Jetstream Elem Tb

August 18, 2017 | Author: Jenny Jen | Category: English Language, Noun, Vocabulary, Adverb, Languages
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Short Description

Jetstream teacher´s book...

Description

elementary

elementary

beginner

Real language & memory training

Real language & memory training

Jeremy Harmer ∙ Jane Revell

Student’s Book

Student’s Book

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

Student’s Book

Real language & memory training

Everyday English videos

Everyday English videos

Student’s Book

Student’s Book

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

advanced

Everyday English videos JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

• Grammar to go

The right grammar at the right time plus a full grammar reference

• Emphasis on speaking

Real language & memory training

Student’s Book

Teacher’s Guide

Your opinion, your voice - right from the start of the lesson

Mary Tomalin

advanced

intermediate

Real language & memory training

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

upper intermediate upper intermediate

intermediate

• Personalisation

Everyday English videos

Student’s Book

Jeremy Harmer ∙ Jane Revell

Get you interested and communicating Helps you find the right words

Real language & memory training

Dialogue karaoke videos

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

elementary

• Motivating topics

• Focus on vocabulary

Student’s Book

Dialogue karaoke videos

with Jane Revell and Mary Tomalin

pre-intermediate pre-intermediate

beginner

Jane Revell ∙ Mary Tomalin

Student’s Book

Engaging activities to get you talking

• Thinking & Memory

Encourages thinking and memory training

• Cross culture

Maximise your social and cultural awareness

Comprehensive introduction and overview elementary

Jane Revell ∙ Mary Tomalin

Student’s Book

Amanda Maris

Student’s Book

Student’s Book

JETSTREAM is the brand new Helbling Languages 6-level course for adult learners. Its carefully balanced pace and challenge offer a learning experience that is fun and motivating and which prepares students to use their English effectively in work and life.

Ingrid Wisniewska



Extension activities



Culture notes



Ideas for mixed ability classes



Photocopiable games and tasks



Technique Banks

• Stories

Lively stories for extra reading practice

• Dialogue karaoke videos on • Cloud Book

• Pronunciation

• Cyber Homework

• Exam practice

• Dialogue karaoke videos • Testbuilder • Mp3 audios

• CLIL Projects

w w w.helbling-ezone.com

An exciting way to practise real language

• JETSTREAM Workbook



Guide for new teachers on

Revision and practice, progress checks and writing skills development

• PLUS - fully integrated digital components Lots of options for flexible blended learning

Teacher’s Guide

www.helblinglanguages.com

With Audio CDs 9783852729770_cvr.indd 1

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Ingrid Wisniewska

with Jane Revell and Mary Tomalin

elementary

Teacher’s Guide

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Contents Jetstream Elementary Student’s Book contents Introduction Letter to you, the teacher Jetstream Elementary components Jetstream approach – a summary Unit overview Unit notes Nice to meet you! Unit 1 Unit 2 Units 1&2 review Unit 3 Unit 4 Units 3&4 review Unit 5 Unit 6 Units 5&6 review Unit 7 Unit 8 Units 7&8 review Unit 9 Unit 10 Units 9&10 review Unit 11 Unit 12 Units 11&12 review Photocopiable games Photocopiable tasks Technique banks Using the video Using stories Using memory games 20 easy games Five fun techniques to use with a flagging class Extra questions and tasks for Movies & Music Working with mixed-ability classes Ensuring learner autonomy and using technology De-stress cartoons

4 7 8 8 12 23 27 39 52 55 70 84 86 99 111 114 127 140 143 156 168 171 183 197 201 217 225 226 227 229 231 232 233 233 235

Introduction

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CONTENTS



Jetstream Elementary Student’s Book VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

The alphabet Numbers Personal information Classroom language P The alphabet

The imperative

Following instructions

LESSON 1 I’m from Argentina.

Countries and nationalities P Sentence stress

be affirmative

Introducing yourself Exchanging phone numbers Introducing people

LESSON 2  Are they dancers?

Jobs P Word stress

be negative be questions and short answers

Reading: The world has talent

Talking about jobs and nationality

LESSON 3 Where’s our suitcase?

Common objects (1) P Plural noun endings /s/, /z/, /z/

this / that / these / those Possessive adjectives

Listening 1: Three airport conversations Listening 2: flight information

Talking about possessions Talking about flights and destinations

VOCABULARY PLUS

Common objects (2)

INTRODUCTION Nice to meet you page 6

UNIT 1 Who are you? page 8

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

UNIT 2 Family and home page 16

6

Colours

READING AND LISTENING

Nationalities

Asking about language Making requests FOCUS ON: can VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

LESSON 1 We have six children.

Family

Have: affirmative / negative / questions Possessive ’s

LESSON 2  There’s a painting on the wall.

Rooms and furniture P Schwa /ə/

There is / There are

LESSON 3 Is there a bank?

Places in town Prepositions of place P /ɒ/ Large numbers People

VOCABULARY PLUS EVERYDAY ENGLISH

6

SPEAKING AND WRITING

Physical appearance

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

Talking about your family

Reading: Unusual houses

Describing a plan of a home Writing a description of your home

Listening: population statistics

Talking about places and population Writing a description of a place

Personality

Asking for directions

REVIEW Units 1 & 2 page 24; Cross culture: Stereotypes

UNIT 3 Leisure time

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

LESSON 1 I love parties!

Music

Present simple: I / you / we / they Questions with who and what Object pronouns P // v /i/

Reading: Are you an introvert or an extrovert?

Talking about music likes and dislikes.

LESSON 2  I travel a lot.

Leisure activities

like / love / hate + noun / + -ing form Present simple Questions with why

Reading: dating website profiles

Writing a personal profile Talking about your interests

LESSON 3 We do the same things every weekend.

Days of the week

Questions with where, when, which

Listening 1: an interview about weekend activities Listening 2: an interview with a video producer

Talking about weekend activities

VOCABULARY PLUS

Musical instruments

Nouns from verbs

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Making suggestions

Agreeing and disagreeing

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

LESSON 1 She gets up very early.

Time (1) Daily routine (1) P Third person ‘s’: /s/, /z/, /z/

Present simple: third person affirmative, questions and short answers

Reading: The daily routine of a sound engineer

Comparing two people’s routines

LESSON 2  She sometimes sees very sad things.

Adjectives

Adverbs of frequency Questions with how

Reading: Tahira loves her job

Writing an email about a job

LESSON 3 She doesn’t feel good in the morning.

Daily routine (2) Time (2)

Present simple: third person negative

Listening: a conversation about early birds and night owls

Talking about daily routines

VOCABULARY PLUS

Transport FOCUS ON: have

page 26

UNIT 4 Monday to Friday page 34

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

6

Expressing interest

Personal information

P using intonation to express interest

REVIEW Units 4 & 5 page 42; Cross culture: Culture shock

4

Introduction

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UNIT 5 Amazing lives page 44

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

LESSON 1 He was born on a plane.

Personal qualities in / at with time expressions

was / were born be past simple

LESSON 2 There weren’t many events.

Ordinal numbers Sports (1)

There was / There were

LESSON 3 All sports for all people.

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

UNIT 6 How things began

6

LESSON 1 It started with a party.

Modifiers

Talking about the Olympic Games Deciding on a shortlist of famous athletes Writing a biography of an athlete

Sports (2) FOCUS ON: play, do, go

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

Dates Animals (1)

Past simple regular affirmative P Past simple –ed endings /t/, /d/, /Id/ Past simple irregular affirmative

LESSON 2 She didn’t get up.

Technology (1)

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

Talking about the year you were born and your Chinese Zodiac sign

Past simple negative last, ago

Reading: The First Lady of Civil Rights – Rosa Parks

Writing a story using appropriate connectors: and, but, because, so Retelling a famous story

Past simple questions

Reading: an article about Steve Jobs Listening: a conversation about Steve Jobs

Writing a paragraph about a famous person Talking about technology use

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

Animals (2) Technology (2) FOCUS ON: get

VOCABULARY PLUS EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Reading: Two great Olympians – 100 years apart

Asking for and giving opinions

page 52

LESSON 3 Who did he call?

Talking about when and where you were born Talking about people’s personal qualities

Listening 1 & 2: an interview with the author of a book about the Olympic and Paralympic Games Listening 3: a radio documentary about Tanni Grey-Thompson Opinion adjectives

VOCABULARY PLUS

SPEAKING AND WRITING

6

Talking on the phone

REVIEW Units 5 & 6 page 60; Cross culture: Birthdays

UNIT 7 It’s delicious! page 62

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

LESSON 1 There isn’t any olive oil!

Food and drink (1) Adjectives

Countable and uncountable nouns a / some / any

LESSON 2 We eat too much sugar.

Food and drink (2)

a lot of / much / many too much / too many

Reading: The obesity epidemic

Writing a food blog Talking about the food you eat

How often …?

Listening 1: four short conversations about food P /υ/ v /u/ Listening 2 & 3: a programme about the world’s top restaurants

Talking about restaurants and food Writing about a memorable meal in a restaurant

LESSON 3 How often do you go to a restaurant?

UNIT 8 People and abilities page 70

VOCABULARY PLUS

Food: collective nouns

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Ordering food in a restaurant

Talking about ingredients for making a dish Describing food

Cooking

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

LESSON 1 She can speak a lot of languages.

Languages

can / can’t for ability P can / can’t be good at / be interested in

Listening: information about hyperpolyglots

Talking about what you can do and what you’re good at

LESSON 2 What do you want to do?

Personality adjectives

want to / would like to / need to

Reading: an article about Oprah Winfrey

Writing a paragraph about a successful person Talking about ambitions

LESSON 3 And then they lived happily ever after.

Physical descriptions Parts of the face

Adverbs of manner

Listening 1: a conversation Describing people’s about two famous film appearance scenes Describing a couple Listening 2: an interview with a married couple

VOCABULARY PLUS

Parts of the body (1)

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

6

Verbs of movement

Asking for, giving and refusing permission

Physical descriptions

FOCUS ON: good

Talking about possibility

REVIEW Units 7 & 8 page 78; Cross culture: TV across the world

Introduction

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VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

Weather P /w/ Clothes (1)

Present continuous

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 9 Clouds, clothes and careers

LESSON 1 He’s singing in the rain.

page 80

LESSON 2 She wears a uniform at work.

Present continuous v present simple State verbs

Reading: Are you the cleaner? – an article about male nurses

LESSON 3: I have to think quickly!

have to / don’t have to

Listening 1: people talking about unusual jobs Listening 2: an interview with a teacher

Writing about your job or studies

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

Clothes (2) FOCUS ON: verbs with clothes

VOCABULARY PLUS EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Describing a person’s clothes

6

Shopping VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

UNIT 10 Health and fitness

LESSON 1 What are you going to do?

Health and fitness

going to

page 88

LESSON 2 Do you want to be stronger and more flexible?

Parts of the body (2)

Comparatives P Unstressed sound schwa /ə/

Reading: an article about Pilates

Writing a comparison of two activities

should

Listening: a radio interview with a fitness expert

Talking about how to reply to a problem page letter Writing a reply to a problem page letter

LESSON 3 You should do both!

Parts of the body (3)

VOCABULARY PLUS EVERYDAY ENGLISH

6

Adjectives

Talking about things you are going to do at the weekend

Vague words: thing, things, stuff

Giving advice

REVIEW Units 9 & 10 page 96; Cross culture: Colours

UNIT 11 Going places page 96

LESSON 1 Have you ever been to Machu Picchu?

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

Natural features Prepositions of movement: across, into, to, over, through

Present perfect Past participles, been and gone

Talking about things you have done, and things you have always wanted to do

Present perfect v past simple Reading: an article about Past questions Catherine Destivelle

Writing an email reply to an advertisement to a mountain school

too and enough

Talking about travel experiences P /aI/ v /I/ Writing a short story about a travel problem

LESSON 2 She’s climbed all over the world. LESSON 3 I forgot my passport!

Travel

VOCABULARY PLUS

Places

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

6

Adventure

Prepositions of place: on, in, at

page 106

LESSON 1 The most expensive city in the world? LESSON 2 Is this the coolest place to stay?

Hotel facilities (1)

LESSON 3 What’s the hardest thing you’ve ever done?

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

6

FOCUS ON: go

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

Superlatives

Reading: a travel website about the best and worst cities

Talking about capital cities P Consonant clusters /st/

could / had to

Reading 1: the Ice Hotel in Jukkasjärvi Reading 2: online comments about the Ice Hotel

Talking about good and bad hotels Writing a review of a hotel

Review of tenses

Listening 1: a conversation about an interview with Helen Skelton Listening 2: a report about Ade Adepitan

Talking about charities Writing about a charity

Hotel facilities (2) FOCUS ON: look

VOCABULARY PLUS

Listening: five travel problems

SPEAKING AND WRITING

Buying a ticket VOCABULARY

UNIT 12 Extremes

READING AND LISTENING

Checking in

FOCUS ON: a useful word

Solving problems

REVIEW Units 11 & 12 page 114; Cross culture: Hollywood and Bollywood Pages 116 – 123 Information gap and extra material Pages 124 – 131 Stories Pages 132 – 143 Grammar reference

6

Pages 144 – 154 Transcripts Page 155 Mandala Pages 156 – 158 Pronunciation and irregular verbs

Introduction

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Letter to you, the teacher Welcome to Jetstream, a course designed to motivate and engage learners. We aim to provide you with material that is stimulating and relevant, so your students learn English easily and with real enjoyment. We hope to give you everything you would expect, and more besides. We have aimed to balance the familiar and the new: to give you what you know works well and, at the same time, to introduce some unique features that will greatly enhance your students’ learning experience.

Our approach in general We believe that engaging content together with enjoyable and useful learning activities are the keys to successful learning. We believe that students need to be exposed to the most useful vocabulary that they will need to speak and write English at this level. We pay special attention to the grammar of the language – without grammar, vocabulary is just words! We believe in the importance of having students meet words and grammar in exciting and interesting situations – and in giving opportunities for students to practise this language so that they can be comfortable with it. We also believe that teacher support is crucial – we know you’re really busy. This Teacher’s Guide provides clear lesson notes and a lot of other things as well (see Contents page 3). There is also a lot of support online in the form of extra material, practice tests and so on. You don’t have to use all – or even any – of the Teacher’s Guide, of course, but it’s there if you need it and it will help to give you lots of choices. We’ve put a lot of work into ensuring that Jetstream is simple to use. And thought-provoking. And effective. And fun. Enjoy! Jane Revell and Mary Tomalin

Introduction

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Jetstream Elementary components For the student: Student’s Book The Student’s Book contains 12 units of three double-page lessons, and a Vocabulary plus and Everyday English section at the end of each unit. It also contains the following: • a two-page review unit after every two units • four stories • a comprehensive Grammar reference section • information-gap activities and extra material • complete transcripts for the audio • a Pronunciation spread covering the main vowel sounds • an irregular verbs list

Workbook with audio The Workbook contains 12 units of four pages – one page per SB lesson, and one page for Vocabulary plus and Everyday English. It also contains the following: • a review quiz after every two units • a Check your progress test after every two units • one page of dedicated Writing practice for each unit, giving students a structured writing development course E-zone The e-zone is an online resource for students and teachers containing:

For the teacher: Teacher’s Guide with class audio CDs The Teacher’s Guide contains full teaching notes for each unit including all transcripts, keys and useful background information, plus ideas for early finishers and mixed-ability suggestions. Three class audio CDs contain all the listening material for the Student’s Book. The Teacher’s Guide also contains the following extra material: • one photocopiable game per unit • one task per unit • eight ‘technique banks’ giving ideas in the following areas: Using the video Using stories Using memory games 20 easy games Five fun techniques to use with a flagging class Extra questions and tasks for Movies & Music Working with mixed-ability classes Ensuring learner autonomy and using technology Interactive book for whiteboards DVD-ROM E-zone Full access to the students’ area plus • the video for all Everyday English pages • mp3 audio files • downloadable Teacher’s Guide with answer keys • Helbling placement test • Guide for new teachers • Testbuilder containing 12 unit tests covering Grammar, Vocabulary, Functions and the four skills and 6 progress tests

• the video for all Everyday English pages • a cloud book – an interactive version of the Student’s Book including all video and audio • cyber homework – interactive activities covering grammar, vocabulary, reading, listening and dialogues. They are assigned by the teacher in a virtual classroom and have automatic feedback. (They can also be used in self-study mode – see below.) • mp3 audio files • online training – pronunciation exercises, exam practice (Cambridge ESOL, TOEFL, IELTS and TOEIC) and cyber homework in self-study mode (extra practice) • CLIL projects For more information on the e-zone, see page 11. 8

Jetstream approach – a summary Motivation Research shows that motivation is key to learning; to learn, students need to be interested! Jetstream has been written to be highly motivating for students, and includes the following: • interesting and relevant topics • stimulating and often thought-provoking photos • lots of personalisation activities where students are encouraged to talk about themselves

Introduction

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• communicative activities which give students a real purpose for completing a task

Most of the three main lessons in Jetstream have a vocabulary component. In addition:

• highly motivating tasks throughout the Student’s Book, and also a bank of photocopiable tasks in the Teacher’s Guide

• Vocabulary plus pages (one at the end of each unit) provide an opportunity for vocabulary enrichment.

• a Movies & Music feature in every unit which encourages students to use their English in a fun and less formal way

• Focus on sections within the Vocabulary plus pages highlight and practise high-frequency words and phrases and their different uses and meanings.

• Everyday English pages at the end of every unit which provide immediately useful conversations practising different functions, including short video clips • plenty of games and game-like activities, and also a collection of 20 Easy games and a bank of photocopiable games (one for each unit) at the back of the Teacher’s Guide

Grammar Grammar is an important element in Jetstream. It is dealt with in the following way: • It is introduced gradually – each of the three main lessons in a unit usually has a grammar point. This enables the grammar to be introduced step-by-step, practised and easily absorbed.

• Preposition park sections in the Review units focus on prepositions, often within an interesting text. • Similar or different activities ( ) get students comparing new words with words which are the same or different in their own language.

Reading The main reading focus in Jetstream is usually in Lesson 2, but there are often other, shorter reading texts elsewhere. There is a variety of high-interest text types – reallife stories, articles, quizzes, blogs, etc. Where possible at this level, texts are based on real people, places and events.

• It is revised in the review units that occur every two lessons.

• Activities develop the students’ ability to scan a text for its general meaning and guess meaning from context.

• The grammar for a lesson is introduced in context. The grammar form is highlighted and students given activities where they deduce the form and meaning.

• Texts, whether in the form of human interest articles or fiction stories, are absorbing and memorable and a key way of learning and practising language.

• Activities are realistic and meaningful.

• Four two-page stories at the back of Jetstream are an extra resource that provide practice in extensive reading, where students can read for meaning and pleasure without necessarily studying the text in detail. See page 226 for more ideas on how to use these stories. Other sections that provide very short, highinterest texts for additional reading comprehension relevant to the topic are:

• A clear and straightforward Grammar reference section at the end of the Student’s Book explains each lesson’s grammar. • The we don’t say ... / we say ... section at the end of each Everyday English page rounds off a unit by highlighting common grammatical mistakes in the language learnt in the unit. • The Irregular verbs section provides an invaluable reference for students.

Vocabulary It is increasingly recognised that vocabulary is just as important as or perhaps even more important than grammar when learning a language. Jetstream has a high vocabulary input so that students can understand, speak, read and write with ease. Stimulating and unusual pictures and motivating activities ensure students absorb the vocabulary easily and there is plenty of practice.

• Movies & Music • Did you know? The Cross Culture section in the Review units provides additional reading matter. It offers interesting and practical information on different cultures and should lead to stimulating discussions.

Writing Regular short Writing sections in the Student’s Book provide guided writing practice through a variety of tasks. The core writing course, however, Introduction

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is to be found at the back of the Workbook, which includes a full page of guided writing tasks per unit. In this writing development course, students cover the following areas: • form-filling • chatroom posts and social-media messages • blogs • profiles • messages, notes and invitations • a review • emails • anecdotes The Don’t forget feature summarises the use of linkers and other accuracy features: word order, punctuation, time expressions, paragraphing, etc. The Writing section also starts to cover format and tone, which many lower-level books don’t cover. Check it sections allow students to review and improve their work.

Listening

• The main Speaking section of a lesson generally has longer speaking activities than earlier in the lesson. • The photos, cartoons, listening and reading texts all provide stimulating platforms for speaking activities. • You first! at the start of some lessons uses a short question to get students engaged with the lesson topic immediately. • Everybody up! sections encourage students to stand up and move around the class, interacting with each other to find out information. • The Movies & Music and Did you know? sections in the main units, and the Cross Culture sections in the Review units also provide platforms for stimulating discussions. • The photocopiable tasks in the Teacher’s Guide and the information-gap activities at the back of the Student’s Book provide further communicative practice.

The main listening focus in Jetstream is in Lesson 3 of each unit, but there are often short listening activities elsewhere. The Everyday English page provides further listening practice in the form of functional dialogues. To train students in useful and relevant listening skills, the listening texts reflect a variety of real-life situations, including:

Pronunciation

• conversations

• simple intonation

• interviews

In addition, students are encouraged to listen to and repeat the main vocabulary groups throughout the book. The Pronunciation section on page 156 of the Student’s Book includes a phonemic chart for students’ reference and fun practice of all the major vowel sounds.

• talks • reports • radio programmes The transcripts of the listening texts can be found at the back of the Student’s Book for students’ reference and are also reproduced in the relevant activity notes in the Teacher’s Guide.

Speaking For many learners of English, speaking is the most important language skill. There are speaking activities at all stages of a lesson in Jetstream: • At Elementary level, activities are carefully controlled so that students can express themselves freely without making a lot of mistakes.

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Short pronunciation activities throughout the Student’s Book provide clear practice of some common areas, including: • specific sounds • word stress • sentence stress

Stories There are stories about real and fictional people throughout the course, but at the back of the Student’s Book (SB pages 124–131) you will also find four slightly longer, completely new stories. These stories are a way of providing an opportunity for students to read more extensively and gain a sense of satisfaction from doing so. For this reason, they deliberately contain language which is slightly above students’ level (linking in with Stephen Krashen’s idea that we learn most from language which stretches us a little – but not too much). However, the texts are not too difficult

Introduction

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and students shouldn’t be reaching for their dictionaries all the time. There are no tasks on the Student’s Book page itself. This is in order to leave you completely free as to how you approach the stories, but you will find a variety of interesting techniques on page 226.

Online training

Consolidation and review

Cloud Book An interactive version of the Student’s Book & Workbook, where students can access all audio and video content at the click of a mouse or touch of a screen. Students can complete the activities, check their results and add their own notes.

Resources and interactive activities for individual student access. Includes: • exam practice • pronunciation • all exercises from the cyber homework in selfstudy mode.

Consolidation of recently acquired language and regular revision are crucial to learning. After every two units there is a Review unit that revises key language in these units. Each Review unit contextualises the language through reading and sometimes listening texts. There are also grammar exercises and writing and speaking tasks. The Workbook provides further practice and testing of the language in a unit. In addition, after every two units in the Workbook there is a Review quiz, which tests students using a general knowledge quiz. This is followed by a Check your progress test.

Cyber homework Interactive activities assigned to students by their teacher within an online virtual classroom. Full results and feedback are automatically given as soon as the deadline fixed by the teacher has been reached. Projects Open-ended tasks on both cultural and global themes, where students can embed other resources such as web links or files and share them with the teacher and their class.

Online resources – available on e-zone HELBLING Placement Test Designed to give students and teachers of English a quick way of assessing the approximate level of a student’s knowledge of English grammar and usage.

How to integrate LMS (a Learning Management System) into your teaching Initial assessment Assessment

HELBLING Placement Test

Exam Practice Testbuilder

1

Planning

>

2

Scope & Sequence Teacher’s Guide

>

6

5 4

>

Virtual Class and Self-study practice

Lesson enrichment • Projects • Online training • Cyber homework • Student downloads

3

Class routine Student’s Book & Workbook

• Resources • Videos • Interactive Book for Whiteboards • Teacher downloads Introduction

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Unit overview

Grammar or vocabulary spots When you see a section highlighted in yellow, this means that it gives simple information about a grammar or lexical item. They are generally short notes on items that help students to do an activity.

Listening This symbol tells you that there is recorded material that goes with the activity. This can either be a full listening text, where there is no text on the page, or, as here, it might be listening to check answers or to hear the correct pronunciation of words or the correct stress on words or sentences. Full transcripts are given in the back of the Student’s Book.

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P Pronunciation There are regular pronunciation activities throughout the Student’s Book. At Elementary level, these focus mostly on simple but often-heard sounds, and word and sentence stress. There is a small introduction to intonation, but it is not a key feature of this level. All the pronunciation activities are recorded so that students can hear the correct sounds or stress. There is also a Pronunciation section at the back of the Student’s Book on pages 156–157. This contains all the main English sounds and a focus on vowel sounds in particular.

Introduction

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Explore This is an opportunity for students to go beyond the page and find out more about some aspect of the topic: a sort of mini project. They should do the research online, make notes and report back, working either alone or in pairs. You may want to set this up in the classroom by suggesting possible websites or just by eliciting suggestions for words and phrases to type into the search engine. As with Movies & Music, there is a natural mixedability element to this section.

Information gap There is an information-gap activity in every second unit. In these, students need to get information from each other in order to complete a task. All the material students need to do the tasks is in the back of the Student’s Book on pages 116– 123.

Grammar reference There is a useful grammar reference at the back of the Student’s Book. Each main grammar point from the grammar boxes throughout the book has a relevant section in the Grammar reference.

Introduction

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You first! Students have very different levels of knowledge but most students know something, however little, and that needs to be validated. You will find a You first! box on many of the large photos at the beginning of a lesson. It has a triple purpose. Firstly, to engage students and get them saying something immediately. Secondly, to allow students to use what they already know and boost their confidence. And thirdly, to give you an idea of what and how much they already know so that you can target your teaching much more effectively. What if your students don’t respond at all? That’s fine. Now you know. Just move on and start to teach them something.

Did you know? These are very short, interesting pieces of information related to the theme of the lesson. They can usually be done at any point in the lesson. The Teacher’s notes suggest ways of exploiting this section, but if students want to know more, they can be encouraged to search online.

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Introduction

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Memory games This symbol represents your brain! Memory is a crucial component in learning anything and it’s like a muscle: the more you exercise it, the stronger it will be. These simple games ask students to remember a variety of things: vocabulary items, facts from an article and so on. But you can play a lot more games than the ones suggested here (see page 227). And remember that the more you get students to exercise their memory in English, the more it will serve them in other aspects of their life as well.

Think

Movies & Music This section is designed to motivate students and transfer the language to a new context. Most people enjoy films and songs and know a fair amount about them, and this section also gives students the opportunity to research online and bring the information back to the class. There is also a natural mixed-ability element: more competent students will be able to take it further than those who are less competent. Each section provides a very short reading text or a task, incorporating language from the unit. Students are then invited to go online to check their ideas and to find out answers to one or two more questions, find lyrics and perhaps listen to the song in the Music section.

This is used to signal a creative or critical-thinking exercise. Students are asked to work something out for themselves, give an opinion or use their creativity, rather than find an answer directly on the page. A simple example might be: How old was Rosa? Students know her year of birth, and they know the year of the incident, so they can calculate how old she was at the time. Encouraging students to think creatively means they increase their engagement with the material. The increased alertness enhances their learning capacity. With these sections – as indeed with many others – it’s a good idea to give students a chance to look at the material and think about (or even write down) their ideas individually (for say 30 seconds) before they start talking to each other. Some students are quick thinkers and talkers, while others need more time. Giving them ‘thinking time’ evens it out a little.

Introduction

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Similar or different? This symbol often occurs where new vocabulary is introduced and it suggests that you ask students which words are the same as or similar to words in their own language – and which are very different. This feature of Accelerated (or Holistic) Learning (see page 22) aims to draw students’ attention to the fact that they already know some words. It serves to reassure them, build their confidence and lighten their learning load. It can also give them a basis for wordbuilding (eg the fact that words ending in -ion in English may also end in -ion in their language). Suddenly they know ten words, not just one. Note: Very often, if the word is a similar one, the difference is in the pronunciation – especially the word stress – or the spelling. Also, similar or different is obviously easier if you have a unilingual class, especially when you are familiar with the students’ mother tongue, but it can work well with a multilingual class, where students compare words in different languages.

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De-stress! Apart from providing tiny practical texts to read, these sections are there to help students unwind from time to time. Why? Because, quite simply, we don’t learn well when we are stressed. We learn best when we are relaxed. You will find a simple de-stress exercise in every unit. If it’s a piece of advice, talk about it with students. If it’s a physical exercise, get (or help) students to read it and follow the instructions. Do it there and then in the classroom if you can. Then you can use it again and again, whenever it’s useful (see, for example, the mandala on SB page 155 – instructions on how to use it are in the notes for Unit 3 on page 60).

Introduction

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Guess Asking students to ‘guess’ answers before reading or listening to information not only gets them to interact, it also frees them up from having to know the ‘right’ answer and thus inhibiting their response. In addition, it prepares them for the text and gives a valid reason for reading or listening to something – to see if they were right. For this reason, it’s very important not to confirm if students are right or not in their guesses. Just say things like: Hmm or That’s interesting or Possibly, etc and let the text provide the answers.

Everybody up! This is a Find someone who … activity, a chance for students to move around the classroom and use specific language in a controlled way to get information from other students. This kind of short intensive practice can be very lively and also very rewarding if students succeed in completing the task using the language resources available to them. It also allows them to interact with lots of different people. The act of physically getting up and moving around is also mentally refreshing; being physically active helps us to learn. Students may naturally find that they engage in longer conversations than the activity requires. If time allows, this is good and enjoyable practice for them. However, it’s a good idea to set a time limit for this activity.

Introduction

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Vocabulary plus Students need words. They need lots of them and they need to know how to combine them. This page, which comes after the third lesson in every unit, provides an opportunity for vocabulary enrichment and consolidation. It’s a flexible section and can be used in several ways. It can be done as a complete lesson. Alternatively, the unit-by-unit notes indicate points where a vocabulary set can be usefully explored in a lesson. Or an exercise can be used as a filler by a teacher with time to spare, or given to stronger students when they have finished a task ahead of other students.

Focus on These short sections appear on many of the Vocabulary plus pages. They are dedicated practice of a word or words that have come up in the unit, taking them further, and showing students how they can be used in different ways. In Elementary there are Focus on sections for can, have, play, do and go, get, good, verbs to use with clothes, go, look and left.

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Introduction

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Everyday English This section provides practice in the everyday functional language that students need when getting around in English and interacting with people, such as making requests, asking for directions, buying a ticket and so on.

Video The main conversation in Everyday English appears on video, which provides extra contextualisation for the functional language. (If you don’t have the video or prefer not to use it, then just play the audio version.) See also Using the video on page 225.

Karaoke video After practising the language in the video, students act out the conversation themselves. They can do this in pairs or else by interacting with the karaoke video, where they take the role of one of the speakers, read the words on the screen and say those words at the right time.

We don’t say … / We say … This section focuses on common errors that we know from experience students are likely to make. The ones we have selected are those made by learners from a variety of different language backgrounds, but there will, of course, be many errors which are made by speakers of a particular language that you will also need to pick up on. By drawing students’ attention to them, and making it very clear that these are errors, we hope to help them avoid making such mistakes. One way of using this section is to ask students to cover the We say … column and produce the correct version, then look back and check.

Introduction

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Review units Six review units revise key language from the preceding two units, using a reading text as the main presentation.

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Cross Culture Each of the Review units finishes with a Cross Culture section. This is often an opportunity to reflect on how people do things differently (or not!) in different parts of the world and how we can begin to be sensitive to these differences and act accordingly. There is usually a short reading text with a task or questions, often leading to a discussion and a comparison with the students’ own culture.

Preposition park This section appears in each review unit and provides a short text either practising some of the prepositions from the previous units, enabling students to recycle them in a new way, or presenting new and useful prepositions.

Introduction

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A final word The features new to Jetstream, which occur throughout the units, are informed – in a gentle way – by some of the key principles of Holistic Learning (sometimes called Accelerated Learning*): 1 We learn with our body as well as our mind: they are connected. Hence the value we attach to bringing more physical activities into the classroom and paying attention to our students’ physical well-being. 2 Different learners prefer different kinds of input. Some people learn more with their eyes, some more with their ears and some more with their bodies and movement. We aim to provide a variety of activities to reflect these preferences. 3 What we learn with emotion, we tend to remember best. We hope to engage students’ emotions through the use of stories, songs and games – and making them laugh. 4 Our memory is very powerful … and we can make it work even better. The reason for all the little memory training games is to give students practice in using their memory, and aid their learning.

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5 People know a lot already – more than they think. Good teaching and good material can help to make students aware of what they already know and boost their confidence. 6 People are different. Some people are more outward-going and sociable, while others are more introspective and reflective. The former readily enjoy interacting with others while the latter often prefer to work on their own. They usually welcome time to think on their own too, before being asked to participate in an activity. As teachers, we need to try to cater for these differences.

*The roots of Accelerated Learning go back to the Bulgarian educator, Georgi Lozanov, who developed something called ‘Suggestopaedia’ in the early 60s. By helping learners feel comfortable, relaxed and confident, they were able to absorb and remember more information more quickly. That’s it in a nutshell!

Introduction

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Nice to meet you! UNIT FOCUS

GRAMMAR: the imperative VOCABULARY: the alphabet; numbers; personal

information; classroom language

Aims

Tip: You may want to introduce a strategy for signalling the end of walk-around activities. Sometimes these activities can be a little noisy, so it’s a good idea to have a signal that everybody recognises and to avoid having to raise your voice. Ideas could include: switching the lights on and off. raising your hand – everybody who sees you raises their hand and stops talking. ringing a small bell.

The focus of this introductory unit is to give students the opportunity to get to know each other, and feel relaxed about speaking English in the classroom. Focus on creating a positive and comfortable atmosphere and helping students to reduce possible anxiety about speaking.



You first! There are You first! boxes at the beginning of many lessons in the Student’s Book. They have three goals: firstly, to engage students and get them saying something immediately, secondly, to allow students to use what they already know and boost their confidence, and thirdly, to give you an idea of what and how much they already know so that you can target your teaching much more effectively. Students can say as much or as little as they want. For this one, start by introducing yourself to the whole class. Say: I’m …, / My name’s … Then introduce yourself to one or two individual students. Model shaking hands. Emphasise warm, positive intonation, making eye contact, smiling and nodding.

Introductions 1

1.2 Play the audio and ask students to repeat the short conversation all together and then individually. Emphasise warm, positive intonation.

Transcript FENG Hi, I’m Feng. LEILA My name’s Leila. Nice to meet you. Ask students to stand up and move around the classroom. Walk among them and join in the activity. Tell students to try and remember the names for the next activity.

pp6–7





2

This symbol shows that this is a memory game – the first of many in the book. Memory is an important part of learning anything, and the more we exercise our memory by playing these kinds of games, the better it will be.



Practise the language with the class and check understanding of my and your.



Tell students to remain standing. This time they should move around the class and try to remember everybody’s name. Focus on the example exchange in the book.

The alphabet 3 P 1.3 Ask students to call out each letter in turn. Focus on their pronunciation. This will help students to complete exercise 4.

Transcript and answers A B C D E FG H I J K L M NO P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Tip: Some letters are pronounced differently in different languages. For example, ‘a’ can be pronounced /æ/ and ‘b’ can be pronounced /beɪ/. You may want to use this kind of contrastive approach to help students improve their pronunciation. 1.4 Say the first letter in each line, 4 P emphasising the vowel sound in each case. Students can work in pairs to complete the lists. Encourage them to say the letters aloud as they work. Then play the audio to check the answers and repeat the letters again.

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Transcript and answers 1 A, H, J, K 2 B, C, D, E, G, P, T, V 3 F, L, M, N, S, X, Z 4 I, Y 5 Q, U 1.5 Play the audio once through. Then play 5 it again, pausing to allow time for students to write. Play it several times if necessary. Practise the conversation as a class. Divide the class into two groups. Each group says one part. Then they switch roles. Transcript and answers WOMAN Hello, what’s your name? STUDENT Javi Montejano. WOMAN How do you spell that? STUDENT J-A-V-I, Javi. M-O-N-T-E-J-A-N-O, Montejano. WOMAN Thanks. OK, you’re in the Elementary class. 6 Students can stand up and walk around to do this activity. Monitor students and make notes of any errors with pronunciation. Give feedback by writing the problem letters on the board and practising them again.

Extra idea: Dictate the spelling of four or five names. They can be names of students in the class, names of famous actors or sports people, or random first names that include problem letters. Invite volunteers to write the answers on the board.

8

Point out the way we say double numbers, eg double one, double two, etc. Write some double numbers on the board as further examples. Also point out that 0 is usually pronounced oh, not zero when giving phone numbers.



Play the audio twice. Then invite volunteers to write their answers on the board. Practise the numbers all together and individually. Then ask students to write the phone numbers as words.

Transcript and answers 1 116 77 3450 double one six, double seven, three four five oh 2 399 21 8800 three double nine, two one, double eight double oh

Extra idea: Dictate four or five phone numbers. Make sure you include a variety of numbers and some double numbers. Check the answers by asking students to read them out or write them on the board.

9

Ask the whole class to read out the numbers. Then ask individuals. Play the audio and repeat each number as a class and then nominate individuals to repeat each one.



MA As an extra challenge, ask higher-level students to say the numbers from twenty to zero very quickly.

Ask the whole class to read out the numbers. Then ask individuals. Play the audio and repeat each number as a class and then nominate individuals to repeat each one.



MA Wherever you see this icon (MA) in the teacher’s notes, you will find an idea for using the activity with a mixed-ability class. Here, as an extra challenge, ask higher-level students to say the numbers from ten to zero very quickly.

1.6

Transcript and answers ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, one, zero

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1.8

Answers 16 sixteen, 17 seventeen, 18 eighteen, 19 nineteen, 50 fifty, 60 sixty

Numbers 7

1.7

Transcript eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, twenty-one, twenty-two, thirty, forty, fifty, sixty



Extra idea: Write the following number series on the board and put students in pairs to complete the numbers in each series. The answers are in brackets – don’t write them on the board! Invite students to write the answers on the board and ask them to explain their answers. They probably won’t have the language, so help them with this using plus, minus signs, etc.

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1 5, 7, 9, 11, __, __, __, __ (+2: 13, 15, 17, 19) 2 2, 4, 8, 16, __, __ (double the number: 32, 64) 3 47, 41, 37, 31, __, __, __ (prime numbers backwards: 29, 23, 19) 4 14, 18, 23, 29, 36, __, __, __ (+4, +5, +6, etc: 44, 53, 63) 5 69, 65, 61, 57, __, __, __ (–4 each time: 53, 49, 45) 6 12, 21, 30, 39, __, __, __ (+9 each time: 48, 57, 66)

Answers 1 What’s your first name? 2 What’s your family name? 3 What’s your mobile number? 12 Allow time for students to work in pairs. Then call for volunteers to present their conversations to the class. Tip: To encourage students to get to know each other, ask one student in each pair to sit with another partner. Repeat as many times as appropriate so that students have the opportunity to work with different partners.

Personal information 10

Tell students to cover exercise 11 while they do this exercise. Play the audio and allow time for students to compare answers. Play the audio again if necessary. Write the answers on the board. 1.9

Answers First name: Li Family name: Lee Mobile phone number: 07642 251938 Transcript Man What’s your first name? Woman Li. That’s L-I. Man And what’s your family name? Woman Lee. That’s L-E-E. Man Oh, Li Lee! What’s your mobile number? Woman It’s 07642 251938.

Culture note: In some cultures, the family name is first and the given name is second. This may be confusing and can cause misunderstandings. Make sure that students understand that when someone says first name, it means given name, and last name means family name or surname.

11 Allow time for students to work individually or in pairs. Play the audio again to check the answers, then write the answers on the board. Practise the conversation as a class. Divide the class into two groups. Each group says one part. Then they switch roles.

Classroom language 13 This part of the lesson focuses on language that students will need to understand your instructions. You may want to add other instructions that you frequently use, eg Stand up. Walk around. Make groups of three. Swap books with your partner. Switch roles. etc.

Focus on the use of the imperative for giving instructions. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 132 for more information about this structure. Go through it with them. Elicit / Show students that don’t = do not.

Answers

1f, 2d, 3e, 4b, 5a, 6c



Extra ideas: Say four or five instructions and have students act out the response, eg stand up, sit down, open your books, etc. Then have students repeat the activity in pairs.



Write these instructions on the board. Put students in pairs and ask individual students to read out the instructions and follow them. Then in their pairs, students take turns to follow the instructions.



1 2 3 4 5

Ask your partner a question. Repeat the answer. Write the answer in your notebook. Circle the answer. Check the answer. Ask, ‘Is this right?’

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14 Ask students to look at the pictures and work out the instructions.

MA For an extra challenge, ask students to cover the instructions in exercise 13 and try to remember the words.

Answers

A2, B5, C6, D4, E1, F3

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1.10 Use exercises 15–17 to practise the use of the imperative to give instructions. Check understanding of any new language before allowing time for students to circle the correct words. Then play the audio. Check answers, then practise each line with the class.

Answers 1 Excuse 2 Sit down 3 look 4 say that again 5 look Transcript JAVI Excuse me, is this the Elementary class? TEACHER Yes, it is, come in. Sit down. What’s your name? JAVI Javi. TEACHER Say hello to Javi, everyone. CLASS Hi Javi. TEACHER OK, everyone, look at page 21, please. LI Sorry, I don’t understand. Can you say that again? TEACHER Of course! Yes, look at page 21, please. 16 Ask students to make groups of three. Encourage them to switch roles and practise the conversation again. MA As an extra challenge, have students close their books and repeat the conversation from memory using their own names. 17 Model the instructions in the example. Ask students to help you make a list of other instructions on the board. Then ask students to work in pairs. Finally, ask volunteers to say an instruction and choose someone in the class to respond. Encourage students to be creative with their instructions, eg Ask a question. Now repeat the question, please. Make sure they include some instructions with don’t, eg Don’t laugh!

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Nice to meet you!

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1 UNIT FOCUS

Who are you? GRAMMAR: be, present tense; possessive adjectives VOCABULARY: countries and nationalities; jobs; common objects FUNCTIONS: introducing yourself and other people; asking about

Lesson 1 I’m from Argentina.

Transcript Europe: the UK, Spain, Turkey, Russia North America: Mexico, the USA Asia: Thailand, Taiwan Africa: South Africa South America: Brazil

pp8–9 Aims

The focus of this lesson is to practise the verb be in the affirmative form, to learn names for countries and nationalities and to practise introducing yourself and other people. Note: It will be useful to have a map of the world on a wall or a computer in this lesson.

You first! If possible, point to a world map on the wall or projected on your screen or whiteboard. Point to various countries and ask students to name them. Invite volunteers to come to the board and point to their country saying, I’m from …

3 Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Ask one or two to ask you as well. Than ask students to practise in pairs. Notice any problem words and practise them again. 4 This exercise reviews the use of correct pronouns (he, she or they) and the correct form of the verb be. Review these points before starting the exercise if you feel students may have problems with them.

Ask five or six individual students the question. Ask a student to ask you, too.

When you see this icon with a vocabulary exercise, it means that you should ask students which words are the same or similar to words in their own language – and also which are very different. See detailed notes in the Introduction, page 16.



Check that students understand the word continent. Allow time for individual work. Elicit from students that Turkey is in Europe and in Asia. Ask students which words for countries are very similar in their own language and which are very different. Do not check answers at this point.

2

1.11 Play the audio, then ask students to repeat the countries as a class and individually. Notice any names that cause special problems and practise them again.

Answers 1 South America 2 Europe 3 Asia 4 Asia 5 Africa 6 North America 7 North America 8 Europe (although large parts of Russia are also in Asia as it is such a big country) 9 Europe 10 Europe (it is in both Europe and Asia)

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Tell students to look at the photos and the world map, then complete the sentences.

Answers 1 They’re from Mexico. 2 He’s from Brazil. 3 They’re from the UK. 4 She’s from South Africa. 5 She’s from Spain. 6 She’s from Turkey. 7 They’re from Thailand. 8 He’s from Russia.

Vocabulary Countries and nationalities 1

language; making requests

5

Tell students to look at the photos again and the list of nationalities. Point out that there are two nationalities they don’t need to use.



Check the answers and correct any problems with pronunciation. Play the audio and practise the pronunciation again. Pay attention to stress patterns in each word, eg Brazilian and Taiwanese.

1.12

Transcript and answers Photo 1 They’re Mexican. Photo 2 He’s Brazilian. Photo 3 They’re British. Photo 4 She’s South African. Photo 5 She’s Spanish. Photo 6 She’s Turkish. Unit 1

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Photo 7 Photo 8

They’re Thai. He’s Russian.

Tip: To demonstrate the meaning of stressed syllables, ask students to identify how many syllables are in each word. Demonstrate the stress pattern by beating the rhythm with your hands or writing the words on the board with small bubbles above each unstressed syllable and a larger bubble above the stressed one, eg O oo Mexican. Stressed syllables are louder and have more force or energy. 6



9 Write all the subject pronouns on the board if necessary. Do the first sentence together with the class as an example. After students have completed the task individually, write the answers on the board.

Answers 1 This is Neymar. He is / ’s from Brazil. 2 This is Salma Hayek. She is / ’s from Mexico. 3 This is Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem. They are / ’re from Spain. 4 Hi! We are / We’re One Direction. We are / ’re from the UK. 5 I am / ’m from Turkey. It is / ’s in Europe and Asia!

Demonstrate the rhythm of stressed and unstressed words in the first line by beating the rhythm with your hands (tapping or clapping them lightly together) or writing it on the board with bubbles (see the Tip above). Play the audio and ask students to identify the stressed words. Play the audio again and pause for students to repeat each line. 1.13

Transcript and answers LUIS Where are you from? PAULA I’m from Argentina. LUIS Really? You’re Argentinian! PAULA Yes. What about you? Where are you from? LUIS I’m from Argentina too. 7 After students have practised with a partner, ask one student in each pair to stand up and sit with another partner. Repeat as many times as appropriate so that students have the opportunity to work with different partners.

Grammar be affirmative 8 Tell students to look at the grammar table. Explain the difference between full and short forms. (Short forms are used in speech and in informal writing.) Write the answers on the board.

10 Ask if students know any of the famous people in the photos and what they know about them.

I am (I’m) you are (you’re) he / she / it is (he’s / she’s / it’s) we / you / they are (we’re / you’re / they’re)



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 132, now or at the end of the lesson.

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MA For an extra challenge, ask students to cover exercise 9 and remember the sentences about each picture.

Answers A2, B3, C5, D1, E4 11 You may want to organise this as a team competition. Set a time limit of three minutes for students to write as many countries as they can. Award points for correct spelling and extra points for the nationality associated with each country.

Speaking 12

Ask students to look at the photo. Ask: Where are they? Where are they from? What are their names?



Ask students to read the conversation silently and try to predict the missing words; not the actual words, but what type of word it is, ie a nationality or a number. Play the audio and check their predictions. If appropriate, play the audio again and pause after each line so that students can repeat in order to focus

Answers

Extra idea: Practise pronunciation by contrasting each pair of forms, eg I am / I’m, we are / we’re, etc. Say one of each pair and ask students to raise their hand – their left hand if it is a short form, their right hand if it is the full form.

1.14

Unit 1

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on intonation and pronunciation. Then ask students to practise the conversation in pairs.

Answers

1 Spanish 2 Spanish 3 Taiwanese 4 0766 594211 5 0795 590043

Transcript EDUARDO Hi, I’m Eduardo. What’s your name? LIN My name’s Lin. Nice to meet you. What nationality are you? EDUARDO I’m Spanish. LIN You’re Spanish! Really? I’m Taiwanese. EDUARDO Let’s have a coffee. LIN Cool! … EDUARDO Can I have your mobile number? LIN Yes, it’s 0766 594211. What’s your number? EDUARDO 0795 590043. LIN Thanks! Bye! See you soon! 13 Monitor pairs as they practise the conversation, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation. 14 Encourage students to stand up and move around the classroom as they do this activity.

Movies & Music Tip: This could be a good opportunity to teach / revise I don’t know and other fixed expressions, eg I have no idea. Perhaps Russia? This section is designed to motivate students and transfer the language to a new context. Most people enjoy films and songs, and this section also gives students the opportunity to research online and bring the information back to the class. The Movies section provides a very short reading text and task on a film or films. Students can go online to check their ideas and to find out answers to one or two more questions.

a couple more questions, then find the lyrics and listen to the song if they want to. Read through the short text in the Movies section and teach / elicit the meaning of popular, stars, set and several. Do the same with the Music section, checking understanding of city. Explain that the missing word is the name of a city. If students have access to the internet, they can do a lot of the activity in class. If not, they can do it for homework and you can discuss the answers in the next lesson. You may want to ask students to find the words and listen to the song for homework. Tell them to read the words of the chorus (the third verse) as it’s easy to understand.

Extra idea: Ask a student to write the words of the chorus on the board. Teach / Elicit the meaning of legal alien. Play the chorus while students sing along. Then remove the words from the board and ask students to sing it again.



Extra questions for class or for homework



Movies



Are James Bond films popular in your country?



Which actor is James Bond?



Who is the villain (bad guy)?



Who is your favourite James Bond actor?



Find three titles of other James Bond films. Suggest titles in your own language and search online to find the English equivalent.

Answers Movies British Skyfall is set in Istanbul (Turkey), Shanghai and Macau (China) and Scotland (UK) Music New York Song title: An Englishman in New York Singer: Sting

The Music section often gives an incomplete line from a song, or a song title, which students have to complete. Again, they can go online, answer

Unit 1

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Culture notes: Skyfall is the third film with Daniel Craig as James Bond, an agent for the British secret intelligence service, and the 23rd James Bond film. Javier Bardem plays the villain Raoul Silva, an ex MI6 agent. Silva’s aim is to kill M, the head of MI6, played by British actress Judi Dench, as an act of revenge for betraying him. It is Bond’s job to protect M and he takes her to Skyfall, his family estate in Scotland. Silva and his men follow them there. The film made over $1,000 million worldwide. Englishman in New York is by the British artist Sting and is on his album Nothing Like the Sun (1987). The original version was released as a single and didn’t do very well but a new version, released in the 1990s, was commercially successful. Sting, born in 1951, is an English singer / songwriter whose real name is Gordon Sumner. He was the lead singer and songwriter for the rock band The Police, which had worldwide success between 1978 and 1983. Since then he has had a hugely successful career as a solo artist.



Point out the difference between a and an (a for words beginning with consonants and an for words beginning with vowels).



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 132, now or at the end of the lesson.

Transcript 1 a doctor 2 a scientist 3 an engineer 4 an office worker 5 a teacher 6 a factory worker 7 a journalist 8 a dancer 2

Explain that the similar / different strategy can help students work out the meaning of new words. You may want to give some other examples from the students’ own languages, or some international words such as television or internet.

3

1.16 Ask students to look at the photos and make one or two guesses about the people’s jobs. Then ask students to read the example dialogues and say who they refer to. Then play the audio and ask students to repeat. Teach / Elicit maybe.

Lesson 2 Are they dancers? pp9–10

Transcript 1 WOMAN M AN 2 WOMAN M AN

Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise the verb be in the negative and also questions and answers with be, learn names for jobs, make guesses / suppositions and to practise predicting and guessing meaning from context.

You first!

4

Ask students about their jobs and write all the job names on the board in random order. Afterwards, point to each job and see if everybody can remember whose job it was.

Vocabulary Jobs 1 P 1.15 Check the comprehension of the words. Ask: Where is a doctor’s place of work? What is a scientist’s job? Use drawings, mime and translation if necessary to explain meaning. Play the audio and pause for students to repeat. Check any difficult points of pronunciation (eg silent ‘c’ in scientist) and word stress (eg engineer, journalist). 30



Maybe they’re dancers. I don’t know. I think they’re teachers. Maybe he’s an engineer. I’m not sure. I think he’s a factory worker.

GUESS When you see GUESS in front of an instruction, it means students can talk about what they think the answers to something are, but they don’t have to know the right answers. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 17. Ask students to work in pairs and try to agree on the job for each person. They should make a list of their guesses in their notebooks. Ask students to cover exercise 5 and don’t give any answers away at this stage!

5 Ask students to read the sentences silently and match them with the photos. Write the answers on the board. Check students understand boyfriend, married, Indian and the negative meaning of isn’t and aren’t.

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Grammar 1 be negative

Reading

6 Contrast the full and short forms in the table and practise the pronunciation of each form. Point out the alternative negative form: He’s not / He isn’t.

10 THINK When you see THINK in front of an instruction, it means students should think about ideas before they start doing an exercise. Students could also think on their own for one minute, then talk to a partner about their ideas. In this case, students look at the photos on the page and the title of the review and think about what the connection is. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 15.

Answers I am not / I’m not (American). He / She / It is not / isn’t (Turkish). We / You / They are not / aren’t (Taiwanese).

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 132, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

7 Read the example sentence together and practise the language with the class. Refer students back to exercise 5 to find the answers.

Answers 1 She isn’t a teacher. She’s a scientist. 2 They aren’t engineers. They’re teachers. 3 He isn’t a journalist. He’s an engineer. 4 He isn’t Spanish. He’s Chinese. 5 They aren’t Brazilian. They’re British. 6 She isn’t a dancer. She’s an office worker. 7 He isn’t Chinese. He’s Indian.

Extra idea: Refer back to the students’ jobs that you wrote on the board in You first! Make false sentences about some students so that students can correct you using the be negative form. Then ask students to make some false sentences about each other, eg He’s Turkish. He’s 25 years old. (He isn’t Turkish, he’s Spanish. He isn’t 25 years old, he’s 24 years old.)

Writing 8

Ask students to cover the text in exercise 5 and just look at the photos. You may want to organise this as a team competition to see who can write the most true sentences in three minutes.

9 Allow a few minutes of quiet time for students to write two sentences about themselves. Ask volunteers to read out their sentences. Ask other students to correct them if appropriate.

Culture note: Talent shows now exist in more than 58 countries around the world, so it’s likely many students will have heard of shows like The World Has Talent. In monolingual classes students could discuss the shows in L1 as a lead-in.



Ask: What does ‘talent’ mean? Give an example of a famous person with a talent, eg Jennifer Lawrence. Ask students to say what talent they have, eg She’s a great actor. Check comprehension of the words in the box by asking for examples of famous actors, dancers, etc. 11 Allow a few minutes for silent reading, then check students’ ideas from exercise 10. (The connection is that the people in the photos are in a talent show.) Check that students understand the word review by asking: Who wrote this article? Is it a description or an opinion? Why do people read this type of article? (You might need to use L1 at this stage to help students.) Ask some general comprehension questions, eg Where are the people from? What kind of talents do they have? Elicit possible explanations of the words in bold. Answers programme = something you watch on television show = another word for programme professional = relating to your work or career other = different person or thing different = not the same judges = people who decide the winner of a competition

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Tip: Encourage students to guess the meaning of the words in bold, and after guessing they can consult their dictionaries. Explain that it is better to guess first using the context because the dictionary may provide many different meanings that are unrelated to the context. 12 Students can work individually or in pairs. Go through the list of people and make sure students can remember who they are. Ask students to tell the class their answers.

MA Students who need extra support may want to keep the text uncovered and simply circle or underline the information relating to each person.

Suggested answers 1 the people on the show – they are from a lot of different countries, some are professional singers and musicians, some are good, some are bad, some are young, some are old 2 Pati – she is a singer and a salsa dancer, she’s from Switzerland, she’s 80 years old 3 May – she is a judge on the show, she’s from Thailand, she’s a singer 4 Vicente – he is a judge on the show, he’s from Chile, he’s an actor 5 Alison – she is a judge on the show, she’s from Canada, she’s a songwriter 6 Bruno – he is a judge on the show, he’s from Italy, he’s a scientist

Grammar 2 be questions and short answers 13 Point out the word order in be questions. Ask: Which word is first? Which is second? You may want to refer students to the different types of questions (wh- versus yes / no questions) depending on the level of your class. Point out that short forms are not used in the affirmative short answers.

Answers Are you (a teacher)? Yes, I am. / No, I’m not. Is he / she / it (Spanish)? Yes, he is. / No, he isn’t. Are they (Thai)? Yes, they are. / No, they aren’t.

32



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 132, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

14 Allow time for students to work individually. Then compare answers in pairs. Ask volunteers to write the answers on the board.

Answers 1 Is 2 Are 3 Are 4 Are 5 Is 6 Is 15 Encourage students to use short answers where possible, then monitor pairs as they ask and answer the questions, making a note of any common problems with grammar. Give students praise and corrective feedback at the end of the task.

Answers 1 Yes, it is. 2 Some people are young and some people are old. 3 Some people are good and some people are bad. 4 No, they aren’t. May is Thai, Vicente is Chilean and Alison is Canadian. 5 No, he isn’t. He’s from Chile. 6 Yes, she is. 16



1.17 Ask students to read the conversation and predict the missing words. Check students understand nice place. Then play the audio. Write the answers on the board. If appropriate, play the audio again and pause for students to repeat the missing words. Emphasise pronunciation and intonation. Then ask students to practise the conversation in pairs.

Answers 1 is 2 are you 3 ’m not 4 ’m 5 ’s 6 are you 7 ’s 8 ’m 9 ’m Transcript BRUNO Hello and welcome to The World Has Talent! NICO Thank you very much. BRUNO What is your name? NICO Nico. Nico Drouga. BRUNO And are you from Portugal, Nico? NICO No, I’m not. I’m from Greece. From Piraeus. BRUNO Oh! I know it. It’s a nice place. How old are you, Nico? NICO I’m 28. BRUNO And what’s your job?

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NICO

I’m an office worker. But I’m also an opera singer! BRUNO Great.

Speaking 17 Ask everybody in the class to write down one talent that they have (real or imaginary), eg I’m a singer. Ask students to form groups of four or five and to each do a short act, eg sing a song, do a dance, play a real or imaginary instrument, do a magic trick, perform with an animal (dog, horse, elephant!). If you tell students they don’t have to perform their act well, they can choose to do it really badly – it will help them to be less self-conscious and it will also be a lot of fun.



Choose two people in each group to be judges and interview the performers, using the conversation in exercise 16 as an example. They can role-play the conversation several times, switching roles each time. Ask one or two groups to present their conversation to the class. When everybody in each group has performed their act, the judges choose their favourite act: I like … best.

Lesson 3 Where’s our suitcase? pp12–13

Picture B: Chocolate? Big pens? (Dynamite?!) Also revise I don’t know.

Vocabulary Common objects (1) 1

Ask students which names for objects are very similar in their own language and which are very different. Check the pronunciation of the words as you check the answers.

Answers 1 a bag 2 a mobile phone 3 a pen 4 a ticket 5 an apple 6 a key 7 a passport 8 a suitcase 9 a toothbrush 10 a camera 11 a watch 12 a book 13 an umbrella 1.18 Play the audio and ask students to 2 P notice the three different ways to pronounce the plural ‘s’ ending. Don’t check answers at this stage.

Transcript books, suitcases, toothbrushes, umbrellas, cameras, tickets, apples 1.19 Allow time for students to predict 3 P which category each plural word is in. Then play the audio to check their answers. Write the answers in a table on the board. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each word.

Aims

Transcript and answers

The focus of this lesson is to practise possessive adjectives, learn names for common objects, ask about and identify objects, practise listening for numbers, letters and names of places and practise useful language when in an airport.

/s/ books, passports, tickets /z/ apples, bags, cameras, keys, mobile phones, pens, umbrellas /ɪz/ suitcases, toothbrushes, watches

Warm-up

4

Ask: What’s your favourite possession? Give some examples of your own. You could also ask students to guess what things are in your bag or purse. Ask students to work with a partner and name all the objects in their bag today. Ask students to look at the pictures and try to name as many objects as they can. Ask: What’s the woman’s job? (security officer). Note: The objects the security officer is holding in the pictures are deliberately not obvious so it makes her question a genuine one. Ask students to speculate about what the things could be. Picture A: Matches? A camera? Cake?

The sooner students recycle newly learnt words, the more likely they are to remember them. Ask students to close their books and either say the words to a partner, or write them in their notebooks.

5 Demonstrate the difference between this, that, these, those by placing objects near or far away from you. Invite a volunteer to come up to the front of the class and practise using the same objects to ask What’s this? and What’s that? Practise the different pronunciation of this and these.

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Extra idea: Ask students to choose one object and draw a picture of it on a small piece of paper. Pass a paper bag around the class and ask everybody to put their ‘objects’ in it. Gather students around a table and take turns to pull out an ‘object’ and ask: What’s this / What are these? If they are correct, they can keep the object.

6

Refer to any famous brand names that are in the classroom or amongst students’ possessions. Ask about famous brands of computers, clothes, watches, shoes, etc. Hold something up and ask, What’s this? What’s the brand? Discuss the names shown and then play the audio to check students’ answers. 1.20

Transcript and answers 1 MAN Mont Blanc is famous for pens. WOMAN Yes, and it’s also famous for watches. Rolex is famous for watches. 2 MAN 3 WOMAN Apple is famous for computers, iPads and mobile phones.

Listening 1 Did you know?  * There are short Did you know? sections

throughout the Student’s Book. They are very short high-interest reading texts whose aim is to give extra information on the lesson topic. They can usually be done at any point in a lesson.

Ask students to look the photo and ask Where are the people? (At an airport.) Ask students to read the text and ask comprehension questions, eg What’s the busiest airport in the world? Check students understand busiest, passenger. You don’t need to teach superlative adjectives at this stage, just the meaning of the word.

