

Which nutrient is used primarily as an energy source? a. b. c. d.

Item 82

Protein Carbohydrates Fat Vitamins

Which nutrient, when found in excess, is converted to fat? a. b. c. d.

Item 84

Protein Carbohydrates Fat Vitamins

Which nutrient is used primarily as a source of energy for the body? a. b. c. d.

Item 83

Protein Carbohydrates Fat Vitamins

Protein Carbohydrates Fiber Minerals

According to the food guide pyramid, how many servings from the milk, yogurt, and cheese group should you receive each day? a. b. c. d.

One to two Two to three Three to four Four to five Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-20

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 85

What is the description for reference, MCO P5000.12D? a. b. c. d.

Item 86

What does MCO P1900.16F relate to? a. b. c. d.

Item 87

c. d.

Performance Evaluation System Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test and Body Composition Program Manual Individual Records Administration Manual Pregnancy and Parenthood

What is the recommended caloric intake for normal adults? a. b. c. d.

Item 89

Pregnancy and Parenthood Personnel Reporting Instructions Manual Individual Records Administration Manual Separation and Retirement Manual

What is the description for reference, MCO P1070.12K? a. b.

Item 88

Pregnancy and Parenthood Personnel Reporting Instructions Manual Individual Records Administration Manual Separation and Retirement Manual

1,000 1,100 1,200 12,000

In order to produce a 1- to 2-pound loss per week, you must reduce your daily caloric intake by how many calories? a. b. c. d.

100 to 200 250 to 750 500 to 1,000 1,000 to 2,000 Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-21

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 90

What is congestive heart failure a sign of? a. b. c. d.

Item 91

Workout too heavy Starvation diet or fasting Workout too light Excessive upper body workout

What are the four components of a weight loss program? a. Moderate caloric reduction, aerobic exercise, strength training, and a lowfat diet b. Major caloric reduction, aerobic exercise, strength training, and a fat-free diet c. Caloric reduction, anaerobic exercise, isometric exercise, and a low-fat diet d. Moderate caloric reduction, anaerobic exercise, strength training, and a low-fat diet

Item 92

What is the primary determinant of your resting metabolic rate? a. b. c. d.

Item 93

Total body fat Total caloric intake Body weight Total lean body mass

What is the purpose of the Fitness Report Audit Program (FRAP)? a. Provides a process for Marines to ensure the accuracy and completeness of performance records b. Gives Marines an opportunity to argue disagreements c. Provides insight on the Marine Corps Total Force System (MCTFS) d. Places performance records in the hands of the Reporting Senior (RS) Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-22

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 94

Which of the following are references that contain information on performance records? a. MCO P1070.12_Marine Corps Individual Records Administration Manual (IRAM) b. MCO P1610.7_Performance Evaluation System (PES) c. MCO P1080.40_Marine Corps Total Force System Personnel Reporting Instructions Manual (MCTFSPRIM) d. All of the above

Item 95

The purpose of the Master Brief Sheet (MBS) is to a. provide statistical data of a Marine’s proficiency and conduct. b. provide key personal data and a summary of a Marine’s performance evaluation record. c. provide a listing of a Marine’s fitness report from most recent to oldest. d. explain in detail all reviewing officer remarks.

Item 96

Which are two sections of the Master Brief Sheet? a. b. c. d.

Item 97

Header Data and Fitness Report Listing Top and Bottom Section Header Data and Reviewing Officer Remarks Correcting Authority and Master Brief Sheet Listing

Name, social security number, and rank description on the Master Brief Sheet are corrected via a. b. c. d.

CMC (MMPR). The Unit Diary. CMC (MA). Active CMC (MMOA). Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-23

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Items 98 Through 102

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the description from column 2 that best describes the listing in column 1. The answers in column 2 may not be used more than once. Column 1

Column 2

Listing

Description

___ 98. ___ 99. ___ 100. ___ 101. ___ 102.

Item 103

#[email protected] Promotion Organization/School OCC REL [email protected]

a. Number of fitness reports written by RS on Marines of same grade as MRO as of time of processing report b. RS promotion recommendation c. Command or unit to which the Marine was assigned for duty d. Occasion for submitting report e. Relative value of the MRO fitness report based on the RS’s rating history for Marines of the same grade as the MRO

The OMPF provides a(n) ______ of the Marine’s ______ from entrance into the Marine Corps until the present. a. b. c. d.

analysis; statistics history; career snapshot; data report; production Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-24

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Items 104 Through 108

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the description from column 2 that best describes the folder in column 1. The answers in column 2 may not be used more than once. Column 1

Column 2

Folder

Description

___ 104. ___ 105. ___ 106. ___ 107. ___ 108.

Item 109

Service a. Documents on civilian and Commendatory/Derogatory military education, personal awards, and other material Health/Dental pertinent to selection, assignment, Performance and retention decisions Field b. Unless broken service, no records are held c. Contract information, discharge documents, reserve documents, orders to active duty, and general administrative and service documents to compute service time for benefits program or retirement d. Fitness reports and standard addendum pages for sergeants and above e. Contains documents from previous OQR/SRBs if a Marine has periods of broken service

Marines should request a copy of their OMPF for review and correction under which circumstance? a. At least once every 2 years b. At least 12 months prior to the convening board c. At least 12 months prior to applying for programs such as the Warrant Officer and Marine Corps Enlisted Commissioning Education Program d. All of the above Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-25

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 110

The Performance Evaluation Section (PES) of the Personnel Management Support Branch (MMSB) provides essential data to _________ CMC’s personnel management responsibilities. a. b. c. d.