7

Tell students they’re going to hear three conversations in an airport. Tell them to listen and look at the objects on SB page 12. Play the conversations two or three times if necessary. Then check students’ answers and play the relevant lines in the conversations again. 1.21

Transcript 1 WOMAN Excuse me? I think that’s my suitcase! Your suitcase? No, it isn’t. It’s my MAN suitcase! WOMAN No, look! That’s my name – Jemima Jackson-Jones! Oh. You’re right. I’m so sorry. MAN WOMAN That’s alright. 2 SECURITY OFFICER Excuse me? Is this your bag? No, it isn’t. Ask those people. GIRL Perhaps it’s their bag. SECURITY OFFICER Excuse me? Is this your bag? Oh, yes. It’s our bag. MAN WOMAN Thank you. SECURITY OFFICER Please keep it with you. Right. Sorry. MAN 3 OLD MAN Goodbye! WOMAN Bye! Have a good flight! Look! His tickets are on the table. MAN WOMAN Oh yes, and that’s his passport too. Quick! Excuse me! Your passport and MAN tickets! OLD MAN Oh thank you. 8 Tell students to read through the conversations briefly and see if they can remember the missing words – it doesn’t matter if they’re wrong. Ask some general comprehension questions such as: Which conversation is between friends / between strangers / with an airport official / about a mistake. Play the audio again as students write their answers. If necessary, play the audio a third time and pause after each line to check the answers. Students can practise the conversations in pairs. Encourage students to use appropriate intonation and stress. Answers 1 my suitcase 2 Your suitcase 3 my suitcase 4 my 5 your bag 6 their bag 7 your bag 8 our bag 9 His tickets 10 his passport 11 Your passport 12 tickets

Answers suitcase, bag, tickets, passport

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Grammar Possessive adjectives



9 Demonstrate the meaning of all the possessive adjectives by pointing to objects around you and on students’ desks. Then ask students to point to objects around the room and ask other students to say whose they are, eg That’s Ali’s book. It’s his book. Then ask students to look at exercise 8 again and read out the sentences with possessive adjectives. (Note that students learn apostrophe ’s for possession in Unit 2. Some students will know it, of course.) Ask students to complete the grammar table.

Answers singular It’s my book. They’re my books. my your It’s your suitcase. They’re your suitcases. his It’s his book. They’re his books. her It’s her ticket. They’re her tickets. plural It’s our bag. They’re our bags. our your It’s your key. They’re your keys. their It’s their ticket. They’re their tickets.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 132, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

10 Model conversation 1 in exercise 8 with a student, using different objects. Then ask students to practise in pairs. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation. Encourage students to be (over) dramatic and have fun with the conversation.

Extra idea: Direct students to the photos of the people on SB page 10. Get students to ask and answer about their jobs, eg What are their jobs? She’s a … and he’s a …. . You could then put students in pairs to write some questions and answers.

Listening 2 11

1.22 Check comprehension of the column headings in the table. Check that students know the pronunciation of these place names and ask which countries they are in. Point to them on a map if available.

Play the audio a couple of times, pausing if necessary. Draw the table on the board and invite students to write the answers.

Answers 1 30 2 BA456 3 15 4 007 5 367 6 60 Transcript Emirates flight EK983 to Dubai is now boarding at Gate 45. Air France flight AF261 to Buenos Aires, please go to Gate 30. British Airways flight BA456 to Acapulco. Last call at Gate 15. Thai Airways flight TG007 to Bangkok. Please go immediately to Gate 22. Aeroflot flight SU367 to St Petersburg is now boarding at Gate 60.

Speaking 12 EVERYBODY UP! When you see EVERYBODY UP! in front of an instruction, it means that this is a chance for students to move around the classroom and use the language they have learnt. This kind of short intensive practice can be very lively and also very rewarding if students succeed in completing the task using the language resources available to them.

Ask students to write down the flight number and destination they have chosen – but don’t show it to anybody. Practise the question with the whole class a couple of times before they get up and do it on their own. You can use some different examples to practise, eg Are you on flight NZ054 to Wellington? Are you on flight CA789 to Beijing? Tell students that whenever they find someone on the same flight they should shout out: Yes! (Dubai / Wellington, etc). Do a tally at the end. Which is the most popular destination? Tip: Walk-around activities are a good way to ‘eavesdrop’ on conversations without being too obtrusive. Take a notebook with you and write down both good and incorrect phrases. At the end, you can write correct and incorrect phrases on the board and ask students to identify the incorrect ones and correct them.

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Vocabulary plus p14 This page provides an opportunity for vocabulary enrichment. It’s a flexible section and can be used in several ways. It can be done as a complete lesson or alternatively, there are notes at appropriate points in the unit where a vocabulary set can be usefully learnt and practised. You could also practise a vocabulary set when you have time to spare or give a Vocabulary plus activity to stronger students when they have finished a task ahead of other students. In this unit, we suggest you do the whole of this page after Lesson 3. Note: If possible, bring in pictures of flags and a world map.

Common objects (2) 1 P 1.23 Use objects around the room and in your bag to elicit the words. Then play the audio so that students can practise the pronunciation of each word. Ask students to notice the stress pattern in the two-syllable words (stress on the first syllable) and mark it on the words.





5

Go through the instructions with the students and make sure they understand what they have to do. Reassure them that it’s fine not to remember all the objects or colours! What’s important is doing these mental exercises – they will help their memory improve.



Practise the questions and elicit more examples of questions. Then put students in pairs to do the activity.

Nationalities 6 Revise the countries and nationalities already studied in this unit.

Transcript and answers 1 glasses 2 credit card 3 comb 4 diary 5 tissues 6 tablet 7 wallet 8 notebook 9 coins

Extra idea: Ask students to switch partners and guess what is in their new partner’s bag or pocket. Three correct guesses and they win.

7 Ask students to describe their flag in pairs or to write the description in their notebooks: My flag …

Colours 3 Ask: How many colours do you know? Then allow time for students to complete their answers. Don’t check the answers yet. 4

Ask students to say the colours and spell the words out. Write the answers on the board. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. 1.24

Answers 1 red 2 blue 3 green 4 yellow 5 black 6 white 7 brown 8 pink 9 orange 10 grey 11 purple 36

Ask for the country for each nationality (Egypt, Greece, India, Wales). Ask where these countries are and point to them on a world map. You may want to teach the words stripes, cross, symbol, circle and dragon.

Answers The blue and white flag is Greek. The red, white and green flag is Welsh. The orange, white and green flag is Indian. The red, black and white flag is Egyptian.

2 Ask students to work in pairs. They can name all the things in their pockets or in their bag.

Extra ideas: Hold up different objects of various colours and ask students to name the colours. Name various colours and ask students to name everything of that colour in the room.



Extra ideas: Distribute pictures of flags, one to each student. Ask each student to write a description, then collect the flags and put them on the wall. Collect the descriptions and redistribute them. Ask students to find the flag on the wall that matches their description. Play a flag game – which you may need to research yourself in advance. Either give students names of countries and they tell you the colours in the flag or give them a colour or colours and they must name countries which have that colour in their flag. This is a good game for both colours and countries.

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Everyday English p15 Everyday English provides practice in the everyday functions that students need when getting around in English and interacting with people. The main conversation has a video which provides extra contextualisation and is fun to watch. See page 225 for suggestions on exploiting the video. If you don’t have the video or prefer not to use it, then just play the audio.

Asking about language; making requests 1

1.25 Allow time for students to read the conversation and predict the missing words. Then play the audio. Write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line.

Answers 1 help 2 say 3 speak 4 ask 5 explain Transcript 1 ALI Julie, can you help me, please? TEACHER Yes, Ali. How do you say ’Memnun oldum’ ALI in English? TEACHER Nice to meet you. Sorry, can you speak more slowly? ALI TEACHER Nice to meet you. Thank you. ALI 2 HADIYA Can I ask you a question, Julie? TEACHER Sure. HADIYA Can you explain this? We say ‘a’ doctor but ‘an’ office worker. Why? TEACHER ‘O’ is a vowel. We say ‘an’ with vowels. HADIYA Now I understand. Thanks, Julie. 2



Play the audio. Then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each line. Check answers as a class.

Transcript ALI What does ‘Memnun oldum’ mean, Julie? TEACHER Nice to meet you. ALI Can you repeat that, please? TEACHER Nice ... to ... meet ... you. ALI Nice to meet you. Thanks. Can I ask you another question? We say ‘a’ doctor but ‘an’ office worker. Why? TEACHER ‘O’ is a vowel. We say ‘an’ with vowels. ALI I see. Thanks, Julie. 3 Tell students to work in pairs and ask about the meaning of other words on this page.

Focus on: can This section focuses on common and useful language items. Make requests, eg Can you stand up, Juan? and get students to do what you ask them. Ask students to find questions with Can …? in exercise 1 and write them on the board. Underline can + pronoun and explain that we use can to make requests. Read through the first part of the Focus on box with students. Check students understand menu and bill and ask them to match the phrases to make sentences. Tell them that they can match each item 1–3 with more than one ending. Ask individual students to write the answers on the board and practise the language with the whole class and individually. Then ask students to make more requests, eg Can you write your name here? Thanks! Put them in pairs or small groups to do this.

Answers 1 a/d 2 b/c 3 d

1.26

De-stress!

Although students haven’t studied can yet (the main focus on can for ability is in Unit 8), introduce them to it as part of a phrase they can use to make a request, but don’t go into detail. It’s a good idea to practise the correct, unstressed pronunciation of can /kən/ with them. You could do the Focus on section at this stage if you want to.

These sections do two things. First, they provide very short practical texts. Second, and more importantly, they are there to help students unwind from time to time. You will find a simple de-stress exercise in every unit – not necessarily a physical one, but one that’s easy to do in the classroom as far as possible. For more detailed information about the De-stress sections, see the Introduction page 16.

Answers 2, 3, 5

This first de-stress exercise is based on a Pilates exercise called the Corkscrew, which helps to free up your upper back and get rid of tension. It gives Unit 1

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you a lovely stretch across the top of your back and works against having a rounded back and shoulders from sitting too long! Do it with your students and be careful – do it gently – no brusque or sharp movements! Explain the meaning of De-stress (start by explaining stress). Then read out the instructions, demonstrating the meaning of each word / phrase as you do so. Then divide the text into sections, eg Put your hands behind your head, and get students to do the actions. Finally, students perform all the actions. Remember, you can do this activity at any point in the lesson (or in the unit).

 4

1.27

6 Decide whether you are going to

use the video or simply play the audio (you may not have the video or the necessary video equipment). Ask students to look at the photos and say where the people are (in a hotel / restaurant). Ask them to identify the waiter and receptionist.

JACK Thanks. Can I have the key, please? RECEPTIONIST Yes, here you are. Thanks very much. JACK 3 RECEPTIONIST Good morning. Hi. Can I have the bill, please? JACK RECEPTIONIST Yes, here you are.

5

When you see the karaoke symbol, this means that students can practise the conversation online, taking one part of the conversation themselves.



Put students in pairs and ask a few pairs to make the conversations. Then students act out the conversations in pairs.



MA Stronger students can do this as a memory exercise.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversation. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.



Note that at this level, the speed at which the actors speak (on the video and audio recordings) is not quite natural speed. It’s slowed down slightly to help with students’ understanding.



Ask students to read the conversations and check they understand room, key, here you are. Tell them you are going to play the video or the audio and ask them to match the photos with each conversation. Ask: How do you know? (The conversation is in a restaurant / hotel. The man asks, Can I have the …?)



Each conversation is very short so you can then practise the language as a prediction exercise. For each conversation play the first line and ask students to repeat it. Then ask What’s the next line? Elicit answers and then play the next line and practise it. Continue through each conversation in this way.

we don’t say … / we say …

For other video techniques, see page 225.

This section focuses on common errors that students of many different language backgrounds are likely to make. By drawing students’ attention to them, and making it very clear that these are errors, you can help students avoid such mistakes.



Check students understand the heading and explain that the section focuses on common mistakes in the unit. Give some examples of mistakes. Then ask students to cover the green we say … side and to see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.



This section focuses on the following errors:



• omission of article • omission of subject • omission of auxiliary verb in questions



Answers 1B 2C 3A Transcript 1 WAITER Good evening. Good evening. Can I have the LAURA menu, please? Yes, here you are. WAITER Thank you. LAURA Good afternoon. My name’s 2 JACK Humphreys. RECEPTIONIST Ah, good afternoon. You’re in room 27, Mr Humphreys. 38

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2 UNIT FOCUS

Family and home GRAMMAR: have; possessive ’s; there is / there are VOCABULARY: family; rooms and furniture; places in town; large numbers FUNCTIONS: : talking about your family; describing your home; talking about

Lesson 1 We have six children. pp16–17 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise the different forms of the verb have, talk about relationships using possessive ’s and use vocabulary to describe families. Note: It will be useful to have photos of weddings and a DVD of Star Wars (or download a clip from Star Wars from the internet).

Note: Star Wars characters left to right in the photo: Yoda (green mask), Emperor Palpatine (black robe), a stormtrooper (white spacesuit), Chewbacca (monster), Obi-Wan Kenobi (at back, brown hood and robe), Darth Vadar (black space suit), C-3PO (gold robot mask at the back). It isn’t clear who is Princess Leia, the woman in the orange dress or the bride. Student can give their opinions.

Culture note: Star Wars is a film series created by the American director and producer George Lucas and is divided into two trilogies. The first film (1977) was a worldwide success and the other two films in the first trilogy (1980, 1983) were equally successful.



The second trilogy was a prequel and the films were released in 1999, 2002 and 2005.



The story is set in a galaxy ‘far far away in the distant past’ and concerns an epic battle between the forces of good (the Jedi warriors) and the evil Sith. There is an energy called the ‘Force’ that some people are able to use for good or evil. The soldiers of the Sith are known as ‘stormtroopers’.



One of the main characters in the first trilogy is Darth Vader (a Jedi who turned to ‘the dark side’). Fighting against him are the Jedi knight Obi-Wan Kenobi, Luke Skywalker, Han Solo (a smuggler) and Princess Leia. They eventually defeat the Sith. The prequel shows the descent of Darth Vader (originally called ‘Anakin Skywalker’) to the dark side.



Extra idea: Ask students if they like the idea of a Star Wars wedding. What theme would they prefer? Brainstorm some funny ideas for themed weddings.

2

Draw a family tree on the board (perhaps your family tree) and ask students to identify the names of the different people in the tree, eg Mike is my (father). Play the audio and practise the pronunciation of any difficult

You first! Ask students to look carefully at the photo for a minute or two. Check students understand the question and put them in pairs to discuss it. Walk around and listen to students’ answers. Someone is likely to mention that it’s a Star Wars wedding and point out some of the characters.

Vocabulary Family

Extra idea: Ask students to look quickly at the photo and guess how many people are in it, then count the numbers. I think there are 24. Maybe there are 20.

1 Ask: What kind of wedding is this? and elicit or tell students that it’s a Star Wars wedding. Ask the questions and check students understand fan and characters. If there are any ‘experts’ in the class, ask them to tell you just a little about the story and the characters. Help them with the language. Students might want to identify the characters in the photo, eg That’s Darth Vader. If possible, bring in some video clips from Star Wars and ask students to talk about the kind of film it is and what the story is about. Don’t worry about correcting language as the point of this is simply to introduce the topic and get students interested.

places; asking for directions

1.28

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Transcript I love this photo. It’s my wedding photo so Pete and I are now husband and wife! My mother is on the right, next to me. And just behind her is my sister and her son – he’s in black. And that’s my father behind me – he’s Darth Vader! Next to him, on the left is my brother – he’s a stormtrooper!

words. Ask students which names for family members are similar in their own language and which are different.

Transcript aunt, brother, daughter, father, grandfather, grandmother, husband, mother, parents, sister, son, uncle, wife 3 Explain that the pale green figures refer to female and the turquoise ones refer to male. Allow time for students to work in pairs. Then check the answers as a class.

MA Students who need less support should cover the words in 2.

Answers 1 grandfather 2 aunt 3 father 4 sister 5 husband 6 son Parents is not used. 4



MA To provide extra challenge, ask students to work in pairs, cover the page, look at the wedding photo again and describe who Sally’s family members are. Students take turns to check their answers by looking at the text on SB page 17.

6 Explain the meaning of only child or ask students to explain (= no brothers or sisters). Do the first item together. Then allow time for students to work alone or in pairs.

Answers

GUESS Encourage students to work in pairs to discuss and write their opinions. Check students understand Let’s … . Then see if everybody in the class agrees. Don’t check the answers yet. The answers will come up in the next exercise.



Extra idea: Ask students about wedding customs in their countries. What is different or special about weddings there? If possible, bring in pictures of weddings and ask students to identify the family members in each one.

Culture note: You may want to discuss differences in words for family members. Some languages, for example, have different names for male or female cousins, or for maternal or paternal grandparents.



Extra idea: Ask students to do a survey of the class. Each student can have a different survey question, eg how many people are an only child, how many have one brother, or one sister and so on. They should walk around asking everybody in the class and making notes of the answers. Finally they should sit down, summarise the results and tell the class.

7

Ask students to close their books and work in pairs or teams to write as many family words as they can in three minutes.

5

1.29 Demonstrate the meaning of the phrases on the left / right, etc by pointing to people in the photo or to objects in the room. Use the Darth Vader helmet images on SB page 17 to help with understanding.



Allow time for students to read the text and look at the photo. Point out that on the right here means from the viewpoint of the person looking at the photo. Play the audio and check the answers.

Answers 1 husband 2 wife 3 mother 4 sister 5 son 6 father

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1 Tan

2 Paul

3 Paul

4 Tan

Grammar 1 have 8 Tell students to read the texts in exercise 6 and find the missing words for the grammar table. Allow time for students to work individually. Then check the answers and write them on the board. Ask: When do we use ‘have’ and ‘has’? When do we use ‘do’ and ‘does’? What do you notice about word order in questions? (They use do or does followed by the subject

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followed by have.) What do you notice about short answers? (They use do or does but not has or have.)

Answers affirmative I / you / we / they have he / she / it has negative I / you / we / they don’t have he / she / it doesn’t have questions and short answers Do I / you / we / they have …? Yes, I do. / No, they don’t Does he / she / it have …? Yes, he does. / No, he doesn’t.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 133, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

9

1.30 Ask students to complete the conversations. You may want to discuss differing answers. Then play the audio to check the answers.

Answers 1 don’t have 2 I have 3 have 4 has Transcript 1 WOMAN PAUL 2 WOMAN TAN

Paul, tell me about your family. Is it big? No, I don’t have brothers and sisters. But I have five cousins. Tan, do you have a big family? Yes, I do. We have six children and my sister has nine!

Extra idea: Ask students to role-play interviews with Paul and Tan. Ask volunteers to present them to the class. This will practise second person questions and first person answers. Then ask students to interview a partner about Paul and Tan. This will practise third person questions and answers.

Grammar 2 Possessive ’s You may want to teach the word apostrophe to help explain this grammar point. Explain the

difference between ’s and s’ using examples from the class, eg Lin’s ruler, the books’ pages. Then look at the examples in the table. Point out that we say children’s because children is plural. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 133, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. 10 Do the first item together with the class. Then ask students to work in pairs to complete the exercise.

Answers 1 true 2 false (My aunt is my father’s / mother’s sister.) 3 true 4 false (My cousin is my uncle’s daughter. / My niece is my sister’s / brother’s daughter.) 5 true

Extra idea: Do a dictation using clues for family members, eg Number 1 is my sister’s daughter etc. Then ask students to tell you the answers and dictate the clues back to you, eg Number 1 is your niece.

Speaking 11 THINK This exercise encourages students to reflect on assumptions and expectations in their own culture compared with other cultures. Give them 30 seconds to collect their ideas individually before talking to other people. Ask students to think of real examples of families they know or have read about. 12 Ask students to find out about names too, eg Do you have brothers and sisters? Yes, I do, I have a brother. What’s his name? My brother’s name is … . Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation. Ask volunteers to tell the class about their family. The other students can ask questions. Tell the class about your family and encourage them to ask you questions.

Extra ideas: If you didn’t use your family tree in exercise 2, describe it and ask students to draw it in their books. Or describe a fictional family tree. Encourage lots of Unit 2

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‘schwa’ sound and is often used when a vowel sound isn’t stressed. Repeat the schwa sound several times and practise it with the whole class and individually. Then practise cooker again.

questions about spelling of names and relationships.

Play a find someone who ... game. Ask students to find someone who has two uncles / nephews or nieces / a child / an aunt / a sister-in-law / two brothers / a small family / a grandfather.



Lesson 2 There’s a painting on the wall. pp18–19 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise there is / there are, learn names for rooms and furniture and practise talking about your home. Note: If possible, bring in magazine pictures of different kinds of rooms.

You first! Ask students to compare their bedrooms at home with the room in the painting. Talk about furniture, colours, size of room, size of window, floor, etc. Give some examples by talking about your own bedroom. There’s no need to teach extra vocabulary, but see how much students can say on their own.







Answers in the painting: bed, chair, door, floor, mirror, painting, table / desk, wall, window. Not furniture – door, floor, painting, wall, window

2 P 1.31 Play the audio and ask students to repeat each word chorally and individually. Practise the stress pattern in these words: armchair, bookcase, cupboard (point out the silent ‘p’), television.

42

Practise the pronunciation of cooker and explain that the final vowel sound is called the

Transcript and answers armchair, bath, bed, bookcase, chair, cooker, cupboard, desk, door, floor, fridge, mirror, painting, shower, sink, sofa, table, television, toilet, wall, wardrobe, window Refer to the Pronunciation pages on SB page 156 for more practice of the schwa sound.

3 Remind students of the things they said for You first! They should now be able to add more information about the furniture in their room. Allow time for individual and pair work. Teach any extra vocabulary items as they come up. 4

Vocabulary Rooms and furniture 1 Ask students if they know this painting and the artist. (The painting is called Bedroom in Arles and is by the Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh, (1853–1890).) Ask: Do you like it? Why? / Why not? See how many things students can name without looking at the list. Make two lists on the board: Things in the painting. Things not in the painting. Underline items of furniture so that it’s clear which things aren’t furniture.

Play the audio and ask students to repeat the words. Play the audio again and ask them to underline the words with the schwa sound. Elicit and check answers and practise these words.











Check understanding of the name of each room. Elicit an example sentence, eg A bathroom has a bath. Then ask students to predict what kind of furniture is in each room. Play the audio to check their answers. 1.32

Transcript and answers 1 A bathroom has a bath, a mirror, a shower and a toilet. And maybe a chair. 2 A bedroom has a bed, a wardrobe and a mirror. And maybe an armchair, a bookcase, a chair, a painting and a television. 3 A dining room has a chair, a table, and a cupboard. And maybe a mirror and a painting. 4 A kitchen has a chair, a cooker, a cupboard, a fridge, a sink and a table. And maybe a television. 5 A living room has an armchair, a bookcase, a sofa and a television. And maybe a chair, a table, a mirror and a painting. 6 An office has a chair, a desk and a bookcase. And maybe an armchair and a painting.

Unit 2

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Extra idea: Bring in 8–10 pictures of different kinds of rooms and ask students to list the items in each picture. Then stick the pictures on the wall with numbers attached. Say one or two items for one of the pictures. Students have to tell you the number of the picture.

5 EVERYBODY UP! Ask students to stand up and walk around the room. Their task is to ask questions to find one person who fits each of the descriptions. When they have found five names, they can sit down. Demonstrate asking questions for the first item, eg Do you have an office at home? Monitor students as they are doing the activity and make notes on use of grammar. Give praise and corrective feedback at the end of the activity. 6 For this exercise, students only need to answer true or false. (They don’t need to use the target grammar yet unless they are happy to.)



Answers 1 true 2 true 3 true 4 true 5 false 6 true



Extra ideas: Ask students to correct the false sentence in exercise 6 (5 There isn’t a sofa in the room.).



Make true and false statements about Van Gogh’s bedroom. If the sentence is true, students should repeat it. If it’s false, they should say: That isn’t true! You can do this first with books open, and then with books closed. Some ideas: There’s a bed. (T) There’s a table. (T) There are two doors. (T) There’s a mobile phone. (F) There isn’t a suitcase. (T) There aren’t any bananas. (T)



As a follow-up exercise, students can work in pairs taking turns to make statements about the classroom which their partner must repeat if it’s true or say That isn’t true!

8 Demonstrate the difference between in and on by using objects in the classroom or on your desk. Ask students to write six more questions about the painting. Then ask them to close their books and ask a partner.

Grammar there is / there are



7 Tell students to look at the sentences in exercise 6 and highlight the use of there is / there are. Allow time for them to complete the grammar table individually or in pairs. Check the answers as a class. Check the pronunciation of There is (There’s) and There are.



Answers affirmative There is (There’s) a table. There are five paintings. negative There is a television. There are three chairs. questions and short answers Is there a sofa? Yes, there is. / No, there isn’t. Are there two doors? Yes, there are. / No, there aren’t.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 133 now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.



Answers 1 Is there a phone in Van Gogh’s bedroom? No, there isn’t (a phone in the bedroom). 2 Is there a cupboard in the room? No there isn’t (a cupboard in the room). 3 Are there things on the table? Yes there are (things on the table). 4 Are there things on the chairs? No there aren’t (things on the chairs). 5 Are there paintings on the walls? Yes there are (paintings on the walls). 6 Is there a person on the bed? No there isn’t (a person on the bed).



Grammar note: We say a the first time we mention something. The second time we say the, eg There’s a table in the room. The table is small.



We also say the if we know what we’re referring to or if there’s only one of something, eg The bed is orange.



Note that after there is / there are we use a not the.



Extra idea: You could extend this exercise to asking questions about the classroom. Ask students to look around the room for one minute. One student in each pair closes their eyes, while the other asks questions about the furniture. Then they switch roles. Unit 2

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9

Use this activity to review furniture and colours. You may also ask students to test your memory by asking you questions.



Many students hate being asked to draw. Reassure them by saying a sketch or plan is fine. It doesn’t have to be a Van Gogh!



Write these sentences on the board for students to complete: The bed is _____, ____ and ____. The chairs are _____ and ______. The walls and doors are ______.

De-stress! Laughter is a great antidote to stress. It raises your energy, it increases the number of endorphins in your body, it increases your white blood cells and it massages your stomach. Tell students: Laughter is very good for you! Ask: Do you laugh a lot? Do you watch funny videos? What films make you laugh? If you have the technology, bring into class a video clip that you find funny (or you can send students the link or write it on the board). Ask students to share links too. Remember that you can do this section at any point in the lesson (or unit).

Reading 10 Ask students to describe the photos that go with the article on SB page 19. Talk about the colours, the number of floors and which countries they think they are in. Encourage students to use vocabulary for different types of rooms and furniture when they talk about the photos, eg I think there’s a bedroom in this house but there isn’t a kitchen. I think there’s a cooker. I don’t think there’s a bathroom, but I think there’s a shower. Ask students to write down their guesses. 11 Allow a few minutes for quiet reading time and tell students to check their ideas from exercise 10. Students may ask you about unfamiliar words; help them to use the context to work out the meaning whenever possible.



Ask students to match the texts and the photos. Check the answers as a class.

Answers A2, B4, C1, D3

12 Check comprehension of the words in bold. Give examples of how to use the context to work out the meaning of new words, eg photo C illustrates the meaning of container. 44

Windows earlier in the sentence gives a clue to the meaning of views. Also ask students which words are easy to guess because they are the same or similar to words in their own language, eg electricity.



Answers containers = big metal boxes, they are used on ships for carrying things comfortable = pleasant to spend time in electricity = a form of energy that produces light, heat and power entrance = the place where you go into a building open-plan = with no walls dividing up the space views = the things you can see from, eg a window steps = something you walk on to go up to a different level

13 Ask individual students to read out the questions and elicit the answer to the first question. Note that kitchen and bathroom are not counted as rooms. Put students in pairs to ask and answer the questions.





Answers 1 a) 2 b) 1 & 4 2 a) 1 b) 1 & 4

c) 3 d) 2 & 4 c) 1 & 3 d) 4

Extra idea: Extend this activity by asking additional questions about the texts, eg Which house has three floors? Which house doesn’t have a garden?

Speaking and writing 14 Encourage students to talk and share opinions. Brainstorm ideas for the second question. Possible answers: colourful and unusual houses, small but comfortable houses, interesting and unusual rooms and houses. Students who have lived in other countries may want to speak about differences in homes between countries that they know.



Answers All these houses are in the Netherlands, and Van Gogh himself was Dutch.

Unit 2

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15 This is the first of regular pairwork informationgap activities. They appear in every second unit throughout the book. In these activities, each student looks at a different page at the back of the Student’s Book. Make sure they don’t look at each other’s information while doing the activity.

Check students understand what they have to do in this activity. Explain that they have different pictures and should make notes about their picture before listening to each other’s description and drawing a plan of their partner’s flat. Finally, they compare their drawings with the original picture in the book.

Answers house flat number of floors 2 1 bedrooms 3 2 bathrooms and 3 2 toilets sitting room, sitting room, sitting room, dining room, dining room, kitchen kitchen, office kitchen office garden, garden, none swimming pool, garage of these garage 16 You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish it for homework. Begin by asking one or two confident students to describe their home and then ask students to do this in pairs. They can draw a plan of their home to illustrate the description. If they are posting homework on a class blog, they can add a picture of their home. Use the homework to get feedback on how well students are handling the new grammar and vocabulary.

Explore The Explore exercises give students the opportunity to go beyond the page and find out more about some aspect of the topic. They should do the research online, make notes and report back, working either alone or in pairs. You may want to set this up in the classroom by suggesting possible websites or just by eliciting suggestions for words and phrases to type into the search engine. For this activity, students should type into their browser: unusual houses in (name of country) and look at different images. They choose a house and make brief notes on it. You might like to give them some questions to guide their note-taking, eg What’s the name of the house? Where is it? What rooms are in it? What’s special about it? They report back in the next session.

Lesson 3 Is there a bank? pp20–21 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise questions with there is / there are, learn names of places in a town, ask for directions and describe places.

You first! Students may talk about their home town or the town where they are (if it is different). You may need to teach some extra words to help students with this question, eg church, temple, mosque, meeting house, social centre, library. 1

Extra idea: Ask students to work in pairs. One partner describes their home, the other draws a picture. Tip: When giving feedback on homework you may want to explain your criteria for evaluation. Some students may think you are only looking at grammar, so it is worth explaining that you consider use of vocabulary and creative ideas, too.



Check comprehension of each place name on the map. Ask: Where can you eat? Where can you buy food? Where can you get medicine? etc. Play the audio as students write the answers. Then play the audio again so that students can repeat each word. Check pronunciation of any difficult items (chemist’s starts with a /k/ sound, station has a /ʃ/ sound in the middle). Note also that restaurant is usually pronounced with only two syllables. Ask students which place names are very similar in their own language and which are very different. 1.33

Transcript and answers 1 bank 2 restaurant 3 cinema 4 station 5 post office 6 art gallery 7 supermarket 8 chemist’s

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2 Prepare students for this activity by reminding them of the word order of questions with there is / there are. Then remind them of singular and plural forms of each question type. This activity mixes up all four kinds of question to provide a thorough review of question forms with there is / are and do / does + have. Check students understand near.

Check comprehension of the new vocabulary items by asking, eg What can you do at an airport? What can you see in a museum? What is the difference between an art gallery and a museum?



Ask students to answer the questions about their hometown, or about the town where they are. Ask individual students to read out the questions and answer them, using short answers. Then put them in pairs to do the activity.







Extra idea: Extend this activity by asking students to make four more sentences, two true and two false. They should write the sentences in their notebooks. Then ask individual students to read out a sentence each. The others in the class will say if it is true or false.

6

1.34 Ask students to look at the map on SB page 20, read the conversation and predict the missing words. Then play the audio to check. Write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing to allow students to repeat each line.



MA To help weaker students, write an example for each type of question on the board.

Transcript MAN Excuse me, where’s the train station? WOMAN It’s in Carlton Road. It’s next to the supermarket. MAN Thanks. And is there a restaurant near here? WOMAN Yes, there’s a restaurant between the cinema and the chemist’s.

Answers 1 Is 2 Are 3 Is 4 Do 5 Is 6 Is 7 Does 8 Does

3 Give some examples of the kind of questions students could ask, eg Is there a station in your town? Then ask students to work in pairs.

Note: You may want to look at Everyday English at this point to do some work on directions and more vocabulary for places in a town.

4 Tell students to look at the pictures of the dog and the bench. Ask: Where is the dog in picture A? Then check again, by asking: In which picture is the dog in front of the bench? Provide further examples of the meaning of the prepositions using objects in the classroom.



Answers A behind B between C next to D in front of E opposite

5 Students decide whether the sentences are true or false according to the map. They then correct the two false sentences. Check answers as a class.

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Answers 3 The post office is opposite the chemist’s. 4 The supermarket is behind the chemist’s.

Answers 1 train station 2 supermarket 3 restaurant 4 restaurant 5 cinema 6 chemist’s

7 Brainstorm words that might go in each gap in the conversation in exercise 6 (list some on the board if necessary). Model one example conversation with a student. Then ask two students to model an example conversation. Students then practise their conversations in pairs. MA Stronger students can practise with books closed. 8 P The letter ‘o’ can be pronounced in different ways. Begin by practising the pronunciation of not with students and isolate the short vowel sound /ɒ/ and practise it. You may want contrast the /ɒ/ sound with the /əʊ/ sound in sofa and post. Ask students for other examples of words with ‘o’ and identify which sound it uses.

Students could work in pairs to say the words, and underline the words with the /ɒ/ sound.

1.35 Play the audio, pausing for students 9 P to repeat each word.

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Answers opposite, office, shopping



Transcript cooker, in front of, opposite, post office, shopping mall, sofa, sports centre



Write all the figures on the board and ask students to tell you the numbers. Invite volunteers to write the numbers on the board. Play the audio, pausing for students to repeat each word. Note that we can say a hundred or one hundred. 1.36

Answers 1 ninety 2 a hundred 3 and fifteen 4 four hundred and twenty-three 5 thirty thousand 6 fifty thousand 7 a / one hundred thousand Transcript seventy, ninety, a hundred, a hundred and four, a hundred and fifteen, four hundred, four hundred and twenty-three, ten thousand, thirty thousand, fifty thousand, a hundred thousand, a million



Extra ideas: Write a list of numbers on the board that have a special meaning for you (eg the number of your house, the age of your daughter, the number of people in the class). Students try to guess what they represent.



Prepare a number dictation, eg 385, 68, 943, 5,602, 23,476 and ask students to write down the numbers. Then ask them to repeat the numbers back to you.

Listening 11 Point out the map and the cities mentioned in question 2. Ask students to read out each question. Take a class vote on the correct answer. Don’t check the answers yet. 12

Play the audio and check the answers to exercise 11. You could also use one or two sentences from the audio as a dictation and extra practice for writing large numbers. 1.37

2 Birmingham

Transcript The UK is a small island, but it has a population of 63 million. London, the UK’s capital, has a population of eight million. Four of the main cities in England are Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds and Birmingham. Manchester and Liverpool both have a population of about 465,000. The population of Leeds is about 751,000 and the population of Birmingham is about one million.

Vocabulary Large numbers 10

Answers 1 63 million



Extra ideas: Ask students about the map, eg Which countries are shown here? Discuss the differences between the UK (United Kingdom), Great Britain and England. (The UK is England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Great Britain is England, Scotland and Wales.)



Ask, eg Which cities do you think are the biggest? Do you know anything about these places? What other cities in Britain do you know?



Ask students about the population of the towns and cities where they live.

13

Ask students to read the text. Teach / Elicit any difficult vocabulary, eg famous, rugby, village, wedding. Ask students to predict what sort of words are missing, eg places, numbers, prepositions. Play the audio while students listen and write in the missing words. Write the answers on the board.



Encourage active guessing about the location of the place. Use a map to show where the three places are. Note: the pronunciation of Portmeirion is /pɔ:tˈmerɪən/.



Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line.



1.38

Answers 1 Europe 2 three million 3 next to 4 restaurants 5 fifteen 6 3,000 Where am I? c) Portmeirion, Wales Transcript Welcome to today’s episode of Guess where I am! Unit 2

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Today I’m in a very beautiful place. It’s in a country in Europe that’s famous for the game of rugby. There are about three million people in this country. I’m in a village next to the sea. It’s a very small village but there are a lot of cafés and restaurants. The village doesn’t have a post office but there are two hotels and fifteen houses for tourists. It’s a very popular place for weddings and there are about 3,000 visitors every day in the summer! Where am I? a) Portofino, Italy? b) Dubrovnik, Croatia? c) Portmeirion, Wales? Extra idea: Ask students to describe the photo.



Students can do the task in class or for homework and you can check answers in the next lesson. Tell them to look on YouTube and watch a video of the song. In class, they could find the words and sing the chorus if they want to.

Extra questions for class or for homework



Movies Which film is set in the future?



Which one is about a dangerous sport?



What nationality are the directors?



What are some of the things 2001: A Space Odyssey is famous for? (the music, the voice of Hal the computer, the cinematography)



Music Can you sing the chorus of this song?

Writing 14 Help students to brainstorm names of places they could write about. They can be international places or places in their home country or in the country where they are right now. Write questions on the board about things they could include in their descriptions, eg Where is this place? Why is it famous? Is it near the sea / in the mountains? What places are there? Is it popular with tourists? Give a short description of a place you know well and ask students to take notes. They can use their notes to write the description in class before starting their own description.

Answers Movies 1 2001 2 Million The name of the computer is Hal. The main actors in the second film are Clint Eastwood, Hilary Swank and Morgan Freeman. Music 1 Happy

Culture notes: 2001: A Space Odyssey is recognised as one of the most influential films ever made. It was released in 1968 and directed by the American film director Stanley Kubrick. The screenplay was based on The Sentinel, a short story by sciencefiction writer Arthur C Clarke. The film is about successive encounters between human beings at various stages of their history and strange black monoliths which appear to affect their evolution. A famous part of the film takes place in the future and is about a journey to Jupiter to trace a signal from one such monolith. The film music is very famous, as is the part played by the very humansounding computer Hal.



Million Dollar Baby stars Clint Eastwood, who plays Frankie Dunn, a brilliant but unsuccessful older boxing trainer who reluctantly agrees to train Maggie Fitzgerald, a woman amateur boxer, played by American actress Hilary Swank. Under his guidance she becomes very successful but breaks her neck in a $1 million match. Hilary Swank won an Academy Award for Best Actress.

MA Ask weaker students to write just two or three sentences. Stronger students should write a paragraph.



15 This may be done in groups or as a whole class. Use this opportunity to provide praise and corrective feedback. You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish it for homework. Tip: Collect the descriptions (or ask students to email them to you) and use them to collect correct and incorrect examples to review the grammar and vocabulary from this lesson in the next lesson.

Movies & Music Teach / Elicit any difficult vocabulary, eg science fiction, boxer, space. Elicit from students that Pharrell’s full name is Pharrell Williams. 48

Unit 2

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Happy, written by American singer / songwriter Pharrell Williams, is one of the best-selling singles of all time. It was first released in 2013. The music video of the song is probably one of the reasons for its popularity. Pharrell Williams (often called just ‘Pharrell’) is also a rapper, record producer and fashion designer.

Vocabulary plus p22



4 Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each word.

Physical appearance 5

People 1



Ask students to describe the people in the photo. They could guess their ages and nationality. Ask: What is the time of year? How do you know? (December, because there is a Christmas tree behind them.) Ask students to read the sentences and predict the missing words. Then play the audio to check. Play the audio again, if necessary. 1.39

2 Review the plural forms and the pronunciation of man / men, woman / women (/wɪmɪn/) and people. Identify which plurals are regular and irregular.

3





Answers singular one man one woman one boy one girl one child one person

plural two men (irr) two women (irr) two boys two girls two children (irr) two people (irr)

Play the audio, pausing for students to write their answers. Check the answers and invite students to write the answers on the board. 1.40

Transcript and answers 1 women 2 woman 3 men

1.41 Ask if students know any of the words and ask more questions to check comprehension, eg Is Rihanna attractive or beautiful? Play the audio, pausing to allow students to repeat each word. Pay attention to syllables and stress, eg attractive, beautiful. Ask students to work in pairs to discuss the questions. Then compare answers as a class.

Answers 1 ugly 2 attractive, good-looking, ugly Transcript attractive, beautiful, good-looking, pretty, ugly

Answers 1 man 2 woman 3 boy 4 girl Transcript The man in the photo is Polly’s husband. The woman is her mother. The boy on the left is her son. The girl on the right is her daughter.

4 man 5 people 6 person

6 Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Elicit opinions about the people, then put students in pairs to discuss their opinions. You could also ask students to describe the people in the photos or they could guess their jobs, ages and nationality.

Personality 7 Ask students if they know any of the words. Ask them to give an example of a person who is each of these things. Say the words and get the class and individual students to repeat them. Ask which words they would use to describe themselves. Give an example by describing yourself.



Answers 1 horrible 2 friendly / warm / kind / nice, shy / quiet



Extra idea: Put students in pairs and ask them to mime a word from exercise 7 for their partner to guess. Give an example by miming a word yourself, eg kind. You may get this kind of exchange: You’re kind. – No, I’m friendly.



MA Write descriptions on the board and ask students to match them with the words, eg Unit 2

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doesn’t talk much (quiet), helps other people (kind), doesn’t like big groups of people (shy), makes you laugh (funny). 8

Ask individual students to read out the examples. This activity may be done in groups. Monitor students as they work, making notes of any common problems with grammar, vocabulary or pronunciation. Ask students to tell the class about someone in their group. You may want to set this as a written task for homework.

Play the audio or video and ask students to circle the correct words. Elicit the answers line by line. Play again, pausing after each line. Ask students to repeat each line and practise where necessary. Check students understand Excuse me, How do I get there? Go along this road. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line.



Everyday English p23

Transcript JACK Excuse me, is there a hotel near here? MEL Yes, there’s one in Chart Street. JACK How do I get there? MEL Go along this road. Turn right, turn left, then turn left into Chart Street. The hotel is on the right. JACK Thanks very much.

Warm-up Start by checking and practising the words on the map. The following words are new (ie not in Lesson 3): bus stop, theatre, school, tourist information, hospital, car park. Ask students to read out the names of the roads.

Asking for directions 1 Point out ‘You are here’ on the map as that gives students the perspective for the activity. Stand facing the board as if you are facing the Student’s Book page. Indicate left and right using your arms. Practise the example language and point out the pronunciation of the short form Where’s = Where is. 2 Ask a volunteer to stand up. Give them some instructions for walking around the classroom. Model Turn left and Turn right. Then ask everybody to stand up and take turns giving instructions to their partner. 3

1.42 6 See page 225 for suggestions on exploiting the video. Decide whether you are going to use the video or simply play the audio.



If you are using the video, play the video silently and point out Jack and Mel. If you are using the audio, play the audio once through without stopping. Ask: What do you think Jack and Mel are doing? Elicit suggestions and teach the phrase, He’s asking for directions.



Note: You might want to draw students’ attention to the use of one to avoid saying the same word (hotel) again.



Allow time for students to read the conversation and predict the missing words.

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Answers 1 hotel 2 one 3 get 4 right

4

Ask students to practise the conversation in pairs, then ask a few pairs to act out the conversation for the class.



MA For an extra challenge, students can try to act out the conversation with books closed.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversation. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

5

1.43 Ask students to look at the map again while they listen to the directions. Play the audio and make sure everybody has written an answer. If any students are unsure, play the audio again. Practise and repeat useful phrases on the audio.



Answers 1 the bus stop 2 the station Transcript 1 WOMAN MAN

How do I get there? Turn left into High Street. Go along the road, then turn right into Green Lane. Then turn left into Upper Road. It’s on the left.

Unit 2

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2 WOMAN MAN

Go along this road and turn right into Upper Road. Then turn left into Top Lane and left into Chart Street. Go along Chart Street and it’s on the right, opposite the hotel. Thanks very much



Extra idea: Point out different ways of asking for directions (Where’s the …? Is there a … near here? How do I get to …?) and write them on the board. Point to one of them and say the name of a place, eg



TEACHER

(point to Where’s the …? on the board) bus stop





STUDENTS

Where’s the bus stop?

6 Students can work in pairs, taking turns to ask for and give directions. If necessary, make a list of places on the board. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any problems with grammar, vocabulary or pronunciation. Praise students and provide corrective feedback. Ask volunteers to present their dialogues to the class. 7 Read out the instructions and make sure students understand what they have to do. Ask confident students to model the role-play. Provide examples of language you expect to hear.

MA Students who finish early can write a sixline conversation in their notebooks.

we don’t say … / we say …

This section focuses on the following errors:



• • • • • •



Ask students to cover the green we say … side and to see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

incorrect word choice omitting the auxiliary in questions incorrect word order in questions incorrect plural noun form incorrect use of auxiliary incorrect subject / verb agreement

Unit 2

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Units 1&2 review

pp24–25

Reading

Grammar

1 Ask students to describe the photos and say what they know about Haiti and about Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt. Check students understand adopted. Discuss the questions with the class. Encourage lots of active guessing, but don’t give away the answers.

4 Allow time for students to write sentences in their notebooks. Check their work as you walk around the classroom. Invite students to write their sentences on the board. Check the answers. Then ask some additional questions using the possessive ’s, eg Is Angelina Brad’s mother? Is Brad Maddox’s father? etc. If students have problems with possessive ’s, refer back to the grammar on SB page 17. You can also review possessive adjectives from SB page 13, eg Brad and Angelina are their parents.

2 Allow two or three minutes of silent reading time. Discuss the answers with the class. Students may arrive at the correct answer: Both families have adopted children. If they don’t, elicit and practise the sentence. Check that students understand new vocabulary, eg dead, earthquake. Ask about the meaning of biological (which is explained in the text).



Answers 1 sixteen, fourteen, nine and three years old. 2 Haiti 3 Brad and Angelina have adopted children. 4 six children

3 Check the answers and ask students to say the correct sentences.



Answers 1 Carter is on the sofa in the photo. 2 Grady has two sisters and a brother. 3 There are four children in the Augustan family. 4 Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have a big family with six children.



Extra ideas: Extend the activity by asking students to make two further false sentences and asking their partner (or the class) to correct them.



Ask additional questions about the article, eg Are Mark and Julie famous? How many sisters does Grady have? How many sisters does Zahara have? Where are Brad and Angelina’s children from? Is it a good idea to adopt children from different countries?



5 Use this exercise to evaluate how well students have understood the grammar points be and have. If necessary, refer back to the grammar on SB pages 17 and 18. Review question forms by asking students to change each sentence into a question.



Answers 1 has 2 don’t have 3 aren’t 4 are 5 is 6 isn’t

6 Focus on the answers first and make sure students understand they have to write the questions that have these answers. Review yes / no question forms, referring back to SB pages 17 and 18 if necessary.



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Answers 1 Mark Augustan is Carter’s father. 2 Carter is Julie’s son. 3 Maddox is Pax’s brother. 4 Zahara is Brad Pitt’s daughter. 5 Julie is Mark’s wife.

Answers 1 Is Carter British? 2 Are Mark and Julie Augustan from the UK? 3 Do Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have a big family? 4 Are there four children in the Augustan family? 5 Is Haiti a Caribbean Island? 6 Are Emma and Cana adopted?

Units 1&2 Review

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Listening and writing 7

Allow time for students to read the table and check that students understand what type of information goes into each box, eg a nationality, a number, a job.



Play the audio all the way through. Ask students to compare answers in pairs. Play the audio again and check the answers. Write the answers on the board. Ask these additional questions about the audio: How old are Carmen’s other children? Where is Marie’s daughter from? How old is she?

1.44

Answers nationality number of rooms job number of children adopted child’s nationality age of adopted child

Argentinian four journalist two Vietnamese five

Transcript MARIE Hi, I’m Marie Colbert. I’m your neighbour. I’m in flat 23. CARMEN Oh great! Come in. Sit down. It’s great to meet you. My name’s Carmen Sanchez. MARIE Where are you from, Carmen? CARMEN My husband and I are both Argentinian. MARIE Oh, OK. Your flat is lovely. CARMEN Yes, it’s great. There are four rooms and I have an office too. I’m a journalist. MARIE Really? And are these your children? They’re beautiful! CARMEN Yes. Paulo is three and Martin is five. Martin is adopted. He’s Vietnamese. MARIE Oh really! He’s adopted! We have one child and she’s adopted too. CARMEN Wow – we both have adopted children! What nationality is your daughter? MARIE She’s Mexican. She’s five too. CARMEN So Martin and your daughter are the same age. MARIE Yes!

8 Remind students to write complete sentences in a paragraph format. If necessary, play the audio again so that students can make more detailed notes than just the answers in the table in exercise 7. You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish for homework.

Preposition park Preposition park is an exercise on prepositions that occurs in each review unit. Use the pictures to contrast the meaning of at with in or on or under. Ask if students can remember the other prepositions from page 20. Check students understand wallet. Allow time for students to work individually. Then check the answers as a class. Ask students to read out each sentence.



Answers 1 in 2 on 3 in 4 in 5 to 6 under



Extra idea: To extend this activity, ask students to make groups of three and roleplay the scene as a short play with three characters: the narrator, Aisha and Aisha’s husband. They can practise the scene with books open a couple of times (switching roles if they want). Then practise again with books closed. Ask two or three groups to perform the scene for the class. Encourage lots of exaggerated intonation for surprise, shock, panic, etc. The class can give points for the funniest performance.



MA Weaker students can perform with books open.

Cross Culture: stereotypes Each of the six Review units finishes with a Cross Culture section. This is often an opportunity to reflect on how people do things differently (or not!) in different parts of the world and how we can begin to be sensitive to these differences and act accordingly. There is usually a short reading text with a task or questions, often leading to a discussion and a comparison with the students’ own culture. a Ask students to look at the photo and guess who and where the people are. (The American flag gives a good clue!) Ask what kind of event they think it is. Ask students to read the information about stereotypes. Units 1&2 Review

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b Check comprehension of any new words by asking questions, eg Which word is the opposite of noisy? The opposite of stupid? The opposite of short? Check comprehension of: general, exceptions. Ask: What’s a cultural stereotype? and ask for examples.



Answers a) American b) Thai people are beautiful; Swedish people are all tall and blond.

c Encourage discussion of the stereotypes and say why they are all generalisations. d Ask students about stereotypes in their country. They may want to write about this topic in their notebooks for homework.

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Extra idea: Get students to write two stereotypes about people in their own country, one of which they think is true, one false. Other students must guess which is which.

Units 1&2 Review

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3 UNIT FOCUS

Leisure time GRAMMAR: present simple: I / you / we / they; object pronouns; like / love / hate + noun / -ing VOCABULARY: music; leisure activities; days of the week; verb phrases FUNCTIONS: talking about likes and dislikes; making suggestions; agreeing and disagreeing

Lesson 1 I love parties! pp26–27



Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise the present simple and object pronouns, learn vocabulary for different kind of music and talk about likes and dislikes. Note: You may want to ask students to bring in audio clips of their favourite songs for this lesson.

You first! Ask students to look at the two photos and compare the people in them. Ask questions, eg Are they quiet or loud? Do they like being alone or in groups? Encourage students to use any vocabulary for personality that they already know. Then ask them to say which photo is more like them.



Ask students to speculate about the photos, eg I think the man in this photo is an … because …. Go briefly through the quiz to check vocabulary and pronunciation, and point out the box (I quite like parties). Model and practise saying the sentences. You may want to point out that emphasising different words in each sentence can affect the meaning. Contrast the meaning of quite with very, really and not very. Note that quite is practised with other modifiers in unit 5.



Ask students to work in pairs to complete the quiz. Compare the results of the quiz as a class. Ask students to ask you the questions, too. Students can check their scores on SB page 122. Ask if the results correspond to their idea of themselves as an introvert or an extrovert.

Make sure to tell students that this is a very simple quiz and it is not black and white. Some people are very extrovert and some very introvert, but many are somewhere in between!

Answers Mostly a = introvert, mostly c = extrovert, mostly b = somewhere in between.

MA For an extra challenge, ask students to make up one or two more multiple-choice questions for the quiz. Ask them to read them to the class for suggestions and feedback.



Culture note: The Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist Carl Jung (1875–1961) invented the terms extroversion and introversion. According to him, an extrovert is focused on the outside world and is energetic and lively, while an introvert is more interested in their own internal world and is quieter.



Two women, Katherine Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers, studied Jung’s book Psychological Types (1921) and from it produced The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment, which they believed would assess psychological preferences and types and help people make the right career and life choices. Extroversion / introversion is one of the main psychological types in the MBTI, which is used extensively in business today. It has a lot to do with where we get our energy: from outside ourselves / other people or from within ourselves.

Reading 1 Read out the title of the quiz (Are you an introvert or an extrovert?) and explain the meaning of these two words by giving one or two examples, eg I like parties and big groups of people. My brother doesn’t like big groups of people – he’s quiet and shy. Practise the pronunciation of both words.

form

Grammar 1 Present simple (1) 2 Encourage students to use the quiz to work out the missing words in the grammar table. Point out the short form for the negative form (don’t = do not). Ask: When do we use ‘do’? What do you notice about the short answers? (they don’t repeat the verb.) Unit 3

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Answers affirmative I / You / We / They like loud music. negative I / You / We / They don’t like big groups. questions and short answers Do you like books? Yes, I do. / No, I don’t. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 134, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. Note that third person singular forms will be presented later.

5 Tell students to choose a partner. Model the example conversation with one or two students, then together as a class. Encourage students to talk together about the quiz and find out about their partner’s answers. When they have finished, ask students to work with a different partner. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation.

Vocabulary Music 6

3 Model the first sentence with the class. Allow some quiet time for individual work, then invite volunteers to write their answers on the board. Make sure students can say the sentences correctly.

MA For students who need more support, give them the first word in each line.

Answers 1 A Do you like my family? B I like your sister, but I don’t like her husband. 2 A My friends love parties. B We love parties too. 3 A Do your parents like your friends? B Yes, they do. They love my friends.

Transcript and answers 1 rock music 2 jazz 3 pop music 4 house music 5 folk music 6 rap 7 classical music 8 country music 7

4 Explain that students will need to choose affirmative or negative verb forms. Compare answers as a class and, if necessary, write them on the board. Ask students to suggest any other verbs they could use in these sentences, eg have, play or read.

Note: Point out that these sentences are true according to the quiz only, and not necessarily true of all extroverts and introverts, and neither is being an introvert a negative thing.

Answers 1 Extroverts have a lot of friends. 2 They like loud music and they love parties. 3 They don’t like books much. 4 Introverts don’t like loud music. 5 They don’t have a lot of friends, but they have good friends.

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MA For an extra challenge, ask students to make two more sentences about extroverts and introverts, eg Introverts don’t talk much. / Extroverts talk a lot.

Ask students how many different types of music they know and write them on the board. You may want to start talking about their opinions of each type of music, too. Ask students to compare their answers and encourage some guesswork and discussion of any missing answers. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. 1.45

Play the audio, which is eight different types of music. Pause for students to say the type of music and also whether they like or dislike it. 1.46

Answers 1 jazz 2 house music 3 country music 4 rock music 5 pop music 6 classical music 7 rap 8 folk music



Extra idea: Ask students when they usually listen to music and why, eg to cheer themselves up when they feel sad, or to relax. Ask students to bring in some samples of their favourite music and play it for the class. They can explain something about the type of music and why it is special for them.

8

1.47 Ask if students know the singer in the photo and what they know about him (look at the Did you know? box). Check understanding of any new vocabulary. Ask students to read the conversations and predict the missing lines. Then play the audio to check. Write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line.

Unit 3

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MA For an extra challenge, ask students to replace some words in the conversations to make new ones, eg A: What do you think of the food? B: I don’t like it very much. It’s horrible!

Answers 1 A So tell me, what do you do? B I’m a singer. I sing with a band. A What kind of music do you play? B Rock music. 2 A Great song! I love it! Bruno Mars is my favourite singer. B I like him too. I like Marry you. But I prefer jazz. 3 A Hi, Jane. B Who are you? A I’m Matt – remember? B Yes – sorry! What do you think of the band? A I don’t like them very much. They’re so loud! I’m into classical music.



Extra idea: Ask students to role-play the conversations in pairs. Then switch roles.

Did you know?  * Ask students to read the information and

check they understand tattoo and shoulder. Then ask them to close their books. Ask: What do we learn about Bruno Mars? What else do you know about him?

Culture note: Bruno Mars is an American singer-songwriter and record producer. He was born in 1985 in Honolulu, Hawaii, and his parents are musicians. He started making music and performing on stage as a child and moved to Los Angeles to become a professional musician. He plays many different instruments and in different musical styles. His first album, Doo-Wops and Hooligans (2010), was a worldwide success, as was his second album, Unorthodox Jukebox (2012). Mars has sold more than 11 million albums and is one of the most successful solo artists in the world. His stage performances are famous. Some of his bestknown songs are Just the Way You Are, I Was Only Dancing, Locked Out of Heaven.

9 Look at the information about who and what below exercise 9. Explain that question words are words that start a question and usually begin with wh-. If necessary, practise the pronunciation of what (initial sound /w/) and who (initial sound /h/). Ask students to read out each question and ask someone in the class.

Answers For underlined question words, see exercise 8 answers. 1 What 2 What 3 What 4 Who Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 134, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

Extra idea: Make a list of ‘party questions’ with who or what on the board. Then have a party! Ask students to stand up and walk around. Play some music as students ask each other as many questions as they can. Tip: Playing music as background music to some activities can help students to relax and feel less nervous about making mistakes. Also, switching off the music is a nice way to signal the end of an activity.

10 THINK Use the questions to encourage students to challenge ideas and discuss their opinions about introverts and extroverts.

Grammar 2 Object pronouns 11 Allow time for students to read the conversations in exercise 8 and work individually. Discuss the difference between subject pronouns (before the verb) and object pronouns (after the verb). Ask: Which pronouns are the same in both forms? (you and it)

Answers subject I you he she it we they

object So, tell me, what do you do? I like you. I like him too. I don’t like her. Great song! I love it! They like us. I don’t like them very much. Unit 3

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Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 134, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

do this. If the groups are bigger than five or six people, they should split in two. When students are in their groups, ask them to tell the class about the kind of music they like. Elicit example language from them, eg We all love rock music and we don’t like jazz. Our favourite singers are ... Give groups about three minutes to discuss what they want to say to the class. Tell them to choose someone in the group as their spokesperson. Then that person tells the class about their group’s musical tastes. Encourage students to ask questions and make comments. Note major mistakes and write them on the board for the class to correct.

Extra idea: Do a quick quiz with books closed. Call out a subject pronoun and ask students to say or write the correct object pronoun.

1.48 Demonstrate the difference 12 P between /ɪ/ and /iː/ by saying the example words him and he. Ask students to predict the answers, but don’t check the answers yet.



Play the audio and write the answers on the board with help from the students. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Explain that confusing these two sounds can sometimes cause misunderstandings, eg ship and sheep, live and leave. We bought a ship / sheep. How did they live / leave?

Answers /ɪ/ /iː/ him he it me sing she we sit Transcript he, him, it, me, she, sing, sit, we

Speaking 13 If you have asked students to bring in audio clips of their favourite songs, this may be the opportunity for them to play the audio and try to convince the others to include it on their playlist. Monitor groups as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation.



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Extra ideas: Ask students to stand up and walk around and ask each other questions about music. Who’s your favourite singer, band? etc. Say to students, Imagine you’re at a party. Find people who like your kind of music and make a group. Elicit example questions from students. Get students to walk around and

Lesson 2 I travel a lot. pp28–29 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise like, love and hate followed by a noun or an -ing form, provide further practice of the present simple and use vocabulary for talking about leisure activities.

Warm-up Ask students to make guesses about the people in the photos, reviewing vocabulary for jobs, nationalities and whether they might be introvert or extrovert.

Vocabulary Leisure activities 1 Check comprehension of the words in the box. Ask: What does an actor do? Where does a film producer work? Then ask students to say what they think each person does. Write the guesses on the board, eg I think … is a … Their answers will be checked when they do the reading.

Note: You might need to tell students the difference between a film producer and a film director. The producer is in charge of preparing and supervising the making of a film – they look after the business side of a film. The director is in charge of the creative side of the film.

2

GUESS Use the pictures to help check comprehension of the words. Ask students which words are similar in their own language and which are very different. Model the example dialogue with one or two students, then ask students to make guesses



Unit 3

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about the people in the photos in pairs and compare answers as a class.



MA You could ask stronger students what places they associate with each activity, eg ballet school (dancing), shopping centre (shopping), swimming pool (swimming), etc. Extra idea: Make a list of any other leisure activities that are popular with your students. Carry out a class survey to find the most popular free-time activities.

Answers

1 Danny: IT worker Lola: actor Petra: sports teacher Alex: (film) producer Liz: travel writer



2 Words in bold are the ones listed in exercise 2

Danny: watching TV and films, sport, playing football, good food, restaurants Lola: travel, shopping, films, sport, swimming, tennis, spending time with friends

Grammar 1 like / love / hate + noun / -ing form



3 If students have difficulty completing the table, refer them back to the examples in exercise 2. Point out the difference between a noun and an -ing form. You could also point out some spelling rules for -ing forms, eg the double final consonant in swimming, shopping and jogging and no final e in dancing. (Full spelling rules for -ing forms are in the grammar reference on SB page 139.)



Answers like / love / hate + noun I like football. We like art galleries.

like / love / hate + -ing form I love playing tennis. We hate visiting museums.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 134, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

4 Allow time for students to discuss the questions in pairs. Then ask volunteers to tell their answers to the class. Give praise and corrective feedback on the use of like / love / hate + noun or -ing form.

Alex: films, art, visiting art galleries and museums, watching sport, swimming Liz: art, visiting art galleries, reading, listening to music

6 Make sure students don’t look at the profiles while they complete the sentences. Go through the list of verbs before they start and check comprehension. Allow a few minutes for individual writing, but don’t check answers yet. 7 Allow time for students to check their answers to exercise 6. Ask volunteers to read out their sentences. Check the answers and practise the sentences as a class.



Answers 1 visit (Alex) 2 talk to (Liz) 3 travel (Lola) 4 write (Liz) 5 play (Danny) 6 work (Alex)

Grammar 2 Present simple (2) 8 Use concept-checking questions to make sure that students understand the meaning of in general, eg Liz travels a lot. Is this something she does regularly? Note that the verb can also be negative, eg I don’t like swimming. (= this is something that is true about me).

Reading 5 Refer students to the reading text on SB page 29. Ask them to explain the purpose of a social website. Check understanding of the navigation bar headings (home, matches for you, etc). Point out that these people are the same as the ones they talked about in exercises 1 and 2. Ask a few students if their guesses in exercises 1 and 2 were correct.

Petra: sport, swimming, films



Answers true in general Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 134, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

9 Check students understand all the words in the boxes, then give one or two examples of things that are true for yourself and your friends, eg I play tennis. We don’t go to football matches. Unit 3

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Model the example sentence with one or two students. Then ask students to make their own sentences in pairs. You may want to set a time limit for students to make as many sentences as they can. 10 Check students understand that they can find the answers to the questions in the profiles, but they may not find the exact words they need. After checking their answers, practise the questions and answers as a class, then ask students to role-play them.

Point out the grammar note about why and because, and check pronunciation of both words.

Suggested answers 1 Because I’m a travel writer. 2 Because I live near the sea. 3 Because I love good food. 4 Because I love films! Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 134, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

Extra idea: Ask students to choose one person from the website and interview them about their likes and dislikes.



MA For an extra challenge, one student closes the book. The other asks questions using the book. Students who need more support can do this with the books open.

11 Ask volunteers to read out the conversation. Encourage students to justify their answers by referring to the text.

MA For extra support, write pairs of names on the board.



Point out the grammar note about both. Practise the sentence, focusing on the word order: They both enjoy sport. Ask some questions about the people in the reading: Do Petra and Alex both like sport? Mention that both comes before a main verb, but follows the verb be.



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 134, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. 12 THINK Explain the meaning of a good match. Ask volunteers to present similar

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conversations to the one in exercise 11 to the class. Have a class discussion about which people are the best match.

Writing and speaking 13 Brainstorm ideas about what should be included in a personal profile for a social website. You may want to put some headings on the board, eg age, job, nationality, appearance, personality, free-time interests. Set a time limit for students to write their profiles. Walk around the classroom and provide help as needed. 14 Ask students to form small groups of four or five. Ask students to read out their profiles while the others take notes and then try to find a good match from within the group or the class. Ask a spokesperson from each group to tell the class, eg Edita and Ivan are a good match because they both like movies. Finally, provide praise and corrective feedback. Collect the profiles to obtain review material for the next lesson. Did you know?  * Read the information and encourage students

to find out more about the Student Letter Exchange online. Note that the website is for students aged 9–20, so students might want to find a penpal website that is more appropriate to their age group.

De-stress! A mandala is any kind of regular, symmetrical figure with a central point, like the one here (note that it is also reproduced much bigger on SB page 155). Many mandalas exist in nature (eg snowflakes, sunflowers, whirlpools) and generally in the world (eg rose windows, certain plates, bicycle wheels). The human eye is also designed like a mandala, with the pupil in the centre and the iris forming symmetrical patterns around it. Mandalas have been used for centuries in the east in order to heighten concentration. Many people use them nowadays in the west as a calming device or as a way of tuning into our unconscious mind in order to gain fresh insights on issues or as a way of engaging the non-dominant part of our brain to enhance our creativity. Tell students what to do with it. They should stare at it for several minutes breathing slowly and deeply. Start short – just a minute or two – and

Unit 3

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gradually extend the time. Tell them to hold the mandala at a comfortable distance from their eyes and stare at the centre. As they do this, lines around the centre will seem to move around, clearing and blurring. Tell them to keep staring at the centre, focusing on their breathing, counting each breath in and out in order to give their conscious mind something to do. If they keep thinking about other things (as they probably will (lunch? an important phone call?)), tell them not to fight these thoughts, just accept them and focus even more on their breathing and counting.

3 4 5 2

If students like the mandala on SB page 155, they should use it as often as they want to. If they don’t like that mandala but like the idea of using one, tell them to search online to find one they like.

Lesson 3 We do the same things every weekend. pp30–31

Listening 1 3

Explain the setting of the audio (a woman is in the street and a man is asking her questions). Ask if any students have any experience of answering surveys in the street. Ask if they usually say yes or no to this kind of survey.



Read out the question. Play the audio all the way through. Discuss the answer and ask how they know she is busy.

You first! Elicit the three activities in the photos (sleeping, relaxing with family, shopping). Ask students to say which one they like most and why (I like sleeping the most). Give your opinion, too.

Vocabulary Days of the week 1

Ask students to read the text and predict the missing information. Explain that more or less in the instructions means that they don’t have to guess the exact percentage. Play the audio to check their ideas. Ask: What is important for most Americans? Do more men or more women like time alone at the weekend? Write the answers on the board. Ask which statements are true for them, their family, or people in their country. 1.49

Answers 1 44% 2 93% 3 40% 4 38% 5 44%; 38% Transcript 1 44% of Americans plan their weekends on Thursday or Friday. 2 93% of Americans say it is important for them to relax with their family at the weekend.

Tell students to find the days of the week in the text in exercise 1 and write them in the list. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Focus on any difficult words, such as Wednesday. Ask which words are similar in their language and which are different. 1.50

Transcript and answers Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise wh- and yes / no questions with regular verbs and be and to talk about daily routines using the present simple.

40% of Americans do the shopping at the weekend. They do more shopping on Saturday than Sunday. 38% of Americans say they do too much at the weekend and they feel tired on Sunday. 44% of women like time alone at the weekend. 38% of men like time alone at the weekend.



1.51

Answers No, she isn’t. She’s very busy. Transcript MAN Excuse me. Um, excuse me! WOMAN Yes! MAN I work for a magazine. Can I ask you some questions? WOMAN Oh, OK. Please be quick. MAN When do you do your shopping? WOMAN I do it on Sunday morning. MAN Where do you do it? WOMAN At the local supermarket. MAN When do you plan your weekend? WOMAN Usually on Monday or Tuesday – in the afternoon or evening. Is that all? Goodbye.

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MAN

No, please wait just a moment. What do you do at the weekend? Do you relax with your family at the weekend? WOMAN No, I don’t. MAN Do you do too much at the weekend? WOMAN Yes, I do. Is that all? Goodbye. I’m very busy. MAN No, no, please wait just a moment. Which day do you feel very tired? WOMAN Very tired? I feel very tired every day. I have six children. MAN Oh. Six children! Congratulations! Um – do you like time alone at the weekend? WOMAN Yes, I do. But with six children, I don’t get it. Is that all? Goodbye! MAN Goodbye.

4 Ask students to read the questions and check they understand them. Play the audio again. Students listen and choose the correct answers. Check the answers as a class. If students disagree, play that segment of the audio again. Ask students what they think the magazine article will be about.



Answers 1 Sunday. 2 At the local supermarket. 3 Monday or Tuesday. 4 No, I don’t. 5 Every day. 6 Yes, I do. 7 She’s very busy.

5 Check comprehension of the sentences and of the prepositions in, on and at. Use sentences from exercise 4 to teach / elicit that we use on with days of the week, at with the weekend, and in with a time of day, eg afternoon / evening. Don’t go into more detail at this point as more work will be done on prepositions of time in Unit 5. Check the answers and practise the sentences.



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Answers 1 on 2 at 3 in Extra idea: Ask students to close their books. Say the sentences using mmm instead of the preposition. Ask students to repeat (or write) the phrase with the correct preposition. Students could also do this activity in pairs or ask a student to come to the front of the class and play the role of teacher.

Explore For this activity, students should type into their browser: typical weekend activities or perhaps a question, eg How many people go shopping at the weekend in (Mexico)? etc. This information may be difficult to find out, but students should be able to find some information about what people like to do at the weekend, even if they can’t find exact percentages. 6 Refer students to exercise 4. Point out the first question word (When). Remind students that question words usually start with ‘w’ (except for How). After completing the questions, ask: Which question word asks about a time? (when) Which word asks about a place? (where) Which asks about a thing? (which) What is different about ‘which’? (It is followed by a noun.) Practise the questions and answers with the class.

Answers

1 Where 2 When 3 Which 4 Why



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 134, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

7 Model the example dialogue with one or two students and look at the questions in exercise 4 again. Put students in pairs to ask and answer the questions. Get them to practise again with a different partner. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation.

Listening 2 8

1.52 Ask students to look at the photo and say what job they think the man has and what he is doing. Focus on the map and ask: What country is it? What are the cities? What do you know about these two cities?



Read the sentences out and check comprehension before playing the audio. Play the audio again as students write their answers. If necessary, play the audio a third time and pause after each line to check their answers.



Answers 1 live 2 week 3 night 4 four 5 love 6 relax

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Transcript TOMMY INTERVIEWER TOMMY INTERVIEWER TOMMY INTERVIEWER TOMMY INTERVIEWER TOMMY INTERVIEWER TOMMY INTERVIEWER



11 Tommy, where do you live? I live in Chicago. Where do you work? I work in Los Angeles. I spend the week in LA and I come home to Chicago on Friday evening. When do you fly to LA? I fly to LA on Sunday night. It’s about four hours. So why do you work in LA? It’s a long way from Chicago. I love my job. I’m a music video producer. The work is in Los Angeles. And my wife, Jo, has a good job in Chicago. Where do you stay in LA? I have an apartment. What do you do at the weekend when you come home? I relax. I don’t work.



Transcript TOMMY INTERVIEWER TOMMY INTERVIEWER TOMMY INTERVIEWER TOMMY INTERVIEWER TOMMY INTERVIEWER

Answers 1b 2d 3a 4c

What do you do at the weekend when you come home? I relax. I don’t work. Do you do interesting things? Oh no, we’re very, very boring. We do the same things every weekend. We do the same things every Saturday and the same things every Sunday! Really? Oh yes. On Saturday morning, Jo and I do the housework. Maybe in the afternoon, we go to a movie. And then we see friends in the evening. We go to a restaurant and then a club. What do you do on Sunday? We get up late. We have a big lunch with friends. We don’t go out. We watch a movie on TV. We relax. And then? I fly to Los Angeles – and start the next week!



Extra ideas: Ask some extra questions about the audio, eg Do Tommy and Jo do the housework on Saturday? (Yes, they do it on Saturday morning.) Does Tommy go out on Sundays? (No, he doesn’t.) When do they have a big lunch with their friends? (On Sunday.) Then play the audio again.



Ask students to list Tommy and Jo’s activities on each day. Check that students understand the word housework. Write the answers on the board.

Answers 1 Where do you live? 2 Where do you work? 3 When do you fly to LA? 4 Why do you work in LA? 5 What do you do at the weekend?

10 Ask students to work individually to match the parts of each phrase. Check the answers as a class and practise the sentences. Point out that have can have several meanings: have (eat) lunch, have (organise) a party, have (own) a car. Note that have friends is also possible, but it doesn’t describe an activity.



Answer Saturday

Extra idea: Ask additional questions about the audio, eg What is Tommy’s wife’s name? (Jo) What kind of videos does he make? (music videos) Where does he stay in LA? (in an apartment)

9 Do the first question together as a model. Allow time for individual writing. Check the questions and write them on the board. For each question, ask a student to give the answer. Ask the others if it is correct. Then play the audio again to check.

Read out the question, then play the second part of the interview. Check the answer with the class. Play the audio again to check. 1.53

12 Allow time for individual work. Then call on students to tell their answers to the class.

MA For more support, play the audio again first. For a more challenging exercise, ask students to complete the answers from memory. Then play the audio again to check the answers. Unit 3

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Music The name of the song is Tell Me On a Sunday (by Andrew Lloyd Webber). The next line is Don’t call me at 3am from a friend’s apartment.

Answers 1 do 2 go 3 see 4 go 5 get up 6 have 7 watch

Speaking 13 THINK This activity encourages students to challenge ideas in the listening and express their own opinions. Ask some questions to encourage critical thinking, eg What does ‘boring’ mean? How does ‘boring’ mean different things to different people? 14 Encourage pair and group discussion of things students do at the weekend. Encourage them to ask you questions, too. Praise students for using vocabulary and grammar from this lesson.



Extra idea: Tell students to write a quiz about Steven Spielberg’s films. Help them with questions, eg Which Spielberg film stars …? / Which Spielberg film is about …? / Who is in …? / Where is … set?



Culture note: Jaws (1975) is a world-famous thriller about a man-eating great white shark that starts attacking swimmers at an American seaside resort town. Part of its fame is because it became a model for the Hollywood ‘blockbuster’ with lots of exciting action based on a simple idea. A police chief (Roy Schneider), a shark hunter (Robert Shaw) and an oceanographer (Richard Dreyfuss) go out in a small boat to hunt and kill the shark.



E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) has been called the greatest science-fiction film ever made. In it, a lonely boy called Elliot becomes friends with an extra-terrestrial whom he calls E.T. E.T. can’t get back to his planet and the film is about the efforts of Elliot and his brothers and sisters to help E.T. get back home. The inspiration for the story was Spielberg’s creation, as a child, of an imaginary friend after his parents’ divorce.



Jurassic Park (1993) is an adventure thriller with a science-fiction element. An eccentric millionaire (played by Richard Attenborough) invites two scientists (played by Sam Neill and Laura Dern) to his amusement park on an island off Costa Rica. He has succeeded in cloning dinosaurs and his park contains five different types, including the man-eating Velociraptor and Tyrannosaurus Rex. The scientists and the millionaire’s grandchildren go on a tour of the park, but when the power supply fails and the dinosaurs get out of control, the dinosaurs pursue the visitors. The film is based on the novel of the same name by the American author Michael Crichton.

Movies & Music Read through the instructions and questions for both sections and teach / elicit any difficult vocabulary, eg alien, dinosaur, shark. You may want students to check the answers to the first two questions in Movies in class as a lot of students may know who the director is. If you want to make the online task more specific, ask students to find out three things they don’t know about the film director for homework. Have students read the first line of the song and check comprehension. Ask: What can you do instead? Note that students will find several versions by different singers online. Students can do the task in class or for homework and you can check answers in the next lesson.

Extra questions for class or homework Movies What’s your favourite Spielberg film? Why? Music What word occurs eleven times in the song? (don’t) Where does the singer want to hear the news? (a park, a zoo, a circus)

Answers Movies a) E.T. b) Lincoln c) Jurassic Park d) Jaws The director is Steven Spielberg and he’s American.

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Lincoln is a historical drama that takes place in 1865, the last year of the American Civil War, and is about President Abraham Lincoln’s fight to ensure freedom for slaves and the end of the civil war. The film ends with his assassination. A tremendous performance by Daniel Day Lewis as Lincoln won him an Academy Award for Best Actor. Steven Spielberg is one of the world’s most influential and successful film directors and producers. His early films were sciencefiction and adventure films – the Indiana Jones series of films are adventure classics. Spielberg’s later films are an exploration of issues such as war (Saving Private Ryan 1998), the Holocaust (Schindler’s List 1993) and the slave trade (Lincoln, Amistad 1997). He has won the Academy Award for Best Director twice, and several of his films have broken box-office records. Tell Me On a Sunday is a song from a musical of the same name. The music is by the British composer Andrew Lloyd Webber and the lyrics are by Don Black. The musical is about an ordinary English girl who goes to the USA looking for love. Several well-known singers have sung the song, including Sarah Brightman, Lulu, Denise Van Outen and Marti Webb.

Vocabulary plus p32 Musical instruments 1

Ask students what words for musical instruments they know and write them all on the board. Check comprehension of the words in the box by referring to the numbers in the photos, eg What’s number 1? Is it a guitar or a flute? Ask students which names for instruments are similar in their own language and which are different. Don’t check their answers yet.

2

1.54 Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Focus on the stress in piano and saxophone.

Answers 1 flute 2 violin 3 piano 4 drums 5 guitar

Transcript drums, flute, guitar, keyboard, piano, saxophone, trumpet, violin 3

EVERYBODY UP! Energise your lesson with this quick walk-around activity. Elicit examples of questions from students, eg Do you play the guitar? Do you play it well? Set a time limit for students to find three people for each description. When they have finished, call on students to tell the class their information.



Draw students’ attention to the grammar note below the exercise. Point out the use of the after the verb play with musical instruments.

Nouns from verbs 4

1.55 Ask students to read out the questions and help with pronunciation. Point out the use of the unstressed schwa sound in singer, drummer and player. (More work will be done on making words like this in the next exercise.) Tell students to look at the photo and elicit answers. Ask if students know this band, then ask questions about them, eg Do you like their music? What songs do you know? How old are they? Where are they from? Play the audio to check their answers.

Answers 1 The Rolling Stones 2 a) Mick Jagger b) Charlie Watts c) Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards



Transcript MAN What’s the name of the band? WOMAN They’re the Rolling Stones. MAN What’s the name of the singer? WOMAN He’s Mick Jagger. MAN What’s the name of the drummer? WOMAN He’s Charlie Watts. MAN And what are the names of the guitar players? WOMAN They’re Ronnie Wood and Keith Richards. 5 Write the words sing, play and teach on the board and then (using a different colour) add the -er ending. Read out the information in the box and ask students to complete the missing jobs. Note that the noun from drum is drummer – which they saw in exercise 4. Unit 3

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Say each word out loud and get students to repeat, checking their pronunciation. You could play audio 1.55 again so students can hear singer, drummer and player again.

Answers singer, teacher, dancer, traveller

Extra idea: You could ask students to think of other jobs they know that are formed in the same way.

6 Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Get students to think of other famous people. Remind students that some verbs add -or, eg actor, director.

Extra idea: You can turn this into a team quiz. Students work in teams. Tell them to name a famous singer, actor, etc. The first team to answer correctly gets a point. Tip: This may be a good opportunity to encourage students to start listing new vocabulary in a vocabulary notebook. New words can be listed by theme, with example sentences or pictures, or translations to illustrate meaning.

Personal information 7

1.56 Teach the term speed-dating. Explain that it’s an organised event where people have about five minutes to find out about another person, then move on to somebody else. At the end of the evening, they decide if they’d like to meet any of the people again. Also point out the heading on the profile form: matchmaker.com. Teach / Elicit the meaning of matchmaker (somebody who finds partners for people). Allow time for students to read the form and check comprehension of vocabulary. Make sure students understand that some of the information in the form is incorrect. Play the audio as students write their answers. Check answers by asking students to say: He isn’t divorced, he’s …

Answers Family name First name Male / Female 66

Ramos Nicolas Male

Married / Divorced / Single Single Spanish Nationality Profession Dancer Age 26 Address Flat 2, 46 Hillsden Road, London, NW3 4XC Email [email protected] Mobile number 0891 9535211 Interests Dancing, swimming, football

Transcript WOMAN OK, Nicolas, it’s great to meet you. Let’s check your details for this evening. Now, your family name is Ramos. NICOLAS Yes. That’s R-A-M-O-S. WOMAN Thanks. And you’re divorced, Nicolas, is that right? NICOLAS No, I’m single. WOMAN Oh, single, OK. And what nationality are you? Oh yes, you’re Mexican. NICOLAS No, no, I’m Spanish – Spanish. WOMAN Oh, I’m sorry – Spanish. Now, your profession. You’re a dancer. NICOLAS That’s right. WOMAN A dancer, mm, interesting. What next? Your age. You’re 28. NICOLAS No, I’m 26. WOMAN Oh, right, 26. And what’s your address? I have Flat 1, 46 Hilsden Road, London. NICOLAS Actually, it’s Flat 2. WOMAN Flat 2. Let me check, how do you spell ‘Hilsden’? H-I-L-S-D-E-N? NICOLAS No, it’s double ‘l’. WOMAN H-I-double L-S-D-E-N. OK. And what’s your postcode? I have NW3 4XC. NICOLAS That’s right, NW3 4XC. WOMAN Good. Now, I know your email address. It’s [email protected] com. NICOLAS That’s correct! WOMAN Thank you! NICOLAS And my mobile number is 0891 9535211. WOMAN Ah, 0891 9535211. Good. OK, now your interests are dancing, obviously, swimming and cricket.

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NICOLAS WOMAN



Yes, but not cricket. Football. Right, football. OK, that’s all – good luck this evening. I hope you find your perfect partner!

8 Tell students to copy the form in their notebooks. They then role-play a conversation to complete the form for their partner. This task reviews questions and answers with the verb be, spelling, numbers, jobs and free-time activities. Monitor students as they work and give feedback at the end. Ask one or two pairs to present their conversations to the class. Tip: When giving feedback, remember to give feedback on all areas of language production, not just grammar, ie pronunciation, intonation, good use of vocabulary and other strategies such as hesitation or clarification strategies (What do you mean? How do you spell that? etc.).

JACK

OK. But how about getting a takeaway? How about a Chinese takeaway? LAURA OK. JACK And why don’t you make a dessert? LAURA Why don’t I make a dessert? No, you make one. Hey, let’s do something in the evening! ... Jack?

2 Ask students to read the conversation and check they understand takeaway and dessert. Ask for some examples of each, eg a takeaway pizza, ice cream. Play the video or audio again and pause for students to complete the answers. Play it again and pause at the end of each line for students to repeat. Pay special attention to the intonation the characters use when they make a suggestion and point out how some words run together in natural speech, eg you can’t really hear the ‘t’ of don’t in the expression Why don’t we ….

Answers 1 go to the cinema 2 cook lunch 3 Chinese takeaway 4 make a dessert

Everyday English p33 Note: You may want to bring in sections of local newspapers showing films that are currently on at the cinema, and use them as prompts for exercise 8.

3

Ask students to practise the conversation in pairs, then ask a few pairs to act out the conversation for the class.

1.57 6 Decide whether you are going to use the video or simply play the audio. Ask students to look at the photo and say where the people are. Ask if they can remember what their relationship is and get them to discuss what they might be talking about. Both characters were in unit 1, so ask what students can remember about them. Play the audio or video with books closed and answer the question.



MA For an extra challenge, students can try to act out the conversation with books closed. You can put key words on the board to help with this.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversation. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

Answer Jack is tired.

4 Ask how many suggestions there are in the conversation. Then write the language for making suggestions on the board. Point out the differences between Let’s / Why don’t we, which are both followed by an infinitive without to, and How about, which is followed by the -ing form. Ask students which expressions they have heard a lot and which ones are new. Discuss the difference between Why don’t you / Why don’t we / Why don’t I … Ask: Who is going to do the action? Check answers as a class.

Making suggestions 1

Transcript LAURA I love Sundays. We have nothing to do. JACK Great! Let’s just relax and listen to some music. LAURA Why don’t we go out? Let’s go to the cinema. JACK No! I’m tired. LAURA Well then, why don’t we cook lunch and ask some friends?

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Answers See transcript 1.57 on page 67.

Let’s go to the cinema. Alright. What’s on? JULIA Let me see. Oh, Alien – I love that film! MAXIM I don’t – I hate science-fiction films. JULIA OK, how about the new Bond film? That’s on at 7pm. MAXIM Great idea! I love Bond films. JULIA So do I. OK, so let’s watch the film, then go for a pizza. MAXIM No way! It’s Sunday evening – I have a really busy day at work tomorrow. JULIA

5 After students have completed the conversation, check the answers and write them on the board. Ask students to explain how they chose their answers (according to the form of the verb), referring to the table as appropriate. Ask students to close their books and practise the conversation in pairs.

MA For more support, write the conversation with gaps on the board. Stronger students can use their own ideas to make new conversations.

Answers 1 Let’s 2 let’s 3 Why don’t 4 How about 5 How about 6 Let’s

7 Allow time for students to write their answers in the table. Ask if they know any additional phrases for each column, eg Wonderful! Sure! and No, that’s boring. No, I don’t like ….

Answers agreeing disagreeing That’s a good idea. I don’t think so. OK. I don’t – I hate science- So do I. fiction films. Alright. No way! Great idea!

Agreeing and disagreeing 6



Ask students about the film Alien. Ask questions, eg Have you seen it? What is it about? What kind of film is it? Do you like this kind of film? Why do people like sciencefiction films? Encourage some agreement / disagreement. Ask: Do (Julio) and (Alex) agree? Do they disagree? 1.58

Explain that you are going to play a conversation between two people talking about what to do. Go over the phrases in the list and clarify any that students aren’t sure of. Play the audio and allow time for students to compare answers. Then play the audio again. You may want to pause the audio and ask students to repeat each line, or each phrase.

8 Explain that students will use language from both sections on this page: making suggestions and agreeing / disagreeing. Remind students about the verb forms used after Let’s and How about. Model the example conversation with one or two students, focusing on using intonation to sound engaged and interested.

If you have brought in sections of local newspapers showing films that are currently on at local cinemas, you can use them as prompts for this exercise. Students make their own conversations in pairs. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation. Give feedback and repeat the exercise with different partners.



MA To help students who need more support, write some of the example sentences and phrases on the board. Ask students to choose whether to sit looking at the board or looking away from the board.

Answers 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 Transcript JULIA What shall we do this evening? MAXIM Let’s just relax – we have friends for lunch! JULIA No, let’s go out – please. MAXIM OK. Where do you want to go?

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MAXIM

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Extra ideas: Brainstorm a list of free-time activities on the board, eg go for a picnic, see a film, play golf, go swimming, etc. Ask students to work in pairs to develop a conversation using all the activities except one. Ask pairs to present the conversation to the class. The others can say which activity they didn’t use.



Tell students to work in pairs and imagine they have a foreign visitor. They work together to plan a day of interesting activities for him / her.

we don’t say … / we say …

This section focuses on the following areas: • omitting the auxiliary verb in questions • incorrect use of or missing preposition • incorrect verb / noun collocation • incorrect word order in questions



Ask students to cover the green we say … side and to see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

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4

Monday to Friday

UNIT FOCUS

GRAMMAR: present simple: he / she / it; adverbs of frequency: always, usually, often, sometimes, hardly VOCABULARY: time; daily routine; transport; adjectives FUNCTIONS: talking about daily routines; expressing interest

Lesson 1 She gets up very early. pp34–35 Aims The focus of this lesson is to provide further practice of the present simple, with the focus on the third person singular affirmative and questions, and also to learn how to talk about times of the day and to talk about daily routines. Note: You may want to bring in a large clock face with moveable hands to use in this lesson.



Extra ideas: If you brought in a large clock face, use it to review additional times using half and quarter. Hold up the clock and ask students to tell you the time.



You can also do a dictation. Hold up the clock and say ‘number 1’ as students write down the time in numbers. Continue with five or six different times. At the end they can tell you the answers in words.



Ask students to move around the class and find people who get up at the same time as they do.



Culture note: Note that in some languages, eg German, half past is described as halfway to the next hour so half past ten is said as half to eleven.

Warm-up Say one or two things you do every day, eg I go to work. I read emails. Ask students to write two things they do every day on a piece of paper. Tell them to swap papers with another student, correct any mistakes on the new paper, then read out the sentences. You could do a class survey and write on the board how many people said the same thing.

Vocabulary Time (1) 1

1.59 Ask students to complete the times. Point out that there are two different ways of saying the half and quarter hour times. Play the audio to check the answers. Pause at the end of each item so that students can repeat each one chorally and then individually. Check the pronunciation of half (silent ‘l’). Note that other times (eg twenty past) are covered in Lesson 3.

Answers 1 o’clock 2 past 3 fifteen 4 quarter; forty-five Transcript 1 ten o’clock 2 half past two or two thirty 3 quarter past eleven or eleven fifteen 4 quarter to eight or seven forty-five

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ever, never

2 Model the example dialogues with one or two students. Point out the two ways of asking somebody for the time. Use a clock, watch or mobile phone to practise the two different ways of saying each time. Then ask students to work in pairs to ask and answer questions about different times. One student should ask about the time, the other says the time, then they both write the time in numbers.

Extra idea: Dictate five or six times (hours, quarters or half past) and ask students to write them down in their notebooks as numbers. Then ask students to tell them back to you.

Vocabulary Daily routine (1) 1 Ask students to look at the photo and read the description of Tania Green. Ask questions, eg What is a CEO? (Chief Executive Officer) What does she do? Ask students to read the information silently.

Direct students’ attention to the small numbered pictures. Check that students understand each one by matching them with the words in bold. Ask students to say what time Tania does each of the activities. Check

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they use the prepositions at, from and to correctly: She arrives at the office at nine. She works from nine to six. She leaves the office at six.

Note that Preposition park in the review unit on SB page 43 gives further practice of from / to.

Answers



4



which sound the remaining verbs have. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word.



Transcript and answers /s/ gets, looks, works /z/ answers, arrives, goes /ɪz/ relaxes, watches MA To provide an extra challenge, write additional words on the board and ask students to decide which sound each one has and add them to the chart, eg starts, finishes, likes, washes, writes, sings, dances.

1 works at her desk 2 goes to bed 3 has a shower 4 gets up 5 works out 6 arrives in the office 7 looks at her emails



Culture note: The times in the text are shown using the 24-hour clock, but in the UK we usually say, eg six o’clock, even if the time is written as 18.00. Some countries only use the 24-hour clock and may find this confusing.

Grammar Present simple (3)

Tell students to cover the information, then go through the times with them. Make sure they say each time correctly (see the note about the 24-hour clock above). Encourage students to work in pairs to remember what happens at each time and write a sentence for each time. They then look and check their answers. Alternatively, one student can have their book open and check their partner’s answers.

6 Allow time for students to work individually to complete the table. Then check the answers and write them on the board. Ask: When do we use ‘s’ at the end of a verb? When do we use ‘do’ and ‘does’? What do you notice about word order in questions? (they use do or does followed by the subject followed by the verb) What do you notice about the short answers? (they use do or does but not the main verb).

Answers affirmative I / You / We / They get home at 6pm. He / She / It gets home at 6pm. questions and short answers Do I / you / we / they work? Yes, I / you / we / they do. No, I / you / we/ they don’t. Does he / she / it work? Yes, he / she / it does. No, he / she / it doesn’t.

MA For more support, ask yes / no questions about Tania, eg Does she get up at 5.45 or 6.45? Then ask students to work in pairs and do the same.

Answers 09.00–18.00 She works at her desk and has meetings. 22.45 She goes to bed. 05.45 She gets up. 18.30 She gets home. 06.30 She has breakfast with her daughter. 08.15–09.00 She takes her daughter to school. 20.15 She answers emails and makes phone calls. 1.60 Demonstrate the three different 5 P sounds by doing the first word for each sound with the students: gets, answers, relaxes. Point out that the /ɪz/ ending adds an extra syllable to the verb: re-lax-es. Ask students to predict

Point out the use of pm in 6pm to talk about a time in the afternoon or evening. Ask students what we say to talk about the morning (am).



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 135, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. Tip: It is sometimes helpful to describe do or does as an auxiliary verb and contrast it with the main verb. You may want to explain routine as something we do every day or usually and not something we are doing right now or at the moment. Unit 4

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7 Ask students to complete the questions about Tania individually. You can check the answers when doing exercise 8.

Answers goes to work by train = travels to his office on a train starts work = begins to work work team = the people he works with makes = produces radio advertisements = short articles on the radio that make you want to buy something finishes work = stops work play together = make music with different musical instruments spends the evening = does something over a period of time (here between about 7pm – 11pm)

Answers 1 Does 2 Does 3 Does 4 Does she have 5 Does she get 8 Ask individual students to say a question and pick someone to provide the answer.

Answers 1 Yes, she does. 2 Yes, she does. 3 No, she doesn’t. 4 Yes, she does. 5 No, she doesn’t.

Culture note: You may want to discuss question 5 briefly and ask whether students think she comes home late or not as this can vary between cultures and 5.30 may be considered early or late.



Extra ideas: Tell students about your daily routine and have them take notes. Then ask them to interview each other about you.



Ask students to role-play an interview about Tania. Ask volunteers to present it to the class.



Write seven or eight actions on the board (get up, have breakfast, start work, have lunch, finish work, have dinner, go to sleep) and ask students to write when they usually do each one. Students can role-play in pairs. Then ask one student from each pair to tell the class about their partner.

Reading 9 Ask students to look at the photo and describe the man. Ask questions to help them, eg What does he do in his job? Does he look friendly / shy / kind? Allow time for students to read silently. Ask about the words in bold. Encourage students to use clues from the context to work out the meaning, eg Who does he meet in the morning? (colleagues or co-workers) How can you describe a group of co-workers? (a team).

10

Ask students to read the article and guess the missing times. You can write the guesses on the board, but don’t give the answers yet. Do the first item together with the class. Students should write their answers as numbers. Then play the audio for students to check their answers.



Point out the vocabulary note for talking about approximate times. Discuss what about six means as it may mean different things to different people. Also point out that we often say just a number, eg six rather than six o’clock.

1.61

Answers 1 7.00 2 9.30 3 9.45 4 5.30 5 11.00 Transcript He gets up at 7.00 and has breakfast with his wife and son. He goes to work by train. He starts work at 9.30. Every morning at 9.45 there’s a meeting with the work team. Sam makes the sound for TV and radio advertisements and films. He often works with famous people – he loves that part of his job! He doesn’t make a lot of money but that’s OK. He finishes work at about 5.30. He plays in a band and they often play together in his house after work. He spends the evening with his family and goes to bed at about 11.00. 11 Check students understand how and when by asking questions, eg How do you go to work – by car? When do you go to work – at 8.00?

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Highlight the use of the word by in the answer to the first question. If necessary, practise the questions with one or two students first, then ask students to write their answers. They can ask and answer the questions in pairs.

Check that students are able to say each time correctly.

Answers 1 He gets up at 7.00 / seven o’clock. 2 He has breakfast with his wife and son. 3 He goes to work by train. 4 He finishes work at about 5.30pm / half past five / five thirty. 5 He plays with his band. 6 They play at his house. 7 He goes to bed at about 11.00 / eleven o’clock.

Extra idea: Ask students to write two additional questions, eg Does Sam’s wife get up early? Tip: An alternative way to check answers is to say the answers in random order and ask students to tell you the questions. You can say the answers fairly rapidly to stretch higher level students. You can also say the same answers in different ways (in this case saying the time in different ways).

12 Check students understand what they have to do in this information-gap activity. Explain that they each have information about different women. Make sure students don’t look at each other’s information while doing this activity. They each read their information and make notes. They then ask and answer questions and use all the information to find out which couple spends most time together.

Suggested answers Anna Sally Perez Chan

3 evenings sometimes has dinner has dinner with with husband, husband often goes and out, works at children, her desk sometimes goes out, works at her desk 4 bed

at about 12

at about 11

Speaking 13 Model the example sentences with one or two students, then ask students what is the same and what is different about the daily routines of Tania and Sam. Which do they think is better and why? You could end the activity by having a class vote on which life students prefer. Ask, eg Who prefers (Tania’s) life? 14 Give some examples of similarities or differences between your routine and that of Tania or Sam. Ask: What is the same and what is different about your routine and Sam’s or Tania’s? What do you like or dislike about your daily routine? Ask confident students to give feedback to the class.

Lesson 2 She sometimes sees very sad things. pp36–37 Aims The focus of this lesson is to review the use of the present simple for talking about work and travel routines using adverbs of frequency, to talk about feelings using adjectives, and to learn about the conjunctions and and but. Note: You could bring in a map of the world to help with locating Azerbaijan.

You first! Ask students to point to a world map or explain where Azerbaijan is located. Find out what students already know about this country.

Reading

1 breakfast with her not with husband her 1 Ask students to describe photo A. Ask: Which city do you think this is? (Baku). Explain that husband using pictures to make predictions about a 2 number of 11 (from 10 (from reading is a useful strategy and will make the hours at the 8–7) 8–6) text easier to understand. Check students office understand the questions and can correctly say Unit 4

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disabled children. For question 3, give a hint that students can use the pictures and the title to help them guess.



2

Answers 1 Photo A shows Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan. 2 Photo B 3 Students’ own answers. Culture note: The Republic of Azerbaijan is at the crossroads of Eastern Europe and Western Asia. A large part of the country is mountainous. It became part of the Soviet Union in 1920 and announced its independence in October 1991. It does not have an official religion but the majority of the population are Muslims. It is economically well-developed and has a low rate of unemployment. It has an ancient culture and architecture, literature and music play an important part in the country’s cultural life.

GUESS Active guessing is a useful strategy to make information easier to understand and remember. Model the example language with one or two students, then ask the class for their guesses. Write the ideas on the board. Point out that now that students have a little bit more information (from exercise 1 and from the instructions for exercise 2), they can make some more specific predictions about the content. Ask: Does she like her job?

3 Allow time for silent reading. Encourage students to identify new words and try to guess their meaning. Check the ideas they came up with in exercise 2. 4 Go through the sentences and check comprehension. Practise the pronunciation of social service centre. Allow some time for individual work. Check answers by asking individual students whether a sentence is true or false, and to give their reasons. After checking the answers, ask some additional questions about the article, eg Why does Tahira live with her parents? Why doesn’t she drive to work? How long does it take her to get to work? What are the buses like? Does she start work at 8.45?

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Answers 1 false: She’s single. 2 false: She usually walks. 3 true 4 false: They come to clubs at the social service centre. 5 true 6 false: She feels good because she helps other people.

Extra idea: Ask students to think of more questions about the text. Then they can choose someone in the class to ask.



MA For weaker students, write five answers on the board and ask students to write a suitable question for each answer.

5

THINK These questions encourage students to develop a personal response to the information in the article. Go through the questions with the class first to check comprehension.

6

This activity will help to recycle the vocabulary in the article as well as using the present simple. Tell students to cover the text, then work in pairs to make notes about Tahira’s day. Put pairs together to make groups so students can exchange information about Tahira. They can then check their ideas by reading the article again.

Grammar Adverbs of frequency 7 Use the grammar table to point out the position of the adverb in each sentence. Ask: When is the adverb before the verb? When is it after the verb? Students work individually to underline all the adverbs they can find in the article. Check answers as a class, asking individual students for one example each.

Answers

Tahira Abazov always feels good in the morning …



… single women usually live with their parents.



… Tahira never drives to work.



… she usually walks.

She sometimes goes by bus, but the buses are always crowded and slow.

… they don’t usually go out.

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answers. Encourage students to explain their answers, eg I usually go to work by train because I live a long way from the city.

Some children hardly ever go out …

She usually visits one or two families a day.

… Tahira is usually there.



… she sometimes sees very sad things.



Both the parents and the children are often angry and she’s sometimes very tired after work.



9



Point out the grammar note about how below the exercise. Ask questions about their town, eg How is the traffic in the morning? How is the bus service? Ask questions about feelings, eg How do you feel about your job? How do you feel at the end of the day?



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 135, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

11 Ask students to stand up and walk around. When you give a signal, they should stop and ask someone the questions from exercise 10, making a note of their answers. Do this four times. Then ask everyone to sit down and report their answers to the class.

Answers always, usually, often, sometimes, hardly ever, never Tell students to choose adverbs that make each sentence true for them. Use this activity to check that students understand the meaning of the adverbs and the correct word order. Note that some adverbs (eg sometimes) can also go at the beginning or end of a sentence, while others cannot (eg always, never). Remind students of the use of by with transport, eg by bus.

Suggested answers 1 I never travel by bus. 2 I sometimes have breakfast with my family. 3 I often watch films in the evening. 4 My friends are never angry with me. 5 I often help my friends with their problems.

10 Explain that students can choose any adverb to complete the sentences so that they are true for them. Practise the pronunciation of how and the questions if necessary.



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 135, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

8 Look at the boxes on SB page 37. Explain that the first box (completely shaded in) represents always. Ask: What’s the opposite of always? (never). Explain that the last box (not shaded in at all) represents never. Then allow time for students to write their answers. Draw a scale of 100% to 0% on the board and ask students to tell you where to write each word. Practise the pronunciation of the adverbs.





Ask individual students to read out their answers. Find out who in the class has similar

Answers Students’ own answers.

Tip: Instead of correcting grammar mistakes yourself, ask the other students if they could hear any mistakes. This will encourage students to listen to each other more carefully.

Extra idea: Ask students to carry out a class survey about daily routines. Give each pair a question, eg How do you usually go to school? They should ask everyone in the class their question and write down the answers. At the end they can report the results to the class, eg Everyone usually goes to school by bus. or 8 out of 10 students go by train.

Vocabulary Adjectives 12 Read out the words and practise the pronunciation as a class. Make sure students don’t pronounce the ‘r’ in tired. Ask which word does not describe a feeling (crowded). Check the meaning of crowded. Allow time for students to find the words in the article. Check the meaning of each word using mime or facial expressions. Explain that the word bad can describe a feeling but in the article it is used to describe traffic.

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Answers Crowded isn’t about feelings. Bad isn’t used to describe a feeling in the article. Extra idea: Give some situations to illustrate each of the words for feelings and ask students to tell you which word fits the situation, eg My dog isn’t very well. (sad) I get home late every day. (tired). Ask students to work in pairs and give each other extra situations.

13 Point out the grammar note about word order with adverbs of frequency in questions. Model and practise saying each question. Students can then ask and answer in pairs or small groups. Then report their answers to the class.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 135, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.



You could do exercises 1–4 on transport in Vocabulary plus at this point if you wanted to.

Writing 14 Read out the example sentences. Teach / Elicit that and and but can join two sentences or ideas and show the relationship between them. Ask: Are the ideas in each sentence similar to or different from each other? Then elicit the rules.



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Lesson 3 She doesn’t feel good in the morning. pp38–39 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise the present simple negative in the third person, to review and extend talking about the time and to talk about morning and night-time routines. Note: You may want to bring in a large clock face with moveable hands to use in this lesson.

You first! Look at the picture and ask for adjectives to describe each bird. Ask: Which is the early bird? Which is the night owl? Elicit why we use the adjectives early and night. (Because most birds wake up early but an owl is awake at night and sleeps during the day.) Brainstorm things that each bird likes / dislikes. Ask students to raise their hands and see how many of each type of bird there are in the class.

Grammar Present simple (4) 1

Ask students to use the grammar table to explain the formation of the third person singular negative. Point out the short form doesn’t = does not. Also point out that there is no ‘s’ on the main verb in the negative.



Ask students to read the text and predict the missing words. Then play the audio for students to check their answers. Write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing to allow students to repeat each line. Ask about the meaning of these words: opposite, midnight, lazy, internal clock, human clock.

Answers 1 but 2 and Extra idea: Provide some sentence starters and ask students to continue them using and or but, eg I like my job but … I like my job and …

15 Explain that there are two tasks here. One is to fill in the gaps with the correct form of the verb in brackets and the other is to choose the correct conjunction. Students can work individually. Check students understand boss, late, advice and practise their pronunciation. Then ask students to read out their answers or come to the board and write the answers.



16 Encourage students to agree and disagree about the best advice for Jake.

Answers 1 but 2 has 3 likes 4 but 5 doesn’t like 6 is 7 and 8 gives 9 comes 10 and 11 don’t see 12 isn’t



1.62

Answers 1 wakes up 2 goes 3 doesn’t feel 4 feels 5 doesn’t wake up 6 doesn’t go Transcript Are you an early bird or a night owl? An early bird wakes up early and goes to bed early. She doesn’t feel good at night – she wants to be in bed by ten o’clock! But she feels great in the morning.

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A night owl is the opposite. He doesn’t wake up early and he doesn’t feel good in the morning. He doesn’t go to bed before midnight and he feels fine late at night. What’s the reason? It isn’t because night owls are lazy and can’t get out of bed. It’s because of their internal clock. The human clock is about 24 hours. But for the night owl it’s longer, and for the early bird it’s shorter. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 135, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

Extra idea: Ask some comprehension questions about the text, eg When does an early bird feel good? Why do night owls feel lazy in the morning?

2 You may decide to lead a class discussion on the theme of being an early bird or a night owl. Encourage students to express themselves and supply additional vocabulary as needed.

Culture note: Some cultures start earlier than others. Ask: What is the usual start / finish time for shops and offices in your country? What time do people usually have dinner in the evening? Ask about possible proverbs about being early or late, eg The early bird catches the worm. Better late than never. Early to bed, early to rise, makes you healthy, wealthy and wise.

Vocabulary Daily routine (2) 3



Ask students to describe the pictures. For each one, ask: Is it morning or evening? What room is he in? Students can work individually or in pairs to match the pictures. and put them in the order they think is correct. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each sentence. 1.63

Answers 1B 2E 3G 4F 5A 6C 7D (order = 5, 3, 6, 2, 7, 4, 1) Transcript In the morning, Enrico gets out of bed. He cleans his teeth and washes his face. Then he gets back into bed and has breakfast. Then he gets dressed.

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At night, Enrico has a bath or a shower. Then he gets into bed and plays the guitar. He goes to sleep late!

Extra ideas: Tell students to cover the sentences and talk about Enrico’s routine using only the pictures. Then ask them to make questions about each picture.



Ask students to role-play a conversation with Enrico.



MA For more support, elicit questions from the class and write them on the board. Stronger students can make up their own questions.

4 Read out the first line of the example and ask students to say if it’s true or false. Then model one or two additional negative sentences for the class, He doesn’t get up early. (That’s true. He gets up very late!) Practise the pronunciation of doesn’t. Monitor students as they work in pairs. Give feedback at the end.

Listening 5



1.64 Explain that you are going to play an interview with a man talking about his and his wife’s daily routines. Play the audio and discuss the question. Elicit as much information as possible.

Answers Martin is an early bird and Kay is a night owl. They both have very different morning and night-time routines. Transcript What do you do, Martin? I’m a journalist. INTERVIEWER And Kay, your wife, what does she do? MARTIN She’s a writer. INTERVIEWER And you tell me that you both have very different routines. MARTIN That’s right. INTERVIEWER So what time do you get up, Martin? MARTIN I get up at about six every morning. INTERVIEWER That’s quite early. How do you feel? MARTIN I jump out of bed and feel great! INTERVIEWER Do you have breakfast? INTERVIEWER

MARTIN

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MARTIN

Yes, then I go to my desk and write. INTERVIEWER And what time does Kay get up? MARTIN She usually gets up at about nine. But I sometimes go into the bedroom and she’s still asleep – at about nine. I say, ‘Come on, it’s nine o’clock, get up!’ She says, ‘OK, OK!’ Then 20 minutes later I go in and say, ‘Come on, it’s twenty past nine, get up!’ No answer.

MARTIN

Or later! Much later. She comes into the kitchen. She doesn’t have breakfast – and she doesn’t talk! INTERVIEWER So what does she do? MARTIN She reads the paper. She really doesn’t feel good in the morning. INTERVIEWER And what happens at night? MARTIN At night! At half past nine, I’m tired. I’m in bed at quarter past ten. INTERVIEWER And what time does Kay go to bed? MARTIN She works, she writes, sometimes till two or three in the morning. INTERVIEWER She doesn’t feel tired. MARTIN No. She usually goes to bed at two or three. INTERVIEWER So she really is a night owl. And you’re an early bird. Do you ever meet? MARTIN Not often. That’s why we’re happily married!

6 Ask students to read the sentences. Make sure they understand the phrase jump out of bed. Then play the audio while students listen for the sentences. Play the audio again for students to check their answers and pause at the end of sentences 1, 2, 5 and 6 so that students can repeat.

7

Answers 1, 2, 5, 6 1.65 Explain that students are going to hear the second part of the interview, which gives more information about Kay. Ask students to read the sentences.



MA With stronger students you could ask them to guess what the correct words are before you play the audio, as they already know quite a bit about Kay and Martin.



Play the audio while students do the activity. Play it again for students to check their answers and pause at the end of each sentence so that students can repeat.





Discuss the meaning of the final sentence: That’s why we’re happily married. Elicit what that refers to (the fact that they don’t meet very often). Ask students if they agree with Martin.

Answers 1 doesn’t get up till ten 2 doesn’t have 3 doesn’t talk 4 doesn’t feel 5 quarter past ten 6 doesn’t feel



Vocabulary Time (2) 8 Use a clock or draw a clock on the board and demonstrate the meaning of twenty to and twenty past. Then set the clock to different times and ask students to tell you the time.

Say the times (or ask students to say the times) on the clocks on SB page 39 in random order. One person says the time, the next person says the correct letter. Focus on correct pronunciation and stress (especially the unstressed to).



Play the audio and ask students to write the number of the conversation next to the correct clock. Note that there are eight clocks but only five conversations.

Transcript No answer? No! Twenty to ten, five to ten, she’s still in bed! INTERVIEWER So she sometimes doesn’t get up till ten. INTERVIEWER

MARTIN

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Extra idea: Ask additional questions about the audio, eg What does Kay do at breakfast time? (she reads a paper) What does she do in the evening? (she works) When does she go to sleep? (at 2 or 3am) Do they meet very often? (no)



Answers 1B 2D 3E 4F 5A

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Transcript 1 MAN What time is it? WOMAN It’s ten to one. Time for lunch! 2 WOMAN Is it nine o’clock? It’s twenty-five past eight – get up! MAN 3 WOMAN What’s the time? Five past nine – dinner time! MAN 4 WOMAN Is it time for breakfast? Yes, it’s twenty-five to eight. MAN Can I watch TV? 5 GIRL No, It’s twenty to twelve – go to MAN bed!



Extra idea: Dictate five or six times in words and ask students to write the times in numbers. Then ask them to read the times back to you. MA For stronger students, dictate the times rather rapidly. To add support, write the list of times on the board in random order before dictating.

Speaking 9

EVERYBODY UP! This is a chance for everyone to move around and re-energise. Tell students to ask questions (using first and second person forms) in order to find someone whose routine is different from theirs. Tell them to make a note of the answers they get.

10 Read out the example. Emphasise the use of stress to highlight differences, ie I get up at half past six. She gets up at half past seven. Highlight the s in the third person singular form. Remind students to use some negative sentences, too. 11 GUESS Model the example conversation with one or two students and practise the pronunciation of probably. Then ask two students to read it out. Ask a different pair of students to make guesses about another student or about you. Allow time for students to work in pairs, then gather ideas from around the class. Check with the person described to see if their guesses were accurate. Encourage a class discussion. 12 Students can use logic and general knowledge to help them complete these sentences. Encourage discussion and disagreement! Look back at SB page 32 to see who Keith Richards is. Ask which facts students find most surprising.



Answers 1 night owls 2 night owls 3 early birds 4 Night owls; early birds 5 Night owls 6 Early birds 7 Night owls

Movies & Music Put students in pairs to read the short text about Driving Miss Daisy, check new vocabulary and answer the first two questions. They can check their answers online in class or for homework. It’s probably easier to give students the final task (Find two more films for each actor) for homework. For the song, check students understand the first line before they do the task. Ask: What do you do the moment you wake up? If you want, tell students that the woman’s boyfriend is in the Vietnam War and she’s afraid for him. (See Culture notes below.)

Extra questions for class or for homework

Movies

Find another film by director Bruce Beresford. Why is the film called Driving Miss Daisy?



Music Who is the songwriter? What other songs do you know by him? (The songwriter is Burt Bacharach. He’s written a lot of very famous songs.)



Find the words of the song. What is the theme of the song? (The woman really loves the man and thinks about him all the time.)



Why does she ‘say a little prayer’ for him? (Because she loves him so much.)

Answers Movies Film description ending: they become close / good friends. Actors: Morgan Freeman and Jessica Tandy Two more films for each actor: Morgan Freeman (The Shawshank Redemption 1994; Amistad 1997; Million Dollar Baby 2004; The Dark Night 2008; Invictus 2009) Jessica Tandy (The Gin Game 1997; Cocoon 1985; Fried Green Tomatoes 1991) Music Next line of the song: I say a little prayer for you Singer: Aretha Franklin Unit 4

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very similar in their own language and which are very different.

Extra idea: To teach students some simple language for talking about films, give students this gapped text to complete for homework. They will need to read about the film online to complete it. The missing words are useful vocabulary for films. Then you can ask students to write about one of their favourite films, using these words. Driving Miss Daisy ____ Jessica Tandy as Miss Freeman, a rich old woman, and Morgan Freeman as her African American driver. Dan Aykroyd ____ Miss Daisy’s son. The film ____ their relationship. (Answers: stars / plays / is about) Culture notes: Driving Miss Daisy stars Jessica Tandy as Daisy Werthan, a rich, lonely and elderly white Jewish woman. After she wrecks her car, Daisy needs a driver and her son Boolie (Dan Aykroyd) finds Hoke Coleburn, an African American driver (Morgan Freeman). The film explores the theme of racism in America and charts Daisy and Hoke’s relationship over 25 years as they slowly become good friends. Daisy teaches Hoke to read and he helps with the cooking and gardening. When Daisy finally enters a retirement home, Hoke is one of her visitors. The film won Academy Awards for Best Picture and Best Actress. I Say a Little Prayer is a well-known song that was first sung by the American singer Dionne Warwick in 1967. The music is by the hugely successful singer / songwriter Burt Bacharach. The lyrics, by Hal David, are about a woman’s fears for her boyfriend, who is fighting in the Vietnam war. The blues singer Aretha Franklin released a famous version in 1968.

Transcript and answers 1 taxi 2 car 3 bike 4 motorbike 5 boat 6 train 7 underground 8 bus 9 plane 10 helicopter 11 tram

Extra idea: Ask students if they know any other words for types of transport, eg ferry, ship, yacht, van, caravan, lorry, hot air balloon.

2 Match the photos with the words in exercise 1 and review the pronunciation of any difficult words. Point out the initial syllable stress in underground, helicopter and motorbike. It might also be useful to point out the meaning of each part of the word in underground.



Answers 1E 2I 3B 4D 5H 6J 7G 8A 9F 10K 11C Culture note: In American English, underground is subway, tram is streetcar, taxi is cab and helicopter can also be chopper. Tip: This may be a good opportunity to review how students are recording new vocabulary in their vocabulary notebooks. New words can be listed by theme, with example sentences, or pictures or translations to illustrate meaning.

Vocabulary plus p40

3 Check comprehension of public transport and of these new adjectives: expensive, fast, slow, dangerous. Ask students what the opposites are (cheap, safe). Discuss the questions as a class and encourage agreement and disagreement.

People



Extra ideas: Ask for additional adjectives to describe transport, eg comfortable, quiet, noisy, crowded.



Describe one type of transport without saying its name. Students have to guess which type of transport you have chosen.

1

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1.67 Before they do the activity, ask students to name as many types of transport in the photos as they can. Then ask them to complete the words with the missing vowels. Play the audio to check the answers and write the answers on the board. Then play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Ask them which names for transport are

4 Check students understand the sentences and can say them. Allow some quiet time for

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students to complete the sentences. They can ask questions to find out each other’s answers in pairs or small groups. Practise one or two questions before they do this, eg How do you travel when you go on holiday in the summer? Ask students to ask you, too.



Point out the vocabulary note on verbs for travelling. Note that we use take / get with public transport. When it’s a regular thing we use the, eg I take the train to work every day.

Focus on: have

2

b Elicit example answers to the question, eg I always have a glass of water at lunch, I often have a swim at the weekend. Put students in pairs to do the activity.



Everyday English p41 Expressing interest 1 Explain that active listening and showing interest is an important conversational skill. Go through the list of things we do and check students understand any new vocabulary, eg smile, lean forward. Students could work in pairs or groups to do this activity. As a class, discuss which behaviours are the same or different in their cultures and check students’ ideas.



Suggested answers a, b, d, f, g, h

1.68

6 Decide whether you are going to

use the video or simply play the audio. Look at the photo and describe what is happening. Ask: What is this person’s job? What is this job like? Make sure students understand what they are listening or watching for. Remind them to listen out for the woman’s intonation, and if you’re using the video, remind them to look at her body language. Play the video (or audio) with books closed and answer the question. Tell students that they don’t need to understand everything the speakers say for this exercise.

a Explain that have can have a variety of meanings and is used with a lot of different nouns. Write the headings on the board and invite students to come to the board to write the answers and to add their own ideas. Practise the phrases in class, checking for correct pronunciation.

Answers have + meal: breakfast, lunch have a + food: a snack, a picnic, a salad, a sandwich have a + drink: a drink, a beer, a glass of water have a + action: a shower, a swim, a walk other: a holiday, a good time, a party

Culture note: In some cultures, it is impolite to look the other person in the eyes for too long. It may be more polite to look downwards, which can seem to show lack of interest in western cultures. Another difference may be in nodding. Sometimes people nod to show interest, but mainly it means Yes, I agree with you. In some cultures, shaking one’s head is a way to show agreement.



Answers Conversation 1: bored (monotonous, monosyllabic answers) Conversation 2: interested (varied intonation, asks questions, reacts to answers) Transcript 1 FRED Hi, my name’s Fred. RITA Hello. I’m Rita. FRED It’s nice to meet you, Rita. What do you do? RITA I’m a secretary – it isn’t very interesting. FRED Oh right. I’m sorry to hear that. I’m lucky, I love my job. RITA Oh. FRED Yes, I’m a firefighter. RITA Ah. FRED Every day is different. That’s the great thing about my job. RITA Oh, there’s my friend Clare. Bye! FRED Bye! Nice to talk! 2

LAURA

What do you do, Fred? I’m a firefighter. LAURA Really? That’s interesting! Is it dangerous? FRED

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Sometimes! I’m sure! Do you rescue lots of people? FRED Not lots of people, but I rescue some people, yes. LAURA Fantastic! Do you enjoy your job? FRED I love it! LAURA Do you? That’s great! I hate my work. So why do you enjoy your job? FRED Because it’s never boring. And I save people’s lives. LAURA Of course, you save lives! But is it tiring? FRED Yes, it is. Oh, that’s for me. Sorry, I must go. LAURA Well, it’s great to talk to you. FRED Thanks, you too.

3

LAURA

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6 Ask students to read the

conversation and check they understand rescue, boring, save lives and tiring. Play the video or audio and pause for students to complete the answers. Play the video or audio again and pause at the end of each line for students to repeat. Pay special attention to intonation, fluency and expression.



Answers 1 Really? That’s interesting! 2 I’m sure! 3 Fantastic! 4 Do you? That’s great! 5 Well, it’s great to talk to you! Transcript See conversation 2 above.



Extra idea: Ask students if they can remember any of the woman’s questions in conversation 2. Ask them to dictate the questions to you so that you can write them on the board. Don’t correct them yourself. Encourage students to correct them as needed. Play the video again to check.

4

Act out the conversation with a strong student. Then students act out the conversations in pairs.



MA Stronger students can do this as a memory exercise.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and

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watch the conversation. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

FRED

1.70 Practise saying the expressions 5 P using different intonation patterns. Ask students to say if your voice goes up or down a lot or just a little. Explain that English speakers have a wider ‘voice range’ than a lot of other nationalities. Tell students that when we’re interested our voice range gets wider. Play the audio and ask again. Play the audio again so that students can repeat each expression. Students may have difficulty with intonation, so help them with this by exaggerating the voice range.



Answers The woman’s voice range is big. Note that her voice often goes down at the end. Transcript 1 Really! 2 I’m sure! 3 Fantastic! 4 That’s great! 5 Cool! 6 Well, it’s great to talk to you!

6 Ask students to look at the picture. Ask: What is the man doing? What is his job? Is it exciting?

7

Model the first example exchange with a student and explain that the echo question uses the auxiliary verb, or the verb be (if be is the main verb). Check the answers and write them on the board.

Answers 1 Do you? 2 Are you? 3 Is he? 4 Are there? 1.71 Play the first dialogue and practise the intonation chorally with the class. Play the rest of the audio and pause for students to repeat chorally and individually.

Transcript 1 MAN WOMAN 2 WOMAN MAN

I work as a lion tamer. Do you? I’m a dancer. Are you?

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3 WOMAN MAN 4 MAN WOMAN

My brother is the CEO of a multinational company. Is he? There are some interesting people in my office. Are there?

Extra idea: Provide some additional examples and ask students to respond as a class, or write their answers, eg My sister works as a firefighter. (Does she?) My parents live in Alaska. (Do they?) My brother is a yoga teacher. (Is he?)

8 Allow time for students to write their dialogues. Make sure they only write affirmative sentences in the present simple. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation.



Extra ideas: Hand out some pieces of paper with surprising sentences and the correct responses written in brackets, eg I’m the president of the USA. (Are you?) Ask students to stand up and walk around. When you give the signal, they should read their sentence to another student. The second student should respond with an echo question (using correct intonation). The first student should check to see if it matches the question on their paper. Then they switch roles.

Note: Only do one or two breaths to start with. It’s possible to become dizzy if you do too many and you aren’t used to so much oxygen! If students practise regularly at home, they can gradually increase the number of breaths. Why is it a good idea to do this? It gets more oxygen into our system and raises our energy and at the same time this slower breathing calms us down. Get students to stand up and take a few breaths like this whenever you feel the energy level of the class has fallen or become too hyper.

we don’t say … / we say …

This section focuses on the following errors:



• omitting the third person singular ‘s’ • incorrect word order with adverbs of frequency • incorrect third person singular form of the auxiliary • omission of the auxiliary in questions • incorrect word order with adverbs of frequency with the verb be



Ask students to cover the green we say … side and to see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

Tell students to find someone in the class they don’t know very well and ask them about their job. They should express real interest through their language and intonation.

De-stress! It is probably not a good idea to have your students lie down in the classroom, but they can learn this breathing standing up, and then practise it lying down this way at home. Students stand up and put their hands on their stomach. As they breathe in deeply, their stomach pushes out their hands a little. As they breathe out, their hands come in. There is little or no shoulder movement.

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Units 3&4 review

pp42–43

Reading

Grammar and writing

1 Ask students to describe the photos and guess why these people are feeling the way they do. Ask students to guess what their jobs are. Encourage lots of active guessing, but don’t give away the answers.

4 This exercise reviews the present simple affirmative and negative. You may want to review the pronunciation of the third person singular ‘s’ ending, eg stays, teaches, feels. Check the answers as a class.



Answers A tired B sad C angry

2 Allow two or three minutes of silent reading time. Tell students they don’t have to understand everything on this first reading. Discuss the answers with the class.



3





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Answers Reza doesn’t sleep very well, he thinks about his patients all the time. Sally works from home and often feels sad because she is lonely. Philip doesn’t enjoy teaching because the students don’t listen to him. Go through the questions first and make sure students know what information they need to remember. As they only read the article quickly in exercise 2, they might not be able to remember all the answers.



Answers 1 stays, doesn’t go, don’t see, feel 2 teaches, don’t like, 3 doesn’t sleep, think Extra idea: Ask students to underline adverbs of frequency in the article. Ask additional questions with who, eg Who sings in a band? (Philip) Who always feels tired? (Reza)

5 Use this exercise to evaluate how well students have understood present simple questions. If necessary, refer back to SB page 35 or the grammar reference on SB page 135. Review short answers by asking students to answer each question.



Ask students to write the answers to these questions in their notebooks, then exchange notebooks with a partner and read the article again to see how many they got right. Then check answers with the whole class.



Answers 1 Reza loves his work. 2 He doesn’t sleep well because he is thinking about his patients. 3 Sally works from home because she has a three-year-old daughter. 4 Most of her friends go out to work every day. 5 Philip doesn’t enjoy teaching because his students don’t always listen to him. 6 He sings in a band at the weekend.





Answers 1 Does Reza work from home? No, he doesn’t. 2 Does Sally think about work all the time? No, she doesn’t. 3 Does Philip feel good in the morning? No, he doesn’t. 4 Does Sally’s husband get home late from work? Yes, he does. 5 Does Philip take work home? Yes, he does. 6 Does Reza usually sleep well? No, he doesn’t.

6 You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish for homework. Collect the written work and use it to obtain example sentences for review at the beginning of the next lesson.

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7 Review object pronouns by writing a table on the board with subject pronouns and asking students to complete the object pronouns.



Allow time for students to read the sentences and complete them with the correct object pronoun. Ask students to compare answers in pairs then ask pairs to write answers on the board.

Answers 1 him, them 2 it 3 you 4 us 5 me 6 her

Cross Culture: culture shock a Ask students to look at the picture and explain what is happening. Ask, eg What nationality are the people? Who are they? Where are they? How do they feel? Focus attention on the man in the suit. Ask: How does he feel? (surprised, confused) Why? (People are very relaxed. In his country people aren’t relaxed at a meeting.)