Item 111

Policy and Research Unit (MMSB-31) is responsible for fitness report policy, research, correction, and accountability for all a. b. c. d.

Item 112

officers. active duty personnel. reserve Marines. enlisted Marines.

Which of the following personnel are authorized to endorse fitness reports that require administrative corrections? a. b. c. d. e.

Item 113

support enhance influence maximize

Reporting senior (RS) Administrative officer (AO) Reviewing officer (RO) a and b a and c

To warrant a correction of a date gap, the date gap must be how many days delinquent? a. b. c. d.

30 or more 30 or less 31 or longer 31 or less Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-26

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 114

Which of the following are components of the basic individual record (BIR)? a. b. c. d.

Item 115

Which of the following are components of the Basic Training Record (BTR)? a. b. c. d.

Item 116

PFT, service schools code/year, and dependent certification code BST/EST, security clearance, citizenship, and religion T/O number/line number, date of birth, and security investigation/type Current pistol qualification, local schools, and PFT

What are the occasions for conducting an audit of the BIR and BTR? a. b. c. d.

Item 117

Foreign language, record status, and date of birth Name, SSN, EAS, and record status SSN, marital status, and current rifle qualification Army radio code, service spouse’s SSN, and name

A Marine retires An annual inspection A Marine joins a unit and triennially A Marine reenlists

To report additions, deletions, and change missing or erroneous data on the BIR or BTR, ______________ entries are made. a. b. c. d.

unit diary historical data administrative central master file Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-27

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 118

Which type of information is contained in a file? a. b. c. d.

Item 119

What is the Kraft folder mainly used for? a. b. c. d.

Item 120

Mailing correspondence Displaying correspondence Filing correspondence Routing correspondence

How many major subject groups are in the Navy’s SSIC system? a. b. c. d.

Item 121

Written correspondence Electronic correspondence Verbal correspondence Televised correspondence

10 12 13 20

What document is used to revise the department of the Navy SSICs and department of the Navy file maintenance procedures? a. b. c. d.

SECNAVINST 5210.11D SECNAVINST 5212.5 SECNAVINST 5215.1 SECNAVINST 5216.5 Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-28

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Items 122 Through 126

Item 127

Matching: In the space provided, place the letter of the SSIC designator from column 2 that best describes the general category in column 1. The answers in column 2 may not be used more than once. Column 1

Column 2

General Category

SSIC Designator

___ 122. ___ 123. ___ 124. ___ 125. ___ 126.

a. b. c. d. e.

4000 to 4999 6000 to 6999 2000 to 2999 12000 to 12999 8000 to 8999

Which task is accomplished through directives? a. b. c. d.

Item 128

Telecommunications Logistics Medicine and Dentistry Ordnance Material Civilian Personnel

Modifies authority and changes responsibility Regulates another directive Directs courses of action or conduct Conducts training

Which directive is used to publish material that is either primarily informative or otherwise directive in nature? a. b. c. d.

Orders Bulletins Letters Messages Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-29

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 129

Which type of order does the letter “P” preceding the SSIC identify? a. b. c. d.

Item 130

What are communications used to transmit written ideas and messages called? a. b. c. d.

Item 131

Recording Photo analysis Correspondence Video

What publication is used to prescribe uniform standards for management and preparation of correspondence? a. b. c. d.

Item 132

Letter ALMAR 5-paragraph Manual

SECNAVINST 5216.5 MCO 5215 SECNAVINST 5210.11 MCO 5600.48

Use automated office equipment to increase efficiency, is an example of guidelines for a. b. c. d.

using office equipment. writing correspondence. sending messages. improving employer/employee relations. Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-30

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 133

Which part of a paragraph restates the main idea of the paragraph using different words? a. b. c. d.

Item 134

Which line of a standard letter consists of a sentence fragment that tells readers what the letter is about? a. b. c. d.

Item 135

Enclosure Reference Subject Text

The distribution block of a multiple-address letter is used when you have a. b. c. d.

Item 136

Supporting details Topic sentence Subject sentence Closing sentence

more than four addressees. addressees from separate commands. less than four addressees. a group title of unknown distribution.

Which memorandum format is used when direct liaison with individuals outside the command is authorized? a. b. c. d.

Plain-paper From-To Letterhead Memorandum For Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-31

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 137

What is a stand-alone document that presents the essential elements of a subject? a. b. c. d.

Item 138

Which type of publication contains a narrower focus detailing tactics, techniques, and procedures used in the prosecution of war and other assigned tasks? a. b. c. d.

Item 139

MCWP MCDP JMEM MCRP

Which Internet Web site lists multi-service publications? a. b. c. d.