Speaking 8 Read through the suggestions and check understanding of any new vocabulary, eg parttime job, relaxation exercises. Draw attention to the -ing form after How about. Allow time for students to discuss their answers in pairs. Note that there’s no one fixed answer, so as long as students can back up their suggestions, anything they say is OK. After checking the answers, ask students to guess how these people might respond to these suggestions.





Suggested answers 1 Reza 2 Sally 3 Sally 4 Philip 5 Philip 6 Philip, Reza

9 Remind students of ways to make suggestions and agree or disagree (see SB page 33). Read through the instructions with the students, then put students in pairs to do the role-play. After two minutes, ask students to change partners and work with a different student.



MA Students who finish early can write out a conversation in their notebooks or on the board.



Answers 1 at 2 after 3 from 4 to 5 at 6 for

Answer description 1 Culture note: Different cultures have different dress codes and behaviour at work. In some countries, the dress code at work is quite formal (suit and tie for men, for example) and in others more casual (shirt and no tie, or a sweater). Behaviour at business meetings can also be more or less formal. In some cultures, it’s fine to eat, drink, text or chat during a meeting. In others, the guest must wait until the host has finished speaking. So in this picture, the Japanese man is confused because everybody else at the table is casually dressed, chatting, eating, texting, etc, all of which wouldn’t happen in Japan.

b Ask if any students have experienced culture shock. Ask them to tell the class about it. You may want to introduce the word homesick and contrast culture shock with feeling homesick. You may also want to describe your own experiences of culture shock and encourage students to ask you questions.

Preposition park Use the first pair of clocks to contrast the meaning of before with after. Draw a timeline on the board to show the difference between a period of time and a point of time to explain the meaning of from / to and for. Refer to the pictures in the book to reinforce the meaning. Practise the pronunciation of all the prepositions. Allow time for students to work individually, then check the answers as a class.

Ask students to read the two descriptions and do the task. Check they understand abroad.



Answers 1 A person has culture shock when they travel abroad. 2 They have it when the country is very different to their own. 3 They feel unhappy and disorientated.

c Read through the suggestions first and check comprehension. Ask students to work in groups and choose the best suggestions. Elicit ideas as to why each suggestion is good or bad advice, and when or for whom it might be useful. Ask each group to suggest three more pieces of advice. Units 3&4 Review

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5

Amazing lives

UNIT FOCUS

GRAMMAR: was / were born; be past simple; there was / there were VOCABULARY: personal qualities; ordinal numbers; sports FUNCTIONS: talking about personal qualities; asking for and giving opinions

Lesson 1 He was born on a plane. pp44–45



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 135, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise was / were born in statements and questions, to learn the past simple of be and to learn vocabulary for personal qualities. Note: You may find it useful to have a world map to refer to in this lesson.

You first! Put students in groups and ask them to talk about the people in the photos. They can say anything about them – they may only know what they are famous for, but that’s OK.



Extra idea: Use a short drill to practise question forms. Teacher: you Students: Where were you born? Teacher: she Students: Where was she born? etc 2

Practise the pronunciation of each year in the box. Note that years with ‘20’ can be said in two different ways, eg twenty ten or two thousand and ten. The general rule is that for the early years of the century we say two thousand and …, but after 2010, we say twenty eleven / twelve, etc – but many people say both.



Allow time for students to make guesses about the people, then play the audio for students to check their answers. Play it again, pausing for students to repeat each sentence.

Grammar 1 was / were born 1 Write possible answers to question 1 on the board, teaching new vocabulary as needed. This question may repeat what students discussed in You first!, but it’s useful reinforcement of vocabulary.



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Read out the place names in the box and ask where they are. If you have one, point to a world map or get students to come and point to the map. Model the example dialogue with one or two students, and get them to add in their guess for where Emma Watson was born. Focus on the grammar table to practise the structure of the question and answer. Check pronunciation of was /wəz/ and were /wə/, pointing out that they are both unstressed in these questions and answers. Allow time for students to discuss their answers in pairs.

Answers Emma Watson is an actor. She was born in Paris, France. Mo Farah is an athlete. He was born in Mogadishu, Somalia. Rihanna is a singer. She was born in St Michael, Barbados. Jackie Chan is an actor. He was born in Hong Kong, China.

2.2

Transcript and answers 1 Emma Watson was born in 1990. 2 Mo Farah was born in 1983. 3 Rihanna was born in 1988. 4 Jackie Chan was born in 1954. 3 Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Make sure they use the correct pronunciation of was and were. Students can then ask you the questions. Tell students to work in pairs to ask and answer the questions.

Extra idea: To extend this activity, ask students to talk about members of their family or famous people they know about.

4 Ask students to look at the photo and read the title of the story. Ask if they can guess what it will be about. Go through the questions below the story so students know what information to look for. Allow a few minutes for silent

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reading. Ask some easy comprehension questions, eg What’s the mother’s name? What’s the baby’s name? Where are they from? Check students understand pregnant, flight attendant and nurse. Ask students to write their answers, then check the answers as a class.



MA For an extra challenge, ask students to retell the story to their partner with their books closed.

Answers He was born in the sky! Alfie Delemere was born on a plane,10,000 metres up in the sky! In April 2007, his parents, Nicola (31) and Dominic (28), were on their way from Manchester to Crete for a holiday. Nicola was only six months pregnant, but when they were over Germany, Alfie was born. There were no doctors on board, but luckily, the flight attendant, Carol Miller, was there and there was also a nurse. Afterwards, Dominic said, ‘Thank you, everybody for your help in the air and on the ground. And thank you, Carol, for saving our baby’s life.’



Extra idea: Ask students to interview Nicola, Dominic or Alfie ten years later. Ask them to tell the story from that person’s point of view.

7 Students can work individually then compare their answers in pairs. Ask them to explain the reasons for their choices.



Background note: Seven years later, in July 2013, because of this ‘miracle’ birth, Alfie was the name of the new Thompson Airways Boeing 747 Dreamliner Jet!



Answers 1 2007 2 in the air 3 31 4 the flight attendant 5 Because the flight attendant and a nurse helped and saved Alfie’s life.





Grammar 2 be past simple 5 Draw a timeline on the board to contrast the meaning of past (last year, yesterday) and present (now). Ask students to complete the table, then say each question and statement and get students to repeat.

Answers questions affirmative negative What was Her name She wasn’t a her name? was Carol. doctor. Who were They were They weren’t his parents? Nicola and on a train. Dominic.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 136, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

6 Refer students back to the story on SB page 44. Do the first example together, then allow time for individual work. Check the answers by asking how many examples of each form they could find. Ask individual students to read out the examples.

Answers 1 wasn’t; was 2 was 3 wasn’t 4 Were; weren’t Extra idea: Ask students to write three sentences about where or when they were born. Two are true and one is a lie. Their partner has to guess which one isn’t true.

Vocabulary Personal qualities 8 Check comprehension of the question What are you like? Contrast its meaning with What do you like? by showing the different kinds of answers to each question, eg I’m quiet and shy. I like reading books.

Brainstorm some words for personality and write them on the board. Explain that the information links personality with time of birth. Allow time for quiet reading. Encourage students to ask you questions about the text.



Check comprehension of the words in bold, eg Which word means ‘good with computers’? (technical) Which word means ‘like to work alone’? (independent).

9 Go through the grammar and vocabulary notes below the exercise. Review the meaning of am and pm by relating some of the times in the text What are you like? to the 24-hour clock. Ask students to explain the different uses of at and in based on the examples given. Unit 5

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Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 136, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. Model the task by identifying your birth time in the text and saying if the description is good for you or not or if there’s another one you would prefer. Ask students to work in pairs, then call on individuals to tell the class. Extra ideas: Ask students to work in pairs. One partner picks a personality description, the other has to guess which one by asking questions.

Ask: Do you agree with this statement: There is a connection between your character and the time of day you were born? (Answers: No, I don’t, it’s silly! / I’m not sure. / Perhaps it’s true.) 10 EVERYBODY UP! Energise your class with this walk-around activity. Go through the list first to check comprehension. You may want to give one trait to each student, or ask each student to find three people for each category.

Speaking 11 GUESS Model the example conversation with one or two students. Remind students of their answers to exercise 9 as these will help them with this activity. Ask students to stand up and walk around the classroom. Play background music if appropriate. Students should spend one minute with each person and try to find out when they were born and what they are like. When you ring a bell (or use some other signal) they should switch to another partner.

Extra ideas: Tell students to write a sentence on a piece of paper. They should write the month, year, time and place they were born, eg I was born in March 1989 at 4 o’clock in the morning in a hospital in Recife. Collect in all the pieces of paper then hand them out at random around the class. Students should then try and find the person whose sentence they now have.



Ask students to find someone who was born at the same time as them. Then ask them to find ten things they have in common and three things that are completely different.

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Explore For this activity, students should type into their browser the name of a famous person (not somebody from this unit) and place of birth. As an example, you could ask if anyone knows where Freddie Mercury (the singer from the rock band Queen) was born (Zanzibar).

Movies & Music Read through the instructions and text for the first section and teach / elicit any difficult vocabulary, eg fish market, planet, rocket, perfume, murderer, central. Students can do the task in class or for homework and you can check answers in the next lesson.

Extra questions for class or for homework



Movies How many Superman films are there? Who is your favourite Superman actor? What’s the name of the main villain (baddy) in the films? (Lex Luthor) Which actors play him in different films? (Gene Hackman, Kevin Spacey, Jesse Eisenberg) Perfume was originally a book and it became a novel. How many other films do you know that were originally books?







Music How many other songs by this famous group can you name? Can you name the members of the group?

Answers Movies 1 on another planet 2 in a fish market Superman had special powers and was incredibly strong. Jean-Baptiste Grenouille had an amazing sense of smell. Music The song: Yellow Submarine The group: The Beatles

Culture notes: Superman was originally a comic-book superhero, created by two school students, Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster, and published by DC Comics. The story goes that he was born on the planet Krypton and then sent to Earth in a rocket moments before the planet exploded. He was brought up as

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Clark Kent, an ‘ordinary’ boy, by an American farming couple, but he soon realised he had very special powers, which he uses to fight evil and help people.

There have been at least six Superman films including: Adventures of Superman (1952), Superman (1978), Superman 2 (1980), Superman 3 (1983), Superman Returns (2006) and Batman v Superman (2016).



Perfume: the story of a murderer is based on a book, Das Parfum, which was written in 1985 by German writer Patrick Süskind. It became a film nineteen years later in 2006. Set in eighteenth-century France, it tells the story of Jean-Baptiste Grenouille (grenouille means frog in French), a man who grows up with an extraordinary sense of smell. He becomes interested in learning about and creating perfumes, and he also becomes interested in murder. He smells and stalks his victims! The film starred Ben Whishaw and Dustin Hoffman.





Yellow Submarine is a song written for The Beatles by Paul McCartney in 1966, and one of the rare Beatles songs sung by Ringo Starr. It went to number 1 in the UK, and stayed there for four weeks. In 1968 it became the title track of an animated film also called Yellow Submarine. The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in the 1960s – and probably the most influential and successful band of the rock era. Paul McCartney and John Lennon wrote most of their songs and played guitar, George Harrison played lead guitar and Ringo Starr was their drummer.

Lesson 2 There weren’t many events. pp46–47 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise the past forms there was / were, learn ordinal numbers and find out about Olympic sports.

Warm-up Ask students what they know about the Olympics. Write the following on the board: The first Olympic Games – Where? When? Modern Olympics – How often? Where? Students can work in groups and brainstorm ideas. Tell students they will find out

much more about the Modern Olympic Games in exercise 13 in this lesson.

Reading 1 Ask students to describe the photos and say how they are different. Ask, eg Where are these two men from? Look at the medals and elicit the correct names (gold, silver, bronze). Ask students to think about how these two men could be linked. Discuss the questions as a class and write their guesses on the board. Don’t check answers yet. 2 Allow time for quiet reading. Then check the ideas on the board. Check comprehension of key new vocabulary, eg poor, water seller, athlete, winner, marathon, runner, farmer, event.



Point out the grammar note under the text. Explain that these are all verbs and their past simple forms. Don’t worry about teaching the past simple at this point as it comes in the next unit, but the students should be able to recognise and understand these words as lexical items. They are needed for clear comprehension of the article.

Answers 1 It is about two great long-distance runners. 2 They both won marathons.

3

This activity focuses on the first section of the article only. Ask students to cover it, then read through the sentences. Students work individually before comparing answers with the article.



Extra idea: To extend this activity, ask students to make additional sentences about Spyros Louis using was or were, eg His father was a water seller.

Answers 1 wasn’t 2 was 3 weren’t 4 wasn’t 5 were 6 were MA For an extra challenge, ask students to close their books. Give them the prompt words and ask them to make the sentences, eg Teacher: 1973 Students: He wasn’t born in 1973.

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4



This activity focuses on the second section of the article only. Ask students to cover it, then read through the sentences. Students work individually before comparing answers with the article. Extra idea: To extend this activity, ask students to make additional questions about Haile using was or were, eg Where was he born?

Vocabulary Ordinal numbers 6

Write the numbers 1–10 on the board and ask students to say the ordinal number for each one. Focus on pronunciation, especially of the /θ/ sound in difficult words such as sixth. Use the picture to help with comprehension. Also ask students to look back at the medals on SB page 46 and say which is first / second / third.



Go round the room saying the numbers in the list. Then play the audio for students to check, pausing it for students to repeat each word.

Answers

1 Ethiopia 2 Geb 3 100 years 4 10km 5 10,000m race (at Atlanta Olympics) 6 In London, in 2002



Extra idea: Ask students to highlight all the instances of the past of be in the complete article.

5 Tell students to look at the questions in exercise 4 and use them as a model to write questions about Spyros Louis. Monitor students as they work and make a note of any common errors that would be useful to explain to the class as a whole.

Extra idea: Ask students to find one difference and one similarity between the two men. Ask which of the two athletes they find the most interesting and why.



(Answers: Differences: Louis died in 1940, Gebrselassie is still alive. They were different nationalities and different races. They were born in different centuries. Their fathers did different jobs. They were at different Games in different events: marathon / 10,000 metres. Louis won in his home town.



Similarities: Their families were poor. They were athletes at an early age. They were both 23 years old when they won their first race. They were both marathon runners.)

Explore For this activity, students should type into their browser long-distance runner or marathon runner. They should come up with many names, but they should discuss in groups which runners they think are the greatest ones in the world at the moment.

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2.3

Transcript first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, twelfth, twentieth, twenty-first, twenty-second, twentythird, twenty-fourth, twenty-fifth 7 Spot check comprehension and pronunciation by calling out names of months at random. Students should point to the month on the list and repeat the name.

Tell students to work in pairs to say the correct ordinal number for each month. Check answers as a class.

Answers October: the tenth month January: the first month March: the third month December: the twelfth month February: the second month April: the fourth month August: the eighth month November: the eleventh month June: the sixth month July: the seventh month September: the ninth month

Vocabulary Sports (1) 8

Brainstorm as many sports as possible and write them on the board. Ask: Which ones can you play? Which ones do you watch on TV? Which ones do you go to see? Which ones are exciting or boring? Students work individually or in pairs to check the list and complete the words. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Focus on the stress in two-syllable words, pointing out that it’s usually on the 2.4

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first syllable, eg rugby, sailing. For threesyllable words, the stress is usually on the first or second syllable, eg athletics, volleyball, gymnastics, badminton.

Ask students which names for sports are very similar in their own language and which are very different.

Transcripts and answers 1 rugby 2 athletics 3 boxing 4 skiing 5 cycling 6 volleyball 7 golf 8 gymnastics 9 badminton 10 sailing 11 baseball 12 hockey 9 Encourage guessing and discussion of what is shown in each picture to elicit further sports vocabulary, eg a badminton racquet, a boat, a hockey stick. Students then match the pictures with the correct sports.

Answers 1B 2D 3E 4G 5L 6K 7H 8I 9A 10F 11C 12J 10 GUESS Focus on the list of sports in exercise 8 again. Students work in pairs or groups to discuss which of them are Olympic sports.



Teacher: a central water system Students: There wasn’t a central water system.



Students can look at the article on SB page 46 if they need help completing the table. Check answers as a class.

Answers affirmative negative There was a problem There wasn’t a school in Athens. near their farm. There were only silver There weren’t gold medals. medals in 1896. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 136, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. 12 Note that this activity has two stages. The first (exercise 12) is grammar practice and the second (exercise 13) is general knowledge. Give feedback on the grammar only at this stage. Tell students to work on their own to complete the gaps in the quiz, then compare answers in pairs. Write the answers on the board. Ask students to explain the reasons for their choices.

Answers 1 was 2 were 3 were; were 4 weren’t; were; were 5 were 6 were 7 weren’t

Answer All the sports are Olympic sports apart from baseball. 13

Extra idea: Ask students what they know about the newest Olympic sports (eg snowboarding, ski halfpipe, luge). Ask: Which sports are not Olympic sports? (eg polo, cricket).

Did you know?  * Ask students if they are familiar with the

game of croquet. Ask any students who are to explain it to the class. (Supply any necessary vocabulary: mallet, hoop.) Ask if students have a similar game in their country.

Grammar there was / there were 11 This grammar point may be confusing because the verb agrees with the noun that follows the verb. Provide some prompts for students to make sentences starting with There was / were, eg



Tell students to work in pairs or groups to answer the quiz questions. Ask groups to give feedback to the class and see how many students got the same answers. Play the audio and check the answers. Find out which ones they got right and ask if there were any that everyone get wrong. 2.5

Answers 1 1896 2 9 3 22 4 4 (croquet, golf, sailing and tennis) 5 London 6 26, 11,000, 204 7 Because of World War I and World War II. Transcript 1 The year of the first Modern Olympic Games was 1896. 2 There were nine events at the first Modern Games. They were: athletics, cycling, fencing, gymnastics, shooting, swimming, tennis, weightlifting and wrestling. 3 There were 22 women in the Games for the first time in 1900 (but there were 975 men!). Unit 5

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Transcript

4 There weren’t many sports for women in that year. Only four were possible. What were they? Croquet, golf, sailing and tennis. 5 The 2012 Summer Olympics were in London. 6 In that year, there were 26 sports, and almost 11,000 athletes from 204 countries. 7 There weren’t Games in 1914, 1940 or 1944. Why not? Because of World War I and World War II.

So who exactly was Pierre de Coubertin? AUTHOR Pierre de Coubertin was French. He was born in Paris on January the first, 1863. INTERVIEWER New Year’s Day! AUTHOR Yes, New Year’s Day. A new beginning. INTERVIEWER And he liked sport. AUTHOR Oh yes, he loved sport. Sport was special because it was for everyone: young people, old people, rich and poor, black and white. His motto was ‘All sports for all people’. INTERVIEWER And why were the Olympic Games important? AUTHOR They were very important to help peace and understanding in the world. INTERVIEWER Because people were together. AUTHOR Exactly. The Games united people from all over the world. INTERVIEWER And tell us about the Olympic flag – those five rings. AUTHOR The five rings mean the five continents together and athletes from all over the world. INTERVIEWER And the colours? Blue, yellow, black, green and red (on white). AUTHOR Well, you can find at least one of these colours (including white) in the flag of every country in the world. INTERVIEWER Really? I must have a look! INTERVIEWER

Extra idea: Ask students to research more information about the first Olympic Games online. They could then present their information to the rest of the class in the form of a quiz.

Lesson 3 All sports for all people. pp48–49 Aims The focus of this lesson is to review questions using the past simple of be, and to find out more about the Olympics and Paralympics.

You first! Ask students about the last Olympic Games. Ask: Were they exciting? Why? / Why not? Are the Olympic Games a good idea? Why? / Why not? Explain the meaning of Paralympic Games.

Listening 1 1 Ask students to look at the flag and the photo and discuss the questions. Encourage guessing and write the ideas on the board. Don’t check the answers yet as they will come up in the audio. 2



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Explain that you are going to play the first part of an interview about the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Tell students to listen carefully as there is a lot of information in the interview. Play the audio for students to check their answers to exercise 1. Play it again if any answers were unclear or incorrect. 2.6

Answers 1 He was French. 2 He was born in Paris on 1st January, 1863. 3 ‘All sports for all people’ 4 They represent the five continents. 5 Because you can find at least one of the colours in the flag of every country of the world.

3 Go over the words in the box and practise saying them. For the longer words, ask how many syllables there are and which one is stressed. Ask students to work individually to tick the words they think they heard. Play the audio again for students to check their answers.



Check comprehension of the words by asking, eg Which word means a sportsperson / the opposite of war / the opposite of rich?

Answers sport, special, young, old, rich, poor, peace, understanding, world

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Tip: Play the audio and ask students to raise their hands when they hear the word.

Background note: 776BC was the year of the first ancient Olympic Games – in Athens. (The events were: athletics (running), long jump (jumping), discus throwing, wrestling, boxing and equestrian: horse and chariot racing.)



Years of some of the Games:



1900 = Paris, 1936 = Berlin, 1992 = Barcelona, 1994 = Lillehammer (Norway), 2000 = Sydney, 2004 = Athens, 2008 = Beijing, 2012 = London.



1994 was the first year that the Winter Olympics, in Lillehammer in Norway, were in a different year from the Summer ones. (Subsequent winter Olympics: 1998 Japan, 2002 USA, 2006 Italy, 2010 Canada, 2014 Russia.)

Speaking 4 Allow time for students to discuss the questions in pairs or in small groups. Compare answers as a class.



Answers 1 blue, yellow, black, green, red, white 2 suggested answers: pink, brown, purple, orange, grey 3–5 Students’ own answers

Listening 2 5 Ask students to look at the photos on SB page 49. They may be able to predict how the idea of the Paralympic Games first got started. Allow time for quiet reading and discussion in pairs. Check understanding of any difficult words, eg neurosurgeon, specialist, spinal injuries, disabilities. Check the answers as a class.

Note that the questions in exercise 6 will also help to check comprehension of this biography.



The photo at the bottom of SB page 49 shows the first Paralympic Games (the 1st International Wheelchair Games). The only sport was archery and this photo is from that year – 1948.



Answers 1 He was a German neurosurgeon. 2 He was the father of the Paralympic Games. The photos show athletes in the Paralympic Games.

6 Tell students to read the biography of Ludwig Guttmann again, then work in pairs to write the questions. Ask pairs to write the questions on the board and check each others’ work.

7

MA For a greater challenge, ask students to write additional questions with was or were (eg What was Stoke Mandeville Hospital?). For more support, write the answers to the questions in a random order on the board.

Suggested answers 1 When was Dr Guttmann born? 2 Where was he from? 3 What did he do? / What was his job? / What kind of doctor was he? 4 What was his dream? 2.7 Go through the table and check that students know what type of information to write in each column. Draw the table on the board. You may want to do the first one as an example with the class. Explain that you are going to play the second part of the interview. Play the audio and invite students to call out their answers so that you can write them in the table. Play the audio again for students to check their answers. Ask: How were the Games different in Stoke Mandeville and London?

Answers year event competitors countries st 1948 1 16 1 International Wheelchair Games, Stoke Mandeville 1960 Paralympic 400 23 Games, Rome 2012 Paralympic 4,302 164 Games, London

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Transcript So how did the Paralympic Games start? AUTHOR Well, the first Paralympic Games weren’t called the Paralympic Games, they were called the First International Wheelchair Games, and they were at Stoke Mandeville Hospital near London. INTERVIEWER And when was that? AUTHOR That was in the summer of1948. INTERVIEWER Uh-huh. AUTHOR They were very small that year. There were only 16 competitors. They were all in wheelchairs and they were all from the UK. INTERVIEWER So just one country? The Games weren’t international. AUTHOR That’s right. But over the years, they were open to other countries and to people with other disabilities too – not just wheelchair users. At the Paralympic Games in 1960 in Rome, there were 400 athletes, and they were from 23 different countries. INTERVIEWER Wow! That was only 12 years after 1948. AUTHOR That’s nothing. In London in 2012, there were 4,302 athletes. INTERVIEWER Four thousand three hundred and two athletes! And how many different countries? AUTHOR A hundred and sixty-four! INTERVIEWER

Listening 3 8

2.8 Ask students to look at the photo and say who they think the woman is and what she is doing. Explain the word Baroness (it’s a title the Queen of England can give a woman when she has done something for the country).



Ask students to read the information. Explain any new words, eg nickname, spina bifida (/spaɪnəˈbɪfɪdə/), charity. Play the audio as students write their answers. They can compare in pairs. Play the audio again, pausing to check each answer.



Note: Spina bifida literally means ‘split or open spine’. It is a birth defect in which the bones of the spine (vertebrae) do not form properly around the spinal cord. The causes of spina bifida are not really known.

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Answers Surname Grey-Thompson Real name Carys Davina Place of birth Cardiff, Wales Year of birth 1969 Nickname Tanni Disability Spina bifida Number of medals gold: 11 silver: 4 bronze: 1 Year of first medal 1988 London Marathon Won six times between 1992 and 2002 Year of last Paralympics 2004 Current occupation Works for charity; helps other disabled people Transcript Tanni Grey-Thompson has a wheelchair because she was born with spina bifida. Her real name is Carys Davina, and she was born in Cardiff in Wales in 1969. She was a very small baby, and her sister called her tiny or ‘tanni’ – the name she still uses today. Tanni has 16 Paralympic medals for wheelchairracing events. Eleven medals were gold, four were silver. The first one was bronze. She won it in Seoul in 1988 for the 400m wheelchair race. She also won the London Marathon six times between 1992 and 2002. Her last Paralympics were in Athens in 2004. Nowadays, Tanni does a lot of work for charity and for disabled people. Tip: When playing the audio, it is best for students to work out the answers by themselves, even if it means playing a segment several times.

Writing and speaking 9 Read the biography outline together. Then ask students to write the missing words. Note that students can take the information from the table in exercise 8. Remind them that won is the past simple of win – this was mentioned in the reading in lesson 2. They will learn more about the past simple in the next unit.

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Transcript and answers alright, strange, awful, dangerous, different, modern, difficult, horrible, interesting, easy, safe, beautiful, similar, lovely, traditional, ugly, boring

Answers 1 was born 2 1969 3 is ‘Tanni’ 4 baby 5 16 6 wheelchair 7 won 8 six times 9 1992 10 2002 MA For a greater challenge, ask students to close their books. Then read out the text, saying Mmm for the missing words. Students can write their answers in their notebooks. For more support write the missing words on the board in a random order. 10 Start by brainstorming the names of three or four famous athletes and ask what students know about them. Students can then continue in groups. Point out that these notes will help them with exercise 11. 11 You may want to assign this activity as research and writing for homework. Students can use exercise 9 as a model to help them make notes

De-stress! Ask students how they come to class, eg Do you walk, jog or cycle? If not, why not? Also ask: What exercise do you like doing? What exercise do you do regularly? Could you do more? Finally, ask them: Why is exercise important? It’s important, not only for weight control, but also for stress management: exercise uses up the harmful ‘chemicals’ produced by stress and increases our endorphins – which make us feel good! And while stress reduces our energy, exercise increases it.

Vocabulary plus p50 Opinion adjectives 1 P Go through the words and check comprehension. Ask students which words they know already. Tell them to work in pairs, say each word out loud and mark the stress. Bring in pictures of places, people and things and ask students their opinions. Try to elicit as many adjectives from the list as possible. Ask students which adjectives are very similar in their own language and which are very different. 2.9 Play the audio for students to check 2 P their answers to exercise 1. Then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Focus on the different stress patterns in words of more than one syllable, eg dangerous, traditional.

3 Draw the table on the board and explain the meaning of it depends. Give some examples of how modern could be positive or negative, eg a modern house (it could be a beautiful modern house or an ugly modern house). Allow time for students to work individually to complete the table, then compare answers as a class.

Answers positive negative interesting awful alright dangerous easy difficult beautiful horrible safe boring lovely

it depends modern strange different similar traditional



Extra ideas: Ask students to give examples of what each word can describe, eg an easy test, an easy question, an easy job. Encourage disagreement and ask students to give examples to support their opinions.



To extend the activity, ask students to add other words to the table eg, weird, nasty, funny, nice, attractive.

4 Read out the example pair of opposites. Allow time for individual work, then check the answers and write them on the board. Ask if students know any other opposite words that go with these words.

Answers awful / horrible – lovely; dangerous – safe; different – similar; modern – traditional; difficult – easy; interesting – boring; beautiful – ugly 5 There are a few 3x3x3 exercises throughout the book. They get students to find a set number of things in a set time. You may want to make this activity into a team competition. Ask a student from each group to call out a word for each category and write them on the board. Unit 5

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Modifiers 6 Draw the diagram on the board. Give examples of how to use these modifiers with adjectives from exercise 1. Use intonation and emphasis to show how the meaning changes, eg It’s really strange. It’s a bit strange.





Discuss the pictures and elicit what is happening in each one. Teach / Elicit useful vocabulary, eg flag, wave, umbrella, sun, cloud, blow, bend. Check the answers by saying the number of the picture and asking students to say the correct sentence. Focus on appropriate stress and intonation.



Answers 1H 2E 3B 4D 5G 6F 7C 8A Darts, fishing and windsurfing are not Olympic sports.



Extra ideas: Ask: Which sports are popular in your country? Which ones can you play? What is it like? Which ones do you think are most interesting, dangerous or boring? (Remember to use modifiers.) Which ones are outside or inside? Which are team sports?

Answers a1 b5 c2 d4 e3 f6



Choose two sports and find three ways in which they are the same and different. Students guess which two sports they are.

Background note: The pictures are taken from the idea of the Beaufort Scale, which is used to indicate the strength of the wind. The Beaufort Scale is really important for one Olympic sport on SB page 47. Which one? (sailing)

Focus on: play, do, go

Point out the vocabulary box below the pictures about using a bit with negative adjectives. You may also want to teach not very as another modifier (It isn’t very windy.).

7 Read through the sentences and point out the words in italics. Gather ideas from the whole class and encourage good-humoured disagreement and discussion.

Sports (2) 8

You can do this as a class or have students work in pairs to test each other. Tell them to look at SB page 47 to check their answers. Ask: Which words were most difficult to remember? Why? Share tips for remembering these words.

9

2.10 Tell students to read through the list of sports and try to fill in the missing vowels. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word.

Transcript and answers 1 archery 2 basketball 3 darts 4 fishing 5 riding 6 skating 7 table tennis 8 windsurfing 96

10 Check the meaning of each word by matching them with the pictures. (There is also a photo of archery on SB page 49.) Elicit any additional vocabulary, eg skates, bow and arrow, fishing rod. Ask students to identify the sports that aren’t Olympic sports.

a Write play, do and go on the board and point to each one as you say the sport. b Ask a student to come to the board. Ask another student in the class to say a sport. The student at the board has to point to the correct verb. When you have worked through the words in the list, ask students if they can see a rule for which verb to use. Check answers as a class.

Answers play: volleyball, table tennis, rugby do: judo, gymnastics go: swimming, riding, skiing We use go for nouns ending in -ing. We use play for sports with a ball. We use do for other sports. Tip: This may be a good opportunity to review how students are keeping their vocabulary notebooks. Do they list collocations with each noun and verb? Do they write example sentences?

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Everyday English p51 Note: You might want to bring in pictures of paintings for this lesson.

Asking for and giving opinions 1 Elicit adjectives to describe paintings A and B, eg lovely, colourful, bright, soft, clear, realistic, abstract, calm. Ask questions about them, eg What kind of mood or emotion do they evoke? What does the artist want you to feel? Students work in pairs to discuss the questions, then compare answers with another pair.

2

Answers The paintings are A basketball B high jump 2.11

6 Decide whether you are going to

use the video or simply play the audio. Focus on the table and check understanding of neutral. Tell students to listen for the words the characters use to talk about the paintings. Play the video / audio and ask some general questions, eg Do you recognise any of the characters? Where are they? Play the video / audio again while students write their answers. Check the answers.

Answers 1 Sarah: + Jack: + 2 Laura: + Jack: 3 Sarah: +/ Ahmet: +/Transcript 1 SARAH I really like it. It’s interesting. JACK I agree. It’s full of life. And I love the colours.! 2 LAURA I think it’s amazing. JACK I disagree. I really hate it! I think the colours are horrible. 3 SARAH It’s a bit strange, but I quite like it. AHMET Well, it’s – um – different. 3 This activity is in two parts. In exercise 3 they number the opinions in the order they heard them; in exercise 4 they complete the missing words. Play the video / audio again. Write the correct sequence of numbers on the board.



Answers a) 2 b) 5 c) 6 d) 1 e) 3 f) 4

4 See if students can remember the missing words in the opinions in exercise 4. If not, play the relevant segments again. Ask students to repeat the phrases using the same intonation and stress.



Answers a) love b) strange; quite c) different d) really; interesting e) amazing f) horrible

5

Ask students to practise the conversations in pairs, then ask a few pairs to act out the conversations for the class.



MA For an extra challenge, students can try to act out the conversations with books closed. You can put key words on the board to help with this.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversations. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

6 Look at the phrases in exercise 3 again. Ask students to find one phrase for agreeing and one for disagreeing. Check answers with the class.



Answers a) I agree. f) I disagree. Extra idea: Elicit some other ways to agree and disagree, eg Agree: That’s right! That’s true. Absolutely! Disagree: Really? I’m not sure about that. etc.

7 Read out the expressions in the box, making sure you use plenty of expression to get the meaning across. Ask: Which ones are positive, negative and neutral? How can you make them more positive or negative? (by adding really, very etc). Check answers with the class.

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Answers + - +/ It’s great! I think it’s awful. I don’t know. I think it’s I really don’t It’s OK. nice. like it. It’s horrible! I don’t like it.

Culture note: In some cultures, it is impolite to disagree, especially with strangers. Expressing opinions too strongly may also be discouraged. Discuss these cultural differences with your students. Ask: When do you think it is OK to disagree? When could it be impolite? When is it important to give your real opinion? Does it make a difference who you are speaking to or what topic you are discussing?

8 Now ask students for their opinions of paintings A and B. Ask them how the two paintings differ. Encourage students to agree and disagree with each other.

Extra idea: Students can role-play a conversation between two people, one of whom prefers painting A and the other painting B.



Extra idea: Bring in postcards or pictures of paintings and stick them up on the walls around the room. Give each painting a number. Ask students to pretend they are at an art gallery. They can walk around giving their opinions and agreeing / disagreeing. Then give each student a secret number. They have to write a short description of the painting with that number. They can read out the description and the others have to guess which painting it is about.

11 Note that this is similar to the 3x3x3 exercise students did in Vocabulary plus, only this time they have five things to think about. This task is designed to let students practise agreeing and disagreeing. It should be short and lively! Ask groups to give feedback to the class.

we don’t say … / we say …

This section focuses on the following areas: • incorrect tense • incorrect writing of dates • incorrect preposition and use of infinitive • incorrect word order



Ask students to cover the green we say … side and to see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

9 Brainstorm adjectives to describe the third painting. Use phrases from the video as well as opinion adjectives with modifiers. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation. 10 Introduce the activity by asking students to choose one of the paintings on SB page 51. Tell them they are going to write a postcard about it to a friend, giving their opinion of the painting. You may want to write or elicit a few starter phrases and write them on the board, eg Dear Emily, I think this painting is really …. It makes me feel so …. When I look at this painting, I think of … etc.

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Allow a few minutes of quiet writing time. Ask selected students to read out their postcard and let the others guess which painting it describes.

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6

How things began

UNIT FOCUS

GRAMMAR: past simple VOCABULARY: dates; animals; technology FUNCTIONS: talking about important dates

and events; talking on the phone

Lesson 1 It started with a party. pp52–53



Extra ideas: Give a dictation of five or six dates in numerical form. Students write the dates as words. Then ask students to read out their answers and correct each other.



Ask students to talk about special occasions in the year when they usually have a party or a family gathering. Ask: When do you usually have a party?



Write some more special dates on the board and ask students to guess why they are special, eg 31st October (Halloween), 5th November (Guy Fawkes Night), 4th July (US Independence Day).



Culture note: In the USA, dates are usually written with the month first, followed by the day, eg August 9th 2015 or 08/09/2015; in the UK we write the day first, then the month: 9th August, 2015 or 09/08/2015.

2

2.12 Ask what students already know about Chinese New Year – you can use the photo to elicit more information. Go through the words in the box and check comprehension of moon, sun and system. Tell students to work in pairs to try and complete the information. Then play the audio for students to check their answers.

Aims The focus of this lesson is to introduce the past simple and talk about dates, animals and the Chinese Zodiac.

You first! This question is rather cryptic and students may wonder what it means! Tell them to look at the photo and think about what it shows and what the question might refer to. Encourage lots of discussion and guesses and help with vocabulary if needed. If anybody guesses that the question is about the Chinese Zodiac, ask the other students what, if anything, they know about it.

Vocabulary Dates 1 Before you start, review the difference between cardinal and ordinal numbers. Practise the pronunciation of ordinal numbers. Then ask students to read and practise saying the dates in the box. Notice which dates cause problems with pronunciation. Tip: Draw the stress pattern on the board as you pronounce the dates, eg The first of January (o O o Oooo).

Point out the information above the box, which shows students how to say the dates (using the – the first of …). Discuss the questions and make a list of the special dates on the board.

Answers 1st January New Year’s Day International Women’s 8th March Day Tiradentes Day (Brazil) 21st April th National Day (Singapore) 9 August 1st / 2nd November All Saint’s Day / Day of the Dead (Mexico) New Year’s Eve / 31st December Hogmanay (Scotland)



Answers 1 date 2 year 3 moon 4 system 5 animal Transcript Chinese New Year doesn’t have a fixed date. It is on a different date in January or February every year. It changes because of the moon. There are 12 animals in the Chinese Zodiac system and each year belongs to a different animal.



Culture note: The Chinese Zodiac is used by other cultures, too. The Korean Zodiac is exactly the same. The Vietnamese one has a Water Buffalo instead of an Ox and a Cat instead of a Rabbit. The Japanese one has a Wild Boar instead of a Pig and the Thai Unit 6

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Zodiac has a Naga (a mythical sea serpent) instead of a Dragon.

audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Ask which names for animals are very similar in their own language and which are very different.

3 Point out the box on the photo of the dragon. Ask: Whose party was it? Read out the first part of the story or ask students to read it.

Answers It was Buddha’s party.



Grammar 1 Past simple regular affirmative 4 Use the grammar box to explain how we form the past simple. Draw a timeline on the board to illustrate the difference between present and past time.

Tell students to look in the first part of the story for three past simple verbs. Ask individual students to say the verbs and ask them if they can hear any differences in the pronunciation of the -ed ending.

Answers asked, wanted, arrived Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 136, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. In particular, look at the spelling and pronunciation rules on SB page 137. 5

Explain and demonstrate the three different sounds, using the verbs students underlined in exercise 4. Ask students to say the verbs in the box out loud and predict where each one goes in the table. Then play the audio. Draw the table on the board and ask students to tell you the answers. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each word. 2.13

Transcript and answers asked /t/ arrived /d/ wanted /ɪd/ finished called decided helped planned needed looked played started

Vocabulary Animals (1) 6

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2.14 Ask students to cover the word box and say how many of the animals in the pictures they already know. Then tell them to look and highlight any new words. They then match the animals with the pictures. Play the

Transcript and answers 1 elephant 2 lion 3 tiger 4 ox 5 cat 6 dragon 7 dog 8 rat 9 rooster 10 horse 11 pig 12 snake 13 rabbit 14 goat 15 monkey 16 giraffe

7 Look back at the information about Chinese New Year in exercise 2 and ask students to say what they now already know about the Chinese Zodiac. Tell them to discuss the questions in groups, then give feedback to the class.

Answers 1 tiger, ox, dragon, dog, rat, rooster, horse, pig, snake, rabbit, goat, monkey 2 dragon 8 Explain that students should read the story at the bottom of SB page 53 and work out the names of the missing animals. You may give a hint that the ‘clues’ are in the text, eg Which animal is very strong? Discuss without giving away the answers. 9



Play the audio for students to check their answers. Ask students to explain which clues helped them to guess each answer. Play the audio again while students listen and write the animals in the order they arrived. 2.15

Answers 1 Ox 2 Rat 3 Rabbit 4 Dragon 5 Pig 6 Cat The animals arrived in this order: Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog, Pig, Cat Transcript It wasn’t easy to get to Buddha’s house. There was a problem. There was a river in front of the house, but there wasn’t a bridge. Thirteen animals arrived at the river and looked across at Buddha’s house. Ox was very strong. He immediately walked into the water and swam across. Rat and Cat jumped onto Ox’s back, but Rat pushed Cat into the water. When they arrived on the other side of the river, Rat

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jumped off and got to Buddha’s house first, just before Ox. Tiger swam across the river and arrived next. Rabbit jumped from stone to stone and arrived fourth. Dragon flew and arrived in fifth place. She wasn’t first because she helped other animals on the way. Snake arrived next, and then Horse. They both swam across. Goat, Monkey and Rooster went by boat. They were eighth, ninth and tenth. Dog arrived next. He was a good swimmer but he took a long time because he played in the water. The twelfth animal to arrive was Pig. He was late because he got hungry during the race and stopped for a sandwich. Then he fell asleep. Finally Cat arrived, but she was thirteenth, so she wasn’t part of the Chinese Zodiac.

Note: You might want to do Vocabulary plus exercises 1–3 on animals at this point.

Grammar 2 Past simple irregular affirmative 10 Explain the difference between regular and irregular verbs. Ask students for some examples of each. Point out that there is a list of irregular verbs on SB page 158.







Ask students how many of the verbs in the box they already know. Tell them to find the past simple of each verb in the story – some of the irregular verbs will be more obvious than others, eg get – got. Check the answers as a class. MA Stronger students may want to challenge themselves by covering the box and trying to find the verbs without any help. You could also make this into a competition to see who can find all the verbs first.

Answers got, went, fell, flew, jumped, stopped, swam, pushed See the underlined verbs in Transcript 2.15 above.

Answers 1 a) Rat b) Snake c) Cat 2 a) Ox swam. b) Rabbit jumped (from stone to stone). c) Dragon flew. d) Rooster went by boat. 3 Five (Ox, Tiger, Snake, Horse, Dog) (Pig possibly swam too – the story doesn’t say how he crossed.) 4 Three (Goat, Monkey, Rooster) 5 Because Dog played in the water and Pig got hungry and stopped for a sandwich.

Speaking 12 Practise saying the years and remind students of the two ways of saying, eg 2018 – two thousand and eighteen or twenty eighteen. Tell students they can work out the years from the information that 2020 is the year of the Rat. They know the order the animals arrived in (see the answers to exercise 9 above), and this gives the order of the Chinese Zodiac, so they should be able to work out these years.

Answers a) Rat b) Dog c) Snake d) Rabbit e) Pig f) Tiger g) Dragon h) Rabbit

Ask: What personal qualities do you think a monkey has? For example, is a monkey friendly? Discuss their zodiac signs and what their personal characteristics are. Ask students to stand up and form groups with students who have the same zodiac sign and find out what they have in common.

You may want to compare the Chinese Zodiac with the Western Zodiac based on month of birth, not year (so December / January is Capricorn, January / February is Aquarius, etc). What are the differences and similarities?



Note: It’s interesting that we aren’t told the gender of most of the animals. Ox, Dog and Pig are all he. Dragon is she. Ask students to suggest genders for the other animals.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 137, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

11 Go through the questions with the class, then ask students to discuss them in pairs. Discuss the answers as a class and write them on the board.

Extra ideas: Give a dictation of different year dates and ask students to read them back to you. Have students make a list of five years that were important to them in their lives and say why.

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5 Students’ own answers 6 Students’ own answers

Explore If you have time, brainstorm ideas about how to research the answer to this question. Ask students what websites would be helpful and what keywords they could use to search. Students can write the answers in their journals or keep a portfolio of all their mini-projects either on paper or online



Note: This information-gap activity has information about four saints: George, Andrew, David and Patrick, patron saints of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland / Northern Ireland respectively. They all lived a long time ago and the information may not be factually 100% accurate but it is interesting that they all seemed to have connections with many other countries and groups of people – only a few of which are given here. The activity is not about religion, but you should feel free to widen (or change) the content to other religions if you want to. Some supplementary information about key figures in other religions is given below. You can use the information to form an information-gap activity with your students and get them to ask you questions about the different spiritual leaders.



Extra information:



Muhammad: born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia around 570. Lived in the 6th & 7th centuries. Died in Medina, Saudi Arabia on 8th June 632.



Buddha: born in Nepal between sixth and fourth centuries bc and died in India.

Chinese Zodiac years Rat 1948 1960 1972 1984 1996 2008 Ox 1949 1961 1973 1985 1997 2009 Tiger 1950 1962 1974 1986 1998 2010 Rabbit 1951 1963 1975 1987 1999 2011 Dragon 1952 1964 1976 1988 2000 2012 Snake 1953 1965 1977 1989 2001 2013 Horse 1954 1966 1978 1990 2002 2014 Goat 1955 1967 1979 1991 2003 2015 Monkey 1956 1968 1980 1992 2004 2016 Rooster 1957 1969 1981 1993 2005 2017 Dog 1958 1970 1982 1994 2006 2018 Pig 1959 1971 1983 1995 2007 2019 Note: If you were born in January or February, you need to check the exact date of the Chinese New Year that year. If your birthday is before that date, you belong to the year before. (Interested students can go online and check it out for themselves.) 13 Read the example and get one or two more confident students to give some other examples. You may want to ask students to write one or two sentences in their notebooks or set this as a homework task. 14 Check students understand what they have to do in this information-gap activity. Explain that they each have information about different patron saints. Explain the meaning of patron saint before starting the activity. Make sure students don’t look at each other’s information while doing this activity. They ask and answer questions to complete the missing information in their table. They then use the information to answer some questions. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar. Check the answers as a class. Check the question forms and write them on the board.

Answers 1 first: St Andrew, last: St David 2 St David and St Patrick 3 St David and St Patrick 4 St Andrew and St Patrick 102

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Lesson 2 She didn’t get up. pp54–55 Aims The focus of this lesson is to introduce the past simple negative of regular and irregular verbs, do some work with connectors and to find out about a famous woman in the history of civil rights.

You first! Tell students to look at the photos and the title of the article and to discuss in pairs whether they know anything about this story. It doesn’t matter if they don’t, they will be learning more about the woman and what she did during the lesson.

Reading 1 Ask students to describe the photos. Ask additional questions, eg Where is the bus? Why is it there? Why does the woman have a number? How does she feel? Who is in the bus?

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Why is he there? Discuss the title of the article and teach / elicit that first lady usually means the wife of the US president. Also teach / elicit the meaning of civil rights.

Focus on the questions and ask students to discuss what they think happened in the story.



Ask students to tell you as much as they know about Rosa Parks. You may want to draw a table like this on the board and invite students to add statements to each column. What do we know about Rosa Parks? sure



not sure

don’t know

Answers regular irregular

Tip: Inviting students to write their answers on the board gives them the opportunity to correct each other’s errors as well as check their own work.

2 Allow a few minutes for quiet reading. Then ask students to check their ideas from exercise 1.



3 Discuss what happened next and gather ideas from the whole class. Notice which verbs are correctly or incorrectly used in the past tense. Then assign the extra reading on SB page 122. Did you know?  * You can add this information at any stage,



but after exercise 3 is a good time to do it. You could ask students to look up information about Rosa Parks Day online. 4 At this stage, tell students to only say if the sentences are true or false. They will correct the sentences later in exercise 6.



Answers All the sentences are false.

Grammar 1 Past simple negative 5 Look at the grammar table. Ask questions to help students analyse the difference between past simple affirmative and negative forms, eg Which form adds -ed to the verb? Which form doesn’t use the auxiliary verb ‘did’? Why does one verb have an -ed ending and not the other? Students then complete the missing verbs in the table.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB pages 136 and 137, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

6 Look at the sentences in exercise 4 again and go through the example with students. Students can write their answers in their notebooks or on the board. Praise correct use of negative forms.

Encourage students to disagree about the facts without giving away the answers. This will increase their interest in reading the story.

Answers 1 Rosa Parks 2 Because she was tired of stupid rules.

He wanted to sit down. He didn’t want to stand up. She sat in the fifth row. She didn’t sit in the third row.



Answers 1 She didn’t get on a bus to go to work. She got on a bus to go home. 2 She didn’t sit in the third row. She sat in the fifth row. 3 The white man didn’t want to stand up. He wanted to sit down. 4 All four didn’t get up. Three people got up. 5 She didn’t say yes. She said no. 6 She didn’t say no because she was old. She said no because she was tired of stupid rules. Extra idea: Add some extra sentences or ask students to add some of their own, eg Only white men sat in the first four rows.

7 Go through the verbs in the box and ask students to tell you the past simple form of each one. Then tell students to check their answers in the story.



Answers changed (regular); did (irregular); got (irregular); said (irregular); sat (irregular); told (irregular); wanted (regular)

8 Point out the grammar information about last / ago below exercise 8. Practise these phrases by asking students to tell you when they last did these things, drink coffee, see a good film, go to the dentist, etc. Unit 6

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Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 137, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.



Go through the two example sentences with the class so they can see that they should use an affirmative or negative form, depending on what is true for them. Allow time for students to work individually before discussing their answers in pairs. Tip: This exercise is an opportunity for personalisation where students can talk about themselves using the target language and compare experiences with a partner.





Answers 1 drank / didn’t drink 2 came / didn’t come 3 left / didn’t leave 4 got up / didn’t get up 5 had / didn’t have 6 went / didn’t go 7 saw / didn’t see 8 did / didn’t do Extra idea: For a change of pace, you may want to ask students to stand in a line according to who did these things most recently.

Writing 9 Read the sentence in the box. Ask students about the meanings of the connectors (and connects two similar ideas, but contrasts two ideas, because shows the reason for something, and so shows the result of something).

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Allow time for students to read the story on SB page 54 again and find connectors. Tell them to check answers with a partner, then ask pairs to tell the class.

Answers … she did a very courageous thing and it changed the lives … … first four rows of the bus because they were for … … white people only, so she sat … … he wanted to sit down, so the bus driver … Three people got up, but Rosa Parks didn’t … … Rosa didn’t get up because she was tired … … she was tired, but that wasn’t the reason.

She wasn’t physically tired, but she was very tired … … of stupid rules, so she said no … … and she didn’t get up.

10 Allow time for students to write their answers individually. Then ask students to explain their choices to the class.



Answers 1 because

2 and

3 but

4 so

11 Tell students to cover the story, then go through the prompts with them. Put students in pairs to retell the story. Monitor students as they talk, making a note of common errors and also of well-expressed ideas. 12 Brainstorm the key ideas of the story with the class while it is fresh in their memory. Write prompts on the board: Who? Why? Where? When? Review the main points of the story.

MA Stronger students should attempt this task without referring to the story, but allow lower level students to use the story to help them after they have written a first draft.

Speaking 13 THINK This task asks students to develop their own ideas, while still using the past simple. Provide extra vocabulary on the board to help students express their ideas.

Extra idea: ‘Stand up for your word’ (see page 231) works really well with this reading text if you use the word bus. Tell students to close their books and say you are going to read them Rosa’s story one more time. They must stand up (and sit down again) every time they hear the word bus. It’s a great way to end the lesson.

Movies & Music Put students in pairs to read the two shorts texts about the films. Check any difficult vocabulary, eg investigate, disappearance, activist, fight, slave, freedom, remarkable. These are quite difficult texts, but if students know either of the films, it will help with their understanding. For the song, first ask students what they know about Stevie Wonder. Some students may know the next words of the title without having to look online.

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Extra questions for class or for homework



Movies Both films are based on true stories. Can you name two other films based on true stories?

Answers Music Title: I Just Called to Say ‘I Love You’ Months in the song: April, June, July, August Seasons in the song: spring, autumn, summer Special celebrations in the song: New Year’s Day, Halloween, Christmas

Lesson 3 Who did he call? pp56–57 Aims The focus of this lesson is to introduce past simple questions and talk about technology and its uses.

Warm-up Ask students to describe the photos at the top of SB page 56. Ask: Which of these devices do you have? What do you mostly use them for?

Vocabulary Technology (1) 1





Extra idea: Get the lyrics from Metrolyrics. com and blank out the months, seasons and celebrations. Student fill them in, then listen and check and sing along. Culture notes: Mississippi Burning is set in the 1960s, and is loosely based on the murders of civil-rights workers in Mississippi in 1964. The two FBI agents sent in to solve the mystery have a very difficult task: racial tensions are high and the KKK (Ku Klux Klan) is really powerful in the town. The two men have very different approaches: Agent Ward (played by Defoe) is very direct; Agent Anderson (played by Hackman) is much more sensitive to the racial issues.



12 Years a Slave is an adaptation of the 1853 memoir written by Solomon Northup. Northup was a free African American, but he was kidnapped in 1841 and sold into slavery. He was forced to work on plantations in Louisiana for twelve years, until his release in 1853. The British actor (of Nigerian origin), Chiwetel Ejiofor, stars as Solomon Northup. Many people said that 12 Years a Slave was the best film of 2013.



I Just Called to Say ‘I Love You’ is a song that was written, produced and performed by Stevie Wonder in 1984. It was one of his most successful singles ever and he received several awards for it. Wonder himself is a singer-songwriter and a musician who plays several instruments. He was born in Michigan in 1950 and has been singing and performing since the age of eleven. He has been blind since soon after he was born.





2.16 Look at the words in the two lists – students may recognise many of them already. Allow time for students to work individually, then play the audio for them to check the answers. Play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Practise the pronunciation of any difficult items. Note that there are other matches apart from the ones given on the audio, eg video call, phone network, video camera. Ask students which names for technology items are very similar in their own language and which are very different. It’s likely that many words are the same across lots of languages.

Transcript and answers digital camera, internet access, mobile phone, online dating, phone call, social network, text message, video clip, web page 2 Go through the sentences, then allow time for individual work before comparing answers as a class. Ask students to discuss in pairs whether any of these sentences are true for them. MA Students who finish early can make up further examples of sentences using words from exercise 1 and write them on the board so that the other students can guess the missing words.



Answers 1 internet access 2 online dating 3 social network 4 text message 5 video clip 6 phone calls; mobile phones Tip: Remind students to ask you questions about unfamiliar words, eg What does … mean? How do you pronounce …?



Note: You might want to do Vocabulary plus exercises 4 and 5 on technology at this point. Unit 6

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De-stress! When students have been sitting for a long time, their energy level drops – both physically and mentally. Tell them that’s why you’re going to ask them to stand up in a moment and do a gentle gorilla thump! It will make them feel more active and allow their brain to be more active too. Also say that if anyone doesn’t want to do this, that’s fine. By allowing people to opt out, they will often opt in! Once students know the gorilla thump, use it any time you notice that the energy in the classroom is very low – it will have a magic energising effect. It will probably also make people laugh and, as we saw in Unit 2 Lesson 2, that’s no bad thing!

MAN





Answers Steve Jobs – former CEO of Apple

4 Allow time for quiet reading of the rest of the article. Students can write the answers in their notebooks, then discuss the answers together as a class. Brainstorm as many answers as possible. Don’t check answers yet as they will come up in the audio in exercise 5. 5



Play the audio to check the answers. Ask students if they were surprised by the answers and to say why or why not. 2.17

Answers 1 Starbucks 2 ‘Good morning. How can I help you?’ 3 4,000 lattes to go (ie 4,000 coffees to take away) Transcript MAN Did you know about this? WOMAN What? MAN The phone call Steve Jobs made with the first iPhone. WOMAN Oh – you mean the call to Starbucks? MAN Yes, Starbucks. I didn’t know about it. I just read it online. WOMAN Yes, it’s funny, isn’t it? When he made the call, a girl answered – I think her name was Hannah – and

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Extra idea: Tell students that if they search online they can find a video of Steve Jobs’ speech and see him ordering the 4,000 lattes to go!

6 Allow time for students to read the phrases and choose their answers. Then play the audio again and pause after each phrase for students to check the answers.

Reading and listening 3 Ask if any students recognise the man in the photo. Ask: Why is he famous? What does he have in his hand? Why? Read out the text, or ask a student to read it.



she said, ‘Good morning. How can I help you?’ And he said, ‘I’d like to order 4,000 lattes to go, please!’ Yes, and then he said, ‘No, just kidding. Wrong number. Goodbye!’



Answers 1a 2a 3b 4a 5b

7 Play the audio again, pausing regularly to allow time for students to repeat. Focus on intonation and expression. Then tell students to work with a partner to role-play the conversation. Monitor students’ conversations and make a note of any common errors in pronunciation or grammar.

Listening and writing 8 Discuss what is shown in the photos without giving away the answers. Ask students to try to guess which options in the table are correct. Tell them not to worry about the missing information as they will complete the table later (in exercise 10). 9

2.18 Explain that you are going to play a conversation between two people talking about Steve Jobs. Play the audio through once or twice so students can check their answers to exercise 8. Note that the answers are shown after exercise 10.

Transcript WOMAN Steve Jobs was born in 1955, right? MAN That’s right. On the 24th of February, to be exact. WOMAN 24th of February, 1955 … So he was a Goat! MAN Sorry? WOMAN He was a Goat – that was his Chinese Zodiac sign. MAN Oh, right. WOMAN And he was a bit different, wasn’t he?

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Well, he was a Buddhist. He went to India in 1974 and discovered Zen Buddhism. He wore traditional Indian clothes and he shaved his head. WOMAN And he didn’t wear a suit at work, did he? MAN No, he wore jeans, a sweater and trainers. WOMAN And someone said he was a vegetarian. MAN Yes, he was. He ate fish, but he didn’t eat meat. WOMAN What about his interests? What did he like? MAN He really liked cars. He drove a Mercedes Benz SL 55 AMG. WOMAN And music? MAN Well, he loved Bob Dylan and The Beatles. WOMAN And he died very young, didn’t he? MAN Yes, he was only 56 when he died in 2011. He had cancer. WOMAN How terrible! MAN Yes, it was. MAN







10 Now focus on the gaps in the table in exercise 8. Tell students to work in pairs and try to complete the table. They heard all the information they need in audio 2.18. Play the audio again, pausing at significant points for students to check their answers.

Answers Date of birth Chinese Zodiac sign Religion Clothes Food Car Music Year of death Cause

24th February, 1955 Goat Buddhist jeans, a sweater, trainers vegetables, fish Mercedes Bob Dylan, The Beatles 2011 cancer

11 Go over all the information the students now know about Steve Jobs. Tell them to write a first draft of their paragraph, then swap with a partner, who should check the work for any mistakes. They then work on their own paragraph again to write a final draft. This task can be started in class and continued for homework.

MA Stronger students can either use the table in exercise 8 to help them, or they can make their own notes from memory. Weaker students can refer to the transcript on SB page 148.

Grammar Past simple questions 12 Go through the grammar table and help students to notice the form of the questions. Ask, eg Which words come first? Which are second? What are the two types of questions? How are they different? How are the answers different? Students then complete the questions.

Answers What did he do? He made a phone call, but he didn’t call his wife. Who did he call? He called Starbucks. Did he ask for tea? No, he didn’t. Did he ask for coffee? Yes, he did.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB pages 136 and 137, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

13 Advise students to look at the answers first to help them make the questions. Do the first item together with the class to show how the verb in the answer should be in the question: When did Steve Jobs go to India? Remind students of the difference between yes / no and wh- questions, and how to recognise that from the answers – if the answer starts with yes or no, then the questions should start with Did.



Allow time for students to work individually then tell them to work in pairs to correct each others’ work. Check answers with the class.

Answers 1 When did Steve Jobs / he go to India? 2 Did he wear a suit? 3 Did he eat fish? 4 What car did he drive? 5 What music did he like? Extra ideas: Ask students to think of another famous person. Then ask for a volunteer. The other students have to ask questions to find out information and guess who the famous person is. Unit 6

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Go back to the table in exercise 8 and ask students to make questions about the other information about Steve Jobs, eg When was he born? What was his zodiac sign?

Speaking 14 EVERYBODY UP! Elicit and practise the questions first, eg Did you order a takeaway at the weekend? Ask students to stand up and find out who in the class did these things last weekend.

Extra idea: Ask each student to write one sentence on a strip of paper about something they did last weekend. Write an example on the board, eg I had a takeaway pizza. Collect the strips of paper and shuffle them. Then hand them out again, one to each student. Students have to walk around the classroom and ask questions to find the person who wrote their sentence.

15 You may want to demonstrate this first with one student in the class. Model the example dialogue, then ask students to work in small groups and discuss their answers. Ask each group to give a summary of their discussion to the rest of the class.

Vocabulary plus p58 Animals (2) 1

Ask students to name as many of the animals as they can without looking at the words in the box. Encourage guessing and use of words from their own language. Play the audio for students to check the answers. Write the answers on the board. Play the audio again for students to repeat each word. Check the pronunciation of difficult words, eg rhino and whale (both have silent ‘h’), bear ( like pair, not beer) and dolphin (‘f’ sound for ph). 2.19

Transcript and answers 1 whale 2 bee 3 bear 4 frog 5 dolphin 6 rhino 7 butterfly 8 mouse 9 shark 10 spider

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Extra idea: Ask students to group the animals in any way they like. They have to explain their categories to the class, eg

animals that … can / can’t swim, live on land / in water, eat meat / plants, live in cold / warm countries. 2 Look at the questions and check the meaning of farm, dangerous and in danger. Explain the difference between an animal that is dangerous and one that is in danger. Tell students to work in pairs or small groups. Compare answers as a class to see if everyone agrees.

Note that there are lots of different possible answers – pets will vary widely, depending on the country, and also farm animals could include ox in some places, and perhaps not horse in others – so the answers are suggestions only.

Suggested answers 1 goat, horse, pig, rooster, sheep (and perhaps ox) 2 cat, dog, horse, rabbit, rat, spider, frog, mouse 3 bee, bear, rhino, shark, spider 4 whale, bear, rhino 3 Read the instructions to the class and make sure everyone understands what they have to do. Then set a time limit for writing the three animals and numbering them. Ask everyone to check their answers at the same time by looking at SB page 123. You may enjoy doing this activity yourself at the same time, then comparing all the class results.

Technology (2) 4

Allow time for students to complete the labels either individually or in pairs. Play the audio for student to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word.



Note that another word for USB stick is memory stick.

2.20

Transcript and answers 1 laptop 2 screen 3 desktop computer 4 keyboard 5 tablet 6 smartphone 7 mouse 8 USB stick 5 Go through the questionnaire with the class and check comprehension of all the items. Ask: What is this questionnaire about? Tell students

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to do the questionnaire on their own first, then compare answers with a partner. Then ask pairs to report to the class about their answers.

Extra ideas: To extend this activity, ask students to create two more questions for the quiz.



Ask students to write about their use of technology in their notebook, using their answers from the questionnaire as notes for the basis of a report.

Focus on: get a Explain that get can have a variety of meanings. Ask students to tell you any words they already know with get. Go through the six different phrases with get and check understanding of each one. Demonstrate the meaning of get up and stand up by miming and asking students what you are doing. Explain that get up has a different meaning from the meaning of the two words get and up: the two words together have one meaning.

Ask students to complete the sentences. Remind them to use the correct tense. Go over the answers and ask students which tense is used in each one and why. Answers



1 got to 2 got on 3 get up 4 get 5 get up 6 get

b Allow time for individual work. Then ask students to read out their sentences to the class. Ask others to raise their hands if they have the same sentence.

Extra idea: Give students this list of verbs which mean the opposite of some of the verbs in exercise a. Ask them to find the opposites.



get off go to bed leave sit down

video or audio with books closed. Then play it again with books open.

Transcript JACK Hello? PAT Is that Jack? JACK Speaking. PAT Hi. It’s Pat. JACK Oh, hi, Pat. Listen, can I call you back? I have a small problem. PAT Of course. JACK What’s your number? PAT It’s 07941 662 358. JACK OK. Speak to you soon. PAT Yeah. Bye. 2 Discuss the question as a class – point to the photos to help them work it out. Play the video or audio again if necessary.

3

Ask students to practise the conversation in pairs, then ask a few pairs to act out the conversation for the class.



MA For an extra challenge, students can try to act out the conversation with books closed. You can put key words on the board to help with this.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversation. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

4 Discuss the photos at the bottom of SB page 59. Use clues to help them guess where the receptionist is, how she feels and why. Ask them what they think is wrong with the older woman.



Everyday English p59 Talking on the phone 1

2.21 6 Decide whether you are going to use the video or simply play the audio. Ask students to look at the photos and describe what is happening. Ask, eg What is the woman’s job? How does Jack feel? Play the

Suggested answer His car has a parking ticket.

5

Answer The receptionist is in a sports centre. 2.22 Explain the meaning of dental surgery. Ask students to read the conversation and predict the missing words. Then play the audio to check. Write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing to allow students to repeat each line. Focus on fluency and intonation. Ask students how they know if the receptionist was polite or rude. Point out that

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SAM

It’s Sam Gonzalez. G-O-N-Z-A-L-E-Z. RECEPTIONIST Right, Mrs Gonzalez. Is Thursday 23rd March OK? At nine o’clock? SAM But it’s only January! It’s urgent! RECEPTIONIST Oh! You didn’t say that. Come in at 11.30. SAM Thank you very much. Goodbye. RECEPTIONIST Goodbye.

she says No problem, but also uses a lot of variety in her voice range, which shows she is polite and interested.



Answers 1 Hello 2 Is that 3 this is 4 sorry 5 No 6 Goodbye The receptionist is polite. Transcript Hello? SAM Is that the dental surgery? RECEPTIONIST No, this is the sports centre. You have the wrong number. SAM Oh, I’m so sorry. RECEPTIONIST No problem. Goodbye. SAM Goodbye. RECEPTIONIST

6



2.23 Play the audio. Ask students what is different about this conversation. Ask them to notice what makes this conversation less polite than the previous one. Ask for some other suggestions for how to be polite on the phone.

Answer The receptionist is rude and abrupt this time.

8 Ask students to read the conversation and try to remember the missing words. Allow time for students to write the questions in the correct place in the conversation.

Answers 1 How can I help you? 2 Is this your first time here? 3 Can I have your name, please? 4 Is Thursday 23rd March OK? At nine o’clock? 9 Play the audio again to check the answers. Ask students to role-play the conversation, taking turns to be polite or rude. Tip: One way to help students memorise new language is to play the first line of the audio. Then ask students to remember the next line. Play that line and the following line and pause the audio again. In each case they will need to remember the caller’s lines.

Transcript Hello? Is that the dental surgery? RECEPTIONIST No, this is the sports centre. You have the wrong number. SAM Oh, I’m so sorry. RECEPTIONIST Goodbye. SAM Goodbye. RECEPTIONIST

SAM

7



Tell students to cover the conversation in exercise 8 while they listen to Sam’s next phone conversation. 2.24

Answer Yes, she does.

10 Go through the situations and check that students understand each one. Model the beginning of the first conversation with one or two students, then ask two students to act it out in front of the class. Encourage students to use their own ideas to make the conversation fit the new situations.

Transcript

we don’t say … / we say …

Cavendish Dental Surgery. How can I help you? SAM Oh, um, can I make an appointment? RECEPTIONIST Is this your first time here? SAM Yes, it is. RECEPTIONIST Can I have your name, please?



This section focuses on the following errors:



• use of ordinals for dates • incorrect prepositions • incorrect verb tenses



Ask students to cover the green we say … side and see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

RECEPTIONIST

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MA Students who need more support can look at their books to help them.

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Units 5&6 review Reading 1 Ask students to look at the photo and ask if anybody recognises the dance group. Tell them to describe the photo and guess what the people are doing. Also ask students how the three words (dream, believe, achieve) might be connected to the photo.



Allow two or three minutes of silent reading time. Ask students to list the things Ashley Banjo does on the board, then get feedback from the class about his motto.

Answers 1 Ashley Banjo is a street dancer and actor. 2 ‘Dream Believe Achieve’

2 Point out that five of the sentences are false – only one is true. Tell students to read the article again to find the true sentence. Allow time for students to work individually to correct the false sentences. Then call on students to read out the corrected statements and explain why they were wrong.



Answers 1 His mother was English but his father was Nigerian. 2 They had a dance school. 3 Ashley always wanted to be a dancer. 4 True 5 He started Diversity at university. 6 The United Dance Organisation is an international organisation.



Answers present tense = is, be, dance, works, teaches, says, do, want, are past simple = became, won, was, had, knew, wanted, danced, went, studied, decided, celebrated, were

4 Go through the answers first and ask students what kind of question they need to write for each one (they are all wh- questions). Students work on the questions individually, then compare answers with a partner. Invite students to come to the board to write their answers. Ask the rest of the class to correct them if needed.



Answers 1 When was Ashley born? 2 Where was his father from? / What nationality was his father? 3 What did his mother do? 4 What did he study at university? 5 When did he start Diversity? 6 What does Ashley say?



Extra ideas: Write some additional answers on the board so that students can make questions, eg In 2009. Queen Mary University. Diversity. Because they were all different.



Put students in pairs to write questions to ask Ashley Banjo, then get them to swap questions with another pair and write the answers to the new questions. They then use the questions and answers to role-play an interview with him.

Grammar 3 Tell students to go back through the article to find the present and past tenses. Ask how many verbs there are and how many of each tense. Note that dream, believe, achieve are imperatives and express orders or requests, so they aren’t described as present or past.

pp60–61

Speaking and writing 5

2.25 Discuss the meaning of a role model. Talk about a role model who influenced you. Ask: Why do you think Diversity are a role model?

Units 5&6 Review

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Ask students which of the people in the photos they recognise and what they know about them. Ask: What achievements are they famous for? In what way could they be role models? Play the audio for students to check their ideas.



Note: Malala Yousafzai won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 – the youngest person ever to win it. She shared it with Kailash Satyarthi from India.





Answers Barack Obama – first black president of the USA Malala Yousafzai – Pakistani girl, shot for saying girls have a right to education Tanni Grey-Thompson – disabled athlete – won the London Marathon six times, Paralympic gold medalist David Beckham – famous footballer, works with a lot of young people Transcript MAN Well, Barack Obama is easy. He was the first black president of the United States. WOMAN That was a huge achievement. MAN Yes, amazing! WOMAN And wasn’t Malala Yousafzai that young woman from Pakistan? MAN Oh, the one who said girls have the right to an education? WOMAN Yes, and some people shot her. But you know she’s still fighting? She’s really brave. MAN Yes, she’s incredible. WOMAN And Tanni Grey-Thompson is a Welsh disabled athlete who won the London Marathon lots of times. MAN Six times, I think. WOMAN Wow! And she won a lot of Olympic gold medals too. MAN And David Beckham is the famous footballer of course. He played for England. WOMAN Yes, but why is he such a great role model? MAN I think probably because he does a lot of work with young people. He helps them to play sports. WOMAN Oh that’s good. I didn’t know that.

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Extra idea: Play the audio again, pausing after each section for students to make notes about each person. Tell the students to use their notes to write two or three sentences about each person.

6 Discuss what makes a good role model with the class, then set a time limit of three minutes for groups to make a list of three people who they consider to be role models. As the time is tight, students will need to come to a quick conclusion about which three to choose. Compare lists as a class and take a class vote on the top three. 7 Ask: Why was 2009 a special year for Diversity? How did it change their lives? If students need a reminder, tell them to read the first paragraph of the article on page 60 again. Tell the class about a special year in your life. Go through the list of possible ideas they can choose from and make sure they understand them all. Then allow time for students to think and write notes individually. Provide extra vocabulary as needed. Students then work in pairs to tell each other about their special years. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation. 8 Look at the way students can start their paragraph, then encourage students to use their notes from exercise 7 to write a paragraph. You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish for homework.

Preposition park Ask students where Mozambique is and point to it on a world map if available. Check comprehension of new words, eg village, flood, pregnant. Point out that in is used with places, months and years, on is used with dates and days. Students then complete the short text. Check the answers with the class and write them on the board.



Answers 1 in 2 in 3 In 4 On 5 in 6 on

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Extra idea: Ask students to write three questions with when, where and how long based on the text, eg Where did she live? When was the flood? How long did she stay in the tree? When was her baby born? When did the helicopter arrive?

Cross Culture: birthdays a

Start by asking students When’s your birthday? to revise dates. Ask: Do people celebrate birthdays in your country? Do they do anything special?



Ask students to look at the photo and explain what is happening. Ask: Who is he? What is he doing? How does he feel? (It is the boy’s birthday and he is hitting a piñata, which is a hollow object made from paper and filled with sweets, toys or money.) Describe some birthday traditions in your country or other countries you have lived in and encourage students to ask you questions about them.



Allow time for students to read the text and guess which country goes in each gap. Encourage them to ask you about any new words, eg present, unlucky, religious, wedding.



2.26

b Ask pairs to report to the class about their birthday celebrations and how they are the same or different.

After doing the exercises, ask students what is the most interesting tradition they’ve learnt about today. Also ask them what’s the best / worst present they’ve ever received.



Extra idea: Bring in pictures or play a video of birthday celebrations and ask students to describe what’s going on. Extra vocabulary: birthday cake, candles, blow out, make a wish, balloons, presents, cards, party.

Answers 1 India 2 Mexico 3 the USA 4 Saudi Arabia Transcript



Birthdays are a very old European tradition. People had birthday celebrations because they didn’t want bad luck. That’s why people said ‘Happy Birthday’ and gave presents. Different cultures celebrate birthdays in different ways.



Children wear new clothes on their birthday in India. But never give someone a present in black and white paper. It is unlucky.



In Mexico children have a big party with a piñata, a big bag that looks like an animal, full of toys and money. A girl’s fifteenth birthday (quinceanera) is special in many Latin cultures because she is now a young woman.



But not all cultures celebrate birthdays. In the USA, Native American Indians celebrate the day an adult becomes a parent.



And in Saudi Arabia and many other countries, they celebrate religious holidays and weddings but they do not celebrate birthdays. Units 5&6 Review

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7

It’s delicious!

UNIT FOCUS

GRAMMAR: countable and uncountable nouns; a / an / some / any; a lot of / much / many; too much / too many; how often ...? VOCABULARY: food and drink; adjectives FUNCTIONS: describing food; ordering food in a restaurant

Lesson 1 There isn’t any olive oil! pp62–63

Transcript and answers 1 courgettes 2 peppers 3 tomatoes 4 carrots 5 onions 6 green beans 7 tea 8 bread 9 rice 10 pasta 11 noodles 12 coffee 13 fish 14 water 15 bananas 16 oranges 17 lemons 18 apples 19 milk 20 sugar 21 flour 22 salt 23 eggs 24 beef 25 oil 26 chicken

Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise a / an, some and any with countable and uncountable nouns, and to talk about food using common food vocabulary and adjectives to describe food.

You first!



Ask students to talk about their favourite dish. Find out what the most popular dishes in the class are.

Extra ideas: Ask students to group the words according to fruit, vegetable, meat, grain or liquid.



Play an alphabet game with food. The first person says a food beginning with ‘a’, the second person a food beginning with ‘b’ and so on. If they can’t think of a word, skip the letter and move to the next person. The last person still in the game is the winner.



Put students in pairs to discuss various questions about the dishes in exercise 1, eg 1 Which dish do you like best? Why? 2 Are any of these dishes strange? 3 Do you make cakes without flour? 4 Do you cook with coconut milk?

Vocabulary Food and drink (1) 1 Ask students to describe the photos and guess the ingredients. Write all the guesses on the board. Then ask students to read the texts and match them with the correct photo. Ask them to give their reasons, eg Picture A shows chicken and text 2 describes a chicken dish. / There’s chicken in Picture A and text 2 says ‘This is a chicken dish.’ Ask: Which dish is healthy? Which dish looks delicious? Where would you see these kinds of texts and photos? Do you ever look for recipes online?

2

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Answers 1B 2A 3C Focus on the pictures and ask students which food items they know already. Get them to complete the labels individually, pointing out that all the words they need are in bold in the texts in exercise 1. Then play the audio for students to check their answers. Ask students to tell you the missing words and write them on the board. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Ask students which words for food are similar in their own language and which are different. 2.27

Grammar Countable and uncountable nouns; some / any 3 Look at the first grammar table. Explain the meaning of countable / uncountable by reading out the two sub-headings. Draw pictures on the board of a bag of rice and a bottle of oil or milk. Ask why we can’t count rice, oil or milk. Give other examples of things we can’t count, eg water, air, flour, coffee, juice. Explain that to count these things we use measurements, eg a cup of coffee, a litre of water. You could do exercises 1–3 in Vocabulary plus, SB page 68, at this point, as they do more work on measurements.

Look at the second grammar table. Ask questions to help students understand the grammar for some and any, eg Is ‘any’ used with questions? Is ‘any’ used in affirmative

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sentences? Is ‘some’ used in negative sentences? Ask students to look at each item in the exercise and say if it is countable or uncountable. Allow time for individual work. Then ask students to tell you the answers and write them on the board. Practise some of the sentences and check the pronunciation of some and any. Note that some is unstressed and has the schwa sound /səm/. Ask students to explain the reasons for their choices.



5

Tell students to cover the picture at the bottom of SB page 62. Give them three minutes to write as many food words as they can remember, or students can test each other in pairs. Elicit answers using there is / are. Explain that they needn’t use some in the answers as we can leave out the article when we are talking about existence, not quantity.



Extra idea: Tell students to work in pairs. One partner has their book closed, the other asks questions, eg Are there any eggs? How many are there? How many types of fruit are there?



Vocabulary note: Tomatoes, courgettes, cucumbers and peppers are scientifically considered fruit, although most people call them vegetables and they are used as vegetables in cooking.

Answers 1 a 2 some 3 some 4 some 5 any 6 any 7 any 8 any 9 any



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 137, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.



Grammar note: On SB page 62, text 2 says: This is a tasty chicken dish with rice. Note that the article is used because the word dish is countable and chicken describes the dish. You may also want to mention that some words can be either countable or uncountable depending on the meaning. Draw a (very simple!) picture of a chicken and a piece of chicken on the board. Explain that for the animal (or if we buy a whole chicken to eat) we say a chicken and that for the food we say (some) chicken / a piece of chicken. Do the same with a whole cake and a slice of cake.

4 Draw the table on the board. Allow time for individual work. Then ask students to come to the board and write the answers in the correct column on the board. Ask them to explain the reasons for their choices.

countable uncountable nouns nouns apple rice lemon pasta egg water noodles coffee tea milk

MA For an extra challenge, ask students to add any other food words they know, eg cucumber, potato, chocolate, ice cream, yoghurt.

Answers countable uncountable nouns nouns courgette oil pepper flour carrot sugar tomato salt onion fish beans chicken orange beef banana bread

6 Refer students back to the food descriptions in exercise 1 on SB page 62. Allow a minute for students to re-read the texts. Model the example exchange with a student. Ask students for one or two further examples. Students should work in pairs and make at least two statements about each text. Remind them to use a / an, some and any. When they have finished, go around the class and ask for sentences. (Sentences mustn’t be repeated, so this will get progressively more difficult.) The other students in the class must say if the sentence is true or false. 7

Explain that you are going to play a conversation between two people who are planning a meal. Allow time for students to read the conversation and predict the missing words (some or any). Then play the audio for students to check their answers. Write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing to repeat key sentences and clarify any difficult points. Ask: What happened to the olive oil? (Carlos dropped it!) 2.28

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Transcript AZRA I’m hungry. Do we have any food? CARLOS There are some green peppers and an onion. That’s all. Why? AZRA I have a very easy chicken recipe. We need some courgettes and green peppers. Is there any olive oil? CARLOS Yes, there’s some olive oil. Oh no! AZRA OK, now there isn’t any olive oil! What about coconut milk? CARLOS No. We don’t have any coconut milk. AZRA OK, so we need olive oil and coconut milk. And we need four chicken pieces. Can you go to the supermarket? CARLOS Oh … 8 Tell students to turn to SB page 123 and look at the recipe cards. Explain the meaning of the measurements: 500g (grams) and 100ml (millilitres). Explain that each card has ingredients for a different dish. Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Explain any unfamiliar words, eg stock (a liquid made by boiling meat or vegetables which is used to make soup). Then tell students to work in pairs to ask about what ingredients they have for each dish. Obviously they can make up the answers.

Extra idea: Ask students to suggest what kind of dishes they could make with the ingredients on the two cards.

Vocabulary Adjectives 9



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Ask students which adjectives are similar in their own language and which are different.

Answers 1 any 2 some 3 some 4 any 5 some 6 any 7 any

Focus on the list of words. Before they do the activity, ask students the following questions: 1 Which words are opposites? (healthy / unhealthy, savoury / sweet, terrible / amazing) 2 Which words are synonyms? (tasty / delicious, horrible / terrible, wonderful / amazing). Then go through the questions and make sure students understand good / bad for you. Students then answer the questions. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Pay attention to word stress in multi-syllable words, eg amazing, fantastic 2.29

Transcript and answers These words only describe food: delicious, savoury, tasty. These words mean ‘very good’: amazing, fantastic, wonderful. These words mean ‘very bad’: horrible, terrible. These words describe something that is good or bad for you: healthy, unhealthy. This word describes food that has sugar in it: sweet.

Extra idea: Say the names of various types of foods and ask which words describe it, eg chocolate, ice cream, cabbage, beetroot. Students’ answers will vary, depending on whether they like the food or not.

10 Go through the instructions with the class and model the examples with one or two students. You may want to ask students to make a few notes before they start. Move around the classroom and provide extra vocabulary as needed. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar or pronunciation. Then call on individuals to tell the class about the winning dish. Note that some vegetables are uncountable, eg broccoli.

Extra ideas: Describe the recipes for some well-known dishes and ask students to guess what they are, eg apple pie, omelette, paella, pizza. Ask students to bring pictures of their favourite dishes to show the class in the next lesson.



Ask and answer questions about food, eg What kind of food do you cook for good friends? What do you make when you’re in a hurry?

Lesson 2 We eat too much sugar. pp64–65 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise a lot of, much / many, and too much / too many with countable and uncountable nouns as well as learning more words for food in order to talk about diets and how healthy they are.

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Warm-up Ask students if they can find their favourite food in the photos on SB page 64. If not, ask students to say what they like eating best.

Vocabulary Food and drink (2) 1

2.30 Ask students to cover the word list to the right of the photos and look at the photos. Ask how many foods they can name. Then play the audio while students number the food items as they hear them. Ask students to say which items are countable. Play the audio again for students to repeat each word. Point out the silent ‘o’ in chocolate /tʃɒklət/. Ask students which names for food are similar in their own language and which are different.

Answers

A10 B2 C5 D6 E1 F4 G12 H7 I8 J3 K9 L11

Transcript 1 biscuits 2 crisps 3 sweets 4 cake 5 cheese 6 butter 7 fizzy drink 8 chips 9 honey 10 chocolate 11 lamb 12 hamburger Culture note: In American English, biscuit = cookie (biscuits are a savoury type of scone), chips = french fries, crisps = chips, fizzy drink = soda, sweets = candy.

THINK This task gets students thinking about how healthy their diet is before trying the quiz. Pre-teach and check understanding of carbohydrate, protein, calorie, (un)healthy. Note: These are suggested answers only as some of these food items contain different things, eg a hamburger has a lot of fat as well as protein. Sugar is a simple carbohydrate, found in honey, fizzy drinks and sweets. Complex carbohydrates are found in bread, biscuits, etc. You may also want to ask which foods are high in fibre.

2

Suggested answers 1 fat: chips, cheese, cake, crisps, butter sugar: cake, chocolate, biscuit, fizzy drink, honey, sweets carbohydrates: chips, cake, hamburger, crisps, biscuits protein: hamburger, lamb



2 3 4

All of them! Students’ own answers All the foods that are high in fat and sugar are unhealthy.

3 Go briefly through the quiz to check comprehension. Then allow time for individual work. Go through the scoring system on SB page 123, then ask students to share their results and say whether they were surprised and why.

Grammar a lot of / much / many; too much / too many 4 Review the meaning of countable / uncountable. Tell students to look at the quiz and use that to help them complete the grammar table. Check answers as a class.

Answers

1 many 2 a lot of 3 many 4 many 5 many 6 much 7 a lot of 8 a lot of 9 much 10 much



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 138, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

5 Do the first dialogue with a student as an example. Remind students to look at the word after the gap and identify whether it is countable or uncountable. Allow time for individual work, then ask pairs to read out the dialogues. Ask pairs to read them again with a different partner, concentrating on fluency and intonation. Point out that chocolate can be both countable and uncountable, eg we can say a chocolate (an individual chocolate) and some chocolate. The same is true of fish (a fish = a whole fish).



Answers 1 many; much 2 much; a lot of 3 Many; many 4 much; much 5 many; a lot of

Reading 6 Ask students to look at the photo. Ask: What are they doing and why? It might be useful to teach / elicit lose weight, gain weight. Explain the difference between obese, overweight and fat. Look at the title. Teach / Elicit epidemic and ask what other kinds of epidemics there can be, eg flu, measles. Tell students to read Unit 7

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the article quickly and complete the summary sentence. This task helps students to identify the main idea of the article.



Note: You should treat this topic sensitively as some students may be anxious about their weight.

Answer too much sugar

7 Focus on the words in bold in the article, and help students use context clues to work out the meanings.



Answers major cause = important reason advice = an opinion about the best thing to do low-fat = without much fat in it manufacturers = people or a company who make things, especially in a factory cells = very small parts in your body stuff = substance, material, or group of things; here the sweet stuff = sugar

8 Tell students to read the article again, this time more slowly. Allow some quiet time for individual work, then ask students to compare answers in pairs. Invite volunteers to tell the class their answers.

9

Answers 1 Obesity. 2 They think that sugar is a major cause of obesity. 3 To make low-fat food taste better. 4 In the 1970s. 5 You want more sugar and your body makes insulin. 6 Your body makes fat cells. Ask students to close their books and brainstorm as many food words as they can remember. Students should write their answers first, then check by looking back at the article.

Explore This is an opportunity for students to do research outside the classroom and tell the class about their findings in the next lesson. You may want to brainstorm some specific questions about chocolate, eg How do they make chocolate? What are the ingredients? What are the different types of chocolate? (milk / dark / white chocolate). 118

Background notes: Chocolate comes from the cacao plant, which contains flavanols, which have health benefits. Cacao has fats in it but these kinds of fat may not be bad for you. There is medical evidence that eating a few squares of dark chocolate a day is good for you and can help the heart. Most health experts advise that it’s fine to eat dark chocolate with more than 70% pure cacao, as this doesn’t have much saturated fat or sugar added to it. (Milk chocolate isn’t so good.) Did you know?  * One way to do this activity is to tell students

to close their books and write the information on the board, with gaps for these words: a hot curry, ten, a teaspoon of sugar. Put students in pairs to discuss their answers, then tell them to read Did you know? on SB page 65. Ask: Did you know any of these facts? You could then ask students to close their books and say the sentences as a memory exercise.

Writing and speaking 10 Ask: Have you ever kept a food blog or a food diary? What are some reasons you might want to do this? (food allergy, to lose weight, special diets for illnesses like diabetes). Allow time for individual work, then ask volunteers to read out the sentences. Ask: How does the writer feel about his or her diet?



Answers 1 breakfast 2 fruit juice 3 chips 4 cake 5 healthy

11 Suggest that students use the blog in exercise 10 as a model and change the words so that they are true for them, or they can write a totally fictional blog. Don’t forget to write and read out your own food blog, too!

Extra idea: Students write their blogs on a piece of paper and exchange with another student for comments or advice. Or they can read out their food blog to the class and ask for advice from the class as a whole.

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12 Go through the questions first, then put students in groups. Groups may want to create a collective text describing what they all ate yesterday and how healthy each meal was.

Extra idea: Ask students to work in groups and find three things that everyone ate yesterday and three things that no one ate. Ask: What does this say about your diet?

audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line.



13 THINK This task helps students to relate the information in the article to their own contexts. Discuss possible reasons for obesity and the best ways to prevent obesity, eg better health education, more public information (eg better food labelling), restrictions on advertising, taxes on sugary foods, better school meals, etc. Help students with vocabulary and ideas.

Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise questions with How often and expressions of frequency and to talk about restaurants and attitudes to food. Note: You might want to bring in photos of food from different countries (from magazines, newspapers, etc) for this lesson. Ask students to describe their favourite restaurant and restaurants they don’t like (and to say why). As they do so, write adjectives on the board, eg friendly, comfortable, cosy, informal, clean, dirty, quiet, crowded, noisy, expensive, cheap, large helpings, delicious food. (These words will be useful in exercise 2.)

Explain that you are going to play four short conversations about food. Go through the phrases in the box, and allow time for students to read the dialogues and predict the missing words. Ask where they think each conversation takes place (1 in a restaurant, 2 at home, 3 outside a restaurant, 4 at a friend’s house). Play the audio and write the answers on the board. Discuss the meaning of foodie (someone who loves good food) and can’t afford (don’t have enough money). Play the 2.31

I love this lamb. It’s so tasty – and different! I don’t like it. I prefer simple food. And this is a very expensive restaurant. Let’s go to a restaurant tonight. We can’t afford it. Let’s cook a really nice meal here. This restaurant looks good. Look at the menu. Mm, yes, it looks interesting. OK, let’s eat here. This beef is delicious. You are a good cook, Ella. Thanks, well, I’m a foodie. I love good food.

2

THINK Ask students to describe the restaurant in photo A. Ask: What adjectives can you use to describe this restaurant? (quiet, calm, clean, cosy, formal, friendly). Then look at photos B and C. Ask students if they recognise this as food and ask them to guess what the food is. Encourage active and lively discussions about all three photos and then ask students to discuss the other two questions.



Background information: Photo A is the interior of Noma in Copenhagen, Denmark, one of the best restaurants in the world. Photo B is a dish from Arzak in San Sebastián, Spain and photo C is a dish from Mugaritz Restaurant, also in San Sebastián, Spain. All three are in the top ten of the list of the top 50 restaurants in the world.

Listening 1 1

Answers 1 I prefer simple food. 2 We can’t afford it. 3 … it looks interesting. 4 You are a good cook Transcript 1 WOMAN MAN 2 MAN WOMAN 3 WOMAN MAN 4 MAN WOMAN

Lesson 3 How often do you go to a restaurant? pp66–67

You first!

Draw students’ attention to the vocabulary note on look below the exercise. Say: This restaurant looks good. Ask: Are you 100% sure it’s good? Elicit the answer no.

3 P 2.32 Contrast the two ‘o’ sounds in the table. Point out that one is short (good) and the other is long (food). Exaggerate the longer Unit 7

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sound slightly so that students can easily notice the difference. Play the audio for students to repeat each sound and word.

amazing! Did you know that Spain has some of the world’s top restaurants? Last year, we went to Mugaritz in San Sebastián because we live near there. This restaurant does lots of small courses. We had a kind of chocolate cake there – it was different because it had some cheese in it, but it was very tasty! We also went to a restaurant in London. Its name is Dinner by Heston Blumenthal. Its most famous dish is ‘meat fruit’. And the roast fish is wonderful.

Transcript /ʊ/ good /uː/ food 2.33 Put students in pairs to do the 4 P activity. They take turns to say a word, correcting each other if they think the pronunciation is wrong. Then play the audio for them to check their answers. Play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word.

Then this year, we went to another Spanish restaurant – El Celler de Can Roca, in Girona. We had a fantastic meal, and their grilled prawns were delicious. I still think about them!

Transcript and answers /ʊ/ good: book, cook, look, put /uː/ food: blue, noodles, two, you

Extra idea: Ask students to add more words to each group.

Three years ago, we went to the restaurant Noma in Denmark. Noma really is the very best. There was one dish with berries and grilled vegetables. Very strange but wonderful! 7

Read out the sentences and ask students to write their answers individually. Play the audio for students to check their answers. Ask individual students to say the correct sentences for 1, 3 and 5. Note that there is work on the second part of the audio in exercise 10.



MA Stronger students could try to do the activity before they listen again.

Listening 2 5 Check comprehension of the words in the box and ask students to say one or two to practise pronunciation. Ask: What is a first course / a main course? What does ‘grilled’ mean? (Contrast baked, fried or boiled.) Ask students to say which ones they think they definitely wouldn’t hear in a talk about top restaurants. 6



Play the audio while students tick the words they hear. Ask how many people correctly guessed the words they wouldn’t hear. 2.34

Answers berries, fantastic, good cooks, grilled prawns, lucky, roast fish, strange, top restaurants Transcript Hi, my name’s Clara Belasco. My husband and I are both Spanish. We met on a foodie holiday in Italy. And yes, we’re foodies. We’re both good cooks and we love eating out – we love restaurants. How often do we eat in a restaurant? Maybe two or three times a month, but we don’t eat at expensive places because we can’t afford it. Then once or twice a year, we do something fantastic – we go to one of the world’s top restaurants. We’re lucky because we’re Spanish, and Spanish food is

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2.35

Answers 1 false: Clara is Spanish. 2 true 3 false: She is a good cook. 4 true 5 false: They can’t afford to eat in expensive restaurants very often. 6 true Transcript Hi, my name’s Clara Belasco. My husband and I are both Spanish. We met on a foodie holiday in Italy. And yes, we’re foodies. We’re both good cooks and we love eating out – we love restaurants. How often do we eat in a restaurant? Maybe two or three times a month, but we don’t eat at expensive places because we can’t afford it. Then once or twice a year, we do something fantastic – we go to one of the world’s top restaurants. We’re lucky because we’re Spanish, and Spanish food is amazing! Did you know that Spain has some of the world’s top restaurants?

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table. Play the second part of the audio again for students to check their answers. Ask: Which restaurant or dish do you think sounds the most interesting? Ask students to try and imagine what meat fruit is. (There is no explanation in the audio, and it’s entirely up to the students’ (and your!) imagination to think what it might be.)

Extra idea: Ask some additional questions about the first part of the audio, eg Where is Clara from? Where did she meet her husband? How often do they eat out? What do they do once or twice a year?

Grammar How often …? 8 Tell students to close their books. Write the words of the question in the grammar table in a random order on the board and ask students to put them in the right order. Then brainstorm possible answers, eg once / twice / three times a week, every two / three / four days, once in a while, now and again, from time to time, hardly ever, never. Ask students to read the table and answer the questions about the expressions of frequency.

Answers 1 cake 2 UK 3 fish 4 Spain 5 prawns 6 Denmark 7 grilled Transcript Last year, we went to Mugaritz in San Sebastián because we live near there. This restaurant does lots of small courses. We had a kind of chocolate cake there – it was different because it had some cheese in it, but it was very tasty! We also went to a restaurant in London. Its name is Dinner by Heston Blumenthal. Its most famous dish is ‘meat fruit’. And the roast fish is wonderful. Then this year, we went to another Spanish restaurant – El Celler de Can Roca, in Girona. We had a fantastic meal, and their grilled prawns were delicious. I still think about them! Three years ago, we went to the restaurant Noma in Denmark. Noma really is the very best. There was one dish with berries and grilled vegetables. Very strange but wonderful!

Answers 1 one time 2 two times Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 138, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. 9 Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Then ask students to work on the questions in pairs. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar.

Extra ideas: Ask a student to make a guess about someone else in the class, eg Teacher: Mahmoud, how often does Leila go to a restaurant? Mahmoud: I think she goes to a restaurant once a week. Leila: No, I never go to restaurants! Teacher: Leila, please make a sentence about Nasreen. Leila: I think Nasreen meets friends in a café twice a week. Nasreen: Yes, that’s true!

Ask students to stand up and stand in a line according to how often they do each of the activities in the list in exercise 9.

Listening 3 10

2.36 Ask students to describe the photo. Ask: What’s on the table? (napkins, knives, forks, salt, pepper, olive oil, candles). Allow time for students to read the phrases in the

11 If you brought in pictures of food from different countries, you could ask students to use those instead of the dishes in exercise 10. Alternatively, you could use the photos of dishes on SB pages 62 and 64.

Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Ask students to work in pairs to give their opinions. Monitor pairs as they talk, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation.

Speaking and writing 12 EVERYBODY UP! Energise your lesson by asking students to stand up and find one (or more) people for each fact. They should make notes of each person’s name. Afterwards, ask students to tell the class what they found out and ask follow-up questions, eg What are your favourite restaurants? What is your favourite food? Why do you like simple food? Unit 7

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13 Brainstorm some names of local restaurants and what kind of food they serve. Review adjectives to describe restaurants, as well as the adjectives on SB page 63. Go through the questions and elicit answers before they start. Suggest that students make some notes first before they start writing.



Extra questions for class or for homework







Movies Which film would you most like to see? Why? Do you enjoy seeing films of books? If you know the book, and you don’t like the film, how do you feel? Who stars in the films? (Chocolat: Juliette Binoche, Johnny Depp; Like Water for Chocolate: Lumi Cavasos (Tita); Marco Leonardi (Pedro))

Collect in the work when they have finished (you might want to set this task for homework), then hand them out to different students and ask them to read out the work. Ask students to guess who went to each restaurant.



Answers Movies Chocolat (author: Joanne Harris) and Like Water for Chocolate (author: Laura Esquivel)

Tip: You may want to introduce students to the idea of making a bubble diagram to make notes before writing. This is a good strategy to improve writing that helps to collect ideas before launching into the writing task itself.



Extra idea: Students can ask you these questions and take notes of your answers. Then they can write your review of the restaurant.

Music Missing number: two Name of the song: Tea For Two Next two lines: Just me for you / And you for me

Culture notes: Chocolat was nominated for five Academy Awards. Juliette Binoche plays Vianne, a young and unconventional French chocolate maker who moves to a small village with her young daughter and opens a chocolate shop opposite the church. The villagers are fasting for religious reasons but the chocolate is tempting for them. Vianne meets a handsome gypsy (Johnny Depp) and together they plan a chocolate festival. Vianne’s free and loving ways (and her delicious chocolate) eventually change the villagers’ attitudes. It is based on the book Chocolat (1999) by the British novelist Joanne Harris.



Like Water for Chocolate is set in Mexico and is in Spanish. Tita (Lumi Cavazos), the third daughter in her family, by tradition isn’t allowed to marry but must instead care for her elderly, tyrannical mother. Tita and Pedro (Marco Leonardi) fall in love, but Pedro isn’t allowed to marry Tita and marries her elder sister instead. Tita cannot express her feelings and puts them into her cooking, so that everyone who eats her delicious food feels her heartbreak. The film was a huge box-office success, especially in the USA. It is based on the best-selling novel by the

De-stress! We know it’s important to eat as healthily as we can, but it’s also important not to be obsessive about it, because that in itself is stressful. It’s good to have a little splurge from time to time! Ask students what they do, eg Do you drink plenty of water? Or do you drink more fizzy drinks? What tasty / healthy / unhealthy food do you eat? Are you happy with the way you eat? What’s your favourite ‘sugary’ food?

Movies & Music Read through the instructions and questions for both sections and teach / elicit any difficult vocabulary, eg single mother, tea. For the song, ask students to guess the answer to the first question, even if they don’t know it. If necessary, tell them the answer, as they will need to know the complete line to find the answers to the other questions. Invite a student to the board to write the words. The words are very easy and after singing the song a couple of times, you could erase most of the words and then sing it again. 122

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Mexican novelist Laura Esquival. (The film director is her husband.) In some Spanishspeaking countries, the phrase ‘like water for chocolate’ is used to say that you are very angry.

Note: You may want to bring in some empty food containers to help with exercise 1.

Food 1 If you brought in any empty jars and other food containers, ask students to name the food that was in them, eg cereal, coffee, tea, biscuits, crisps. Then teach the name of each kind of container. Look at the picture and identify the containers you can see there. Ask students to match them with the words in the box, then complete the phrases. Don’t check the answers yet.



4

Tea For Two is a duet from the 1924 musical No No, Nanette. They lyrics are by Irving Caesar and the music is by Vincent Youmans. The song quickly became a classic and has been sung by many other people over the years, notably by Doris Day in the 1950 film Tea for Two.

Vocabulary plus p68

2

Cooking First check the meaning of the words in the box and practise them. Then ask students to look at the picture in exercise 1 and tick the items they can see. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. 2.38

Transcript and answers In the picture, there’s a knife, a fork, a spoon, a glass, a cup, a bowl and a plate. There isn’t a saucepan, a frying pan, a mug, an oven or a dish. 5 Explain the phrase odd one out and do the first item as an example. Explain why saucepan doesn’t fit (people use it to cook in – they use the others to eat with). Give students time to think about their answers to 2 and 3, then elicit answers from the class. Ask students to explain their reasons for their choices.





Answers 1 saucepan (we don’t eat from a saucepan) 2 frying pan ( we don’t drink from a frying pan) 3 oven (we use an oven for cooking; we eat out of the other things). We use all the ‘odd-one-out’ items for cooking things in.

2.37 Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Draw attention to the schwa sound in of /əv/ (ie unstressed).



Transcript and answers 1 a carton of juice 2 a bottle of water 3 a glass of water 4 a slice of bread 5 a can of cola 6 a jar of honey 7 a bowl of cereal 8 a piece of cheese 9 a cup of coffee

6 Explain that students will first decide if each sentence is true or false. Then they will replace any incorrect words with the correct words. Do the first two items as a model, pointing out the first item is true, so they don’t have to change any words.

Extra idea: Ask which other foods can go with each word, eg a slice of cake / cheese / bread. Set a time limit of one minute and see how many students can come up with.

3 Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Practise the questions as a class, then ask students to ask you three or four questions. Then they can practise in pairs.

MA As an extra challenge, ask students to make two more lists of words with one odd one out in each list.



Allow time for individual work – students can use their dictionaries if necessary. Finally, check the answers as a class and practise the sentences.



Answers 1 true 2 false: You roast and bake food in an oven. 3 false: You boil food in a saucepan. 4 true 5 false: You add food to a bowl. 6 true 7 false: You fry food in a frying pan. Unit 7

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Extra ideas: Add other cooking words to the list and explain them by miming or drawing, eg stir, mix, shake, slice, grate, spread, etc. You could mime making an easy recipe for something like an omelette or a cheese sandwich and have students describe the actions as you go along. Ask students to group the words into categories, eg Which words describe how to prepare food? Which words describe how to cook food?

7 Ask students about the food in the pictures and what kind of food they eat them with. Ask and answer questions about the food and the amounts in the recipe, eg How much oil do you need? (one tablespoon). Teach / Elicit barbecue, kidney beans, coconut, thyme (a kind of herb). The pictures will help with most of the difficult vocabulary. 8



2.39 Allow time for students to read the recipe and predict the missing verbs. Make it clear that all the verbs they need are in exercise 6. Check the meaning of any new words, eg heat (opposite: cool). Then play the audio to check and write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing to allow students to repeat each sentence.

Answers 1 Chop 2 fry 3 Add 4 roast / bake 5 Put 6 boil 7 Add 8 serve Transcript Chicken with rice and beans Heat the oven to 200°C. Chop the onions and garlic. Heat the oil in a pan, then fry the onions for five minutes. Add the chicken to the pan and fry it for six to eight minutes. Add the barbecue sauce. Put the chicken in the oven and roast it for 30 minutes. Put the coconut milk and the liquid from the kidney beans into a saucepan. Add the rice, thyme and some salt and boil for ten minutes. Add the beans and cook for another five minutes. Then serve with the chicken.

9

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Everyday English p69 Note: You might want to bring in menus from restaurants for this lesson (you can often download them from the internet).

Ordering food in a restaurant 1 Ask students to read the menu. Encourage them to ask you questions, eg What’s a prawn? What’s a pepper? Point out the difference in spelling and stress between dessert (dessert) and desert (desert). Ask students which dishes they know / like / dislike. 2 Discuss the questions and answer them as a class. Ask additional questions about the menu, eg How many different vegetables are there? How many desserts? How much is each course if you have two courses? Which dessert is savoury, not sweet?

Answers 1 pasta with roast vegetables 2 steak and chips, roast beef with roast potatoes and vegetables 3 sugar 3 Check the meaning of any new vocabulary, eg bill, sparkling, reservation, pass. Model the first item with a student, focusing on correct stress and intonation. Allow time for individual work. Then check the answers by asking a student to read a line and ask another student to answer.

4

Tell students to cover the recipe instructions in exercise 8 and look at the ingredients in exercise 7. Students work in pairs to explain how to make the dish. Then tell them to check their answers against the text in exercise 8. Unit 7

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MA For a greater challenge, stronger students can try to explain how to make the dish without looking at their books at all.



Answers 1C 2C 3W 4W 5C 6C 7W 8C 2.40 6 Decide whether you are going to use the video or simply play the audio. Explain that students are going to watch or listen to a conversation in a restaurant. Play the video or audio and ask some general questions. If you are using the video, ask: What can you remember about these people? Ask: Where are they? What happens in this scene? Ask students to describe the restaurant. Play the video or audio again while students tick the sentences they hear from exercise 3. Then check answers as a class.

Answers 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

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Transcript LAURA Hello, my name’s Janes. We have a reservation for half past eight. WAITER Janes – ah yes, a table for two. Come this way, please. JACK Can we have the menu, please? WAITER Here you are, sir. JACK Thanks. And can we have some water? WAITER Sparkling or still? LAURA Sparkling, please. 5

2.41



Ask about the end of the conversation: What does Laura think Jack is going to ask her? What does Jack actually say?



Note that when ordering food from a menu, we use the, so Laura says I’d like the roast peppers.



Answers Laura: roast peppers with tomatoes, prawn salad Jack: onion soup with garlic bread, pasta with roast vegetables Transcript LAURA Can we order, please? WAITER Certainly, madam. Would you like a starter? LAURA Yes, I’d like the roast peppers, please. And I don’t want a main course. I’d like another starter. Um – yes, I want the prawn salad, please. WAITER Roast peppers and prawn salad. And what about you, sir? JACK Can I have the onion soup? Um – the pasta dish is vegetarian, isn’t it? WAITER Yes, it is. JACK Great, I’d like that, please. WAITER The onion soup and the pasta. Do you want any vegetables? JACK Yes, please. We’d like some carrots and courgettes. WAITER OK, thank you. ...



Laura, can I ask you something? Yes? Can you pass the salt?

LAURA JACK

6

Act out the conversation with a strong student. Then students act out the conversation in pairs.



MA Stronger students can do this as a memory exercise.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversation. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

6 Write the menu on the board. Play

the second part of the video or audio and ask students to listen out for what Laura and Jack order. Ask students to write their answers on the board and see if everyone agrees.



JACK

7 Point out the three different structures presented in the table. Allow time for students to complete the sentences individually, then check the answers by playing the video or audio again. Play the video or audio again for students to practise the correct intonation and stress in these expressions.

Answers want I want the prawn salad, please. I don’t want a main course. Do you want any vegetables? would like I’d like the roast peppers, please. We’d like some carrots and courgettes. Would you like a starter? Can I / we have …? Can I have the onion soup? 8 Point out the short form of I would like (I’d like). Ask: What is the difference between ‘want’ and ‘would like’? Encourage students to think of other examples of situations where they would say I want or I’d like.



Point out the difference in pronunciation and meaning between I like and I’d like.

Answer Would like is more polite than want.

9 Read through the conversation with the class first, then allow time for individual work. Ask two students to read out the conversation and write the answers on the board.

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Answers 1 Would you like 2 I’d like 3 I’d like 4 would you like 5 I’d like Extra idea: Students could practise the conversation in different pairs, changing the food words to different items

10 Go through the instructions with the class first. Make sure students understand the three different roles. You may want to write or elicit a few starter phrases and write them on the board, eg A: Do you have a reservation, sir / madam? Could you spell your name, please? A table for two people? B: Good evening. My name is … and I have a reservation for …. For a starter, I’d like …. For the main course, I’d like …. C: For a main course, I’d like …. For dessert, I’d like …. Monitor groups as they work, making a note of any problems with grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation or intonation. Praise students and provide corrective feedback.





Extra ideas: Brainstorm other useful phrases for ordering in a restaurant, eg Does it have garlic in it? What’s in the onion soup? Is it spicy / salty / sweet? What kind of (ice cream) do you have? Bring in menus from restaurants (or get them online) and set up tables around the room as restaurants. Students move around the room trying out different places. Tell students to work in groups of three. Ask them to create a short menu with two starters, two main courses and two desserts. One dish is vegetarian.

we don’t say … / we say …

This section focuses on the following errors: • incorrect use of a with uncountable nouns • incorrect use of plural ‘s’ with food (although foods can refer to a variety of food types) • omitting would before like when making requests

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Ask students to cover the green we say … side and to see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check. Unit 7

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8

People and abilities

UNIT FOCUS

GRAMMAR: can / can’t; be good at / interested in; want to / would like to / need to; adverbs of manner VOCABULARY: languages; personality adjectives; physical descriptions; parts of the face FUNCTIONS: talking about abilities; asking for, giving and refusing permission; talking about possibility

Lesson 1 She can speak a lot of languages. pp70–71

2 Discuss the questions as a class. Brainstorm reasons for learning English, eg I travel a lot / It’s good for work. Write them on the board.

Aims

3

The focus of this lesson is to practise can and can’t, be good at / interested in something as well as words for languages and talking about your abilities.

You first! Put students in pairs to answer the question. Note whether students understand and can use can correctly – give help with it if necessary. Ask for feedback and write the languages they say on the board. Count how many students speak each language.

Vocabulary Languages

Culture note: Many countries have one (or more) official language which is used in schools and in the media, but people also have their own dialects which they speak in at home.

1

Start by identifying the languages in the speech bubbles. Ask what the sentences in the bubbles say. Practise the pronunciation of these words, paying attention to stress patterns, eg Italian, Japanese, Portuguese. Ask students which names for languages are very similar in their own language and which are very different.

Answers 1 Turkish 2 Japanese 3 Italian 4 Catalan 5 Russian 6 Arabic 7 Mandarin Chinese 8 Spanish 9 Portuguese 10 Greek The sentences all say ‘I can speak ten languages.’

Extra idea: Ask students what languages are spoken in different parts of the world, eg Brazil, Mexico or Egypt. Ask: What do you think is the most widely spoken language?

2.42 Look at the photo and the title of the article. Ask: What does ‘hyper’ mean? (over or excessive) Find out if students know any other words starting with hyper, eg hyperactive, hypersensitive, hyperinflation. Check students understand fluently. Allow time for students to read the article and predict the answers. Note that the answers to the questions are the missing words in the article. Tell students not to try and understand every word. Then play the audio to check their answers. Ask students to tell you the missing words.

Answers 1 18 2 eight 3 ten 4 11 5 six Transcript Englishman Ray Gillon is an unusual man. He’s very good at learning languages. He learns them for fun and can speak 18 languages. Well, that’s not quite true. He can speak eight languages fluently. But he can have a conversation in the other ten languages. They include Turkish, Russian, Mandarin and Thai. Language experts describe Gillon as a ‘hyperpolyglot’. Hyperpolyglots speak a lot of languages – 11 or more. Some people can speak six languages, but there aren’t many hyperpolyglots. For a lot of us, learning a language isn’t easy. And some people just can’t learn another language – but then maybe they’re very good at maths or science! Extra ideas: Ask students to close their books. Say the answer to one of the questions and ask students to tell you the question. Ask: Do you know anyone who speaks a lot of languages? What do you think helped them learn so many?

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De-stress! Sometimes when we’re stressed we think very negative thoughts and we talk to ourselves in a very critical way: I can’t do this, I’m stupid, I’m no good at X, etc. One way of countering those thoughts is to use positive affirmations and to say encouraging things to yourself in your head (or out loud) over and over again. It may sound silly but it’s incredibly effective. Ask students if they like the example on SB page 70. Get them to try saying it a few times. Ask: Can you think of a better thing to say? Elicit as many suggestions as possible.

5 Ask how many examples of can and can’t students can find in the article. Get feedback from individual students.

Answers … and can speak 18 languages. He can speak eight languages fluently. But he can have a conversation … Some people can speak six languages … And some people just can’t learn another language …

Grammar 1 can / can’t 4 Ask students to use the table to make sentences and questions with can and can’t. Ask: Do we use ‘do’ in the question form? How do we make the question form? What happens to the main verb? Does it change in the third person singular? Ask them to complete the table.

Check that students understand the meaning of can / can’t. Ask for some examples of things they can and can’t do. They can ask you, too. Give some prompts and ask students to make questions for each other, eg Teacher: play tennis Student 1: Can you play tennis, Miguel? Student 2: No, I can’t but I can play football!

Finally ask students to choose the correct words to complete the sentences.

Answers We use can when we know how to do something. We use can’t when we don’t know how to do something. affirmative I / You / He / She / It / We / They can speak ten languages. negative Some people say they can’t learn another language. questions and short answers Can you speak English? Yes, I can. / No, I can’t. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 138, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. 128

Extra idea: Ask how many things students can remember about Ray Gillon. Then tell them to look back at the article to check.

2.43 Remind students of the schwa 6 P sound in unstressed words. Ask them to read and predict the schwa sound in can or can’t. Then play the audio and practise the pronunciation of these sentences.



Note: Can in all the example sentences here contains the schwa sound (the only time it doesn’t is in affirmative short answers: Yes, I can.). The difference is that can contains the schwa sound and can’t contains the /ɑː/ sound – not a schwa.

Transcript and answers A Can you speak English? B I can speak some English. I can’t speak it fluently. C Yes, I can speak English quite well. 7 Ask students to identify the activity in each picture. Model the example question and answer with one or two students, then ask two students to read the example. Monitor pairs as they work, correcting pronunciation if necessary. Call on students to present their dialogues to the class.

Get students to ask each other similar questions, eg Can you play chess? No, I can’t. What about your boyfriend? Yes, he can play chess quite well.

Answers A Can they dance? Yes, they can. B Can she sing? No, she can’t.

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C D E F

started learning French and then Italian. Three years later, he was fluent in both languages. Then he learnt four more languages. Gillon says that when you are good at three or four languages, you can learn other languages quickly. And when you know the grammar of one language, it’s easy to learn another one.

Can they play the guitar? Yes, they can. Can they play chess? Yes, they can. Can he swim? No, he can’t. Can he drive? No, he can’t.

Hyperpolyglots learn languages for many reasons. They often use languages in their work. Sometimes they are interested in meeting people from different cultures. But that isn’t always true. Some hyperpolyglots aren’t interested in conversation. One example is Alexander Anders, an American. He loves reading in different languages, but he isn’t interested in meeting lots of people. By the way, Alexander speaks 24 languages!

Listening 8



9

THINK These questions prepare students to understand the listening better. In exercise 9, students will listen and decide if these sentences are true or false according to the audio. It also prepares students for the next grammar section. Go through the sentences and check comprehension. To remind students, ask: What’s a hyperpolyglot? Then put them in pairs to do the task. Elicit answers from some students, but don’t check all the answers yet. Explain that students are going to hear some information about hyperpolyglots. Play the audio for students to check the sentences in exercise 8 to find out if they are true or false. Students can discuss the answers in pairs. If necessary, play the audio again, then discuss the answers as a class. Ask students to correct the false statements and help them with pronunciation.



2.44

Answers 1 true 2 false: They aren’t always interested in languages when they’re young. 3 false: When you are good at three or four languages, you can learn other languages quickly. 4 true 5 false: Some hyperpolyglots aren’t interested in conversation.

Extra idea: Ask additional questions about the audio, eg Was Ray Gillon interested in languages at school? What do we learn about Alexander Anders?

Grammar 2 be good at / be interested in 10 Point out that the phrases in the grammar table can be followed by a noun (tennis, art) or by an -ing form (playing, cooking). Point out the negative form. Ask students to tell you which sentences in exercise 8 use a noun or an -ing form. Practise the sentences with the class.



Ask students to write four true sentences, using two with a noun and two with an -ing form. Invite volunteers to write their answers on the board.

Answers Students’ own answers. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 139, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

Transcript

Speaking

Why are some people so good at learning languages? Language experts believe hyperpolyglots can understand word patterns, so they remember words and sounds very easily. But they aren’t always interested in languages when they’re young. Ray Gillon, for example, wasn’t interested in languages at school. His first job was in France, so he

11 EVERYBODY UP! For a change of pace, ask everyone to stand up and find at least one person who is good at or interested in each thing on the list. Check students understand networking, art, gardening, science. Elicit a question and an answer for the first activity on the list and write it on the board if necessary. Model the exchange with one or two students. Unit 8

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Then, if you want, play some music while students mingle and ask each other questions. Stop the music as a signal to sit down. Ask students to tell you about the people they talked to, eg Francesca is good at singing but she isn’t interested in gardening. 12 Start by restricting the discussion to just learning English. Brainstorm a list of topics and write them on the board, eg vocabulary, pronunciation, reading, writing, spelling, listening. Then expand the discussion to things in general. Monitor groups as they work. You may want to encourage them to say three good things they can do for each thing they can’t do. Tip: This is a good opportunity to find out what students feel they need most practice with and to find out what concerns them most.

Explore This is an opportunity for students to do research outside the classroom and tell the class about their findings in the next lesson. Brainstorm a few ideas about what makes a language difficult, eg grammar, pronunciation. (You may decide that the difficulty depends on what your first language is.)

Lesson 2 What do you want to do? pp72–73



2 Ask students to describe the photos. Then ask them to do the task individually. Ask students to explain the reason for their answers – you could ask what clues they used in the photos (eg The pilot has lots of complicated instruments in front of her / she’s wearing a uniform. The TV presenter has a microphone.).

3

Warm-up Ask students what words for jobs they already know. Brainstorm a few words and write them on the board. Ask students what jobs they do.

Vocabulary Personality adjectives 1 Allow time for students to read the descriptions and try to work out the meaning of the new words. Allow them to use their dictionaries or check online. Ask questions to check comprehension, eg Which word is the opposite of ‘funny’? (serious) Which words mean you’re very good at something? (clever, talented) Which word means that you worry a lot? (nervous). 130

Answers A pilot B journalist / TV presenter Play the audio, pausing for students to repeat the adjectives. Point out the stress pattern in: talented, ambitious, confident. 2.45

4 Model the example for the class, then give another example from your own experience. Tell students to work in pairs first, then tell the class about the people they described.

Reading 5 Ask students to look at the photo with the article on SB page 72. Ask: Do you know Oprah? What kind of TV programme is shown here? (a talk show) What is a talk show? Do you watch talk shows? Why or why not?

Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise want to / would like to and need to, learn vocabulary to describe personality and to talk about successful people and students’ aims and ambitions.

Answers 1 journalist 2 doctor 3 athlete 4 TV presenter 5 pilot



Discuss how the words in the box might relate to Oprah’s story, then ask students to discuss the questions in groups. Don’t check the answers to questions 3 and 4 yet.

Answers 1 She is the woman in red on the right. 2 They are Barack and Michelle Obama.

6 Allow time for quiet reading. Then ask students to tell you if they were right or wrong in their guesses for questions 3 and 4 in exercise 5.



Check comprehension of the words in bold by asking, eg Which word means ‘dream’? (goal) What is the opposite of ‘be lazy’? (work hard) Which phrase means ‘be successful’? (do well).

Answers career = the job (or series of jobs) that you do during your working life

Unit 8

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7

childhood = the time when someone is a child teenager = someone aged between 13 and 19 do well = be successful personality = the type of person you are, shown by the way you behave, feel and think with other people goal = a dream, an aim or purpose secret = a piece of information known by one person or a few people and not told to others hard = needing / using a lot of physical or mental effort Tell students to cover the article and try to remember the facts. They can then look back to check their answers.

Answers 1 false: They were poor. 2 false: She wasn’t a good student as a child, but she changed when she decided she wanted success. 3 false: Her first job was on a news show. 4 true 5 false: You need to find work that you love and do it. 6 true 8

THINK Check students understand the questions and the last sentence. Allow time for students to discuss the questions in groups. Then ask one student from each group to report their answers and opinions to the class. Point out that there is no one correct answer – they should make up their own minds from reading the article.

Grammar want to / would like to / need to 9 Explain that these three structures are all ways to talk about our aims, goals and ambitions. Use the grammar table to point out the use of verbs with to and the use of do in questions with want and need. Check the answers as a class.

Answers

I want to get there. Perhaps you would like to teach – then teach! You need to find work that you love and do it.



questions Do you want to be successful in your career? Would you like to dance? What do I need to do?



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 139, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

10 Check students understand the questions. Allow time for them to write their answers individually, then ask students to explain their answers to a partner. Encourage follow-up questions. Ask pairs to report their answers to the class. 11 Read the two example sentences and teach / elicit the difference between the two verbs. Give some further examples and ask students to replace the verb in the same way:

Teacher: I like swimming. Students: I enjoy swimming. Teacher: I’d like to be a dancer. Students: I want to be a dancer.



Answers 1 I enjoy teaching. 2 I want to teach.

12 Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Explain that one person describes their personality, and the other suggests a suitable job. Students may prepare for this task by writing three things they want to do and three things they like doing. When they have finished, ask groups to report back to the class.

Writing and speaking 13 Brainstorm names of people who are successful (they don’t need to be famous – they could be people that students know). Write their names on the board. Ask students to choose one and make notes about what they know about them. You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish it for homework. Monitor students as they work, helping with grammar or vocabulary as necessary. 14 Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Encourage students to talk about their goals and dreams. They can do this in small groups, or as a walk-around activity.

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Movies & Music

Music Last word: millionaire Name of the song: Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out The song is about someone who had plenty of money but now has none and no friends.

Ask students, What’s Facebook? Teach / Elicit the phrase social networking site. Write these questions on the board for students to discuss: 1 Do you think it’s OK to make a film about someone when they’re still alive? What can the problems be for the person?



Culture notes: Praised by critics, The Social Network was a very successful film which describes how Mark Zuckerberg, a student at Harvard University, created Facebook. Two brothers then sued him, saying that the social networking site was originally their idea, and Zuckerberg’s co-founder was more or less forced to leave the company. The real-life Zuckerberg claimed that the film had many inaccuracies.



The Iron Lady begins with Margaret Thatcher as an elderly woman with dementia. In a series of flashbacks the film then traces her life from her youth to her election as prime minister and her eventual resignation in 1990. Meryl Streep won her second Best Actress Oscar for her performance as the adult Mrs Thatcher.



Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out was written by the American songwriter Jimmy Cox in 1923. The blues singer Bessie Smith made it famous in the 1920s and 1930s and it’s often sung today. Eric Clapton sang a version in 1992. The song is about someone who has lost all his money and doesn’t have any friends. The song was written during the Prohibition when the consumption and sale of alcohol was restricted in the USA. The fourth line of the song refers to ‘bootleg liquor’, alcohol that is brewed illegally.

2 Would you like someone to make a film about you? Why? / Why not? (Possible answers for question 1: The facts aren’t true. People see them differently. Their lives change because of the film, eg people aren’t nice to them in the street.) For the song, explain the meaning of once (= there was a time when) in this context. If you want, students can find the answers to the first two questions in class. If you feel they need the help, tell them the song title has the phrase down and out in it and that it means without money, a job or a place to live. For the last two questions, tell students to find and read the lyrics for homework, and try and get the general meaning, using a dictionary or a translated version, but not to worry if they can’t do this. Elicit answers in the next lesson. For the question Do you agree? (referring to the song title Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out), you could take a class vote.

Extra questions for class or for homework



Music Which famous people have sung the song? (Blues singer Bessie Smith, English singer / songwriter and guitarist Eric Clapton) What is the next line of the song? (Spending my money, I didn’t care.) Note that the lyrics are different depending on who sang the song, but these are the Bessie Smith version lyrics.



Answers Movies 1 Mark Zuckerberg (the film starred Jesse Eisenberg and Andrew Garfield) 2 Margaret Thatcher (the film starred Meryl Streep, Jim Broadbent and Richard E. Grant)

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Lesson 3 And then they lived happily ever after. pp74–75 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise adverbs of manner and tell a story, to learn words to describe the face and what people look like, and then describe the appearance and characters of people you know.

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Note: You might want to bring in photos of people’s faces (from magazines or newspapers) for students to use in this lesson. You could also ask students to bring in photos of friends or family to describe in exercise 14.



Transcript and answers 1 hair 2 face 3 nose 4 mouth 5 chin 6 head 7 eyebrow 8 ear 9 eye

You first! Brainstorm names of famous celebrity couples and write them on the board. Write their jobs and nationalities, too.

Vocabulary Physical descriptions; parts of the face 1 If students aren’t sure who these people are, write some hints on the board, eg a footballer, a pop singer / fashion designer, an actor / director, an actor. The person they may not know is Deborra-Lee Furness (the wife of Hugh Jackman). Ask students to describe the people in the photos. Ask: Who looks friendly / sporty / cheerful / funny / fashionable? Then tell them to work in pairs to ask and answer questions. Go through the answers as a class. You could write the table in the answer key below on the board and fill in the answers as students give the answers.

Answers A B 1 He’s Hugh She’s Victoria Jackman. Beckham. 2 He’s an actor. She’s a fashion designer (and singer). 3 He’s married to She’s married to David Beckham. Deborra-Lee Furness.

C

2 He’s a football player.

3 First, identify which name goes with which photo, then call on students to read a sentence. Ask the other students if it is correct and check comprehension of the words in italics. Point out the use of have in descriptions, eg David Beckham has fair hair, and also the use of with in question 1 (where we follow an adjective with an adjective + noun: Hugh Jackman is very good-looking with brown eyes). You might also want to point out that although fair and blonde have very similar meanings, fair just means ‘light in colour’, and can include light brown hair, while blonde means light yellow hair.