Item 140

Business letter Discussion paper Standard letter Point paper

www.doctrine.usmc.mil www.dtic.mil/doctrine www.dtic.mil/alsa www.nwdc.navy.smil.mil

What online interactive system is used to request and distribute publications? a. b. c. d.

MCAIS MCPDS MCLB MCU Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-32

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 141

What information is required when requesting a publication? a. b. c. d.

Item 142

Managing and controlling the organization’s classified material is a function of the a. b. c. d.

Item 143

Price per copy Delivery date Source document Shipping preference

operations section. security manager. executive officer. directives control point.

What is the principle of critical thinking? a. The ability to combine observations, experiences, and theoretical solutions into a practical problem b. The ability to combine observations and experiences into a practical problem c. Defining the objective then revising it for clarity d. Dividing the objective into components then revising it for clarity

Item 144

Which of the following is not a principle of critical thinking? a. b. c. d.

Define the objective Divide the objective into components Gather data Clarity Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-33

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 145

What are inferences? a. Conclusions based on evidence, environmental factors, and/or experience if it is applicable to the objective b. Conclusions based on evidence and experience if it is applicable to the objective c. Conclusions based on evidence and environmental factors that are applicable to the objective d. Assumptions based on evidence and environmental factors that are applicable to the objective

Item 146

What are implications? a. An implied resolution b. An implication occurs when a claim or truth follows two or more premises, which are conclusions drawn from experience or application c. A claim drawn from conclusions d. A claim or conclusion that is drawn from an implied resolution, experience, or an application

Item 147

What are consequences? a. b. c. d.

Item 148

The ability to evaluate an objective or analyze a problem The outcome from evaluating an objective or a problem Results from an implication from certain circumstances Results from an action or condition

Which of the following is not a component of preparation in reference to critical thinking? a. b. c. d.

Reading Listening Discussing Reworking Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

R-34

Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Item 149

What is chunking? a. A questioning technique that will break each paragraph down to a single sentence b. The removal of unnecessary adverbs and conjunctions c. The removal of unnecessary adverbs only d. A questioning technique that will break the topic into smaller pieces

Item 150

Define writing purpose. a. b. c. d.

Item 151

The goal or what the document is supposed to accomplish To mind map a document The goal of the thesis alone The information the writer is trying to relay to the reader in the simpliest form

What is brevity? a. The effective use of conjunctions and adverbs within a sentence b. Removing entire sentences from a document just to make the paragraph shorter c. The minimum number of words to project the maximum idea or thought of the writer d. The minimum number of words used to simplify the sentence to an eighth grade reading level

MCI Course 8101

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Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Answers

The table below lists the answers to the review lesson examination items. If you have questions about these items, refer to the reference page of the course text. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Answer a d a b c d e b a d b a d c b d a a c d a b c a d a c b d b c

Reference 1-4 1-4 1-6 1-6 1-5 1-6 1-6 1-7 1-7 1-9 1-9 1-14 1-15 1-15 1-17 1-18 1-20 2-5 2-6 2-6 2-6 2-7 2-7 2-7 2-7 2-12 2-14 2-13, 2-15 2-13, 2-16 3-5 3-6 Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Answers, continued

Item Number 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

Answer d a a d c a d c b d b a c d b b a d b a c b c a c a b c b b d b

Reference 3-11 3-16 3-17 3-24 3-29 3-37 3-42 3-46 3-53 3-54 3-56 3-68 3-71 3-72 4-4 4-4 4-4 4-4 4-7 4-7 4-7 4-14 4-15 4-14 4-19 4-19 4-19 4-18 4-21 4-22 4-30 4-32 Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Answers, continued

Item Number 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96

Answer a c a d b b a c a d b a b d d d a b c a b a d c c c b a d a d b a

Reference 4-35 4-41 4-42 4-44 4-43 4-46 4-48 4-58 5-4 5-6 5-4 5-10 5-10 5-4 5-12 5-19 5-19 5-19 5-20 5-19 5-29 5-35 5-35 5-35 5-36 5-37 5-36 5-37 5-37 6-5 6-7 6-8 6-8 Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Answers, continued

Item Number 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129

Answer b a b c d e b c a b d e d a b e c b d c a a c c a c a b e d c b d

Reference 6-8 6-11 6-11 6-10 6-10 6-11 6-12 6-12 6-12 6-12 6-12 6-12 6-13 6-20 6-20 6-22 6-24 6-31 6-31 6-32 6-33 7-4 7-4 7-6 7-6 7-7 7-8 7-8 7-9 7-10 7-13 7-14 7-14 Continued on next page

MCI Course 8101

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Review Lesson Examination

Review Lesson, Continued

Answers, continued

Item Number 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151

MCI Course 8101

Answer c a b d c a c d a c b c d a d a b d d d a c

R-40

Reference 7-22 7-22 7-22 7-23 7-27 7-34 7-41 7-45 7-58 7-61 7-62 7-63 7-64 8-4 8-6 8-9 8-9 8-9 8-12 8-14 8-26 8-48

Review Lesson Examination

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