Extra ideas: You could also ask students to describe someone they know, or another famous person. Students could also have fun drawing cartoons of strange-looking faces for their partners to describe.



Brainstorm additional words to describe hair: dark brown, light brown, black, red, straight, wavy, curly, spiky. You could also go to Vocabulary plus, SB page 76, and teach parts of the body or more adjectives for physical description.



Bring in several pictures of people’s faces. Scatter them on the table and ask students to gather round. One student describes a picture and the others have to identify which one it is.

She’s an actor, director and producer.

3 He’s married to She’s married to Hugh Victoria Beckham. Jackman. 2

Allow time for students to work individually or in pairs to label the picture. Then play the audio for students to check their answers. Play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Review the words by pointing to parts of your own face (or draw a face on the board) and asking students to name them. 2.46

Answers 1 short 2 fair; small 3 wide; blonde 4 brown; long

4 Give an example by describing one person in the class. Start with a fairly vague description, eg She’s quite tall. She wears glasses. Then make it more detailed. Then ask students to do the same in pairs.

D

1 He’s David She’s Deborra-Lee Beckham. Furness.

MA Stronger students may know these words already, in which case ask them to cover the word box and try to complete the labels without the words. They then listen and check.

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Listening 1

lively, nervous. Ask some comprehension check questions, eg What does the girl look like in Before Sunrise? Is the boy tall? Where do they meet? Why does the boy talk quickly?

5 Check that students understand the words romantic and scene and ask for some examples of romantic films. Ask students to describe what is happening in each photo.

Note that there is more information about each film after exercise 8.

Answers 1 Before Sunrise; When Harry Met Sally 2 in the street; at a (New Year’s Eve) party 3 happy because they’re in love 6



Tell students to cover the text in exercise 7. Explain that two people are going to talk about the photos in exercise 5. Tell students to listen and work out what question the people are answering. Play the audio all the way through and elicit answers from the class. Note that there could be various possible questions.

8

2.47

Suggested answer What’s your favourite romantic scene? Transcript MAN Oh, it’s a scene in Before Sunrise. Do you know the film? Two students meet on a train. She’s beautiful with blue eyes and long blonde hair. He’s tall and dark and very lively. They like each other immediately. But he needs to get off the train before her and he asks her to get off the train with him. He talks very quickly because he’s nervous. She listens carefully and then she says, … WOMAN I think it’s probably the scene at the end of When Harry Met Sally. Sally’s at a big party. She’s very unhappy because she thinks Harry doesn’t love her. Suddenly he’s there in front of her and he says, ‘The thing is, I love you.’ She answers angrily and he tells her why he loves her. She says ‘I hate you, Harry,’ really sadly. And they …

7 Play the audio again as students listen and choose their answers. Check the answers as a class. Check any new words, eg confident, 134





Answers 1 beautiful 2 lively 3 quickly 4 unhappy 5 doesn’t love 6 why GUESS Brainstorm as many different endings as possible. If some students know the films and already know the ending, ask them to wait until everyone else has had a chance to guess.

Answers Before Sunrise She listens carefully and then she says, ‘Let me get my bag.’ When Harry met Sally And they kiss. In his passionate speech to Sally, Harry says, ‘I came here tonight because when you realise you want to spend the rest of your life with somebody, you want the rest of your life to start as soon as possible.’ In other words he wants to marry Sally. Culture notes: Before Sunrise is an American film (1995) directed by Richard Linklater about a young American man and a young French woman who meet on a train, disembark at Vienna and spend the night walking and talking. Jesse (Ethan Hawke) is returning to the USA and Celine (Julie Delpy) is going back to university in Paris. As the two believe they will never see each other again, they talk in a very deep and emotionally sincere way. Nothing much happens but the dialogue and feelings are very authentic and the Rotten Tomatoes score is an incredible 100%. The film has been described as ‘the best romance of all time’. There are two sequels: Before Sunset (2004) and Before Midnight (2013). When Harry met Sally (1989), directed by Rob Reiner, is a romantic comedy that has become a Hollywood classic. The film stars Meg Ryan and Billy Crystal as college graduates who meet on a cross-country drive to New York. They discuss the question ‘Can men and women ever be just friends?’ and as they gradually become good friends over

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a period of eleven years, seem to prove that it is possible. But eventually they become romantically involved. When this happens, Harry tries to back down, which hurts Sally terribly. Harry realises soon enough that he loves Sally and the film has a traditional romantic ending.

Grammar Adverbs of manner 9 To help students, ask prompt questions such as How does he talk? (quickly) How does she listen? (carefully). Students try to find the words individually, then work in pairs to compare answers.



Answers They like each other immediately. He talks very quickly ... She listens carefully ... Suddenly, he’s ... She answers angrily ... She says ... really sadly.

10 To check answers to exercise 9 and give more information about adverbs of manner, ask: How many adverbs of manner words are there in the text? Do they all end in -ly? (all of them except fast). Point out that not all words ending in -ly are adverbs – some might be adjectives. Teach / Elicit that adjectives describe a noun or person, eg She is careful. (describes she), The book is big. (describes the book), but adverbs describe an action, eg She listens carefully. Ask students if they can find an adjective ending in -ly in the text (lively). (Other adjectives ending in -ly are friendly, lonely and elderly.) We can’t make them adverbs, as they already end in -ly, so instead we say, eg in a friendly way.

11 This is a pairwork information-gap activity. Each partner looks at a different page. Make sure students don’t look at each other’s story while doing this activity. They each read their story and make notes in the table. Then they ask each other questions and make notes on their partner’s answers. Finally, they use all the information to find the differences between their stories. Discuss the differences as a class and brainstorm possible endings. Tip: For pairwork or small-group activities you may want to pair students in same-level pairs or in mixed-level pairs. When pairs are at the same level, you can offer more time to those who need extra support, while other students can move ahead at a faster rate. In mixed-level pairs, weaker students get help from stronger ones, while stronger students can also benefit from helping or explaining new language. Did you know?  * Brainstorm possible reasons why married men

live longer but married women don’t.

Listening 2 12

Note that immediately means instantly or very soon, and suddenly means unexpectedly or without warning.

Answers adjective adverb sad + -ly She looks at him sadly. quick He talks very quickly. angry y - i + -ly She answers angrily.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 139, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

Extra idea: Mention some irregular adverb forms, eg good (well), fast (fast) and hard (hard). Mention some spelling rules such as dropping the -e in words that end with -le like possible and terrible. Also point out that we double the consonant in words that end with ‘l’ like careful (carefully).





2.48 Ask students to describe the photo and make some guesses about these people. Ask: How old are they? Are they married? What are their jobs, hobbies? Do they have children? Ask students to read the statements and check they understand them all. Explain that they are going to hear a talk by a journalist about a couple she interviewed. They have to identify who says each thing. Play the audio as students choose their answers. If necessary, play it again for students to check their answers, then check answers as a class.

Answers 1S 2S 3S 4J 5S 6T 7T 8T

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Transcript What are the ingredients of a happy marriage? I talked to Serena and Tony Roberts – they are a good example of a happy couple. She’s a sports journalist and he’s a music teacher. Serena said, ‘One ingredient is character. We’re quite similar, so we get on well. And we have similar lifestyles, too. We both work hard and get up early. And we have a lot of the same interests – for instance, we both love sport.’ I said that happy couples often look similar – Serena and Tony both have small faces and they’re tall and slim. ‘That’s interesting, but I’m not sure I agree,’ said Serena. ‘An important thing is trust,’ Tony said. ‘Also, when you’re wrong, say sorry.’ Tony went to make the tea, and five minutes later we heard a crash from the kitchen, and then Tony’s voice. ‘Sorry!’ he said.

Extra idea: Ask additional questions about the audio, eg What are their jobs? How are their lifestyles similar? What are their interests? Do they look similar? In what way? Why does Tony say ‘Sorry!’?

Speaking 13 This exercise gives students the opportunity to respond to the audio with their own opinions while also recycling new words and language to express their ideas. Go through the questions with the students and elicit a few ideas. Monitor students as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, pronunciation or intonation. You could ask students to give feedback to the class and see if students had similar opinions. 14 Go through the bullet points and make sure students know what they should include in their description. Model the example or ask a student to read it out. Allow some time for students to talk together and exchange information. Then ask two or three volunteers to tell the class their descriptions. Ask the others to ask follow-up questions about each couple. You may also want to set this as a written task for homework.

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Extra idea: Students bring in photos of their family and good friends and describe their physical appearance and character.

Vocabulary plus p76 Parts of the body (1) 1 Ask students to look at the photo and say all the words they know. Ask which words they find difficult to remember and which words are difficult to pronounce. Check the pronunciation of those, eg knee (silent ‘k’), wrist (silent ‘w’), stomach (/ʌ/ for ‘o’ and final /k/ sound for ‘ch’). Review all the face words from SB page 74. 2

Play the audio, pausing for students to repeat each word. Play the audio again and ask students to point to the correct part of their body. 2.49

Transcript 1 head 2 neck 3 shoulders 4 arm 5 elbow 6 wrist 7 hand 8 finger 9 stomach 10 leg 11 foot 12 knee 13 ankle 14 toe 15 back 3 Say: Follow the instructions and then read out the example. Check that students have done the movement correctly. Give some more example instructions to the class and ask them to do the correct movements. Ask students to practise in pairs. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with pronunciation and intonation. Make sure they are using the imperative for instructions correctly too. If necessary, go back over the grammar notes for the imperative on SB page 132.

When they have finished, ask one student to come to the front of the class and give instructions to the rest of the class.



Extra idea: Draw a stick figure on the board and number the parts of the body in a different order to that in the book. Tell students to write the words in the correct order in their notebooks. Then ask students to come to the board and label the diagram.



MA Students who need more support can look at their books. Other students should keep their books closed. Check pronunciation and spelling.

Verbs of movement 4 Illustrate the meaning of the words in the box by miming the movements. Then give a few instructions using the verbs, eg raise your

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hand, bend your wrist, etc. Practise the verbs with the class and check their pronunciation. Tell students to look at the pictures. Point out that the arrows in the pictures will help them work out the answers. Allow time for students to complete the missing words either individually or in pairs.

7

Ask volunteers to look at their answers from exercise 6, and write a sentence for each person. Ask individual students to say their sentences and ask if everyone agrees. Then play the audio for students to check their answers. Play it again, pausing for students to repeat each sentence.

5

Play the audio for students to check the answers, then play it again for students to do the actions along with the audio.





Note that the illustrations show the exercises being done sitting down. They could, of course, be done standing up, but that is often not practical in a classroom. Make sure students follow the instructions carefully so that they don’t strain their backs.

Note: The vowels in the names rhyme with the first vowel in the adjective, eg in Paul is tall the /ɔː/ sound is in both words. You may want to use this exercise to practise vowel sounds.



2.50

Answers 1 Raise 2 touch 3 bend 4 Touch 5 bend 6 touch 7 Move 8 Turn Transcript OK, everyone, here are some exercises you can do sitting down. Do each action five times. Are you ready? Let’s begin! Raise your arms above your head and look up. Good. Now touch your toes – you can bend your knees a little! That’s right, great! OK, next exercise. Touch your left knee with your right elbow – don’t bend your back! Now touch your right knee with your left elbow. Five times. Very good. Now – move your shoulders up and down five times. That’s right. Now turn your head from left to right – slowly. Great! OK, next exercise ...

Physical descriptions 6 Go through the words in the box by saying each word and asking students to repeat. Check they say each one correctly. Use gestures to illustrate the meaning of each word. Then write the names of the people on the board and ask students to match them with the adjectives. Ask: Which words are opposites? (short / tall) Which words are synonyms? (slim / thin, but note that slim has a more positive feeling).

Ask students to work in pairs. They will check their answers in the next exercise by listening to the audio.

2.51

Transcript and answers 1 Paul is tall. 2 Dee is medium-height. 3 George is short. 4 Kim is thin. 5 Bill is slim. 6 Rose is overweight. 7 Ben is well-built. 8 Tell students to work in pairs and give each other instructions. You may want to illustrate some easy stick figures on the board to help students who aren’t confident about drawing.

MA Weaker students could write out their instructions before they begin.

Focus on: good Explain that good can be used in a variety of different ways. Ask students to try and give you some examples of uses they already know, eg This food is good. (= delicious) This book is good. (= interesting) This hotel is good. (= excellent, high quality). Go through the sentences and check comprehension. Then allow time for students to write their answers. Check the answers as a class. Answers

1g 2d 3a 4h 5c 6b 7e 8f



Extra ideas: Ask students to cover the left-hand column and try to remember the sentences.



As a class, think of some ways we use the words bad and not bad, eg I feel bad. The film was really bad. I’m not bad at tennis. The film wasn’t bad. How are you? / Not bad Point out that not bad actually means quite good.

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Everyday English p77

2 JACK Can I borrow your motorbike this afternoon? LAURA No, sorry, you can’t, not today. JACK What about tomorrow? LAURA You can have it tomorrow, sure, no problem.

Asking for, giving and refusing permission 1 Tell students to cover exercise 2 and ask them to describe the scenes. Ask: Where are they? Ask students what they already know about this couple, eg What is their relationship? Brainstorm as many questions as possible and write them on the board. Ask students to write complete sentences for the speech bubbles for the two photos, then elicit answers but don’t say if they’re correct. 2 Ask students to explain the reasons for their answers in exercise 1. Then model the first conversation with a student and elicit the missing question for photo A. Ask students to match each photo with a conversation. Don’t worry about the missing last line at this point – they will complete the conversations in the next exercise. Answers

3

1A 2B A Can I use your tablet? B Can I borrow your motorbike this afternoon? 2.52

6 Decide whether you are going

to use the video or simply play the audio. Brainstorm ideas for the missing sentence in each conversation and write them on the board. Play the video or audio for students to check their answers. Tick any correct guesses on the board and see if anybody guessed the exact words. Play the video or audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line. Pay attention to stress and intonation.

Answers 1 No, you can’t. Sorry. 2 You can have it tomorrow Transcript 1 LAURA Can I use your tablet? JACK Yes, you can, but I need it later. LAURA Can’t I take it to work? JACK No, you can’t. Sorry.

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4

Ask students to practise the conversations in pairs, then ask a few pairs to act out the conversations for the class.



MA For an extra challenge, students can try to act out the conversations with books closed. You can put key words on the board to help with this.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversations. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

5 Brainstorm a couple of answers to each question, eg No, sorry, you can’t, I need it. / Yes, of course you can. / Yes, just for an hour because then I need it. Then ask students to work in pairs. Suggest that each pair develops two conversations for each question, one giving and one refusing permission. Students should use the conversations from the video as a model. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common grammar, vocabulary or pronunciation problems. Ask volunteers to present their conversations to the class.

Talking about possibility 6 Discuss the different rules there are in an office and ask students about their experience of office rules. Point out the ticks and crosses after each sentence and explain that they refer to things that you can or can’t do.

Do the first item as an example with a student. Ask: Can you wear jeans on Fridays? Elicit: Yes, you can, then the complete sentence: You can wear jeans on Fridays. Ask students to write the remaining sentences. Ask: Which ones are surprising? Which ones are normal? Which ones do you agree or disagree with? Don’t check if their answers are correct yet.

7

2.53 Play the audio for students to check their answers. If necessary, play it again if students weren’t sure.

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Answers 1 You can wear jeans on Fridays. 2 You can’t use social networking sites. 3 You can’t send personal emails on / from the office computer. 4 You can have a break at 11.00. 5 You can’t put your feet on the / your desk. Transcript MANAGER Alex, can we talk about office rules? ALEX Sure. Sit down. MANAGER Thank you. Um, it’s ten o’clock. You can have a 15-minute break at 11, Alex, but not at ten. ALEX OK, sorry. MANAGER And please don’t go on Facebook during office hours. And you can’t send personal emails on the office computer. ALEX Oh, OK! So I can’t go on Facebook or send personal emails? MANAGER That’s right. And, um, clothes – you can wear jeans on Fridays. But only Fridays. Today’s Tuesday. ALEX OK. Jeans on Fridays only. MANAGER And please don’t put your feet on the desk. ALEX Yes, I’m sorry about that.

9 Ask pairs to work with another pair so they are in groups of four. Tell them to talk together about the rules they wrote. Model the example dialogue so they can see that they have to ask questions about the other pair’s rules. A student from the other pair responds with the rule they wrote. If they didn’t write something about a specific situation, they should ask about another. Find out how many pairs wrote similar rules.

Extra ideas: Invite a volunteer to the front of the class (to play the ‘office manager’). Everyone in the class must ask him or her questions about the rules.



Extend this activity by making a list of rules for the school or classroom. Role-play a conversation with a new student about your school or classroom.

10 Go through sentences 1–4 and check understanding. Then look at statements a and b. Teach / Elicit that these are two different uses of the verb can. Students do the activity individually. After checking the answers, you may want to do further work on contrasting can for ability with can for permission.

Culture note: There are different rules about office clothing in different cultures. Some are formal, requiring jackets and ties for men, for example, and some are more casual. Some companies have an office handbook where the dress code is described in detail. In the UK and the USA, some offices have ‘Dressdown Fridays’ when workers can wear jeans and other more casual clothing, but some offices are against it as they say it affects work productivity negatively. Generally speaking, tech and computer company office workers tend to wear more casual clothing. 8 Go through the example with the class and brainstorm one or two other ideas as a class. Think of things the rules could be about, eg clothing, breaks, using the phone, using the internet, talking, having food or coffee at your desk, etc. Choose five areas for the class to write about. Put students in pairs to write their office rules. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any problems with grammar, vocabulary or pronunciation.

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Answers 1a 2b 3b 4a

11 Review ways of making suggestions by looking at Unit 3, SB page 33 again. Go through the table and make sure students understand the instructions.

Model the beginning of the conversation using Let’s or How about …? Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any problems with grammar, vocabulary or pronunciation. Ask two or three pairs to present their conversation and ask the class to give feedback.

we don’t say … / we say …

This section focuses on the following areas:



• • • •



Ask students to cover the green we say … side and see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

incorrect use of infinitive with to after can incorrect word choice use of adverb instead of adjective omission of to before the verb after want

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Units 7&8 review Note: If possible, see if you can find a clip of one of the chefs in the article preparing a dish online. You could also bring in a TV guide for the next week, or download one from the internet.

Tip: One way to check comprehension of a reading text is to write some answers on the board so that students can make questions, eg The Middle East (Where is Yotam Ottolenghi from?), Olive oil (What does Mario put in his orange cake?), She has long dark hair. (What does Nigella look like?).

Reading 1 As a warm-up activity, discuss the idea of a TV chef or a celebrity chef. Ask: What makes a good TV chef? Do you have any favourites? Why do you like them? What makes them popular?



Ask students to describe the people in the photos and guess what kind of food they like to prepare. Ask: What does the title mean? (hot can mean a hot temperature, spicy or very popular). Allow some time for quiet reading. While students are reading, draw a chart on the board with two columns: one for personality and one for appearance. When they have finished reading, invite students to tell you what to write in each column.

Answers Personality: the chefs need to be lively and confident Appearance: … and she’s very beautiful, with long dark hair

2 Go through the questions first so that students know what they are reading for. Allow time for students to read the article again and find the answers. Check the answers as a class.



140

Answers 1 Nigella Lawson doesn’t think much about calories. 2 Jean-Christophe Novelli cooks healthy food. 3 None of them cooks just meat and fish. 4 Mario Batali changes traditional Italian recipes. 5 Rachael Ray does very easy recipes. 6 The chefs on the TV programmes need to be very lively.

pp78–79



Extra ideas: If you were able to find one, show a short video clip of one of the chefs in the article demonstrating a recipe. Play the video with the sound off. Students should watch and make notes on the ingredients, including any cooking techniques they notice. Then play the video with the sound on to see if they were correct. Ask for their opinion of the food.



Ask students to choose one of the chefs in the article and find out more about them for homework. Ask, eg How did they start in the food industry? What are their books called? Do they do anything else, or do they just cook?

Grammar and writing 3 Review when to use some and any, looking back at SB page 63 if necessary. Ask students to write the sentences individually, then ask volunteers to read out their sentences. Ask them to explain the reasons for their choices. Ask: Why did you use ‘some’ and not ‘any’?



Answers 1 Nigella Lawson makes some very sweet desserts. 2 There are some wonderful food programmes on TV. 3 Does Rachael Ray have any difficult recipes? 4 Is there any olive oil in Mario Batali’s famous orange cake? 5 This easy recipe doesn’t have any flour in it. 6 Does Novelli use any butter in this starter?

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4 Discuss whether celebrity chefs are popular in students’ countries. Try to pair up students who know about a celebrity chef with any that don’t. You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish it for homework. They can read their descriptions to the class in the next lesson.





Extra idea: Read the other types of TV programme and ask students to give an example of each one.

7

2.54 Allow time for students to read the questions and predict the missing words. Then play the audio for students to check their answers and write them on the board. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line.

Extra idea: Ask students to role-play an interview with one of these chefs.

5 Review the adverbs relating to the adjectives in the box, reminding students of the irregular form for good – well.





MA With weaker students you could read through the article first and check comprehension of any difficult words, eg winner.

Transcript How much television do you watch? MAN I don’t watch much TV – maybe once or twice a week. I prefer reading. WOMAN I watch about one or two hours a day. INTERVIEWER What are your favourite types of TV programme? WOMAN I like crime dramas. And soap operas. I love soaps. INTERVIEWER How often do you watch them? WOMAN I watch a soap almost every day! INTERVIEWER Really! What about you, Ali? MAN No, soap operas don’t interest me. But yes, I enjoy crime dramas. INTERVIEWER What about food programmes? Are you interested in them? MAN I love cooking, so yes, I often watch them. WOMAN I can’t cook and I don’t want to cook. I never watch them. INTERVIEWER

Ask students to work individually, then compare answers in pairs. Check the answers as a class, asking students to give their reasons for choosing each word.



Answers 1 well 2 sadly 3 badly 4 confidently 5 quickly (the last two could be in any order)

Preposition park Go through the text and check understanding of cookbook (it’s the same as cookery book, which students will also hear in English). Go through the prepositions and teach / elicit what words are used with each one. Ask, eg Do we say a book is for, by or about someone when he / she is the author? Do you buy a present for, by or about someone? Ask students to work individually, then compare answers in pairs. Check the answers as a class.



Answers 1 for 2 by 3 about 4 by

Listening and speaking 6 Look at the photo and ask students what they think is happening. Elicit what kind of TV programme it is. Ask: How do you know?



Answers It’s a talent show.

Answers 1 How much 2 of TV programmes 3 How often 4 you interested

8 Play the audio again, pausing to allow time for students to write their answers.

MA With stronger students, before you play the audio again, ask if they can remember what the woman said.



Extra idea: Ask students if they can remember what the man said. Play the audio again to check.

Units 7&8 Review

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Answers 1 I watch about one or two hours a day. 2 I like crime dramas. And soap operas. I love soaps. 3 I watch a soap almost every day! 4 I can’t cook and I don’t want to cook. I never watch them.

9 Before students begin, go through the instructions and make sure students are clear what they have to do. Tell them to work in pairs to write their survey, then note down the answers to their questions. Students should then present the results of their survey to the class.

MA You could ask weaker students to look at transcript 2.54 on SB page 150 and use the interview as a model for their survey.

Cross Culture: TV across the world a Before you begin this activity, ask students about their favourite TV programmes. Take a class vote on the most popular type of programme. Then ask students to look at the photo and explain what is happening. Ask: Who are these people? Do you recognise the programme? What is the programme about? Go through the phrases in the box.



Answers 1 Dancing with the Stars is a dance competition for celebrities.* 2 Turkish soap operas are very romantic and exciting and show beautiful places in Turkey. 3 Friends was successful all over the world because it was a happy, funny show. *Note: Dancing with the Stars is the American version of the popular British dance show Strictly Come Dancing. c This exercise encourages students to relate the information in the text to their own cultures. Ask students to work in groups to discuss the questions, then ask groups to give feedback to the class. Find out which foreign TV programmes are popular and why.

Extra idea: If you brought in a TV guide, make sure you have enough copies for each pair of students. Ask pairs to choose what TV programmes they want to watch tonight and say why.

Allow time for students to read the article and complete it with the correct phrases. Encourage students to ask you about any new words, eg stars, celebrities, competition.

Answers 1b 2a 3c

b Tell students to read the article again and answer the questions. Discuss the answers with the class. Ask students to add any other details they know about these TV programmes. Ask, eg Are they similar to programmes in your countries? Does anybody watch ‘Modern Family’? Do you know the names of any Turkish soap operas?

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Units 7&8 Review

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9 UNIT FOCUS

Clouds, clothes and careers GRAMMAR: present continuous; present continuous v present VOCABULARY: weather, clothes; jobs FUNCTIONS: describing clothes; talking about jobs; shopping

Lesson 1 He’s singing in the rain. pp80–81



Aims

simple; state verbs; have to

Extra information: Some students may know that photo A is from the film Singing in the Rain, a famous Hollywood musical from 1952 starring Gene Kelly.

The focus of this lesson is to introduce the present continuous and to learn words for weather and for clothes, as well as give opinions about people’s clothes. Note: If possible, find a video weather forecast for your area before the lesson so you can use it in exercise 2. You might also want to bring in a stopwatch and pictures of people wearing various clothes for exercise 10.

2 Ask students about the weather today where you are and in their countries. Ask: Why do you like cold / warm / wet weather? Where are the best places to live in the world for good weather? Ask students to work in pairs to discuss the questions, then get feedback from the pairs and find out what the favourite kind of weather is for the whole class.

You first!



Ask students to talk about when and why they sing.

Vocabulary Weather 1



3.2 Ask students to describe the photos. Ask: Where are the people? (in a park, on a beach, on a street, etc). Then ask students to read the sentences and match them with the photos. Check understanding of each weather type. Check understanding of the question What’s the weather like? Elicit / Teach the phrase be like to ask about the qualities or features of something, eg What’s he like? What was the film like? Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each sentence. You may want to ask students to identify which words are verbs and which are adjectives – we can say: It’s a windy day. but not: It’s a raining day.

Answers 1B 2F 3D 4C 5E 6A Transcript A It’s raining. It’s very wet. B It’s cold. C It’s warm. D It’s snowing. E It’s hot. It’s very sunny. F It’s windy and cloudy.

Extra idea: If possible, use a video clip of the weather forecast for your area. Play it with the sound off and ask students to write down as many weather words as they can. Then play it with the sound on to see if they were correct.

3.3 Model the tongue-twister with one 3 P or two students first, then play the audio and ask students to say both lines along with the audio (this should produce some laughter!). Put students in pairs to practise the tonguetwister. Walk around the class and monitor pairs as they say it – you may want to vote for the best pair and give them a prize.

Transcript MAN Was it wet and windy in west Wales on Wednesday? WOMAN Yes, it was. But it was wonderfully warm at the weekend!

Extra ideas: You could practise this with the class divided into two – one group says the first line, the second group says the second line, then swap over.



Ask students to create their own tonguetwisters with different sounds, eg Was it sunny or snowing in Sydney?

Grammar Present continuous 4 Write the information below on the board to contrast the meaning of something you do Unit 9

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every day (present simple) and something you are doing right now (present continuous):

Mon. Tues. Weds. Thurs. Fri.



I go to work every day.



Today – 11.15am



I’m sitting at a desk in the classroom.



Ask students to notice the form of the questions and sentences in the grammar table. Ask questions, eg What happens to the verb ‘be’? (It changes according to the subject.) What happens to the main verb? (It doesn’t change.) What do you notice about the spelling of the -ing form? (swim has a double m, have has no -e).



Read through the sentences first and ask students to match them with the correct photo (1A, 2F, 3C, 4E). Students work on their own to complete the sentences, then invite volunteers to write their answers on the board.



MA For extra support, write the missing words on the board in a random order.



Practise the short forms and the full forms, showing that What is = What’s, He is = He’s, etc. Remind students that short forms are generally used in speaking and in informal writing.

Answers 1 What is he doing? He is dancing and singing. 2 Where is he walking? He is walking on the beach. 3 What are they doing? They are having a picnic. 4 Why is she having a drink of water? Because it’s hot and she’s thirsty!

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 139, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.



Extra idea: Ask students to come up with alternative answers to each question, eg In picture C they’re talking and laughing. They’re sitting on some grass.

5

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GUESS Model the example dialogue with one or two students and focus on the language they need, eg perhaps, maybe. Put students in pairs or groups to work through the questions. Encourage active guessing

about the situation in each photo and write any new words on the board. 6 Allow a minute or two for students to complete the sentences individually. You may want to explain that right now can cover a period of time around the present, not necessarily at this very moment.

Put students in pairs to ask and answer the questions, then practise in open pairs around the class. Ask follow-up questions in each case, eg What are you listening to? What are you reading? What food are you thinking about? Tip: Closed pairs are when students all work simultaneously with a person sitting next to them. Open pairs are when you ask one student to ask a question and another student across the room to answer. You can nominate the person to answer, or the student can.

Answers 1 Are you listening to music right now? 2 Are you reading a book at the moment? 3 Are you thinking about food? 4 What are you doing?

Vocabulary Clothes (1) 7



Ask students to look at the photos. Go through the seasons associated with each photo. Ask: What clothes are the people in the photos wearing? Students work individually and try to name as many of the clothes as they can. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Note the pronunciation of any difficult words, eg gloves (/ʌ/ sound), suit (/uː/ sound), sweater (/e/ sound). Point out that sweater can also be jumper. Ask students which names for clothes are very similar in their language and which are very different. 3.4

Answers 1 belt, hat, shoes, skirt, top 2 flip-flops, shirt, shorts, T-shirt 3 top, boots, jacket, trousers 4 cardigan, gloves, hat, leggings, scarf, sweater, trousers

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Transcript belt, boots, cardigan, flip-flops, gloves, hat, jacket, leggings, scarf, shirt, shoes, shorts, skirt, suit, sweater, tie, top, trousers, T-shirt Extra idea: You could ask extra questions about the clothes vocabulary, eg How many of these clothes can you see in the room right now? Are there any clothes here that you never wear?

8 Talk about the questions briefly, referring back to the word box in exercise 7. Go through the example sentence with the class, pointing out that these sentences are about regular habits and that is why we use the present simple. Then allow three or four minutes for students to write their sentences. Invite volunteers to read their sentences aloud. Other students can raise their hands if they are true for them too. Correct pronunciation as needed.

Speaking 9 Tell students to look at the photos in exercise 7 again. Ask: Which clothes do you like or dislike? Go over the words in the word box and teach / elicit which ones are positive, negative or neutral (positive: amazing, beautiful, great; negative: awful, horrible, silly, ugly; neutral: alright, nice). Ask students if they can add any more words to the list. Model the words and the example dialogue, using slightly exaggerated intonation and expression to help convey the correct meaning. Students can practise the questions in pairs.

10

Focus on the grammar information below the exercise. Point out the use of the correct pronouns when you’re referring back to something you’ve mentioned before. Tell students to work in pairs. Explain that you will set a time limit for students to study each other’s clothes. Afterwards they should shut their eyes (or sit back to back so they can’t see other) and follow the instructions. Set a stopwatch for 30 seconds. When the 30 seconds are up, tell everyone to shut their eyes. Read out instructions 1 and 2 and tell students to start talking (no looking!). You may want to ask students to switch partners and do this exercise a few times.

Note: You could turn to SB page 86 and do the Vocabulary plus section on clothes at this point.

Extra idea: Bring in pictures of people wearing different types of clothes and ask students to write descriptions, eg She’s wearing an amazing pink dress. Provide extra vocabulary as needed, eg buttons, sleeves, heels, pockets, etc.

Did you know?  * Ask: Who is Princess Beatrice – whose

daughter is she? What relation is she to the Queen of England? Who are Prince William and Kate? What is Princess Beatrice wearing?

Note: This kind of hat is known as a fascinator, an alternative to a hat for formal occasions such as weddings.

Lesson 2 She wears a uniform at work. pp82–83 Aims The focus of this lesson is to contrast the present continuous and the present simple, to talk about jobs and uniforms and discuss stereotypes within jobs.

You first! Ask students to describe their uniforms if they wear one, or describe work uniforms that are common in their countries. If students are younger, you might also ask about school uniforms.

Speaking 1 Ask students about the photos and write the jobs on the board. You might want to supply other useful vocabulary, eg glasses, suitcase, apron, stethoscope. Read out the questions – you may want to contrast What do you do? and What are you doing? and She wears a uniform. (every day) and She’s wearing a uniform. (right now)

Point out the grammar information below the exercise and the use of do to ask about jobs: What do you do? Note that do is not in the answer, instead we use the verb be: I’m a teacher.

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Answers A 1 He’s wearing a blue (short-sleeved) shirt, black trousers and a black tie. 2 He’s an airport security guard / officer. B 1 She’s wearing a dark blue jacket and a dark blue skirt with black high- heeled shoes. She’s wearing a scarf around her neck. 2 She’s a flight attendant. C 1 They’re wearing white jackets with dark buttons and white hats. 2 They’re chefs / cooks. D 1 She’s wearing a blue top 2 She’s a nurse / doctor. 2 Explain that What is … like? means Describe the …. You may want to set a time limit of one minute for this activity and see how many jobs students can come up with. Review names of jobs that come up, eg doctor, nurse, firefighter, postal worker, waiter, bank worker, police officer, train ticket inspector, bus driver, hotel receptionist. You could also ask students to think of some jobs where people don’t wear a uniform. Culture note: Jobs in which people have to wear uniforms vary by country. In the USA, uniforms are quite common in the following jobs: petrol station attendants, bank employees, post-office workers, chain restaurants such as McDonald’s and Pizza Hut, supermarket checkout assistants, bus drivers. You may want to compare this across cultures and talk about the advantages, or not, of wearing uniforms.

Grammar 1 Present continuous v present simple 3 Review the forms of these two tenses by looking at the sentences in the grammar table. Ask: What are the differences? Allow time for students to complete the rules individually, then check answers in pairs.



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Answers 1 present continuous 2 present simple Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 140, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

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4 Get students to complete the sentences individually, then compare their answers with a partner. Call on individuals to read out their answers. To help reinforce the difference between the present simple and present continuous, ask students to say in each case whether it happens in general, is happening now or is describing a photo.



MA For an extra challenge, ask stronger students to make four new sentence pairs, one pair for each picture. For students who need more support, write sentences with some mistakes on the board and ask them to correct them.

Answers 1 are wearing; don’t wear 2 is working; often works 3 travels; is visiting 4 often works; doesn’t make

5 Tell students to complete the dialogues individually, then ask pairs to read them out. Compare the meanings of these questions and why different tenses are used.

Answers 1 A Are you phoning someone? B No, I’m not. 2 A Is someone phoning you? B Yes, they are. 3 A Do you work in a hotel? B Yes, I do. 4 A Are you a receptionist? B Yes, I am!

Extra idea: Ask students to make up two new dialogues with different verbs.

6 This exercise focuses on present continuous and present simple questions. Demonstrate an example by miming an action associated with a job. Make sure students ask you questions such as, Are you driving? Are you wearing a uniform? You can only answer yes or no. Point out the picture, which shows a student miming a phone call. Note that this picture relates to the questions and answers in exercise 5, and helps to give students an idea of what to do. Remind them to use the questions in exercise 5 as a model.

To ensure a variety of jobs, you may want to write jobs on pieces of paper and pass them around. Students work in small groups and

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follow the instructions. Invite some volunteers to come to the front of the class and mime their activity. Make sure the class asks a maximum of ten questions.

Reading 7 Ask students to look at the poster (Are you man enough …) and guess what this advertisement is for. Ask: How does the advert work? What’s the idea behind it? (It’s attempting to counter the idea that nursing is a job just for women. It’s a job for men too, ‘real’ men who are brave.) Ask: Why do you think nurses are more often women than men? Find out if that is true in their countries.

8

Put students in pairs to describe men from the advert. Ask one or two students to give their description to the whole class and see if the class can guess which man it is.

THINK Encourage students to use their own knowledge to think about the questions.

Answers 1 The men do a variety of other things. (Note the following about each man, from left to right: 1 He’s a snowboarder. / He goes snowboarding. 2 He’s a retired army officer. 3 He runs marathons. 4 He’s a retired army officer. 5 He rides a Harley Davidson motorbike. 6 He’s a US Navy SEAL. 7 He’s a Kenpo black belt. 8 He plays rugby. 9 He plays basketball.) 2 To persuade more men to become nurses. 9 Now tell students to read the article. Allow some quiet time for reading. Encourage questions about new vocabulary. Point out the question in the title and elicit a few answers from the class. Does everyone agree? Ask students to explain their ideas by asking which sentence in the article supports their answers. Ask: Which fact surprises you most?

10

Answer No, I’m a nurse. Read through the questions first and check comprehension. Then ask students to cover the article and write their answers. They then read the article again to check. Ask them to correct the false sentences and ask which sentences in the article support their answers.

Answers 1 false: There are more female nurses than male nurses. 2 false: The numbers of male nurses are going up fast. 3 false: He is studying to become a nurse. 4 false: He originally wanted to study law. 5 true 6 true

Explore This is an opportunity for students to do research outside the classroom and tell the class about their findings in the next lesson. Brainstorm a few ideas about different jobs or careers they could research.

Grammar 2 State verbs 11 Read through the notes and look at the list of verbs in the grammar box. Some other state verbs you might want to teach are: know, want, imagine, and have (= own, eg I have a car.). Elicit some examples of sentences using these verbs, eg I love my job. (not I’m loving my job). Students may find this difficult as in modern English you often see the phrase I’m loving ... Point out that while this is increasingly common, it is not grammatically correct.

Tell students to find and underline as many state verbs as they can in the article.

Answers Morris ... wanted to study law He thought the nurses were wonderful. I hated hospitals … now I think they’re fantastic ... do you know what? I feel at home. I really enjoy doing my job. I love caring for people. I love my job. I know I’m making a difference.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 140, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

12

3.5 Go through the dialogues first, then allow time for students to work individually. They can compare answers in pairs. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each line. Discuss the reason for the use of tense in each case.

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Answers

Speaking

1 Do you believe; think 2 don’t understand; does it mean; means 3 Do you mind 4 Do you prefer; love; don’t like

1 Brainstorm as many answers as possible. Provide verbs as needed, eg draw, sketch, press, catch, hold, watch, search for, climb, meet, visit. Check that students are using the present continuous correctly.

Transcript 1 MAN WOMAN 2 MAN WOMAN 3 MAN WOMAN 4 MAN WOMAN

Do you believe there’s life on Mars? No, I think that’s impossible. I don’t understand the word enough. What does it mean? It means sufficient. Do you mind if I sit here? No, that’s fine. Do you prefer orange or apple juice? I love apple. I really don’t like orange juice very much.

13 EVERYBODY UP! Energise your class by asking students to stand up and talk to as many people as they can. Start by eliciting one or two questions and answering them yourself, eg Are you wearing red socks? Do you work in an office? Set a time limit of five minutes for students to find one person for each fact. When they have finished, they can sit down. Then ask a student to ask: Who’s wearing red socks? The other students will reply with the names.

Extra idea: Students work in pairs to find five things they both love, five things they both hate, and five things they don’t believe in.

Lesson 3 I have to think quickly! pp84–85 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise have to and don’t have to and to talk about skills and qualities needed in different jobs.

You first! Read the names of the jobs and ask students to think of adjectives to describe them. As they do so, write adjectives on the board: fun, scary, dangerous, interesting, creative, important, etc. Then ask students to answer the question and explain why. Find out which of the jobs is most popular with the class. 148



Answers Ron is drawing a criminal. Luis is milking a snake. Sue is watching for fires. Sid is giving presents to children at Christmas.

2 Tell students to read the text quickly and match it with one of the photos. Ask about any new words, eg volunteer, map, calm. Ask students to give reasons for their answer. Ask: What helped you choose the person?

Answer Sue

Explore This is an opportunity for students to do research outside the classroom and tell the class about their findings in the next lesson. You may want to brainstorm some possible jobs in class, eg ice cream taster, perfume-maker, personal shopper, dogwalker, crocodile catcher. You can elicit / suggest words for students to type into a search engine, eg unusual / weird / strange jobs.

Grammar have to / don’t have to 3 Check understanding of the meaning of have to by asking about Sue’s job, eg Does she have to wear a uniform? (No, she doesn’t. It isn’t necessary. She doesn’t have to wear a uniform.) What about reading a map? Is it necessary? (Yes, it is. She has to read a map. It’s necessary.)

Tell students to work individually to find example of have to in the text, then check answers as a class.

Answers I don’t have to do this job … I have to have very good eyes … … I have to read a map … I also have to think quickly … And I have to spend long hours alone. One thing I don’t have to do – I don’t have to wear a uniform!

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Extra idea: Make a list of things you have to and don’t have to do when driving a car, or in your classroom.



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 140, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

4

Tell students to cover the text in exercise 2. Students work individually to write their answers, then read the text again to check. Find out how many got the answers right.



MA For extra support, allow another 30 seconds for students to read the text again before they cover it.





Transcript 1 I work in a shopping mall but I don’t work all year round. I only work in December – until December 24th, in fact. So now, in February, I’m not working. It isn’t a very difficult job. I sit all day! But I meet lots and lots of people and it’s tiring. I have to be a good actor and I have to laugh a lot. I also have to wear special clothes and a long white beard. The clothes and the beard make me feel very hot. And red really isn’t my colour! 2 I’m good at art and I work for the police, but I don’t have to wear a uniform. In the photo, the woman is describing a face and I’m drawing it. That helps the police to find the person. I enjoy my work, but it’s difficult when people don’t remember. First they say one thing, then they say something else. I have to be very patient. But it’s usually worth it. When I finish and show them the picture, they often say, ‘That’s the one!’

Answers 1 A fire lookout has to: have very good eyes, read a map, use a radio, think quickly, keep calm, spend long hours alone. 2 She doesn’t have to wear a uniform.

5 Brainstorm a few ideas together as a class. Allow two or three minutes for students to brainstorm in pairs or small groups, then gather the ideas and write them on the board, supplying additional vocabulary as needed.

Tip: Encourage students to develop autonomous learning skills by telling you which part of the audio they would like to hear again or by asking questions about things they didn’t understand.

MA You could ask stronger students to list five things for each person. Compare answers as a class.

Suggested answers Ron: He has to draw accurately and have a good eye for detail. Luis: He has to hold the snake gently and firmly, and be very careful. Sid: He has to be very cheerful and give all the children presents.

7 Go through the questions and check comprehension of any new words, eg patient, acting. Tell students to work individually, then play the audio again for students to check their answers. Ask students to pick out which key words gave them the clues, eg December 24th is a clue for Father Christmas.

Listening 6

Explain that students are going to hear two of the people in the photos on SB page 84 talking about their jobs. Play the audio and encourage students to guess and explain the reasons for their guesses. 3.6

Answers

1 Sid (Father Christmas) 2 Ron (police artist)



Answers 1 Ron 2 Sid 3 Sid 4 Sid 5 Ron 6 Sid Extra idea: Ask some additional questions about the two people, eg Where does Father Christmas work? When does he do this job? What is difficult about his job? Why does the police artist enjoy his job? What makes it difficult?

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8

Allow time for students to read the text and predict the missing words. Explain the meaning of poison, heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer’s and cancer. Say the words to check pronunciation. Play the audio for students to check their answers and write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each sentence if necessary. Ask students to guess what the ending of the last sentence could be. (Possible answer: … the snake could bite us and we could die.) 3.7

MA You could ask stronger students to cover the word box and try to complete the text without seeing the verbs.



Answers 1 have 2 work 3 take 4 use 5 put 6 have to 7 ’m holding 8 is helping 9 make Transcript I have a degree in biology. I work with snakes and take their poison. It’s important work because we use the poison for a variety of medicines. We put snake poison in medicines for heart disease, strokes, Alzheimer’s disease and even cancer, so it can save lives. But it’s a very dangerous job, so I have to be very careful. In the photo, you can see that I’m holding the snake very carefully and someone else is helping me. If we make a mistake, then we …



Extra idea: Ask students to close their books and ask some additional questions about the snake milker, eg What did he study? What do they use the snake poison for? Why does he have to be careful?



De-stress! Wearing something silly can make us laugh. Wearing something red can raise our energy because red has a stimulating psychological effect on us. So wearing something silly and red together is a great idea! Ask, eg Is anybody wearing anything silly? Is anybody wearing anything red? Do you ever wear anything silly or anything red? Ask students to do one or the other or both in the next lesson. 10 Go through the list with the class first and ask students to try and match the things with the correct person without looking back. Then get them to complete the phrases individually before they look back to check their answers.





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Answers 1 She’s teaching / pointing at a board. 2 She’s a teacher.

Answers 1 have 2 read 3 use 4 think 5 keep 6 spend 7 sit 8 be 9 laugh 10 be 11 be 12 have 13 be

11 THINK This exercise will help students to anticipate what is in the audio and understand it better. Give students time to brainstorm a few ideas in pairs first. Then ask them to tell you their ideas as you make a list on the board. 12

Speaking and listening 9 Emphasise the difference in meaning between the two questions: the first is about what she is doing right now, the second means What is her job? Elicit answers to the questions as a class.

Extra idea: Ask additional questions about the photo, eg What is she wearing? What is she holding? Where do you think she is from? What type of words are on the board? Do you understand any of them? What do you think she is teaching? What does she have to do / be in her job?



3.8 Play the audio several times if necessary, replaying any difficult segments as required. Find out how many students guessed everything she said. If they didn’t guess everything, write any new things on the board.

Answers An English teacher has to be: flexible, very patient, a good actor, a good listener, very organised, good at English. (The new items were flexible, a good listener, very organised, good at English.)

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Transcript Do you enjoy being an English teacher? TEACHER Oh, I really love what I do. I never stop learning new things. Every class is different. Every person in every class is different. So there’s lots of variety. It means I have to be very flexible, but that’s good. INTERVIEWER So apart from flexibility, what other skills do teachers have to have? TEACHER Well, you certainly have to be very patient. Sometimes people learn something very fast. Sometimes … they don’t. I think you have to be a good actor, too. You have to make things fun and interesting. It’s important to laugh in the classroom – it helps us remember. INTERVIEWER What about being a good listener? TEACHER Yes, that’s very important too. Students say they like teachers who spend time with them and listen to them. Oh, another thing is you have to be very organised. You have to plan your lessons, and that takes time. INTERVIEWER And finally, what about English? TEACHER What about it? Of course, if you teach English, you have to be good at English. What a silly question!

making a note of any problems with grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation or intonation. Praise students and provide corrective feedback.

INTERVIEWER



Tip: Spending a few minutes writing down their ideas before a speaking activity helps students to gather ideas before speaking. Although it may seem that writing can be more usefully done by students at home, this type of writing task is a way to stimulate discussion and maximise participation in the following speaking activity.

14 Ask students to work in groups. Encourage them to ask follow-up questions about each person’s job. Monitor groups as they work,

Extra idea: To wrap up this lesson, ask: Which of the jobs in this unit would you like (and least like) to do?

Movies & Music Read through the instructions and questions for both sections and teach / elicit any difficult vocabulary, eg deliver, poet, kill, protect.

Extra questions for class or for homework



Movies What other Italian films have you seen? What other films has Kevin Costner starred in? Which do you think is his best film? (eg Dances with Wolves, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, 3 Days to Kill, Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit …) What famous song did Whitney Houston sing in The Bodyguard? Who wrote the song? (The song is I Will Always Love You, written by Dolly Parton.)



Writing and speaking 13 Brainstorm ideas for what students could include in a paragraph about their job, eg skills, abilities, personal qualities. Give a model by describing your job or the job of someone you know. Students can also use the texts in exercises 2 and 8 as a model. Allow a few minutes of quiet writing time.

MA Students who need more support can write just two or three sentences. Others can write a paragraph. Students may continue this task for homework.





Music This song became famous when it was used in a well-known 1952 Gene Kelly film. Ask: Do you know anything about the film? Have you ever seen it? If possible, search – or get students to search – on YouTube for the very famous sequence where Gene Kelly sings the song, and dances and splashes around in puddles in the pouring rain – which is shown in photo A on page 80. Unit 9

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Answers Movies 1 The Postman 2 The Bodyguard The famous poet in film 1: Pablo Neruda The stars in film 2: Whitney Houston, Kevin Costner Music Singin’ in the Rain Culture notes: The Bodyguard stars Kevin Costner as Frank Farmer, the bodyguard, and the late Whitney Houston as Rachel Marron, a singer. The story is that someone has been writing letters to Rachel, threatening to kill her, so her manager hires Farmer to protect her. The famous song from the movie, I Will Always Love You, was actually written by Dolly Parton in 1974. Parton was considered for the role of Rachel Marron (and so were Olivia Newton-John, Madonna, Debbie Harry and Janet Jackson!) but it was given to Houston. Since the film, the song has become one of the best-selling singles of all time. The Postman (often given its Italian name: Il Postino) is set on a small Italian island, where Mario, the unemployed and uneducated son of a poor fisherman, is the postman. A famous Chilean poet, Pablo Neruda, lives on the island in exile, and Mario delivers his letters. The two men get to know each other. Mario is very much in love with the beautiful Beatrice, but he finds it really difficult to express his love for her, so Pablo helps him to write wonderful letters to her full of poetry. Note: Very sadly, the actor who played Mario, Massimo Troisi, died of a heart attack just the day after they finished shooting the film. He was only 41. Singin’ in the Rain is very famous because it’s the title song from the 1952 musical comedy film about the transition from silent movies to sound. The film starred Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor and Debbie Reynolds, and is said to be one of the best musicals ever made. The song itself was written by Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown many years before the film, possibly as early as 1927.

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Vocabulary plus p86 Clothes (2) 1

3.9 Use pictures from magazines to review names of clothing or ask students to describe each other’s clothing. Review the words from lesson 1 (SB page 81) and tell students to find the 12 items that weren’t on that page. Check the pronunciation of new words, eg earrings, tights. Ask: Are these items for men or for women or both? Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word.

Transcript and answers cap, coat, dress, earrings, glasses, jeans, ring, socks, swimsuit, tights, tracksuit, trainers 2 Go through the words in the list and ask students to answer the question in pairs. If necessary, play the audio again. Draw attention to the schwa sound in of in the phrase a pair of jeans /əv/ (ie unstressed). Elicit answers from the students and write them on the board.



Answers 1 earrings, glasses, ring 2 earrings, glasses, jeans, socks, tights, trainers



Extra idea: Write these words on the board and ask students to divide the words into two groups according to their final sound /s/ or /z/. Then say each word to check the answers.



boots, clothes, dress, glasses, jeans, tights, socks, flip-flops, trainers, trousers

3

Quickly revise colours, perhaps by identifying things in the room by colour, or by talking about people’s clothes. Ask two students to model the example dialogue, then ask the class two or three new questions. Tell students to work in pairs. Make it clear that one person has their book open and the other has theirs closed.



MA For extra support, write the colours on the board (orange, red, blue, green, purple, pink, black, white, grey, gold, yellow, brown).

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Extra idea: After pairs have finished, ask all students to close their books and test their memory by calling out the colour, eg

2 WOMAN 1 WOMAN 2 3 GIRL WOMAN 4 WOMAN MAN

Teacher: red Students: dress 4 This game helps to review clothing words and continuous present tenses. Go through the instructions on SB page 123 and check understanding by asking, eg What do you do first? What do you say next? What is third? How do you score a point? Model the examples on SB page 86 with one or two students before they start. Students can work in pairs or small groups to play the game. If they’re in groups of three, one person can keep score.



Focus on: Verbs with clothes 3.10 Allow time for students to read the dialogues and predict the missing words. Then play the audio for students to check their answers. Write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line.

Ask students to identify who they think is speaking in each dialogue, where they are and what they are doing. Help by asking, eg Where do you try on clothing? (in a shop) Where can you change your clothing? (at home) Who can you borrow clothing from? (a friend / your sister / mother). Ask students about the difference in meaning between each pair of words. Demonstrate the difference between lend and borrow by ‘borrowing’ something from a student. Ask students to describe what you are doing and what the student is doing. (Emphasise that it is the same action seen from two different perspectives.) You might also want to point out the prepositions: lend something to someone and borrow something from someone.



Answers 1 change; wearing; wear 2 fit; try … on 3 borrow; lent 4 Take off; wear Transcript 1 MAN WOMAN



Extra idea: Distribute names of objects on pieces of paper. Write the names of items to be borrowed on coloured paper and items you can lend on white paper. Give one of each to each student. The object of the game is to walk around and find someone who can lend you the object to be borrowed. Practise the phrases Can you lend me a …? and Can I borrow a …? before starting.

Everyday English p87 Note: You might want to bring in a clothes catalogue for exercise 9.

Shopping 1 Ask students to describe the photo, including what is happening and what they can see. Teach shop assistant and customer by asking: What do we call a person who works in a shop? What do we call a person who buys something in a shop? Ask: Are Jack and Laura shop assistants or customers?

Ask about sizes of clothes and shoes in the UK, USA or their country. Teach / Elicit small, medium, large, extra large, size 12, 14, etc.



Finally, ask students to match the questions and answers, then check the meaning of the words and phrases in bold.



Is there time to change before the concert? I’m still wearing my jeans. Yes, there’s lots of time. You can’t wear jeans to a concert!

Is this skirt the right size? Does it fit properly? Why don’t you try it on? Can I borrow your new belt? No, you can’t. The last time I lent you something, you lost it. Take off your shoes! You can’t wear those in here! I’m sorry. I didn’t know that.



Answers 1d 2h 3e 4g 5a 6f 7c 8b try on = put on an item of clothing to see if it fits fitting room = a small room in a shop where you can try on clothes cash = money in coins and notes have something left = (in this case) something that is still in the shop and on sale price tag = a label with the price of something on it at the back = at the back of the shop Unit 9

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2 Ask students who says the first question (the shop assistant = S). Give students time to identify who says the other questions, but don’t check answers yet. 3

3.11

6 Decide whether you are going

to use the video or simply play the audio. Explain that students are going to watch Jack and Laura shopping. Play the video or audio and ask students to check their answers from exercise 2. Play the video or audio again, and ask students to identify which words are stressed and notice the intonation.



6



Do you need any help? I’m just looking, thank you. Do you have any swimsuits? Yes, they’re at the back. Do you have this shirt in medium? No, we only have large sizes left. What size are you? I think I’m a size 12. Can I try these jeans on? Yes, the fitting room’s over there. How much is this grey jacket? Look at the price tag. How much are these tights? They’re £5. Are you paying by credit card? No, cash.

Answers 1 help 2 size 3 really 4 good 5 pair 6 Of course 7 feel 8 are The boots are £265. Transcript ASSISTANT Can I help you? LUIS Do you have any walking boots? ASSISTANT Yes, we have lots. Over here. LUIS Thank you. ASSISTANT What size are you? LUIS Forty-three, in Spain. ASSISTANT That’s nine in the UK. LUIS Oh really? That’s good to know. Can I try this pair on? ASSISTANT Of course. You can sit here. How do they feel? LUIS They’re perfect. How much are they? ASSISTANT £265. LUIS Oh.

Answers 1S 2C 3C 4S 5C 6C 7C 8S Transcript 1 ASSISTANT JACK 2 LAURA ASSISTANT 3 JACK ASSISTANT 4 ASSISTANT LAURA 5 LAURA ASSISTANT 6 JACK ASSISTANT 7 LAURA ASSISTANT 8 ASSISTANT JACK

3.12 Check that students understand the meaning of take here (= buy). Play the audio for students to check their answers to exercise 5. Brainstorm some ideas for what else you could say in response to the price, eg Do you have any discounts? Is it on sale? Do you have any cheaper ones?

7



3.13 Play the audio for students to check their answer to exercise 6. Then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each line. Focus on fluency and intonation.

Answer I’ll think about it.

4

Act out the dialogues with a strong student. Then students act out the dialogues in pairs.



MA Stronger students can do this as a memory exercise.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the dialogues. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

Transcript LUIS Um, £265? That’s a lot. I’ll think about it. ASSISTANT They’re expensive, but they’re very good quality. LUIS Yes, I know, but I don’t have that much money. Do you have a cheaper pair?

5 Give students time to read the conversation and choose the correct words. Ask them to predict the answer by speculating about the intonation of Oh. Ask for some suggested prices and ask: Do you think the price is low or high?

8 Point out the words in bold in the conversation in exercise 5, then ask two students to act out the conversation using their own information. Use the table on page 155 to help students with shoe sizes. Tell students to practise the conversation in different pairs, changing the

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thing they are buying to a different item each time. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any problems with grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation or intonation. Praise students and provide corrective feedback.

You may want to invite a couple of pairs of students to come to the front of the class and present their conversation using clothes as props.

9 Use this task to practise asking questions and saying prices. Model the example dialogue with a student and point out that students can make up the prices, so they can say as little or as much as they want. Go through the pictures and make sure students know what they are.



Extra ideas: Brainstorm other useful phrases for shopping, eg Can I return this jacket? This button is missing. Can I get a discount? Is it in the sale? Do you have any other colours / styles?



If you brought in a clothes catalogue, distribute one or two pages to each student so they can practise shopping for those items.

we don’t say … / we say …



This section focuses on the following errors: • incorrect use of jean in the singular form (some words are always plural, eg trousers, pants, jeans, glasses) • incorrect word order • incorrect verb tense • omission of auxiliary verb with have to in the negative



Answers a How much are these earrings? b How much are these trainers? c How much is this coat? d How much is this swimsuit? e How much is this belt? f How much are these sunglasses?



Culture note: Shoe and clothing sizes are different in different countries.



Ask students to cover the green we say … side and to see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

Shoe size guide (approximate) Note: 3½ = three and a half Europe

36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

UK

3½ 4

Brazil

34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

Japan

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

5 5½ 6½ 7 8 9 9½ 10½ 11 12 13

Clothes size guide (note that it does sometimes vary) Europe

34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50

UK

6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22

USA

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18

Italy

38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54

Japan

7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23

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10

Health and fitness

UNIT FOCUS

GRAMMAR: going to; comparatives; should VOCABULARY: health and fitness; parts of the body FUNCTIONS: talking about future plans and intentions; giving

Lesson 1 What are you going to do? pp88–89 Aims The focus of this lesson is to introduce going to to talk about future plans and learn vocabulary for talking about health and fitness.

Warm-up Ask students about the photo at the top of SB page 88. Ask: Where is this person? What is he doing? Why?

3

advice

Ask: Does anyone go to a gym? What equipment or facilities do they have there? Ask students to look at the photo and tick the items they can see. Ask which word in the box is different from the others (mirror, because it isn’t essential for any kind of exercise). Play the audio for students to hear the words, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Practise the stress pattern in: equipment, exercise, machine. 3.15

Answers ball, equipment, mat, mirror, weights

Vocabulary Health and fitness 1







Go through the list of words and ask students to find the two words that are not sporting activities. Discuss the meaning of these two words. (Students may come up with other ideas for words that don’t fit, in which case ask them to explain their reasoning.) Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Ask students which words for activities are very similar in their own language and which are very different. 3.14

Note: Explain that Pilates has a capital ‘P’ because it’s named after Joseph Pilates. There’s more information about Pilates in lesson 2.

Transcript and answers The two words that don’t fit are feijoada and paella … because you can eat them! They are delicious dishes from Brazil and Spain. All the other words are activities: climbing, diving, judo, karate, kickboxing, Pilates, salsa, skipping, tai chi, weightlifting, yoga, zumba

2 Discuss the question as a class. Ask what students know about martial arts, then make a list of any other martial arts on the board, eg aikido, taekwondo, jujitsu, kendo.

Answers judo, karate, kickboxing, tai chi 156

Transcript ball, band, equipment, exercise bike, machine, mat, mirror, rope, weights 4 Explain that students have to match the equipment in exercise 3 with the sports activities in exercise 1. Students can discuss the answers in pairs or as a class. Ask them to describe any other sports activities that use each piece of equipment.

Answers 1 a) judo, Pilates, yoga b) climbing, skipping c) salsa, zumba, tai chi 2 a) Pilates, yoga b) Pilates, yoga c) weightlifting 5 Model the example dialogue with one or two students, focusing on the appropriate intonation for responding with interest. Tell students to ask you about sports that you do, then ask one or two students, making sure they use the correct intonation. Put students in groups to describe what sports they do, what equipment they use and why they enjoy it. Extra idea: Encourage lots of follow-up questions to the exchanges in exercise 5 and write them on the board if necessary,

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eg Where do you do zumba? What is your teacher like? What do you have to do in zumba? Why do you like it? 6 Ask students to describe what is happening in the picture, eg The man is sitting in an armchair, He’s relaxing and he’s watching TV. The woman is in a hurry. She’s carrying lots of things. She’s running out of the house. Brainstorm ideas for what she is carrying, where she is going and what she is going to do.

Grammar going to 9 Read through the grammar box with the students and point out the form of going to + verb. Teach / Elicit the following: the main verb doesn’t change, going to doesn’t change, only the verb be changes according to the subject.

Answers What is she going She’s going to do some to do? exercise. She isn’t going to watch TV. Is he going to stay there? Yes, he is. / No, he isn’t.

Answers 1 She is carrying exercise equipment: a mat, a ball, a band and also a book and a bottle of water. 2 She is going to do Pilates. 7 Give students time to read the conversation and predict the missing words. Ask: What isn’t the man going to do? Elicit answers from the class but don’t confirm the missing words yet.

Answer He isn’t going to do Pilates.

Note: You may want to mention that going to is often pronounced gonna in rapid informal speech.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 140, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

Extra idea: Do a short drill to practise sentences with going to:

8

Play the audio for students to check their answers to exercise 7 and write the answers on the board. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line.

Teacher: She’s going to do yoga. Students: She’s going to do yoga. Teacher: We Students: We’re going to do yoga. Teacher: play tennis Students: We’re going to play tennis.



You might want to do exercise 6 in Vocabulary plus on SB page 94 at this point, as it focuses on useful words like stuff to talk about things.

10 Draw a timeline on the board to illustrate past, present and future:

3.16

Answers 1 do Pilates 2 watch

past

Transcript MAN What are all those things? WOMAN My exercise stuff. I’m going to do Pilates. MAN Really? Why? WOMAN Because I want to be strong, slim, fit, healthy and active! MAN Oh. Right. WOMAN Are you going to join me? MAN No, thanks. I’m very happy to be weak, fat, unfit, unhealthy and inactive. I’m going to watch Modern Family!

present

future

Read the examples and ask students to tell you where to write them on the timeline.

Answers 1 past 2 present 3 future 11 Ask students to identify the activity in each photo. Teach / Elicit any new vocabulary, eg bungee jumping. Do the first photo with the class as a model, then ask students to make one sentence about each photo. Ask students about their own experiences for each photo, eg What do you like to have in your picnic? Do you like flying? What do people usually wear in a race? Would you like to try bungee jumping? Are you afraid to dive from a high board? Unit 10

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Answers 1 They’re going to have a picnic. 2 The plane / It’s going to land. 3 She’s going to win. 4 She’s going to jump. 5 He’s going to dive.

12 Explain that this activity reinforces the work they have just done, but practises the question form as well. Give students time to complete the questions and answers, then compare answers with a partner. Ask pairs to present their dialogues to the class and give feedback on any common errors.

MA For a greater challenge, ask students to make wh- questions and yes / no questions about each photo without looking at exercise 12.

Answers 1 What are they going to do? They’re going to have a picnic. 2 Is the plane taking off? No, it’s going to land. 3 Is she going to win? Yes, she is. 4 What is she going to do? She’s going to jump / do a bungee jump. 5 What is he going to do? He’s going to dive.

finished, ask for some interesting facts about another student, eg Valerie is going to visit her aunt and uncle in London this weekend. They’re going to go shopping.

Lesson 2 Do you want to be stronger and more flexible? pp90–91 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise comparing things using comparative forms of adjectives and to learn words for parts of the body.

Warm-up Ask students to read the question in the title of the article. Ask: What do you know about these famous people? Find out if any students have done Pilates. Ask: What was it like? Did you like it? Ask students to look at the photo and say if it gives any clues about Pilates.

Vocabulary Parts of the body (2) 1

Ask students to look at the words in the box. Check comprehension of the body parts by pointing to the relevant part on your body. This should then make it clear which words are not parts of the body, but don’t check answers yet. Ask students which names are very similar in their own language and which are very different.

13 GUESS The questions in this activity have a number of different possible answers. Encourage active guessing and brainstorm as many answers as possible. You may want to take a class vote on the most creative, original or humorous answers.

2

3.17 Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Point out the pronunciation of muscle /ˈmʌsl/ and stomach /ˈstʌmək/.

14 Ask students to work in groups of three. Explain that each group member should ask questions and also say three things they’re going to do. As this is a 3x3x3 activity, the focus is on a rapid question and answer session, to encourage students to use the language without thinking too much. Remind them they only have three minutes! When they have finished, ask groups to report to the class on the most interesting plans in their group.



Speaking

15 EVERYBODY UP! Energise your class by asking everyone to stand up and move around the room. You could set a target of three names for each statement and encourage follow-up questions. When students have 158

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Transcript and answers back, injury, joint, muscle, shape, spine, stomach, waist Injury and shape are not parts of the body.

Reading 3 Ask students to work in pairs to read the sentences and make some guesses about the words in italics. They should also think about whether the sentences are true or false. Don’t give any answers yet. 4 Give students time to read the article and check their answers. Ask individual students to tell you if they were right or wrong in their guesses. Note that they will find out more about the words in italics in exercise 5.

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Answers 1 false 2 false 3 false 4 false 5 true 6 false trendy = very fashionable energetic = with a lot of energy flexible = able to bend or move easily slimmer = the comparative form of slim – thin in an attractive way better = the comparative form of good special = created for a particular purpose

5 Tell students to work individually to find the words and the nouns or phrases associated with each one.



Answers 1 activity for rich and famous people 2 people 3 you / stomach muscles 4 you 5 you 6 exercise 7 stomach 8 Pilates

6 Do the first item as a model with the class, then ask students to match the words individually. Check answers as a class by saying one of the words 1–8, then asking students to say the opposite.



Answers 1d 2e 3h 4c 5b 6g 7f 8a

7 Go through the questions first, then tell students to read the article again. Ask them to underline places in the article that give this information. Ask individual students for the answers.



8



Answers 1 Anyone (men and women) 2 From Joseph Pilates, who invented it. 3 It helps your body move in a healthier way. 4 Because it makes your stomach muscles stronger. 5 It can give you a flatter stomach and a smaller waist. 6 You need a mat. You don’t need lots of special equipment.

your body get better quicker, it strengthens stomach muscles, it helps your spine, it gives you a better body shape.

Extra idea: Ask students to write three more questions about the article. Then ask students to close their books and ask their partner the questions.

Grammar Comparatives 9 Explain that these adjective forms are all ways to compare things. Use the grammar table to point out the categories: short (one-syllable) adjectives, long adjectives (two-syllable adjectives and adjectives with more than two syllables) and irregular forms. You might want to look at the more detailed table on SB page 141 as well. Ask students to notice the spelling by asking: Which adjectives double the final consonant? Which ones drop the final ‘e’? Ask for some additional examples for each category. Tell students to find the adjectives in the article on SB page 90 and complete the grammar table. Then discuss the answers to the questions below the table.



Answers small – smaller flat – flatter healthy – healthier interesting – more interesting good – better 1 With adjectives of one syllable or two syllables ending in -y. 2 With adjectives of two or more syllables. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 141, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.



Tell students to work in pairs or small groups to write their list. When they have finished, tell them to read the article again to check their answers.

Extra idea: Do a short drill of comparative forms, eg Teacher: small Students: smaller Teacher: interesting Students: more interesting Teacher: good Students: better

Suggested answers It helps you move in a healthier way, it helps joints and muscles, it prevents injury, it helps

10 Allow time for students to write their answers individually. Check answers by asking students to read out each sentence. Unit 10

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Point out the grammar note on the use of than. Also mention that sentence 5 doesn’t use than as it isn’t comparing two things – the second thing is implicit, ie I was happier (than I was before) after my exercise class. Answers 1 weaker 2 more exciting 3 worse 4 more boring 5 happier 6 better

3.18 Review the schwa sound /ə/. Explain 11 P that this is the most frequent sound in English and we pronounce it uh (or like the article a). We often use it when a syllable is not stressed.



Reading and writing 13 Review the meaning of both by giving some examples of sentences with both using students in your class, eg Becky and Rosa both have brown hair. They are both students in this class. Ask students to read the short text and answer the questions about the use of both.

Answers 1 after 2 before

Read the examples, concentrating on the schwa sounds. Ask individual students to say each sentence, checking their pronunciation as they read. Then play the audio, pausing for students to repeat each sentence.

Transcript I’m going to do some exercise. I want to be stronger and fitter. Badminton is better exercise than karate. 3.19 Read the sentences first, then tell 12 P students to work individually or in pairs to identify the schwa sounds. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each sentence.

Transcript and answers 1 A red sky at night means it’s going to be nice tomorrow. 2 Canada is bigger than Alaska and Brazil. 3 I’m going to speak English like a native speaker!

De-stress! Mind and body are connected. Brain gym is a discipline where you do exercises and movements with your body in order to improve connections in your brain. There has been a lot of controversy about it in recent years. Search online to find out more about it and try it out for yourself and see if it helps you. In the cross crawl, you lean forward and put your elbow on your opposite knee and then do the same thing on the other side and you repeat this about ten times. Do it as slowly as you can. The 160

slower you do it, the harder it is. Get students to stand up and practise a little. This will probably make them laugh a lot – which is great too.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 134, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

Extra idea: Say or write some sentences and ask students to add the word both in the correct place, eg Pilates and yoga are difficult. – Pilates and yoga are both difficult.

14 This is a pairwork information-gap activity. Each partner looks at a different page. One student has information about Pilates. The other has information about yoga. Make sure students don’t look at each other’s information while doing this activity. They each read their information and make notes in the table. Then they ask each other questions and make notes about their partner’s answers. Finally, ask students which activity they would prefer to learn and why.

Suggested answers Pilates yoga age 100 years old 5,000 years old country / countries of origin USA India key people Joseph and Hindu monks Clara Pilates components: physical? physical physical and spiritual? spiritual equipment balls, bands, mat weights, mat stomach breathing lateral

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Did you know?  * Read the information about Joseph Pilates. You

could ask students to search online and find out more information about Pilates to add to the information they discovered in exercise 14. 15 Set up the activity by comparing yoga or Pilates with a sport you do and listing similarities on the board. Add any other useful adjectives, eg tiring, dangerous, complicated, difficult, etc. Look at the photos and read the example with the class. You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish it for homework.

Lesson 3 You should do both! pp92–93

Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise should for giving advice about health and to find out about different kinds of exercise.

You first! Brainstorm sports and exercise that students in your class do and write them on the board.

Listening 1 Ask students to describe the sports shown in the photos. Ask: Which one is easy / difficult / tiring? Use the definitions to explain the meaning of aerobic. (Some students may know the word aerobics as a type of exercise.)



Answers 1a 2b

2 Go through the sentences first and elicit the meaning of the words in bold. Tell students to work individually or in pairs but don’t check the answers yet.



3

Answers periods (of time) = amount of time stamina = the ability to work hard for a long time heart = the organ in your body that moves blood around the body lungs = the organs in your body that you use for breathing 3.20 Play the audio for students to check their answers to exercise 2.



Answers 1 AN 2 A 3 A 4 AN 5 AN 6 A Transcript BECKY Hi, there. Welcome back to the Becky Sanders Radio Show. With me in the studio this evening is Rakesh Kapoor. Rakesh is a well-known fitness expert, with a new book called … RAKESH Um, called Get Fitter, not Fatter! BECKY Get Fitter, not Fatter! That’s right. Well, Rakesh, we all know exercise is important, but there are two different kinds of exercise. RAKESH Aerobic and anaerobic. BECKY Yes, aerobic and anaerobic. So what’s the difference? Is one better than the other? Which one should we do? RAKESH You should do both, because they’re different. Aerobic exercise uses oxygen to produce energy. It’s moderate exercise over several minutes – 20 minutes minimum – and your heart rate has to be at least 140 beats a minute for that time. BECKY So things like, um, running or, um, cycling? RAKESH Exactly. Or fast walking or swimming, but it has to be for 20 minutes or more. BECKY So what does aerobic exercise do? RAKESH Well, your breathing is quicker and your heartbeat is faster, so it’s good for your heart and lungs, and you have better stamina. BECKY And it’s good for your muscles and it makes you slimmer too, doesn’t it? RAKESH Yes, it makes you healthier generally, and it makes you happier too! BECKY Great! What about anaerobic exercise? RAKESH Well, anaerobic exercise uses a different energy system because it involves short periods of energetic activity and then periods of relaxation. BECKY So weight-lifting is anaerobic? RAKESH Absolutely. So are ballet and gymnastics. With this kind of exercise, you become stronger and more flexible, but you don’t develop more stamina. Unit 10

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So in fact both kinds of exercise are important, because they’re good for different things? RAKESH That’s absolutely right. Like I said, you should do both kinds. BECKY And are there any activities which already have both kinds of exercise? RAKESH Oh yes, sports like football, for example, or … BECKY



4 Tell students to read through the questions first and try to predict the answers. Draw students’ attention to the use of less in question 1b and ask them what it means (it’s the opposite of more). Then play the audio for students to check their answers and write the answers on the board. If necessary, play the audio or segments of the audio again.

5



6

Answers 1a 2b 3b 4b 5a 6a Read the words in the box and ask students which are similar in their own language and which are different. Students should then circle the words they heard in the interview. Play the audio again for students to check their answers.

7 Go through the grammar table. Ask students what they notice about the grammar, eg What word follows ‘should’? (a verb without to) How do you make a question with ‘should’? (should and subject are reversed) Does ‘should’ change according to the subject? (no). Tell students to work individually to complete the table.

Answers affirmative We should do different kinds of exercise. negative We shouldn’t only do one kind of exercise. questions What should we do to get fit?

Answers BECKY Yes, aerobic and anaerobic. So what’s the difference? Is one better than the other? Which one should we do? RAKESH You should do both … because they’re different … and your heart rate has to be at least 140 beats a minute for that time. RAKESH Exactly. Or fast walking or … swimming, but it has to be for 20 minutes or more. RAKESH That’s absolutely right. Like I said … you should do both kinds.

THINK Go through the questions then allow time for group discussion. Compare answers as a class and ask for feedback on each question.

Explore This is an opportunity for students to do research outside the classroom and tell the class about their findings in the next lesson. Brainstorm ideas for possible answers and ideas for how to research this topic online.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 141, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

8 Refer students to the transcript on page 151 to underline examples of should and have to. Ask them to explain the difference in meaning between them.

Answers ballet, cycling, fast walking, football, gymnastics, running, swimming, weightlifting

Answers 1 aerobic: cycling, fast walking, running, skipping, swimming anaerobic: ballet, diving, gymnastics, judo, karate, weightlifting both: football, volleyball 2 playing computer games, watching TV 3 Students’ own answers.

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Grammar should

9 Use the questions to contrast should and have to. Give additional examples of each using examples from your school or classroom.



Answers The statements are both true. Have to is stronger than should.

10 Ask students to look at the photo and the heading and predict some of the recommendations that might be in the text. Then tell students to complete the sentences individually. Invite volunteers to read their answers to the class. Find out from the class how many people do any of the recommended things.

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Answers 1 shouldn’t 2 should 3 should 4 shouldn’t 5 should 6 shouldn’t 7 should 8 should Extra idea: Write the following on the board and tell students to work in pairs or small groups to discuss their ideas. What kinds of activities should you do to … a) … build up your strength? b) … have more stamina? c) … lose weight? d) … relax?

Speaking and writing 11 Read both letters aloud and explain that these people are asking for advice. Ask some questions about the letters, eg Who is worried about being overweight? (Fiona) Who is worried about not being fit enough? (Marco). Tell students to work in pairs, choose one letter and make a list of suggestions for their reply. 12 Go over the ideas in the box and ask students if any of their ideas from exercise 11 are there. Brainstorm other ideas and write them on the board. Students should work individually or in pairs. Monitor students as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar or vocabulary and providing assistance where necessary. Ask volunteers to read out their letters. You could take a class vote on the best one.

Extra idea: Ask pairs of students to write a one-sentence problem on a sheet of paper. They then pass the paper on to the next pair. The new pair should write a sentence with should or shouldn’t in response to the problem. They then pass the paper on again. Each pair should read all the previous responses and write another piece of advice (without repeating the others). Finally, the paper will arrive back at the original pair and they should choose the best piece of advice and tell the class.

Movies & Music Read through the instructions and questions for both sections and teach / elicit any vocabulary, eg huge, blind, swordsman, reap, sow.



Extra questions for class or for homework



Movies Do you enjoy martial arts films? Why? / Why not? Have you seen films with Jackie Chan, Bruce Lee or Jet Li?





Music What is the theme of this song? (A perfect day is doing simple things in the park, at the zoo, etc.) What is your perfect day? Find out more information about one of the singers of the 1997 version.

Answers Movies 1 Ong-bak 2 Zatoichi Other martial-arts films: Enter the Dragon; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; House of Flying Daggers; The Matrix; A Touch of Zen; The Raid: Redemption; Yojimbo; Police Story; Once Upon a Time in China; The Karate Kid; Ip Man; District 13, etc. Music What it means – you get the rewards from the work you put in. 1997 version: Among others, in order of appearance, Lou Reed, Bono, Skye Edwards, David Bowie, Suzanne Vega, Elton John, Boyzone. For a complete list, send students to Wikipedia: Perfect Day (Lou Reed song). Culture notes: Zatoichi is a Japanese film about a blind masseur. Zatoichi looks very harmless and unthreatening but beware, he isn’t as gentle as he seems! One day he arrives in a town controlled by powerful gangs and meets two beautiful geishas who want to avenge their parents’ murder. The legend of Zatoichi is a very old one on Japanese film and TV screens: 26 films were made from 1962 to 1989, and from 1974 to 1979 a series with 100 episodes was on TV. Ong-bak In this Thai film, thieves steal the head of a sacred statue in a village and a young martial artist (played by Tony Jaa) is determined to get it back. He travels to the big city to fight alone for the missing head against the power of the underworld. Jaa has starred in many martial-arts films since OngUnit 10

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bak, including The Protector (2005) which was also directed by Prachya Pinkaew. Perfect Day was written by Lou Reed in 1972, but it became famous when it was used in the film Trainspotting in 1996. In 1997, the BBC released a video of the song featuring a huge line-up of well-known peformers. Later that year, it was released as a charity single for Children in Need. It was number one in the pop charts in the UK for three weeks and raised more than £2 million.

words. You could draw a simple leg and arm on the board and invite volunteers to write the missing words on the board, then circle the joints.





Extra ideas: Provide extra practice by giving a clue for each word, eg 1 It’s between your hand and your elbow. (wrist) 2 You have five on each hand. (fingers) etc. Ask students to say or write their answers.



MA Provide extra support by saying how many letters are in the word or what letter the word starts with.



Draw a stick figure on the board and number the parts of the body in a different order to that in the book (including words from previous lessons). Students write the words in the correct order in their notebooks. Then call students to come to the board and label the diagram.



MA Students who need more support can look at their books. Other students should keep their books closed. Check pronunciation and spelling.

Vocabulary plus p94 Parts of the body (3) 1

As a review, first ask students to name as many parts of the body in the diagram as they can. Then look at the list of words. Remind students that they learnt heart and lungs in Lesson 3 exercise 2, and they’ve also had spine and wrist, so the only new items are brain and hip. Students identify the things that are inside the body. Ask them to point to the relevant part of the diagram for each one. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Ask students which names for parts of the body are very similar in their own language and which are very different. 3.21

Transcript and answers ankle, brain, elbow, heart, hip, knee, lungs, muscles, neck, shoulder, spine, wrist The ones you only find inside the body are brain, heart, lungs, muscles, spine.

Extra idea: Play the audio again and ask students to point to the part of their body (or where it is inside the body).

2 Use the questions to clarify the meaning of the words for things inside the body. Read them out first to check understanding.



Answers 1 heart 2 lungs 3 muscles 4 spine 5 brain

Answers 2 knee 5 foot 6 shoulder 8 wrist 10 finger The joints are: ankle, knee, hip, wrist, elbow, shoulder

Adjectives 4 Check understanding of the words in the box. Ask: What nouns can they be used to describe? (comfortable shoes, flexible body, popular person, etc.). Highlight the use of the prefixes in the table (in- and un-) to form opposites. When they have finished completing the table, ask if students can add any more adjectives to the list.

Answers in- uninactive unhealthy incomplete uncomfortable incorrect unfit inflexible unhappy uninteresting unpopular

3 Explain the meaning of joints (parts of your body that can bend where two bones meet). Students work individually to complete the 164

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Extra idea: You may want to mention that the prefix in- becomes -im- before a ‘p’, eg impossible, impolite, imperfect, impatient.

5

Ask: Do these boots look comfortable? Give students time to complete the sentences individually or in pairs. Then play the audio for students to check their answers. Play it again, pausing for students to repeat each line.



MA Students who finish early can make up additional sentences with gaps and ask the rest of the class to guess the missing word.



3.22

Everyday English p95 Giving advice 1 Ask students to describe the photo. Teach / Elicit the words weigh and scales. Elicit the sentences: He’s weighing himself. He’s standing on a pair of scales. Ask: How often do you weigh yourself? Is it a good idea to weigh yourself often? Why or why not? What should Jack do? Review these words: overweight, diet, exercise, slim, thin.

Answers 1 uncomfortable 2 incomplete 3 incorrect 4 unpopular 5 unfit

Transcript 1 I can’t walk in these boots. They’re so uncomfortable. 2 This puzzle is incomplete. There’s a piece missing. 3 No, Tallinn isn’t the capital of Latvia. That’s incorrect. 4 He was very unpopular at school, but now he’s got hundreds of friends on Facebook. 5 I should do more exercise. I’m so unfit.

2





Give students time to complete the dialogues individually or in pairs. Then practise the dialogues in closed and open pairs. Ask what words could be substituted for things and stuff in each dialogue (objects, items, topics).

Answers 1 thing; thing 2 things; stuff 3 things; stuff

Answers He’s putting on weight / getting fat. 3.23

6 Decide whether you are going to

use the video or simply play the audio. Give students time to read the conversation and predict the incorrect words. Play the video or audio for students to check their answers. Note that the words are incorrect but sound slightly similar, eg date / diet, hit / hate, rarely / really. Ignore the words in bold for the moment – they’re covered in the Focus on section.

Vague words thing, things, stuff 6 Explain the meaning of vague (not specific or exact). Vague words are useful in all sorts of situations when you’re talking about things in general. Look at the picture, which is a close-up of the woman on SB page 89. Ask: What is she carrying? (Her exercise stuff.) Contrast thing or things (countable) with stuff (uncountable). Model and practise some questions about students’ belongings, eg How many things do you have in your pockets? How much stuff do you have in your bag?

Note: You should use these questions sensitively as some students may be anxious about their weight.



MA With weaker students, it would be useful to highlight the words as a class or in pairs, so that students have more support.

Answers Rarely; date; hit; early; better See the correct, underlined words in the transcript. Transcript JACK Oh no! I can’t do up these jeans. I think I’m a bit fatter. LAURA A bit fatter? You’re kidding. You’re a lot fatter! You should do more exercise! JACK Really? Do you think so? LAURA Why don’t you go on a diet too? JACK Oh dear. I hate diets. LAURA Do you want to wear those jeans or not? JACK OK, OK! But what should I give up? LAURA Well, perhaps you could give up sugar for a start. You shouldn’t eat a lot of sweet stuff. It’s bad for you. Unit 10

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What? No cakes and biscuits? No. And don’t drink cola either. JACK That isn’t going to be easy. I love sweet things. LAURA Well in that case, you’re going to need a bigger pair of jeans! JACK



LAURA

3 Tell students to read the conversation again and circle the phrases for giving advice. Ask individual students to write them on the board. Ask for some additional advice that you could give to Jack using these expressions, eg Why don’t you do more exercise? Perhaps you could start a new sport?

Answers You should do more exercise. Why don’t you go on a diet too? … perhaps you could give up … You shouldn’t eat a lot of … 4

Act out the conversation with a strong student. Then students act out the conversation in pairs.



MA Stronger students can do this as a memory exercise.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversation. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

Focus on: up and on a Explain that the verbs in bold in exercise 2 are two-part, or phrasal, verbs. They’re very common, especially in spoken English. Review any phrasal verbs that students may already know, such as get up, wake up, stand up. Ask the class for ideas for the meaning of these verbs.



Answers do up = fasten something, eg your trousers go on = (in this conversation) start doing a particular activity give up = stop doing something you do regularly

b Tell students to work individually or in pairs. Draw the table on the board and invite volunteers to write the answers. Ask if they can think of any additional words for each column (eg do up your shoelaces, go on a trip, give up coffee).

Answers do up this shirt my trousers

give up smoking sugar sweets

5 Read the pieces of advice and ask students to guess what kind of problems these people were responding to. Model the example dialogue with one or two students. Tell students to discuss ideas in pairs – they should try to come up with as many possible ideas as they can.



Suggested answers a I’m not happy at work. / I don’t like my job. b I’m not feeling very well. I have a lot of pain in my back. c I can’t sleep. d I’m very unfit. / I don’t want to drive to work. e I don’t like heights. / I don’t like climbing.

6 Look at the different ways of giving advice in exercise 5 and discuss as a class which is the most and least direct. Discuss the different situations when you might want to give each type of advice.



Answers Least direct: Perhaps you could … Most direct: Don’t …!

7 Go through the situations with the class. Ask some students to model the example conversation. Tell students to work in pairs to write their own short conversation around one of the situations. They should use the conversation from the video as a model and use vocabulary from this unit if possible. When they have finished, ask pairs to act out their conversation for the class.

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go on a course holiday a journey

MA Stronger students can come up with additional problem situations. Ask them to present their advice to the class and ask the other students to guess the problem.

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8 Model the example conversation with three students – each reading one line. Point out that they only have a fixed time (four minutes) to come up with their list. Brainstorm one or two ideas as a class. You may want to write some headings on the board and ask for ideas under each heading, eg reading, writing, listening, speaking, vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar.

Extra idea: Ask students to make a 5-point plan for improving their English outside the classroom. Ask them to write about it for homework.

we don’t say … / we say …

This section focuses on the following errors:



• • • •



omission of to after going to incorrect use of infinitive with to after should incorrect comparative form incorrect use of that instead of than with comparative form

Ask students to cover the green we say … side and see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

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Units 9&10 review Reading 1 As a warm-up activity, discuss the idea of jobs that are more suitable for men and for women. Ask: Are there any jobs that women or men can’t or shouldn’t do? Remind students of their discussions about nurses in Unit 9 Lesson 2.

Ask students to describe the photo and guess what kind of job this person does. Ask: What is she wearing? What is she looking at? What is she thinking about? Review the present simple / present continuous contrast and ask: What do you think is good or bad about this job? Make list of pros and cons on the board. Don’t check answers to the questions yet.







Tip: Often students focus on getting the correct answers. You may want to mention that it is just as important to notice the strategies they use to find the answers. Did they look at key words, for example, or did they find synonyms or antonyms that helped them? Help students to notice that the True / False sentences in exercise 3 require them to draw some conclusions based on information in the text that isn’t directly stated.

Answers 1 She’s driving a lorry. / She’s looking in the mirror of a lorry / truck. 2 She’s a lorry / truck driver. Discuss the answers to the next two questions as a class. Ask students to identify which parts of the article support their answers.

4

Answers 1 Aiko chose her job because she couldn’t be a ballet dancer / because she likes lorries. 2 She loves driving and enjoys singing out loud.

Tell students to cover the text, then go through the list of things. Students can test each other in pairs. Ask them to write the questions and check them on the board.



MA Students who need more support can keep their books open.

3 Go through the sentences as a class, then ask students to work individually to write their answers. They can compare answers in pairs. Ask volunteers to tell the class their answers and explain how they reached those answers.

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Answers 1 false: Only 2% of the half a million lorry drivers are women, that’s about 10,000. 2 false: She wanted to be a ballet dancer when she was a child. 3 true 4 true 5 false: She turns up the music and sings really loudly when she’s driving. 6 true



2 Give students time to read the article and check their answers to exercise 1.



pp96–97

Point out that phrases in the sentences are paraphrases of those in the text (eg cost a lot of money = was expensive). Point out especially the comparative form with less in item 4.



Answers 1 She hurt her back very badly while dancing. 2 She worked in a supermarket. 3 She loves driving. 4 She loves musicals. 5 She enjoys singing along to her Mamma Mia album. 6 She leaves at 6.15 in the morning. Extra idea: Ask students to role-play an interview with Aiko using the information in the article.

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Grammar and writing 5 Ask students to complete the sentences individually, then ask volunteers to read out their answers. Ask: Which sentences are present tense? Which ones are past?



Answers 1 driving 2 was; didn’t want 3 had 4 wasn’t; makes 5 listens; sings 6 doesn’t leave

6 Go through the example with the class first and point out the use of the comparative. Allow time for students to work individually and then in pairs, then compare answers as a class. Encourage plenty of disagreement! They should give reasons for their opinions. Give feedback on the use of comparative forms.



Suggested answers 1 Lorry drivers are better paid than ballet dancers. 2 Doctors work longer hours than nurses. 3 CEOs have a more stressful life than factory workers. 4 Artists are more creative than scientists. 5 Teachers have a more interesting life than office workers. 6 Chefs wear sillier hats than flight attendants.





8 Look at the photo and go through the questions with the class. Elicit ideas and write them on the board. Teach / Elicit the meaning of smart and scruffy. Ask: When might you want to look smart / scruffy? 9





Play the audio for students to check their ideas from exercise 8. 3.24

Answers 1 Ben is wearing a grey sweater / jumper with a grey and white T-shirt. He is wearing a pair of jeans and a pair of trainers. 2 Scruffy 3 He’s going to have a job interview. Transcript BEN Right, Kate. I’m off to a job interview. KATE You’re going to have a job interview? Like that? What on earth are you wearing? BEN Um, I’m wearing jeans, my trainers … KATE I know, I know, but you shouldn’t go like that. BEN Why not? KATE Because you look really scruffy. BEN So? KATE Well, you have to look smart for a job interview. BEN No, you don’t. It depends on the job. KATE Why? What’s the job?

Preposition park

MA For more support, go through the gaps first and identify the following word or phrase, eg a place, a period of time, etc.

Extra idea: Ask questions about the text, eg How was Steve’s experience of lorry driving different from Aiko’s? Would you like to drive a lorry? Do you think you’re more like Steve or Aiko?

Listening and speaking

7 This exercise is a chance for students to use the language they have learnt to talk about themselves. Review the meaning and form of the present continuous, referring to SB pages 80 and 82 or the grammar reference if necessary. Ask students to write the answers in their notebooks. They should then exchange notebooks and give feedback to their partner, asking additional questions as well.

Review some of the prepositions by saying a sentence with a gap and asking which preposition is missing, eg I get up ____ six o’clock. (at). Ask students to work individually then compare answers in pairs. Check the answers as a class. Discuss the reasons for choosing each preposition.

Answers 1 to 2 at 3 to 4 for 5 on 6 in 7 at 8 on 9 no preposition

10



3.25 Ask: What was Kate’s final question? (What’s the job?) Brainstorm possible answers and gather all the ideas on the board. Play the audio for students to check their answers. You may want to play the audio again and pause for students to repeat each line.

Answer He’s going to be a lorry driver. Units 9&10 Review

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Transcript BEN Right, Kate. I’m off to a job interview. KATE You’re going to have a job interview? Like that? What on earth are you wearing? BEN Um, I’m wearing jeans, my trainers … KATE I know, I know, but you shouldn’t go like that. BEN Why not? KATE Because you look really scruffy. BEN So? KATE Well, you have to look smart for a job interview. BEN No, you don’t. It depends on the job. KATE Why? What’s the job? BEN I’m going to be a lorry driver! 11 Play the audio again for students to listen and write notes. Alternatively, ask students to look at the transcript on SB page 152. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of pronunciation or intonation problems. Invite volunteers to present the interview to the class.

Cross Culture: colour a



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Before you begin this activity, ask students about the photo, eg What’s the woman wearing / doing? Where is she? (She’s at a new-year celebration in Rio, which is why most of the people in the photo are wearing white.) Ask about the title too, eg What does ‘fitting in’ mean? When do you try to fit in? (in a new job, a new school, a new country) What does ‘cultural diversity’ mean? (It means a range of different cultures. Remind students of the dance group Diversity mentioned in Units 5 & 6 Review on SB page 60.) Discuss whether it is more important for people to fit in or to keep their own customs when they move to another culture. 3.26



Answers 1 white 2 black; black and white 3 yellow 4 red; red 5 white; white 6 white; blue 7 grey; blue Transcript In Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on New Year’s Eve, people often wear white to celebrate. For a wedding or birthday in Thailand, you shouldn’t wear black or even black and white because it’s unlucky, but you can wear any other colour. In Malaysia, you shouldn’t wear yellow because it is the colour of the royal family. You should wear something red for a celebration in China, because red is the colour of happiness for the Chinese. In Western cultures, a woman often wears a white dress when she gets married, so don’t wear a white dress when you go to someone’s wedding! In many Asian countries such as China, Vietnam, Korea and India, when someone dies, people wear white, but in Iran people wear blue. In Russia you shouldn’t wear bright or light colours for business meetings, you should wear grey or dark blue.

b Students can work in pairs in groups. Monitor pairs / groups as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar, vocabulary or pronunciation. When they have finished, ask pairs / groups to report to the class on the most interesting or surprising facts. Discuss the answers with the class.

Give students time to read the sentences and predict the missing colours. Encourage students to ask you about any new words, eg Eve, celebrate, royal, bright. Play the audio for students to check their answers. Ask if students know any additional information or have personal experience of the significance of different colours in these or any other cultures.

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11 UNIT FOCUS

Going places GRAMMAR: present perfect; past participles, been and gone; present perfect v past simple; past questions; too and enough VOCABULARY: natural features; prepositions of movement; travel FUNCTIONS: talking about past experiences; buying a ticket

Lesson 1 Have you ever been to Machu Picchu? pp98–99 Aims The focus of this lesson is to introduce the present perfect for talking about past experiences, learn the difference between been and gone, and learn vocabulary for talking about natural features. Note: You could bring in photos of famous places around the world or of unusual activities like snowboarding or kayaking to help with exercises 5 and 12.



2 Read the instructions. Give students time to work individually, then check answers as a class. You could write water and high on the board and invite students to write words under the correct heading. You may want to ask how the words are connected to water, eg an island is surrounded by water, a beach is next to the water.

Warm-up Ask students to name the five most beautiful places they know – they can be in their country or overseas. Take a class vote on the top two.

Vocabulary Natural features 1





Ask students to describe the photos. Ask: Which natural features can you name? Play the audio, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Note the pronunciation of island (silent ‘s’) and desert (not dessert). Then ask students to read the words in the box and tick the words for things they can see. Ask: What do the other words mean? Explain the meaning of any new words by referring to famous places or local places.





3.27

Ask students which names for natural features are very similar in their own language and which are very different.

Answers A forest, waterfall, mountain B beach, island, reef, sea C forest, mountain D pyramid, desert Transcript beach, cliff, desert, forest, hill, island, mountain, park, pyramid, reef, river, sea, square, waterfall, wood

Extra idea: Ask: Which word or words don’t fit? (possibly pyramid because it is man made or square because it isn’t a landscape feature).

Answers water: reef, river, sea, waterfall, beach, island high: cliff, hill, mountain, pyramid (and possibly waterfall) Extra idea: Ask for suggestions for other ways to group the words, eg trees (forest, wood); sandy places (pyramid, beach).

3 Give students time to work individually, then write the words from A on the board and ask students to tell you which word from B goes with each one. Add the name of the country. Ask: Which places do you know about? Which one would you like to visit?

Answers 1 Easter Island: Polynesia, Pacific Ocean Great Barrier Reef: off the coast of Australia Ipanema Beach: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Red Square: Moscow, Russia Niagara Falls: on the US–Canadian border Sahara Desert: northern Africa Yellowstone National Park: Wyoming, USA 2 Red Square isn’t a natural feature. 4

Read the introduction aloud and ask students to discuss the questions in pairs. Play the audio for students to compare their ideas. If students have visited any of these places, ask 3.28

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and a non-specific time. Give some contrasting examples, eg I have been to Machu Picchu. I went there in 2014. You don’t need to go into much detail here as the contrast will be dealt with in Lesson 2.

them to tell the class about their experience and encourage others to ask questions. Ask: Why do people visit these places? Why are they fascinating or beautiful?

Transcript and answers A is Yellowstone National Park in the USA. B is the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. C is Machu Picchu in Peru. D is the Pyramids in Egypt. Machu Picchu was top of the list, followed by the Pyramids, the Great Barrier Reef and Yellowstone National Park.

Background information: Yellowstone National Park is located mainly in the northwestern state of Wyoming in the USA. It is famous for its natural geological features and forests, and especially its hot springs (geysers) and waterfalls.



The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest coral reef system and is located off the eastern coast of Australia.



Machu Picchu is the site of an ancient city built by the Incas in the 15th century. It is 2,430 metres above sea level in the mountains of Peru.



The most famous pyramids in the world are in Egypt, many of them near Cairo. They were built between 2700bc and about 1700bc. They are made of brick and stone and for thousands of years were the world’s largest structures.

5 Give students time to discuss the questions in pairs, then ask pairs to give feedback to the class. Find out how many people agreed with the list, and which place came top in the class.



Extra ideas: Ask students to describe any beautiful or fascinating places they have visited. Ask: What was special about it? Make a list as a class of the five most beautiful places in the world or in the country you are in. If you brought in photos of places around the world, encourage students to ask questions about them.

Grammar Present perfect 6 Draw a timeline on the board to illustrate the difference between a specific time in the past 172



Ask students to notice the form of the present perfect. Ask: What happens to the verb ‘have’? (it changes according to the subject) What word follows ‘have’? (the past participle of the main verb) How is the past participle formed? (add -ed for regular verbs, the same as the past simple). Point out that irregular verbs vary and have to be learnt separately. There is an irregular verbs list on SB page 158.



Model the first three sentences in the grammar table and demonstrate full and short forms. Ask students to repeat them after you. Then ask two students to model the question and answer at the end of the grammar table. Point out the correct use of ever and never.



When students are happy to use the present perfect, tell them to look at the places in exercise 3. Tell them to work in pairs and ask and answer questions about the places. Get feedback from several pairs.



Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 141, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

Past participles, been and gone 7 Read the first sentence in the grammar box and elicit the past participle of a few verbs, eg walk – walked, visit – visited, dance – danced. Then ask: What is the past participle of ‘be’? What are the two past participles of ‘go’? Read the two sentences about Sid, and discuss the questions as a class. Teach / Elicit that been means that he went there and came back; gone means that he’s still there. Answers 1 Been is used when the person is no longer there. Gone is used when the person is still there. 2 1 Sid’s been to Paris. = Sid is no longer in Paris. 2 Sid’s gone to Paris. = Sid is still in Paris.

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 142, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

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8 Ask students about the photo, eg Have you ever seen the Northern Lights? Make sure that students understand the formation of the present perfect. They have to change the verb have according to the subject and find the past participle form of each verb by looking at the list of irregular verbs on SB page 158, or in their dictionaries. Students do the exercise individually, then compare answers with a partner.



MA For extra support, write the past participles on the board in a random order.

Answers 1 have seen 2 hasn’t been / gone 3 has gone / been 4 have had 5 have flown 6 haven’t done 7 have run 8 hasn’t slept

9 Read out the example sentence, then ask students to write true sentences about themselves. Ask students to tell the class what they have and haven’t done.

MA Students who need extra support can write 3–5 sentences. Other students can write 5–10 sentences.

Vocabulary Prepositions of movement 10









3.29 Ask students to describe the two pictures. Ask: What are the people doing? How do you think they are they feeling? How are the two pictures similar and different? Read the text and teach any new vocabulary, eg adventure, kayak, tango. Check comprehension of the prepositions by drawing diagrams on the board or miming the movement in each one.

Give students time to complete the conversations, then play the audio for them to check their answers. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each section.

Answers 1 to 2 across 3 through 4 into 5 over Transcript Oh, I’ve had lots of adventures. I’ve been to Vladivostock many times, and I’ve kayaked across the Atlantic and I’ve walked through the Amazon rainforest and I’ve dived into seas full of sharks and I’ve danced the tango in Argentina and I’ve … … and I’ve flown over the Eiffel Tower in a helicopter and … Oh! They’ve fallen asleep!



Extra idea: Ask students to provide prepositions for sentences with gaps. Say Mmmm for the gap. Students write or say the missing prepositions. I’ve sailed ___ the Pacific Ocean. I’ve walked ____ the Sahara Desert. I’ve dived ____ a waterfall. (across, across / through, over)

11 You may want to turn this activity into a game where each person in a group has to say one sentence using one of the prepositions and a place name. They should use each preposition in turn and place names from this lesson. Monitor students as they work, making a note of any common problems with preposition use and pronunciation.

Speaking 12 Go over each question and ask for one or two examples. Then set a time limit of three minutes to complete all three lists. Compare answers as a class. Take a vote on the most interesting thing anyone has ever done.

Extra idea: If you brought in photos of famous places around the world or of unusual activities, use them as prompts. Tell students to make notes about them and write the questions. Then they ask and answer their questions in pairs. Ask them to tell the class about their and their partner’s answers by showing the pictures again.

Lesson 2 She’s climbed all over the world. pp100–101 Aims The focus of this lesson is to contrast the present perfect with the past simple and to practise asking questions about the past. Note: It might be useful to bring in a map of the world.

You first! Ask students to talk about their experiences of climbing and why they would or wouldn’t like to do this. Ask: Have you ever climbed or wanted to climb a mountain?

Reading 1 Ask students about the photos. Ask: Do you know who this woman is? How do the photos make you feel? How do they think it feels to Unit 11

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be out there? Review or teach any necessary vocabulary, eg cliff, mountain, rock, climbing, high, steep, rope, helmet. Discuss the possible meanings of the title (climbing to the top of a mountain or succeeding in an enterprise).



Tell students to discuss the questions in pairs, then check answers with the class.



Answers 1 She’s climbing a mountain. 2 She isn’t using ropes or other climbing equipment.



2 Tell students to read the questions. Explain that they should skim the text and find the answers quickly. Set a time limit of one minute for them to do this, then ask students to close their books and compare answers in pairs and as a class.









3

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Answers 1 She climbs alone and often with no ropes or safety equipment. 2 She has written several books, she has been a physiotherapist, she has got married and had a son, she has given lectures. 3 She had a bad climbing accident (and broke her leg) and she got married. Extra idea: If you brought in or have access to a world map, it might be useful to find all the places Catherine has climbed on the map. Ask students to work in groups to locate all the places. Extra information: Wyoming is a mountainous state in the north-western part of the USA. It has two national parks: Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park. Devil’s Tower is a geological formation that rises 386 metres above the surrounding land. It is a popular destination for climbers and was also used as part of the plot and setting for the 1977 movie Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Read through the questions first, then tell students to cover the article and test each other in pairs: one student can do questions 1 and 2, the other can do questions 3–5. When they have finished, tell them to read and check their answers.



Answers 1 Europe (France, Italy, Switzerland, Spain, Scotland), Asia (Thailand, Pakistan, Tibet), Africa (Mali), (North) America (Wyoming), Antarctica 2 At the age of 13 in the Alps. 3 They didn’t know about her climbing adventures. 4 No, she was a physiotherapist from 1981 to 1985. 5 Now she is a writer / lecturer. Extra idea: Ask students what they can tell about Catherine’s climbing technique from looking at the photos. What can they infer about her personality from this article?

Grammar 1 Present perfect v past simple 4 Ask students to notice the differences between the two example sentences in the grammar table. Ask: Are they about the past or the present? Which one mentions a specific time? Which one doesn’t mention a time? Go over the questions, emphasising when (ie a specific time) in the second rule.



Answers 1 present perfect 2 past simple Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 142, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

5 Tell students to look back at the article and do this activity on their own. Ask individual students how many examples they found. Check the answers as a class and ask them to explain why each tense was used in each case.

Answers present perfect … has climbed some of the …, … has climbed many of them …; She’s climbed mountains …; Catherine has won …; She’s also written …; … and has made a lot of films; Has she ever had an accident? past simple How did it all start; … parents were …; … she was born; She began climbing …; she

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often spent …; … she didn’t tell her parents …; She studied physiotherapy and worked …; … she decided to become …; 1985 was also the year Catherine won her first …; … Catherine fell 20 metres …; … and broke her leg; … she got married; … Catherine began to do … 6 Go through the sentences first, then allow time for students to work individually. Invite volunteers to read out their answers and write the answers on the board.





Answers 1 went 2 has climbed 3 climbed 4 hasn’t had; broke; fell 5 has written 6 wrote MA For an extra challenge, ask students to make two new sentence pairs illustrating the difference between the present perfect and past simple. For students who need more support, write sentences with some mistakes on the board and ask them to correct them.

Past questions 7 Focus on the grammar table and read questions 1 and 3. Teach / Elicit how the present perfect is often used at the start of a conversation to find out something general (question 1). In contrast, the past simple is used to narrow the focus to more specific information and details (question 3). Ask students to complete questions 2 and 4.



Answers 2 Has she climbed the north face of the Eiger? 4 Did she climb it alone? Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 142, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

8 Explain that the questionnaire is for a climbing school. Ask students what kind of questions they would expect to be asked. Read through the questionnaire together and teach / elicit any new vocabulary, eg expedition, backpacking, training, camping, cabin, tent. Remind students to use the present perfect for the general questions and the past simple for the detail. Ask students to complete it on their own, then check answers as a class.



Answers 1 Have you ever been; was; was; was 2 Have you ever had; was; was 3 Have you ever spent; did you camp; did you sleep; did you travel 4 have you climbed; have you climbed 5 Have you ever used

9 Students work individually to prepare answers – they can use fictional information if they want! They then act out the interview with a partner. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any problems with grammar, vocabulary or pronunciation. Praise students and provide corrective feedback.

Writing 10 Make sure students understand what they have to do. Brainstorm some ways to start the email, eg Dear Mountain School Director (Dear Sir or Madam is too formal). Write some starter sentences on the board, eg My name is … and I am interested in … I have … I haven’t … Could you please tell me about …? I’d also like to know if … Suggest other ways to end the email, eg Kind regards or Regards, followed by your full name. You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish it for homework.

Speaking 11 EVERYBODY UP! Energise your class by asking everyone to stand up and walk around and find as many people as they can for each question. Start by eliciting one or two questions and answering them yourself. Then set a time limit of ten minutes. They should make notes of the details in order to report back to the class at the end.

Extra idea: Ask each student to write one sentence on a piece of paper about an unusual thing they have done. Collect the pieces of paper and hand them out again in random order. Ask everyone to stand up and find the person who wrote their sentence by asking questions (using the present perfect). Then tell them to ask three additional questions (using the past simple) and make notes of the answers.

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Lesson 3 I forgot my passport! pp102–103



Answers A ticket B train C backpack D suitcase E passport

Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise using adjectives with too and enough and to learn vocabulary for talking about travel problems.



Extra idea: Ask students about the last time they travelled by train, bought a train ticket, carried a backpack, used a passport or packed a suitcase. They can also ask you these questions.

4

THINK This task will help students predict what is on the audio and will make it easier for them to understand it. Read the example aloud, then brainstorm as many answers for each item as possible and write them on the board, eg passport – lost, damaged, stolen, expired, out of date (this will come up in exercise 13); suitcase – lost, damaged, delayed, stolen. Ask: Have you ever had any of these problems?

Warm-up Look at the title of the lesson and the photos and elicit a few ideas for the topic of this lesson. Don’t go into detail about the photos at this point.

Vocabulary Travel 1 Ask students to describe the photos. Ask: How do you like to travel? Teach any necessary vocabulary for talking about the photos, eg departure board, tow truck / rescue vehicle, break down. Ask about the meaning of departures and cancelled. Brainstorm as many problems as possible.



2





Answers A lost suitcase B flat tyre C car broke down D train cancelled 3.30 Draw the table on the board and write in the examples. Give students time to work individually or in pairs, then ask volunteers to write their answers on the board. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word. Pay particular attention to the pronunciation of coach, tyre, garage and luggage. Ask students which words are very similar in their own language and which are very different.

Transcript and answers By air: airport, baggage reclaim, boarding card, check-in desk, departure gate, flight, hand luggage By train: coach, platform, station By car: flat tyre, garage, parking ticket, petrol, traffic

3 Ask students to match the words with the pictures, then write the answers on the board. Ask what verbs can go with these nouns, eg buy a ticket, take / get on / get off a train, carry a backpack, pack a suitcase, show your passport. 176

Listening 5

3.31 Explain

that students are going to listen to five people talking about travel problems. Each one involves one of the pictures in exercise 3. Write the letters A – E on the board and tell students to write the number of the conversation next to each one. Play the audio, then check answers as a class. Ask students for key words that told them the answers in each case.



Answers 1E 2A 3D 4B 5C



Transcript See transcript 3.32 in exercise 7

6 Play the audio again and ask students to summarise each problem in one sentence. Play the audio again for students to check their answers.





Answers 1 wrong passport 2 ticket for wrong day 3 lost suitcase 4 missed train 5 backpack too big Extra idea: Ask some additional questions about the audio, eg When did the first speaker realise that she had the wrong passport? Why

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couldn’t the man get on the bus? What did the woman’s suitcase look like? Why were the people in conversation 4 late? Where was the man in conversation 5 going? When did he find out that his bag was too big? 7



3.32 GUESS Encourage students to make as many guesses as possible about what happened next in each conversation. Play the audio for students to check their ideas. As this is a long listening, you might want to pause after each conversation to check students’ ideas. Find out how many people guessed each ending correctly.

Answers 1 She had to go home and pay for another flight the next day. 2 He got on at the last minute because someone else didn’t turn up. 3 The airline delivered her suitcase the next day. 4 He got the next train, but arrived late for his appointment. 5 He had to pay €40. Transcript 1 WOMAN 1

When I got to the check-in desk at the airport, I opened my passport at the photo page and showed it to the man – and it wasn’t me! WOMAN 2 No! Really? WOMAN 1 No, it was my husband! I realised I had the wrong passport! I had my husband’s passport! WOMAN 2 Oh no! So what happened? WOMAN 1 Well, he was very nice, but he said, ‘I’m very sorry, but you can’t travel.’ So I had to go home and I had to pay for another flight the next day! … And I got to the door of the 2 MAN bus and showed the woman my ticket, and she said, ‘You’re too late. You have the wrong day. That ticket was for yesterday, and the bus is completely full!’ WOMAN Oh, how awful! What did you do? MAN Well, I waited until everyone was on the bus, and she came



back and said, ‘Actually, somebody hasn’t come, and there’s one free seat. Would you like it?’ WOMAN That was lucky! MAN Yes, it was. 3 WOMAN The bags were in baggage reclaim and I waited to see my big red suitcase. Everyone picked up their bags until finally there were no bags left. MAN Oh no. Don’t tell me … WOMAN Yes, I waited and waited, but my suitcase wasn’t there. MAN Oh dear! So what did you do? WOMAN Well, I went to the lost-luggage desk and filled out a form. They delivered my suitcase the next day. We left the house really early, but 4 MAN the traffic was terrible. We finally got to the station and I ran over the bridge – and got to the platform just in time – to see the train leaving. WOMAN Oh, how frustrating! So what did you do? MAN Well, I got the next train. But I was very late for my appointment. I was on Cheapoair to Athens 5 MAN and I just had hand luggage, one small backpack. When I got to the departure gate, the man said, ‘That’s a big backpack! I think it’s too big. Could you please put it in this box?’ So I tried, but he was right, the backpack was too big. It didn’t go in the box! So he said, ‘I’m very sorry, but you have to pay. It’s 40 euros.’ I said, ‘40 euros? That’s terrible!’ ‘Yes, it’s a lot,’ he said. ‘Next time bring a smaller bag!’

Grammar too and enough 8 Read the example sentence in the grammar box. Give some additional example situations, eg The shelf was very high and I couldn’t reach it. It was too high. I wasn’t tall enough. Focus on the rules below the table and elicit the correct answers. Unit 11

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Answers 1 before 2 after Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 142, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.

9 Ask students to describe the picture, which illustrates the first sentence in this exercise. Ask: What is the problem? (The suitcase is too small. It isn’t big enough.) Students do the exercise individually, then compare answers in pairs. Ask volunteers to read out their sentences.



Transcript and answers /aɪ/ arrive, climb, cycle, dive, drive, fine, flight, fly, idea, island, light, ride, time /ɪ/ cliff, driven, listen, minute, miss, ridden, ticket, trip

MA Students who finish early can write two more sentences.



Extra ideas: Ask students to close their books and listen. Dictate some of the words in random order and ask students to identify whether it is sound number 1 or number 2.



Ask students to add extra words to each column.

Writing 13

Answers 1 big enough 2 too tired 3 long enough 4 too heavy

Give students time to read the conversation and predict the missing words. Play the audio for students to check their answers and write the answers on the board. 3.34

Answers

Speaking



10 Go through the list of problems and tell students to make notes about each one in their notebooks (this will help them in exercise 14). Provide help with extra vocabulary as needed.

Transcript JOAN So how was your trip? FRANK It was a disaster! We got up really early and left the house at six. We got the airport bus at 6.30 so we got to the airport by seven. We already had our boarding cards, so we went straight to passport control. I showed the woman my passport. She looked at it for a long time, and then she said, ‘I’m afraid your passport is out of date.’ JOAN Oh no! So what did you do? FRANK I said goodbye and went home again.

11 Model the example conversation with one or two students. Remind students to use the present perfect for the first general question, then the past simple for the followup, detail questions. Ask students to work in pairs. Monitor students as they work and make a note of common errors. When they have finished, ask volunteers to tell the class about things they have done. Invite other class members to ask follow-up questions. Encourage students to ask you questions, too. 3.33 Check comprehension of the words 12 P in the box. Ask: Which words describe natural features? (cliff, island) Which words are verbs for doing sport? (climb, cycle, dive, ride) Which words are past participles? (driven, ridden), etc.



178

Write the table on the board and demonstrate the difference between the two sounds /aɪ/ and /ɪ/. Say the words, or ask students to say the words out loud and ask volunteers to write each one under the correct sound. Play the audio for students to check their answers, then play it again, pausing for students to repeat each word.

1 was 2 got up 3 left 4 got 5 got to 6 had 7 went 8 showed 9 looked 10 said



Extra idea: Ask some questions about the story, eg What time did they leave the house? What time did they get to the airport? Did they have their boarding cards? What happened at passport control? What was wrong with his passport? How did Frank feel? What would you do in this situation? Play the audio again if necessary.

14 Allow time for students to make some notes or they can use the notes they made in exercise 10. Provide help with extra vocabulary as needed. You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish it for homework.

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Movies & Music

In Titanic, a rich young woman (played by Kate Winslet) falls in love with a poor young man on board the doomed ship. It’s 1912, and her family don’t approve at all. There have been several versions of the film, both before and after the 1997 one, and in 2010, Titanic 2 came out, telling the story of a ship making the same journey 100 years later.

Extra questions for class or for homework Movies Which two films are about things that really happened? (Alive and Titanic) Do you know the names of other actors who starred in any of these films? Which story did Agatha Christie write? (Murder on the Orient Express)

I Can See Clearly Now was written and recorded by Johnny Nash in 1972. It was re-recorded by Jimmy Cliff in 1993 for the soundtrack of Cool Runnings – a film based on the true story of the Jamaican bobsled team trying to get to the 1988 Winter Olympics in Canada.

Music When was this song a hit? What is the theme of the song? Is the future sad or happy? What about the past?

Answers Movies Murder on the Orient Express – train; Ingrid Bergman Alive – plane Speed – bus; Keanu Reeves Titanic – ship; Leonardo DiCaprio Music mistakes: hear = see; train = rain (I can see clearly now the rain has gone) other things that are ‘gone’: clouds, pain instead: sunshine, rainbow, blue sky Culture notes: Murder on the Orient Express is based on the novel of the same name written by Agatha Christie in 1934, and featuring her famous Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot. The film starred many famous names including Albert Finney, Lauren Bacall, Jacqueline Bisset, Sean Connery and Vanessa Redgrave. It was remade in 2001 starring Alfred Molina and Meredith Baxter. Alive is the true story of the Uruguayan rugby team whose plane crashed into the Andes on 13th October, 1972. Sixteen of the 45 people on board managed to survive the crash and were rescued more than two months later. The film is based on the book written in 1974 by Piers Paul Read. Speed is the story of a young police officer (Keanu Reeves) who, with the help of Annie (Sandra Bullock), must keep driving a bus really fast. If he slows down below 80 kph, a bomb on board will explode. The villain is played by Dennis Hopper.

Vocabulary plus p104 Places 1 As a warm-up activity, review the words for natural features from lesson 1 using pictures or names of famous places.

Ask students to cover the word box, look at the picture and name as many features as they can. Then tell them to look at the word box and see which ones they left out. Focus on the pronunciation of any difficult words, eg bridge, castle (silent ‘t’), mosque, ocean. Discuss the questions as a class and ask students to point out each place on the picture.

Answers 1 man-made: bridge, canal, castle, cathedral, mosque, motorway, tower natural: cave, field, lake, ocean, valley 2 both: bridge, cave, lake 3 Students’ own answers.

Extra idea: Make a list of local places of interest and compare it with a partner. Ask: What’s the best place to visit locally?

Adventure 2 Give students time to work individually or in pairs to match the words. Ask them to explain what these sports are. (Remind students that they already know bungee jumping from Unit 10, Lesson 1, SB page 89.) Discuss the meaning of extreme. You could elicit ideas about what is meant by extreme ironing, but note that this will come up in exercise 4. Unit 11

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Answers bungee jumping, extreme ironing, hot-air ballooning, rock climbing, scuba diving, skateboarding, white-water rafting, windsurfing

3 Write the letters a–h on the board, then ask students to come and write the words they feel sure about next to the correct letter. Ask other students to correct them if they think it is wrong. Ask: Have you tried any of these activities? If not, which ones would you like to try?





Review the difference between been and gone for item 3.



c Tell students to look at the sentences in exercise b and identify the ones that are true for them. Ask individuals to read out any rewritten sentences.

Prepositions of place 4

Answers a extreme ironing b hot-air ballooning c skateboarding d scuba diving e white-water rafting f rock climbing g bungee jumping h windsurfing Extra idea: Pretend that you are doing each of these activities. Describe what you can see and what is happening without saying the name of the activity, eg I can see water going very fast on a river. (white-water rafting) Students have to guess which activity it is.



a Explain that go can be used in a variety of different ways. Go through the words in the box to check comprehension, then ask students to complete the table individually or in pairs. Draw the table on the board and check the answers. Mention that we say go by + transport, but go on foot. Ask: What other words can you add to each category?

Answers go by go on car holiday bike a trip tram a journey a course

go to go … Vladivostock scuba diving university windsurfing the United climbing States skiing the supermarket

b Explain that students have to complete the sentences using one of the four expressions with go in exercise a. Students work individually, then check answers as a class. 180

Ask students to describe the photo. Ask: Where is this person? What is he or she doing? Why? Allow time for students to read the article and predict the missing prepositions, then play the audio to check. Write the answers on the board. 3.35

Answers 1 on 2 on 3 in 4 on 5 in 6 in 7 on 8 at 9 on 10 on 11 on 12 at Transcript Extreme ironing is a sport where people go to strange and sometimes dangerous locations and iron clothes! Here are some of the places where people have done their ironing: on a rock; on a bicycle; in a canoe; on the top of a mountain; in a cave; in the middle of a motorway; on skis; at the bottom of a lake; on a cliff; on a surfboard; on the roof of their house. So where don’t these people iron? They don’t iron at home!

Focus on: go



Answers 1 go by 2 going on 3 been to 4 went



Extra idea: Ask students to close their books. Say the name of each place in the article and see if they can remember the whole phrase including the preposition, eg rock – on a rock.

5 Ask students to compare their experiences of ironing. Ask if everybody in the class actually does the ironing: Who does it in your house? Do you ever / never do it?

Everyday English p105 Note: If possible, bring in train or bus information (timetables, fares, etc) and a world map.

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Buying a ticket

De-stress!

1

When we’re late and have to rush, we tend to get very stressed. To avoid this happening, wherever you’re going, start your journey a little earlier than you need to. Remember, of course, that being late is regarded differently in different cultures. Ask: Are you often late or are you usually on time? Is it OK to be late in your culture? If you have to be on time, how do you make sure you are?

3.36

6 Decide whether you are going to

use the video or simply play the audio. Ask students to say one or two things that they already know about Jack and Laura. Ask: Where have we seen them before? What did they do? Ask students to describe the two photos and say what is happening. Teach / Elicit ticket clerk, single ticket and return ticket. Give students time to read the conversation and predict the missing words. Play the video or audio for students to check their answers. Write the answers on the board.



Answers 1 tickets 2 return 3 much 4 both 5 money 6 far 7 Book Transcript JACK Two tickets to Edinburgh, please. TICKET CLERK Single or return? JACK Um, return. How much is that? TICKET CLERK Just a moment – that’s £173. JACK For both of us? TICKET CLERK No, each. All together, that’s … £346. JACK Really? That’s a lot of money. How far is it? TICKET CLERK It’s a long way! But do you want some advice? JACK What? TICKET CLERK Book your tickets online – it’s a lot cheaper!



This is an opportunity for students to do research outside the classroom and tell the class about their findings in the next lesson. If you have a world map, use it to locate Timbuktu. Ask students for some recommended travel websites which could help them find out the information they need. 3



Extra practice: If you brought in train or bus information, use it in class so that students can practise longer conversations.

3.37 6 Give students time to guess the numbers that are missing. Then play the video or audio for them to check their answers. Play it again, if necessary, pausing after each number.

Answers 1 71.20 2 nine 3 Nine 4 four 5 Eleven Transcript JACK How much is a return ticket to Edinburgh, please? TICKET CLERK £71.20. JACK Oh, that’s not too bad. How long does it take? TICKET CLERK Just under nine hours. JACK Nine hours! The train only takes four. TICKET CLERK Yes, but it’s very expensive. The bus is much cheaper. JACK What time does it leave? TICKET CLERK Eleven o’clock at night. It’s overnight.

Extra ideas: Put students in pairs and ask them to find five differences between the photos.

2 Ask two students to model the first four lines of the conversation. Then ask which words can be replaced (destination = Edinburgh, number of tickets = two, type of tickets = return, cost = £173). Model the example exchange with one or two students, changing the destination each time. Then tell students to work on new conversations in pairs (making sure they only do the first four lines). Ask volunteers to present their conversations to the class.

Explore

4

Act out the conversation with a strong student. Then students act out the conversation in pairs.



MA Stronger students can do this as a memory exercise.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversation. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen. Unit 11

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5 For this exercise, students will have to work out the answers – they aren’t actually given them on the video or in the audio. Also note that the questions refer to both conversations – so you may need to play both of them again. Tell students to work in pairs to try and work out the answers, then compare answers as a class.

Answers 1 a) £101.80 b) £203.60 2 8am 3 10.30 6 Brainstorm adjectives you could use to describe travel by train and bus, eg cheap, expensive, fast, slow, safe, dangerous, comfortable, convenient. Remind students to use comparative forms when they are making a comparison between two things. Give students time to discuss the question in groups, then ask students to give feedback to the class. Find out which is the more popular form of transport – train or bus.

Extra idea: Discuss rail and bus services in your local area. Ask: Are they good or bad? Why?

we don’t say … / we say …

182

This section focuses on the following errors: • incorrect word choice – travel (verb) trip (noun) • incorrect preposition • incorrect phrase (by car, by train, etc but on foot) • incorrect past participle choice (been v gone) Ask students to cover the green we say … side and to see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

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12 UNIT FOCUS

Extremes GRAMMAR: superlatives; could; had to; review of tenses VOCABULARY: hotel facilities FUNCTIONS: talking about places to stay; checking in; solving

Lesson 1 The most expensive city in the world? pp106–107 Aims The focus of this lesson is to introduce superlatives for comparing more than one thing and to use adjectives to describe cities around the world. Note: It may be useful to have a world map available for this lesson.

You first! Brainstorm ideas for where these cities are (Ulan Bator and Tokyo). Ask: What do you know about them? Brainstorm adjectives to describe them, eg big, crowded, dirty, noisy, dangerous, polluted, exciting, interesting, expensive. Don’t give detailed descriptions at this point – just a general first impression.

Speaking 1 Model the example sentences with one or two students. Point out the use of both and on the right and review the word order with both. You could also elicit on the left. Give students time to discuss the questions. Brainstorm as many answers as possible and write them on the board. Find out which city students think looks more interesting and ask for their reasons.



Suggested answers both big cities, lots of buildings, more tall buildings in the city on the right

2 Check the meaning of capital city and population. Tell students to do the quiz in pairs. Ask for their answers (but don’t confirm if they are correct or not) and ask about the country where each capital city is located. 3

3.38 Play the audio so that students can check their answers. Play it again, if necessary, in case any parts are unclear. Find out how many students got all the answers correct.

Answers 1c 2b 3a 4b 5a 6c

problems

Transcript MAN Well, 1 is easy. That’s Tokyo. WOMAN Are you sure? Things are changing all the time. Some cities are growing really fast. I think it’s Seoul. MAN No, I’m absolutely sure it’s Tokyo. I read something about it recently. WOMAN Oh. OK, then. MAN And 2 is definitely La Paz. WOMAN Yes, I agree. And I’ve read that the coldest city is Ulan Bator, in Mongolia. MAN Really? That’s interesting. WOMAN And I think 4 is Oslo. MAN I don’t agree. I think it’s Tokyo again. I read about that recently, too. WOMAN All right, then. Tokyo. What about question 5? MAN No idea! WOMAN Well, it isn’t Taipei and it isn’t Beijing. MAN So it’s Ulan Bator again! WOMAN Yes. And I know number 6 because I was there in the summer. MAN What is it, then? WOMAN Helsinki! 4 Use this exercise to review the present perfect and the contrast with the past simple. Students discuss the questions in small groups. If you have a world map available, ask students to point to the places on the map. Invite volunteers to tell the class about their experiences.

Answers 1 Seoul (South Korea), Jakarta (Indonesia), Tokyo (Japan), Mexico City (Mexico), La Paz (Bolivia), Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), Ulan Bator (Mongolia), Helsinki (Finland), Moscow (Russia), Oslo (Norway), Caracas (Venezuela), Beijing (China), Taipei (Taiwan), Stockholm (Sweden), Ottawa (Canada) 3.39 Give students time to practise first, 5 P then play the audio. Play it again so students can say the sentences along with the audio at

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the same speed. Ask: Which sound is repeated most often in these sentences? (st). Note: /st/ is a consonant cluster that can be quite difficult to pronounce, especially at the beginning or end of a word. Model the pronunciation by exaggerating each sound slightly, and then running them together. You may want to contrast words with /st/ and words with /s/ or /t/, eg stop / top, steam / seam, stand / sand.

Transcript MAN What’s the best place for tourists to stay in Stockholm? WOMAN A five-star hotel! But it isn’t the cheapest.

Grammar Superlatives 6 Use the grammar table to help students notice the three groups of adjectives: short (onesyllable), long (two or more syllables) and irregular. Teach / Elicit the spelling rules for each type of adjective. Ask students for some additional examples of each one. Ask students to say whether the statement is true or false.

Note that additional irregular adjectives are far – furthest (which comes up in the reading on SB page 107) and little – least (when little means ‘a small amount of’).

Answer True Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 142, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them. 7 Tell students to look at the quiz on SB page 106 and find superlative forms. Ask: Which adjectives are short, long or irregular? Which spelling rules do they follow? Why?

Answers the biggest, the highest, the coldest, the most expensive, the most polluted, the cleanest

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Extra ideas: Ask students to make the opposite of each question, eg Which is the smallest city in the world? They should then try to answer them.

Do a short drill to practise superlatives, eg Teacher: hot Students: the hottest Teacher: expensive Students: the most expensive Teacher: good Students: the best etc 8

3.40 Give students time to work individually or in pairs, then play the audio for them to check their answers. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line. Ask: Which spelling rules did each adjective follow? You could also point out here that the superlative form of friendly can be friendliest or most friendly.

Answers 1 the hottest 2 the lowest 3 the oldest 4 the most dangerous 5 the friendliest 6 the most unfriendly Transcript 1 Bangkok is the hottest capital city in the world. It has an average temperature of 25° Celsius. 2 Amsterdam is two metres below sea level. It is the lowest capital city. 3 People have lived in Damascus since about 6000bc. It is the oldest capital city. 4 Mogadishu and Cape Town are two of the most dangerous cities in the world. 5 In a survey, tourists said that people in Tokyo and Lisbon were the friendliest people in the world. 6 On the other hand, people in Moscow and London were the most unfriendly.

Reading 9 Ask students to look at the photo and read the headings. Elicit ideas for what the article is about and what its purpose is. Ask if any students know which city is in the photo (it’s Reykjavik). Put students in pairs to read the article and guess the cities. Ask them to explain what clues helped them to find the answers. Check the meaning of any new words, eg survey, tourist, equator, furthest, nearest.

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Answers 1 Tokyo (Japan) 2 Moscow (Russia) 3 Quito (Ecuador) 4 Reykjavik (Iceland)



10 Give students time to read the sentences and do the exercise individually. Tell them to compare answers with a partner, then ask volunteers to give their answers and explain why.







MA Students who finish early can make two more sentences.



Point out the use of the least in the grammar note below the exercise and refer to the grammar reference on SB page 143.

Answers 1 false: The cleanest city is also one of the safest cities. 2 false: The nicest city is the most expensive. 3 true 4 false: The most unfriendly city is one of the most dangerous cities. 5 false: It’s the second highest city in the world. 6 true Did you know?  * Wellington is in New Zealand, Canberra in

Australia. Ask: What’s your capital city? Which is the nearest capital to it? How far away is it?

Movies & Music Read through the questions and text first and check any new vocabulary, eg romantic drama, simply.



Extra questions for class or for homework Movies What’s the most famous line from this film? (Play it again, Sam – though in fact, Rick actually says: Play it, Sam when he’s asking the pianist to play and sing the song he shared with Ilsa.) The film is set in the early 1940s – what was happening at that time? The film is basically a love story. What’s your favourite movie love story and why? Note: If you can find – or get students to find – a still or a clip of the film online, you can ask: What are they wearing? What do / don’t you like about that style of clothes? What do the clothes tell you about the period?

Music What other songs do you know by this singer? (What’s Love Got to Do With It? Private Dancer, etc) The song is often used as an anthem. If you had to choose an anthem, what song would you choose?

Answers Movies Name of film: Casablanca Director: Michael Curtiz Stars: Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman Famous song: As Time Goes By Music Title: Simply the Best (or sometimes just The Best) Also sung by: Bonnie Tyler Culture notes: Casablanca is a love story set in Morocco during the first years of World War II. Café owner, Rick, is shocked to see Ilse and her husband walk into his café. Rick and Ilse had met and fallen in love in Paris earlier in the war. Will she choose him now, or will she stay with her husband? The song As Time Goes By was written in 1931 by Herman Hupfeld and sung in the film by Sam, played by Dooley Wilson. The Best is a song written by Mike Chapman and Holly Knight. It was first recorded by Welsh singer, Bonnie Tyler (who also sang Total Eclipse of the Heart), but it wasn’t a big hit until Tina Turner released it. The song is used by several sports teams and athletes around the world as their anthem or theme tune.

Lesson 2 Is this the coolest place to stay? pp108–109 Aims The focus of this lesson is to practise could and had to to talk about possibility in the past, and to learn vocabulary for talking about hotel facilities.

You first! Ask students for their opinions about the room. Ask for adjectives to describe the photo, eg cool, cold, icy, freezing, shiny, dark. Explain that cool means cold but it can also mean nice or amazing. Unit 12

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Reading 1 1 Discuss the questions as a class. Point out that the third question (Can you see any animals?) may seem strange, but ask students what they can see (there’s a whale tail in the background). Ask students to look at the map and tell you where this place is.

3 Set a time limit for students to read the article quickly. Circle any words on the board that come up and check the meaning of any new vocabulary, eg Arctic Circle, blocks, melts, thermal, sleeping bag, reindeer. 4

Ask students to work in pairs and take turns to close their books and quiz their partner. Student A can ask questions 1–3, student B can ask questions 4–6.



MA Students who finish early can think of two extra questions to ask about the article.

Answers 1 false: There are several Ice Hotels around the world. 2 true 3 false: They are about –5˚C. 4 true 5 false: The hotel melts in spring and they have to rebuild it every winter. 6 true 5 Tell students to work in pairs to ask and answer the questions, then discuss them as a class.

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Extra ideas: Tell students to go to www. icehotel.com and find out how expensive it would be to stay a night at the Ice Hotel. Ask: What’s the best way to get there from where you are now?

Ask students to find out about other unusual hotels in the world.

Reading 2 6

Background information: At the Ice Hotel, all the bedrooms are designed by different people and there are lots of wonderful different designs, which change every year. This one is an ‘underwater’ bedroom.

2 Ask students to predict what information will be in the article. They should use the photo and the map to help them with ideas. Give students time to write their guesses individually (and no, they can’t use the words ice or hotel!), then gather all the ideas and write them on the board.







Ask students about hotels they have stayed in. Ask: Which was the best? What did you like about it? Which was the worst? What did you dislike? Ask students to read the Travelwise website information and work out the missing words. Ask: What is the purpose of this website? Who wrote the information? Ask students to give a reason for each of their answers and to say what clues they used within the text. Play the audio for students to check their answers. 3.41

Answers 1 the most expensive 2 the most delicious 3 the friendliest 4 the most amazing 5 the hardest Transcript A One of the best It’s one of the most expensive hotels I have ever stayed in, but also one of the best. I strongly recommend it. B Slow service, but wonderful food There was only one restaurant, so we had to eat there. It was expensive and the service was very slow. But when it came, the food was excellent. It was the most delicious food I’ve ever eaten in my life! C Expensive The drinks in the Ice Bar were the most expensive I’ve ever had, so I only had one! But the hotel staff were the friendliest I’ve ever met. D Fantastic place It’s the most amazing place I have ever stayed in. There were lots of activities, from ice sculpting to snowmobile rides. We had to pay for them and they weren’t cheap, but they were great. We even saw the Northern Lights. E Very cold The sleeping bags were nice and warm and very comfortable, but the bed was the hardest I’ve ever slept in. I couldn’t sleep. And I couldn’t get up either because it was so cold. One night was enough!

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7 Discuss the comments on the Travelwise website in more detail. Teach / Elicit the phrase a bit of both (partly positive and partly negative). Ask: Which is the most interesting comment? Find out how often students use websites like this and whether they think they are useful or a good idea. Ask: Have you ever posted a review of a hotel or restaurant online? Was it positive or negative or a bit of both?



8

Answer All the comments are both positive and negative – a bit of both Tell students to cover the website comments, then set a time limit of two minutes to answer the questions. Students can write the answers in their notebooks. Ask them to check their own answers or exchange books with a partner.

Answers 1 a) the service in the restaurant b) the beds c) the hotel d) the sleeping bags e) the activities 2 a) It was expensive and the service was slow. b) It was excellent and delicious. c) They were very expensive. d) They were very friendly. e) It was very cold.





Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 143, now or at the end of the lesson and go through it with them.



Extra ideas: Tell a funny story about a hotel you once stayed in where you couldn’t do certain things and had to do some odd things. Tell the story slowly, then ask students to work in pairs and list the things you said.



Ask students to make additional sentences about a hotel they once stayed in.

Vocabulary Hotel facilities (1) 10

Ask: What kind of facilities does a good hotel have? Elicit ideas, eg a swimming pool, a gym. Write the letters A to J on the board and invite students to tell you which word goes with each picture. Ask: Which one isn’t really a facility? (breakfast). Practise the pronunciation of any difficult words, eg breakfast, access. Ask students which names for hotel facilities are very similar in their own language and which are very different.



You may want to skip ahead to SB page 112 for more vocabulary work with hotel facilities at this point.



Grammar could and had to 9 Review the meaning of can (ability) and have to (obligation or necessity). If necessary, look at the grammar notes for Unit 8 on SB page 138 and Unit 9 on SB page 140. Explain that they both have a past tense form and draw attention to the form. Explain that could, like can, is followed by an infinitive without to and the form doesn’t change; had, like have, is followed by an infinitive with to, but unlike have, the form doesn’t change.

Look at the sentences and pre-teach: terrace, sea view, WiFi, car park. Give students time to write their answers individually, then ask students to tell the class their answers.

Answers 1 couldn’t; had to 2 had to 3 couldn’t 4 had to 5 couldn’t; had to

Answers A balcony B breakfast C minibar D heating E wheelchair access F air-conditioning G lift H spa / sauna I flat-screen TV J garage

11 Refer students back to exercise 10. Explain that they have to write either a negative or a positive comment for each item and read out the two examples. Provide additional vocabulary as necessary.

MA For an extra challenge, tell students to cover the word box in exercise 10 when doing this exercise. To give more support, brainstorm words and ideas about each item and write them on the board.

12 This is a pairwork information-gap activity. Each partner looks at a different page. Make sure students don’t look at each other’s information while doing this activity. Tell students to read the information they have about a hotel and make notes in the table. Unit 12

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Then tell them to ask each other questions and make notes on their partner’s answers. Finally, they use all the information to answer questions and write a short description of a hotel. The writing task can be assigned for homework.

Answers

Palacio Hotel L’Avenida

category **** *** no. of rooms 96 20 bar yes yes restaurant yes no – but good places in the area WiFi free – in all free – in all areas public areas wheelchair access yes no parking private garage private garage – 8 euros – free a day swimming yes small pool on the roof sun terrace yes yes beach 100m 15-minute walk town centre 400m a few metres (12-minute walk) double room 80 euros 70 euros (without (without breakfast) breakfast)

1

1 Hotel Valencia 2 Palacio Hotel 3 more 4 Because it is in the centre of town, it is small, and it has its own private parking. 5 Palacio Hotel 6 L’Avenida 7 Palacio Hotel 8 Palacio Hotel

Speaking and writing 13 Tell students to work in pairs or small groups to discuss the questions. Ask them to make a list of characteristics of a good and a bad hotel, then gather their ideas and write them on the board. 14 Tell students to choose one of the hotels they discussed in exercise 13 and write a review of it. They can use the ideas on the board to help them, and you could also write some starter sentences on the board. Students could also use the comments on the Travelwise 188

website as a model. Encourage students to use superlatives in their reviews. 15 Ask volunteers to read their reviews to the class. Give praise and corrective feedback. Collect the reviews and use them to gather example sentences for review in the next lesson.

Lesson 3 What’s the hardest thing you’ve ever done? pp110–111 Aims The focus of this lesson is to review tenses and talk about charity events.

Warm-up Focus on the photo and ask students to describe it. Ask: Where is this woman? What is she doing? Why do you think she is doing this? Do you think it is easy or hard? Why? Point out the title and ask: What’s the hardest thing you’ve ever done? Elicit some answers from students.

Grammar Review of tenses 1 Give students time to read the information and complete it individually, then compare answers in pairs. Check the answers as a class and check comprehension of any new words, eg TV presenter, longest-running, charity, marathon, tightrope, South Pole. Ask: Which of her adventures do you think was the hardest?





Answers 1 was 2 was 3 is 4 has done 5 ran 6 kayaked 7 walked 8 rode Background information: Sport Relief is an annual event that raises money by asking celebrities to take part in sports activities. Members of the public can take part in the events too and the money is used to help charities.

2 Tell students to look at the information again and find as many tenses as they can. Ask them to explain why each tense is used and to say which tense that they have learnt is not used (going to future). Get students to write a list of the tenses used, then review the

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formation of each one as a class. Ask: Which verbs are irregular? (be, do, run, ride). Review the differences in meaning by referring to the relevant section of the grammar reference.





Answers 1 was born – past simple 2 was – past simple 3 is – present simple 4 has done – present perfect 5 ran – past simple 6 kayaked – past simple 7 walked – past simple 8 rode – past simple Three tenses: present simple, past simple, present perfect

3 Do the first item with the class as an example, then give students time to work individually. Write the answers on the board, then invite volunteers to write the questions next to the correct answer. Ask the others to correct them if necessary.





Answers 1 Where was Helen born? 2 What did she do from 2008 to 2013? 3 What does she do now? 4 Where did she run an Ultra Marathon in 2009? 5 When did she kayak all the way down the Amazon? 6 What did she do in London in 2011? 7 How did she go / get to the North Pole in 2012? Extra idea: Ask: What type of person do you think Helen is? What type of person do you have to be to do her job?

Listening 1 4 Explain that students are going to listen to somebody talking about an interview with Helen. These are the questions Helen was asked. Give students time to complete the questions. Point out that the questions review grammar points that have been studied in the book up till now (superlatives, present perfect, going to). If students have any difficulty with them, refer to the relevant section of the grammar reference.



Answers 1 hardest 2 have ever been 3 hottest 4 have ever had 5 worst 6 going to do

5 Tell students to look at the questions in exercise 4 and brainstorm ideas for Helen’s answers from around the class. 6



3.42 Play the audio for students to check their ideas in exercise 5. Point out that they don’t hear Helen’s exact words, so they will need to change some pronouns, etc (she – I, her – my, etc).

Answers 1 The Amazon in 2010 2 The South Pole 3 Namibia 4 Driving across Turkey in a camper van 5 When someone broke into my hotel room in Australia 6 Go to Nepal and Thailand Transcript MAN I’m just reading this really interesting interview with Helen Skelton. WOMAN Who? MAN Helen Skelton – you know, the TV presenter. WOMAN Oh yes. I know. What does it say about her? MAN Well, she’s done some really amazing things. WOMAN Like what? MAN Well, first she says her hardest adventure up to now was the Amazon in 2010. She kayaked all the way down it, 3,230 kilometres! It took 40 days, but she saw some amazing animals. WOMAN Wow! MAN And then the South Pole is the coldest place she’s ever been. She went there in 2012. It was minus 48! It was so cold apparently, it was painful. WOMAN Yeah, minus 48 is really cold. How did she travel? MAN She skied and cycled. It took 18 days to go about 800 kilometres. WOMAN She’s a brave woman! And what about the hottest place? MAN She ran an Ultra Marathon in Namibia in 2009. That means 126 kilometres in 24 hours. She didn’t sleep for 24 hours! WOMAN Does she ever have a normal holiday? MAN Well, she says her best holiday was in Turkey. She drove across the country from east to west in a camper van. WOMAN A camper van? Unit 12

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Yes, and her worst holiday experience was in Australia. Someone broke into her hotel room. WOMAN Yeah, that’s horrible. So where next? What is she going to do for her next adventure? MAN She says she wants to go to Nepal and Thailand. What about you? What are you going to do for your next adventure? WOMAN I think I’m going to make some tea! MAN





7 Write the headings on the board. Tell students to write key words, not sentences, and point out that there are six places altogether, so there are a lot of notes to make. Play the audio again, up to ... she saw some amazing animals, and do the first one together with the class as a model. Show them how to note down just the key information: place: Amazon year: 2010 distance: 3,230km time: 40 days transport: kayak extra info: amazing animals

Play the rest of the audio while students take notes. Play it as many times as necessary, perhaps pausing after each segment. Note that there isn’t information under each heading for all the countries, so students must listen carefully. Invite volunteers to write their answers on the board.

Answers question 1 2 place Amazon South Pole year 2010 2012 distance 3,230km 800km time 40 days 18 days transport kayak skis and bike extra amazing –48˚C information animals

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3 Namibia 2009 126km 24 hours on foot / running didn’t sleep for 24 hours

question 4

5

6



place Turkey Australia Nepal, Thailand



transport camper van

extra crossed someone information country broke east to into her west hotel room 8 Tell students to use their notes from exercise 7 and to work in pairs to re-tell the story. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any problems with grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation or intonation. Praise students and provide corrective feedback.

Extra idea: Ask students to write Helen’s story.

Listening 2 9

GUESS Ask students to talk about the photo and tell students his name. Brainstorm as many answers as possible and write them on the board.

10

3.43 Tell students they are going to hear a radio report about Ade Adepitan. Play the audio and check the answers to exercise 9.



Answers 1 He is British. 2 He is a TV presenter. 3 Because he got polio when he was six months old. Transcript Ade Adepitan is a British TV presenter and he is also a Paralympic basketball champion. He was born in Lagos, Nigeria, on 27th March, 1973, but went to live in the UK when he was three. At the age of six months, Ade got polio. He couldn’t walk, but he always wanted to be a famous sportsman. In 2004, he won his first gold medal in wheelchair basketball at the Paralympic Games in Athens. He won two more gold medals for basketball in 2008 and 2012 and another one for wheelchair tennis in 2008.

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Ade has been a TV presenter for many years, often on programmes about sport. He uses television to talk about racism and the problems for people with disabilities. He also does a lot of charity work, especially for children’s charities.

are disabled there because of polio. It is one of the richest countries in Africa, but it is the only country in Africa where polio is still a problem. The polio vaccination is free for all children, but some parents don’t want their children to have it. They think the vaccination is dangerous because it is free and because it is foreign.

11 Go through the table first – and perhaps write the headings on the board. Play the audio again as students write their answers. Ask volunteers to read out the answers as you write them on the board.

Answers Name Ade Adepitan Date of birth 27th March, 1973 Country of birth Nigeria Nationality British Occupation TV presenter and basketball player / sportsman Paralympic 2004: wheelchair gold medals basketball 2008: basketball & wheelchair tennis 2012: wheelchair basketball Interests racism, problems for people with disabilities, charity work 12







‘One million children in Nigeria are in danger,’ says Ade, ‘but until we win the fight against polio, we are all in danger.’

Extra ideas: Ask students to role-play an interview with Ade.

Ask: What did Ade mean when he said ‘we are all in danger’? Ask students if they can think of any solutions to the problem of polio, and to find out more online. One place they can search is Journey of My Lifetime – Ade Adepitan.

Speaking and writing 13 Remind students about Sport Relief (see the notes in exercise 1) and ask students for names of other charities they know about or support. If students can’t think of any, point out the logos on SB page 111. Ask: What does the charity support? Ask students to work in groups and explain why they think their three chosen charities are good.

Ask students to read the questions first and try to predict the answers. Then play the audio for students to check their ideas and write the correct answers. Play it again for students to check their answers.



Background information: Greenpeace is an environmental organisation that campaigns on issues such as global warming, deforestation, overfishing, commercial whaling, genetic engineering and nuclear power.

Answers 1 He went to Nigeria to make a TV documentary about polio. 2 It is one of the richest countries in Africa; it is the only country in Africa where polio is still a problem. 3 Because some parents don’t want their children to have the vaccination against polio. 4 One million children



UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund) provides help to children and mothers in developing countries.



Amnesty International is an organisation that campaigns for human rights all over the world. They help people who have suffered injustice or been imprisoned unjustly.



The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is an international humanitarian movement with approximately 97 million volunteers worldwide, which was founded to help people who are suffering, especially as a result of wars or natural disasters.

3.44

Transcript In 2013, Ade travelled back to Nigeria to make a TV documentary about polio. Many people

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Amref Health Africa provides medical assistance to remote regions of East Africa, and helps to alleviate the effects of poverty, tropical disease and insufficient health services.

14 Read out the example. Tell students to choose one of the charities they talked about in exercise 13. You may also want to ask students to rank their three charities in order of importance for the world. Ask: Which one would you give money to? Which one would you help to raise money for? Elicit some ideas for possible criteria and write them on the board, eg They help the poorest people in the world. They help to make the world safer / fairer / better. You may want to start this activity in class and ask students to finish it for homework.

Explore This is an opportunity for students to do research outside the classroom and tell the class about their findings in the next lesson. Brainstorm a list of charities, eg OXFAM, Wateraid, Cancer Research. Ask students to find out and make notes about what each charity does. Did you know?  * Read the information about Ade Adepitan.

Ask students if they know any other celebrities who support charities and which charities they support.

De-stress! A lot of our worries are in the past or the future. We’re unhappy because of something which happened in the past and we keep thinking about it, or we’re stressed about something which might happen in the future. There is less stress in the present, if we can only pay attention to it. Tell students: The past is history. The future a mystery. But the now is a gift … which is why it’s called the present. Ask how many of them find it easy to be in the present and not the past or the future.

Vocabulary plus p112 Note: If possible, bring in some hotel brochures or download information on hotels from the internet.

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Hotel facilities (2) 1 Use this activity to review the vocabulary from SB page 109, exercise 10. Set a time limit for students to write as many words as they can. When they have finished, ask for feedback and write the words on the board. Refer back to SB page 109 to find any missing words. 2 Use questions to clarify the meaning of any new words, eg Which word describes … when you can see the sea from your window? (sea view) … when a waiter brings a meal to your room? (room service), etc. Elicit answers from the class and write the pairs of words on the board. Ask if any other combinations are possible, eg room reservation / room service, hotel bill / hotel reception, single room / double room). Practise the pronunciation of any difficult words, eg reception, reservation, Wi-Fi (/waɪfaɪ/).



Answers double room, hotel bill / reception / reservation / room, room service, sea view, single room, twin room, wake-up call, WiFi password / service

3 Mention that Could I …? is more polite than Can I …? Go through the situations first and model the example question. Give students time to write the questions, pointing out that they should use words from exercise 2 in the questions. Check answers as a class.



MA Students who finish early could write out a six-line conversation starting with one of these questions.

Suggested answers a) Could I have the WiFi password, please? b) Could I have a wake-up call for 5am tomorrow, please? c) Could I have a twin room, please? d) Could I order room service tonight, please? e) Could I have a (room with a) sea view, please? f) Could I have my bill, please? Extra ideas: Ask students to mime one of the requests. The other students have to guess which one it is.

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RECEPTIONIST

Certainly. What’s your room number? MAN Two two two. RECEPTIONIST Two two? MAN No, two two two! Could I have the WiFi 2 WOMAN password, please? RECEPTIONIST Sure. I’ll just write it down for you. Could we have a room with a 3 MAN sea view, please? RECEPTIONIST I’m terribly sorry. There’s a conference on, and all those rooms are full. MAN But we have a room with a very nice view of the motorway! RECEPTIONIST Oh!

Ask: What are some possible replies to these requests? Students work in pairs to develop mini-conversations on each topic.

If you brought in some hotel brochures, ask students to use them to role-play telephone conversations asking about the facilities and the prices and booking a room.

Focus on: look Note that this can be done at any point during the lesson. Ask students if they know the meaning of any of the phrasal verbs with look. Then ask if they know any synonyms for these words (look after – take care of, look out – be careful). Ask students to complete the dialogues individually, then practise them in pairs using appropriate stress and intonation. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any problems with pronunciation.



Answers 1 looking at; looking for 2 look after 3 look up 4 Look out

4

3.45 Review the situations in exercise 3 and go over the questions students wrote.



Explain they are going to listen to three conversations about the situations. Play the audio, pausing after each conversation for students to match it with the correct situation. Check answers as a class and ask what the problems were. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line.



MA As an extra challenge, ask students to close their books and see if they can remember all the situations before they begin.



Answers 1f 2a 3e In conversation 1, the receptionist doesn’t hear the room number correctly. In conversation 3, there are no rooms with sea views available. Transcript 1 MAN

Could we have the bill, please, and could you book a taxi? We need to go.

5 Write the four categories on the board first and go through the words that can go with hotel as an example. Check comprehension of any new words, eg documentary, fan, passenger, stadium, staff. Students then work in small groups to come up with as many possibilities as they can for each category. Invite students to come and write words on the board under the correct heading.





Vocabulary note: The compound nouns in this exercise are a combination of two nouns: the second part identifies the object or person (bill, room, stadium), the first part tells us what kind of object or person it is (hotel, car, football).

Answers television: presenter, documentary, programme car: park, driver, passenger, seat football: player, boots, fan, game, match, stadium, team Extra idea: You could make this into a team game where each group gets a point for each new word added to the table.

Focus on: A useful word Go through the sentences and ask students to guess the missing word (note that it’s the same word each time – although it has a different meaning in each case, and is a different part of speech). Ask: What does it mean in each sentence? What part of speech is it? Tell students Unit 12

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LAURA

to practise the dialogues in pairs, then ask them to make up an additional conversation to illustrate each meaning.

Answer left

RECEPTIONIST

4

Ask students to practise the conversation in pairs, then ask a few pairs to act out the conversation for the class.



MA For an extra challenge, students can try to act out the conversation with books closed. You can put key words on the board to help with this.



Alternatively, students can use the karaoke function on e-zone. They start the video and watch the conversation. Then they select the role they want to play, click on the play button and speak their part when they see the highlighted words on the screen.

5

Explain that you are going to play another conversation in a hotel, this time with a different problem. Play the audio. Help students to notice any key words that help them understand the problem. Play the audio again for students to check their answers.

Everyday English p113 Checking in 1

3.46

6 Decide whether you are going to

use the video or simply play the audio. Ask students to describe the photo and find out what they already know about Laura from previous units. Ask: Where are they? What are they doing? Play the video or audio and give students time to fill in the missing words. Play the video or audio again for students to check their answers.

Answers 1 reservation 2 make 3 booked



Transcript

3.48

Answer The receptionist can’t find the man’s reservation and the hotel is fully booked.



Can I help you? Yes, my name’s Janes. I have a reservation for two nights. RECEPTIONIST Just checking. Um, nothing’s coming up. How did you make the reservation? LAURA I booked online. About a month ago. RECEPTIONIST I can’t find anything, Ms Jones.

That’s right. That’s fine. Could I have your passport, please?

RECEPTIONIST LAURA

Transcript Good evening. OMAR Good evening. My name’s Osman and I have a reservation for tonight. RECEPTIONIST Thank you, Mr Osman. I’ll just check for you. There’s nothing on the system, Mr Osman. How did you book? OMAR By phone. Our secretary booked it last week. RECEPTIONIST No, I’m sorry. I can’t find it at all. And I’m afraid we’re fully booked. RECEPTIONIST

2 Brainstorm as many ideas as possible for what might happen next and write them on the board. If students are finding this difficult, tell them to look at Laura’s surname. 3

3.47 6 Play the video or audio for students to check their ideas.

Answer The receptionist spelt her surname incorrectly, but then found the reservation.



6 Brainstorm as many ideas as possible for what might happen next and write them on the board. 7

Transcript LAURA

RECEPTIONIST

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No, not Jones. Janes. J-A-N-E-S. With an A, not an O! Oh! I’m so sorry. Yes, here it is. A single room for two nights?

3.49 Play the audio for students to check their answers. Explain that Vic is short for Victoria. Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat each line. Then ask them to role-play the whole conversation in pairs.

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Answer Mr Osman didn’t book the Queen Elizabeth – he booked a different hotel – the Queen Victoria.



10

Transcript OMAR

RECEPTIONIST

OMAR



Oh dear. What a pity. A friend told me the Queen Victoria Hotel was the best place to stay here. Oh, this isn’t the Queen Victoria! It’s the Queen Elizabeth! The Queen Vic’s on the next street. Oh, sorry. How stupid of me! How do I get there?

Solving problems 8



Look at the pictures first and ask: What’s the problem in each one? Elicit a few ideas from the students, then play the audio while students match the pictures with the conversations. Play the audio again for students to check their answers. 3.50

Hello, is that reception?

RECEPTIONIST Yes.

Um, I’m sorry, but my TV doesn’t work. 2 RECEPTIONIST Reception. MAN Oh, hello. Um, my WiFi connection doesn’t work. Excuse me. I’ve just seen my 3 MAN room. I asked for a room with a sea view, and there isn’t one. I’m very sorry, but my room is 4 WOMAN a bit noisy. Is it possible to move to another room, please? WOMAN

Answers Oh, I’m sorry. (Conversation 3) I’ll send someone up to fix it. (Conversation 1) I’ll see if there’s a room free. (Conversation 3) Would you like to move now? (Conversation 3) I’m sorry. We’re fully booked. (Conversation 4) You have to go to the Business Centre. (Conversation 2) Transcript 1 WOMAN

Hello, is that reception?

RECEPTIONIST Yes.

Um, I’m sorry, but my TV doesn’t work. RECEPTIONIST I’ll send someone up to fix it. WOMAN Thank you very much. 2 RECEPTIONIST Reception. MAN Oh, hello. Um, my WiFi connection doesn’t work. RECEPTIONIST No, there isn’t any WiFi in the bedrooms. You have to go to the Business Centre. MAN Oh. And where’s that? RECEPTIONIST It’s on the ground floor. MAN Thank you. Excuse me. I’ve just seen my 3 MAN room. I asked for a room with a sea view, and there isn’t one. RECEPTIONIST Oh, I’m sorry. I’ll see if there’s a room free. Um, yes, room 312. Would you like to move now? MAN Yes. Thank you very much. I’m very sorry, but my room is 4 WOMAN a bit noisy. Is it possible to move to another room, please? RECEPTIONIST I’m sorry. We’re fully booked. WOMAN





Answers 1D 2C 3A 4B Transcript 1 WOMAN



Read through the sentences first. Explain that you are going to play the rest of each conversation in exercise 8. Play the audio for students to check their ideas from exercise 9. Ask students to tick any expressions on the list that they heard, then play the audio again for students to check. Play it one more time, pausing for students to repeat each line. Make a note of any useful phrases, eg I can’t find it at all. How stupid of me! 3.51





9 Write the words on the board and tell students to close their books. Ask them to write sentences or mini-dialogues to illustrate their solutions. Compare answers as a class and discuss whether the sentences are polite enough or could be more polite.

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11 Go through the problems and the phrases in exercise 10. Ask students to write a 6–8 line conversation. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of any common problems with grammar or vocabulary. When they have finished, ask a few pairs to act out their conversations. Focus on fluency and intonation in your feedback. MA Students can present their conversation from memory or look at their notes (but they shouldn’t just read directly from their notes).



Tip: When students practise a conversation from the book, encourage them to use the ‘read and look-up’ method. This means that they should first look down and read the line. Then they should look up at their partner and say the line.

Extra idea: Ask students if they have ever had a problem in a hotel and tell the class about it. Ask: What was the problem? How did you solve it? Students can write a description of the situation or write the conversation for homework.

we don’t say … / we say …

This section focuses on the following areas:



• • • •



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incorrect form of superlative and incorrect tense use incorrect use of pronoun incorrect use of direct object with recommend incorrect past tense use

Ask students to cover the green we say … side and see if they can correct the mistakes themselves before they look and check.

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Units 11&12 review Reading 1 Ask students which martial arts they can remember from Unit 10, Lesson 1. Ask them if they know any martial arts films. Name a few recent ones and ask if students have seen them.

Ask students to describe the photo and say what they know about Jackie Chan. Remind them that they know when and where he was born from Unit 5 Lesson 1. You may want to pre-teach the words stunt and stuntman. Ask: What do you think is good or bad about his job? Make a list of pros and cons on the board.

2 Ask students to think about what words they might see in an article about Jackie Chan. Give them time to work individually then gather all the ideas and write them on the board. 3 Tell students to read the article and highlight any of their words that appeared. Tell them to underline any of their words that were similar in meaning to words in the article.

Grammar 1 4 Tell students to complete the sentences individually, then compare answers in pairs. Ask volunteers to tell the class their answers and explain how they reached them. Ask students to identify the tenses used in each sentence.



Answers 1 acts; sings; does (present simple) 2 learnt; didn’t learn (past simple) 3 has had; has never lost (present perfect) 4 was born; wasn’t born (past simple / was born)



Answers 1 What does Jackie Chan do? 2 Where was he born? 3 What did he learn at drama school? 4 When did he start acting? 5 How many films has he been in? 6 Has he ever broken his fingers? Extra idea: Students can role-play an interview with Jackie Chan using the information in the article.

Listening 6 Read through the information with the class and ask students to work on their own to guess the missing words. Then ask volunteers to read out their answers. Find out who has visited the website and what they like or dislike about it.

7





5 Give students time to write the questions individually. Then invite volunteers to write the questions on the board. Ask the rest of the class to correct them or provide alternatives.

pp114–115



Answers 1 fruit 2 vegetables 3 Tomatoes Ask students to read the questions and try to predict the answers. Play the audio while students listen and answer the questions, then play it again for them to check their answers. 3.52

Answers 1 Senh Duong started the website on August 12th, 1998 so that people could read reviews by different critics. 2 He was a great Jackie Chan fan and collected all the reviews. 3 The symbol for a positive review is a red tomato. 4 The symbol for a negative review is a squashed green tomato. 5 To be ‘red’ and not ‘green’ a film needs 60% positive reviews.

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Transcript Senh Duong started the Rotten Tomatoes website on August 12th, 1998. He wanted to create a site where people could read reviews by lots of different critics. Duong was a great Jackie Chan fan and he collected all the reviews of Chan’s films as they came out. The website was an immediate success. So how does it work? The staff collect online reviews and decide if they are positive – a red tomato – or negative – a squashed green tomato. If there are more than 60% positive reviews, the film is ‘red’. If there are fewer than 60% positive reviews, the film is ‘green’.

Preposition park Look at the photo and ask if anyone has seen the film Bend it Like Beckham. Tell students to work on their own to complete the paragraph, then compare answers with a partner. Check the answers as a class. Find out if anybody knows what the title of the film means. (It refers to being able to kick the ball so that it bends around the opposition team players to score a goal – David Beckham is very good at doing this!)



Grammar 2 8



Give students time to read the film reviews, and point out that each one has five mistakes (which are crossed out). Tell students to correct each mistake, then compare answers with a partner. Play the audio for students to check their answers and ask students to explain the reason for each mistake. 3.53

Answers think / best / wrote / thought / the greatest people / most / have ever seen / was / were Transcript Many people think that Citizen Kane is the best film Hollywood has ever made. Orson Welles starred in it, directed it, produced it and also wrote it. People thought it was the greatest film ever because it had a really good story and wonderful music and a new style of camera work. On the other hand, a lot of people say that Alone in the Dark is the most terrible film they have ever seen. It was a science-fiction action horror film! They say the acting was really bad and the special effects were terrible.



198

Extra idea: Ask students to write a review of their favourite and least favourite film for homework. (If the films are well-known, they can read out their review in the next lesson and the other students can guess which film it is.)



Answers 1 in 2 on 3 in 4 in 5 as 6 in 7 about 8 in 9 at 10 about 11 on Extra idea: Ask some comprehension questions about the paragraph with books closed, or open for students who need more support. The answers should include a preposition, eg When was Gurinder born? Where was she born? Where did she grow up? What was her first job? Where was her first job? When did she make ‘Bend it Like Beckham’? Where does Jess’s family live? What is she good at?

Speaking 9 Go through the questions as a class, then tell students to discuss them in groups. Monitor groups as they work, making a note of any problems with grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation or intonation. Praise students and provide corrective feedback.

Explore This is an opportunity for students to do research outside the classroom and tell the class about their findings in the next lesson. Brainstorm ideas for films, either very recent ones or classics. Try to ensure that there is a spread of different types of film genres.

Cross culture: Hollywood and Bollywood a Ask students about the photo, eg What are they wearing / doing? Where are they? Ask students what they know about Hollywood and Bollywood. Ask: What is a typical Hollywood or Bollywood film? What themes

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are popular in each? What are the differences between them? Ask about any recent Hollywood / Bollywood films they have seen.

Extra information: You may want to mention the 2008 film Slumdog Millionaire, which was a crossover Bollywood-type film for international audiences, or the 2004 film Bride and Prejudice, which was a Bollywood treatment of the Jane Austen novel Pride and Prejudice.



Go through the questions with the class, then give students time to read the article and decide whether the sentences are true or false. Discuss the answers as class.



Answers 1 true 2 true 3 false: only in Hindi 4 false: audiences all over the world enjoy them

b Give groups five minutes to talk about cinema, using the questions to help them. Then ask groups to report to the class on the most interesting or surprising facts and discuss the answers with the class. Discuss how cinema can help different cultures to understand each other better. Ask: Are films an accurate reflection of culture in a particular country? Why or why not?

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Extra material Photocopiable games Teacher’s notes Nice to meet you Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 Unit 7 Unit 8 Unit 9 Unit 10 Unit 11 Unit 12

201 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216

Tasks Teacher’s notes Tasks Units 1–12

217 219

Technique banks Using the video Using stories Using memory games 20 easy games Five fun techniques to use with a flagging class Extra questions and tasks for Movies & Music Working with mixed-ability classes Ensuring learner autonomy and using technology

225 226 227 229 231 232 233 233

De-stress cartoons 235

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Photocopiable games Teacher’s notes Unit

Game

Players* Language focus

Nice to meet you 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Bingo rows What is it? Find the differences Say two true things What does it rhyme with? The ‘true or false’ game The contradiction game Link Name something you can … Do or make? Compare them! Have you ever …? Hotel mime game

C P/G/C P/G P/G/C P/G/C P P/C P/G/C C P/G/C P/G/C P G

Vocabulary: Numbers 1–100 (listening) Vocabulary / spelling: everyday objects There is / are, isn’t / aren’t + furniture Present simple: like + verbs Pronunciation: words that sound the same Review: asking / answering personal questions Negative of present and past tenses Vocabulary: finding connections Vocabulary: nouns which go with verbs Vocabulary Comparatives with -er and more Present perfect / past simple Asking questions / polite requests

* C = whole class, G = groups, P = pairs

These games are all photocopiable. Alternatively, you can download them from the e-zone. Remember, you don’t have to play the games just once in the particular unit – you can return to them any time to replay them, or else have them handy as an option for early finishers. If you do want to keep the games and re-use them, it’s a good idea to put them in individual plastic folders and then you’ve always got them when you need them.

Board games (All the games except Nice to meet you, Units, 2, 8 and 12) You can set these games up in several ways: 1 As a normal board game using dice and counters, with students in pairs or small groups of three or four. You will need to make sure you have enough dice for the number of groups. Students place their counters (or coins, paperclips, etc) on START and take turns to throw the dice and move.

In many of these games, players get points for their answers. The first person to reach FINISH gets an extra 2 points and the game stops. The winner is the player with the most points.

2 As a whole-class team game, dividing the class into two teams. Before the lesson, write numbers to correspond to the number of squares on pieces of paper and put them in a hat, box or plastic bag. Call out the number of a square to each team in turn. The team gets points for correct answers. If one team can’t answer, it goes to the other team. Keep a score (or have a student keep a score) on the board. 3 In pairs. One person shuts their eyes and puts their finger on the board before opening their eyes again, and the other answers. (If they don’t point to a particular square, they have another go.) Points as above. 4 As an interactive whiteboard activity with the whole class, or played either individually or in pairs on e-zone. Important notes: 1 You can change the instructions or rules for any game, or ask your students if they can suggest more interesting ways of playing a game! 2 MA If you want to make a game more difficult for some (or all) your students, say that a square already used by one player cannot be re-used by another.

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Possible answers for X in Compare them! (Unit 10)

Unit 2 – Find the differences

(note that many of these are subjective)

MA With a mixed-ability class, you might want to use a variety (1 is easiest, 3 is more difficult).

1 Uruguay, Greece, Singapore, Taiwan 2 St Petersburg, Rio, Istanbul 3 Mercedes, Porsche, Jaguar 4 plastic, wood, steel 5 a knife, a computer, a smartphone 6 gold, platinum 7 donkey, lion, monkey 8 zumba, salsa, tai bo 9 Chinese, Japanese, Breton 10 (students’ own answer) 11 carrots, courgettes 12 scorpion, spider, mosquito 13 The USA, Canada, Russia 14 jogging, squash 15 having a job interview, taking an exam 16 a table, a sofa, a cupboard 17 Iceland, Madagascar 18 a racehorse, a cheetah 19 a gun, a car, a motorbike 20 (students’ own answer)

There are various ways of doing this.

1 Students have the whole sheet so both students can see both living rooms and make statements. 2 Students have one living room each so they can only see theirs and have to ask each other questions. 3 Student A looks at a picture, Student B doesn’t have one. A describes the room for B to draw, or B asks questions and sketches the room. 4 Use one or both pictures as a memory game. Students look at it / them for 30 seconds then write down (or draw) all the things they can remember. 5 You can also use one of the pictures as the basis for a true / false drill – either with students looking at the picture as you do so, or from memory. You could do this as a prelude to any of the other activities.

Non-board games

Unit 8 – Name something you can …

Nice to meet you – Bingo rows

This can be played as a board game with dice and counters but is probably best played as a wholeclass competition, with the students working in pairs or small groups to brainstorm ideas.

Before the lesson 1 Photocopy the page and cut it into ten separate grids – one grid for each student. (It doesn’t matter if some students have the same grid if you have more than ten students.) 2 Write numbers 1–100 on small pieces of paper and put them in a bag or box. Playing the game Take a piece of paper out of the bag or box, and call out the number. Students cross the numbers off as they hear them. They shout Bingo! for a complete line of numbers across, down or diagonally. They don’t have to wait for the whole card! If you want the game to be faster, they could call out if they have four out of five numbers. A very easy way of playing this is to have students choose and write down five to ten numbers between 1 and 100 (or 1 and 20 or 1 and 50, etc). You will still need to write the relevant numbers on small pieces of paper beforehand and put them in a bag or box, so you can call them out. Once they get the idea, invite individuals or pairs of students to do the calling out instead of you.

Before the lesson Write numbers 1–30 on small pieces of paper and put them in a hat, box or plastic bag. Playing the game 1 Pick out and read out a number. (Or you can just shut your eyes and stab the page with your finger!)

Students have 30 seconds to write down all the things they can think of which correspond to that verb.

2 Elicit ideas from the class. Pairs or groups get a point for a word nobody else has thought of. Keep score on the board. A few possible answers (there may be many more in some cases): play – a game, football, the violin sit on – a chair, a sofa, the floor read – a book, a magazine, an email open or close – a window, a door, a book listen to – music, a CD, the rain write with – a pen, a pencil

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write on – paper, a wall, a board

Unit 12 – Hotel mime game

send – a letter, an email, a message eat / drink / wear – lots of possibilities

Before the lesson. Photocopy one page (page 216) for each group in your class. Cut it into 30 pieces of paper or card.

switch on or off – the light, a computer, the TV

Playing the game

get on or off – a bus, a train, a plane

1 Students work in small groups of three or four. Give each group one set of papers, placed face-down between them. Tell them that written on the papers are the kinds of things a hotel guest might ask or tell a receptionist.

ride – a bike, a horse, a camel

get into or out of – a car, a taxi, bed climb – a mountain, a wall, a tree drink out of – a cup, a glass, a mug watch – TV, a film, a match cook – a meal, fish, dinner cut things with – a knife, scissors go up or down – stairs, a hill, a road bend – your knees, your elbows brush – your hair, your teeth, the floor fly – a plane, a kite

2 One student (the hotel guest) takes a paper – without showing it to anyone. They mime what’s written on their paper to the rest of their group, who must guess what the query or problem is. 3 Once the group have guessed what’s on the paper, the next student takes a paper.

drive – a car, a lorry, a tractor wash – clothes, the dishes, your hands catch – a fish, a ball, a bus put in the fridge – lots of possibilities speak – a language, English answer – a question, the phone, an email

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Nice to meet you Bingo rows 1

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Unit 1 What is it? You need a dice and counters

2 spell the word. (1 point for a correct answer)

Playing the game When you land on a square:

The winner is the player with the most points when the first player gets to FINISH.

1 say the number and say what it is. (1 point for a correct answer) 1 It’s an apple.

(All the words in the game are in this unit.)







‘A-P-P-L-E’



START 1

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Unit 2 Find the differences Work with a partner or in small groups. How many differences can you find between these two living rooms? Give yourselves a point for each one. A



B

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Unit 3 Say two true things You need a dice and counters

2 say if you do it or don’t do it every day. (1 point)

Before you begin Go through the words and decide what verb you can use with words that don’t end in -ing, eg parties = go to parties, jazz = listen to jazz.



Playing the game When you land on a circle:

The first player who gets to FINISH gets an extra two points and the game ends. The winner is the player with the most points when that happens. (All the words in the game are in this unit.)

1 say if you like or don’t like that thing or activity. (1 point)



‘I like TV and I watch it every day.’ ‘I like parties but I don’t go to parties every day!’

1

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START

parties

jazz

TV

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shopping

art galleries

classical music

football

museums

housework

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dancing

pop music

learning English

FINISH

rap

the cinema

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jogging

computer games

newspapers

cricket

coffee

the theatre

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tennis

swimming

sleeping

travel books

books

magazines

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Unit 4 What does it rhyme with? You need a dice and counters

The winner is the player with the most points when the first player gets to FINISH.

Playing the game When you land on a square:

(All the words in the game are in Units 1–4.)

1 identify what is on the square. (1 point for a correct answer) 2 find a word in the box below that rhymes with it. (1 point for the correct answer)

‘One! And it rhymes with … son! 2 points!’ game door home guess why small pen blue rock look train our flag please friend far like laugh pink right son great red line come key play where go daughter 1

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Unit 5 The ‘true or false?’ game

‘Where were you born?’ ‘I was born in Kolkata. 1 point!’ ‘I don’t think that’s true.’ ‘No, it isn’t. You get a point.’ ‘One point each. Where were you really born?’ ‘In Izmir.’ ‘How nice!’

You need a dice and counters Playing the game This game is best played in pairs or very small groups. When you land on a square: 1 your partner reads you the question. 2 answer the question. You can lie or tell the truth. (1 point for understanding the question and giving an answer) 3 your partner must decide if your answer is true or false. If they are correct, they get a point. If not, you get another point.

START 1

2 What’s your family name?

10 Are you a James Bond fan?

11 Are you married?

20 What year were you born?

The winner is the player with the most points when the first player gets to FINISH.

3

Where were you born?

4

5

What do you do? How old are you?

What nationality are you?

9

8

6

What’s your favourite colour?

What’s your favourite word in English?

12

13

7

Do you live in a house or a flat?

19

14 Do you enjoy parties?

18

What do you usually have for breakfast?

What’s your mobile number?

Do you get up early?

Where are you from?

15 What kind of music do you like?

17 How do you get to work or college?

Do you play an instrument?

16 What activities do you enjoy?

FINISH

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Unit 6 The contradiction game The winner is the player with the most points when the first player gets to FINISH. Note: If you aren’t sure about something, you can always look it up online.

You need a dice and counters Playing the game When you land on a square: 1 read out the sentence and say if it’s true or false. (1 point for a correct answer) 2 if it’s false, contradict the information and then correct it. (1 point for a negative sentence and 1 point for a correction.)





Federico García Lorca wrote novels. No, he didn’t write novels. He wrote poetry.

’ 2

1

START

Jaws and E.T. are Tarantino films.

3

Chinese New Year has a fixed date.

The letters UK mean United Kangaroos.

8

7

6

5

4

A volleyball team has eight players.

They speak Spanish in Brazil.

The capital of Turkey is Istanbul.

Beethoven composed eight symphonies.

Batman was born on the planet Krypton.

9

10

Federico García Lorca wrote novels.

Verdi and Vivaldi were Portuguese painters.

16

17 Shakespeare wrote War and Peace.

18 An ‘extrovert’ likes being alone.

210

11 The British Prime Minister lives at 20 Downing Street.

15 There are 30 days in July.

12

14

Ludwig Guttman was the father of the Olympics.

Agatha Christie wrote poetry.

19

20

The last Olympic Games were last year.

The Greek flag is blue and white.

Spiders have six legs.

13 Got is the past tense of go.

FINISH

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Unit 7 Link You need a dice and counters Playing the game When you land on a square: 1 name the two things on that square. (1 point) 2 find a link between them (there may be more than one link). (1 point for every link)

10 – June and July. They’re both months and ‘they both begin with ‘J’. Do I get two points? ’

The winner is the player with the most points when the first player gets to FINISH.

START

FINISH

1

8

9

16

17

24

2

7

10

15

18

23

June / July

Tuesday / Thursday

roast / bake

3

6

11

14

19

22

4

5

12

13

20

21

Taiwan / Haiti

gold / silver

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Unit 8 Name something you can … Playing the game 1 Listen to the teacher say a number. You have 30 seconds to write down all the things you can think of which correspond to that verb.

2 Say your words. You get a point for a word nobody else has thought of. Keep score on the board.

‘3 – read’



a book, a magazine, a newspaper, an email, a text message

Name something you can … START 1

2 play

12

3 sit on

11 wear

13

24

drink

get on or off

fly

drive

wash

21 go up or down 28 put in the fridge

write on

18

drink out of

20

bend

catch

send

17 climb

write with

7

ride

16

27

listen to

8

get into or out of

brush

6

open or close

eat

22

26

5

9

15

23

25

read

10

14 switch on or off

4

watch

19

cut things with 29

cook

30 speak

answer

FINISH

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Unit 9 Do or make?

‘An exam. Do. I did an exam a long time ago!’ ‘A speech. Make. I don’t make speeches!’

You need a dice and counters Playing the game When you land on a square:

The winner is the player with the most points when the first player gets to FINISH.

1 say make or do. (1 point) 2 say when you last made or did that particular thing. (1 point)

2

1

START

a crossword

7

8 an omelette

a speech

the shopping

a reservation

a lot of noise!

judo

your hair

14 the ironing

some exercise

12 a lot of money

15

19

18

4

11

16

an exam

5

some homework

10

17

an important decision

6 a mistake

9

3

an excuse

13 a phone call

some housework

20 an appointment

a cup of coffee

FINISH

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Unit 10 Compare them!

‘Luxembourg is a smaller country than Italy.’ ‘Taipei is a more beautiful city than Paris.’

You need a dice and counters Playing the game When you land on a square, make a suggestion for X and complete the sentence. If the sentence is grammatically correct, you get 1 point. If the sentence is true, you get 1 point. For factual questions, check online if you aren’t sure. START 1

2

X is a (small) country than Italy.

10

3

X is a (beautiful) city than Paris.

9

12

X are (healthy) than chips.

20

4

A / An X is a (good) car than a BMW.

8 X is a (difficult) language than English.

11

If you land on square 10 or 20, you can make up your own sentence comparing two things. The winner is the player with the most points when the first player gets to FINISH.

13

19 A / An X is (dangerous) than a knife.

X is a (strong) material than paper.

7

X is a (energetic) form of exercise than yoga.

X is a (hot) country than Spain.

5

6 A / An X is a (noisy) animal than a dog.

14 X is a (big) country than Brazil.

18 A / An X can run (fast) than a person.

A / An X is a (useful) object than a pen.

X is (tiring) than golf.

17 X is a (large) island than Sicily.

X is a (expensive) material than silver.

15 X is (bad) than going to the dentist.

16 A / An X is a (heavy) object than a chair.

FINISH

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Unit 11

Student A Answer the question: Yes, I have or No, I haven’t. (1 point) If the answer is yes, say when you (last) did this. (1 point) If the answer is yes, move forward one square. If the answer is no, move back one square.

Have you ever …? You need a dice and counters Playing the game Work in pairs. Student A When you land on a square, name what’s on the square. (1 point) Student B Ask A a question beginning: Have you ever …? (1 point (for B!))

START 1

‘A horse.’ ‘Have you ever ridden a horse?’ ‘Yes, I have. I rode a horse last summer.’

The winner is the player with the most points when the first player gets to FINISH.

2

3

4

5

6

12

11

10

9

8

7

13

14

15

16

17

18

24

23

22

21

20

19

FINISH

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Unit 12 

Hotel mime game 2

Do you have a mobile phone charger, please?

Do you have an adaptor, please?

6

7

Do you have an umbrella, please?

How do I get to the Art Gallery?

3 Do you have a map, please?

8

12

13

Where can I buy some stamps?

Where can I buy some batteries?

Where can I buy some souvenirs?

16

17

18

What’s the weather forecast for today?

Could I have a wake-up call, please?

21

22

What’s the best way to get to the bus station?

Is there a post Is there a chemist’s office near here? near here?

26

27

Is there an Italian restaurant near here?

216

Is there a Japanese sushi bar near here?

5

Could I have the WiFi password, please?

Do you have any paracetamol, please?

9

10

How do I get to How do I get to the Natural History the town centre? Museum?

11

What time is breakfast?

4

23

28 My TV doesn’t work.

14



1

Where can I buy some postcards?

15

Can I buy a bottle Where can I buy a of water here? newspaper?

19

20

What’s the best way to get to the airport?

What’s the best way to get to the train station?

24

25

Is there a cashpoint near here?

Is there a Chinese restaurant near here?

29

30

I can’t get a WiFi connection.

My room is a bit noisy.

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Tasks General teacher’s notes

Specific task notes

1 You can either read the task instructions to the students, or photocopy the task notes and give them to the students. Note that where there is a table to complete, they will need a copy. Students may need to do some research online (eg Unit 5). If they have smartphones, they can do it in class. If not, then do the task in two stages and ask them to do the research for homework.

Unit 1 STAGE 1: Elicit

other questions students can ask, eg Can you say why? / Can you say more? / Tell me why. Note that students don’t write people’s comments in the chart. Unit 2

STAGE 1:



2 For some tasks, students can produce a printed document if they have access to computers. Decide if you want them to do this and organise the task accordingly. 3 If the task requires certain things, eg large pieces of paper, glue, etc, supply these. 4 Make sure students understand each stage of the task. As you go through the stages, check students understand the example language and elicit more where necessary. Remember that when students are in their pairs or groups, they will need language for suggestions, agreement etc. In the early units, students may need to use a few phrases that are unfamiliar. 5 Tell students that when they need new language they can use a dictionary, or ask each other or you for help.

STAGE 3:

Students may not need to make notes.

STAGE 6:

If there’s enough room, students can put their guides on the classroom wall for the class to read. If they do this, bring in a wall adhesive.



Unit 3 Bring in pieces of paper for students to write their answers to the questionnaire. The pieces need to be identical so that in stage 4 students don’t guess from the type of the paper. Before students write their questions, elicit examples of questions and answers and help with language, eg What are your main interests? Are you good with money? Encourage students to have fun with the questions.

STAGE 1:

6 As students do the task, monitor them and help them with language. Check their written work so they have a correct final version. 7 Cut stages of the task if you want to. For example, where a speaking task follows a writing task, you may want to omit one of the tasks. If students just do the speaking task, tell them to make notes as preparation.

Unit 5 Since most people know quite a lot about very famous people, students will probably only need to look online for dates. Check that students understand the example and the meaning of die / died. (The man in the example is John Lennon.)

STAGE 1:

8 It can be a good idea to do the unit task as revision after you have finished the unit. 9 Students will need a certain amount of help to do the tasks, but at the same time encourage them to be as independent as possible, as this promotes learner autonomy.

STAGE 3:

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Start by eliciting suggestions for an area and also teach / elicit a few phrases for suggestions, agreement / disagreement, etc, eg How about …? That’s a good idea. Tell students that if their group can’t agree on an area they all know well, they can invent an area.



The number of questions will depend on the size of the class.

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STAGE 4:



An alternative approach is to pass round a piece of paper and pairs write their question(s) on it. Then you can do a printed version and enough copies for the class for a subsequent lesson.

Unit 6 For this task you will need large pieces of paper or card for the posters and glue. Students will also need to bring in a small photo of themselves. STAGE 2:



If all students have access to computers, they can do printed versions of the biographies for homework.

If there’s enough room, students can put their posters on the wall for the class to read. If they do this, bring in a wall adhesive.

Unit 7 STAGE 3:

STAGE 5:



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STAGE 5:



Each student in a group talks about different wishes in the list. Every time a wish is mentioned, the student at the board should put a tick beside it.

Unit 9 As preparation for the task, give students practice in describing photographs and saying why they like them. If the class or students have facilities, they can create a printed pamphlet of all the photos.

STAGE 3:

STAGE 2:

Unit 8

Unit 10 Bring in A4 size sheets of paper to give students for the pamphlet, and adhesive to stick pamphlets on the wall. STAGE 2:

Students could print their final recipe versions if they have access to computers. But if they write them in class, they should write them on identical pieces of paper as they are creating a recipe book.

If there isn’t enough room on the wall, groups can pass the pamphlets around.

Unit 12 STAGE 4:



When a student reads out a story, they should use the first person I / we even if it isn’t their story.

Discuss ideas for the cover with students. They can have just a title or include a drawing or photo. If students have online access, they can look for photos and print the cover for homework. Then they can do Stages 4–5 in a subsequent lesson. Use materials from the school or college office to put the recipe book together.

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Unit 1 STAGE 1

TASK: Find out about entertainment favourites of people in your class.

Work in groups of four or five. Ask each other about your entertainment favourites for each category in the table below: band, singer, etc. To do this, Student A turns to the person on their right (Student B) and asks them questions. Then Student B does the same with the person on their right (Student C). Go around the group in this way. Each student listens to the answers of everyone in the group and writes them in the table.

Student’s name

STAGE 2



band

singer

One person in the group exchanges their completed chart with someone from another group. This person then reads out the favourites in the other group’s chart. Their favourite bands are … ‘Listen ’ while the person reads out the list.



For each favourite, ask for a comment.

I ask you some questions? ‘Can ’ Sure. ’ ‘OK, question 1: Which is your favourite band? ’ ‘My favourite band is Coldplay, I think. ‘Oh, they’re my favourite band too. Can’ you say ‘something about them? ’ Yes, I think they’re great musicians! Chris ‘Martin is fantastic! ’

TV programme

STAGE 3

film

actor

Check with each other that you all have the same number of ticks. Is any band, singer, etc really popular?

‘Four people like Coldplay.’ ‘Yes, that’s right. They’re very popular!’

If a name is the same as a name on your list, tick it. Do this each time you hear the same name.

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Unit 2 STAGE 1

TASK: Write a guide to an area you know well. Then give a talk about it.

Work in groups of three or four and choose an area you all know well.

about …? ‘How ’ Yes, I know that area. OK. ‘No, I don’t know it. ’ ’ ‘ STAGE 2

Restaurants



Appetite – This is a great restaurant and

Make notes and prepare a short talk about the area for the class, eg



… is a really nice area in Barcelona. The main street is called … There are two big supermarkets. The area has a lot

of restaurants. … There’s a very good

Write a short guide to the area. Draw a map and show the important places, eg banks, supermarkets, car parks. Include headings and give some information, eg



STAGE 3

restaurant in … Road.

it isn’t expensive.

STAGE 4

Take turns to practise the talk.

STAGE 5

Work with another group. One person in your group gives the talk.

STAGE 6

Exchange your guide with other groups for them to read.



 Unit 3

TASK: Design a short personality questionnaire for a pen pal site.

STAGE 1

Work in pairs. Write ten questions for your questionnaire.

STAGE 3

Write your own answers to the questionnaire on a piece of paper.

STAGE 2

Now work with two other pairs. Read out your questions, choose the ten best and write them down. This is your questionnaire.

STAGE 4

Collect in and mix up the pieces of paper. Choose a student to take one piece of paper and read out the answers to the group. The group must guess who wrote them.

do you think of this question? ‘What ’ I think it’s good. ’ ‘I agree. ’ this question? ‘How about ’ ‘No, I don’t like it. ’ ‘

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think these are your answers, Rachid. ‘IWhy? ’ ’ I know you love skiing. ‘Because ’ ‘ Actually, they aren’t my answers. ’ ‘

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Unit 4 STAGE 1

TASK: Do a survey on the different kinds of transport people use. you ever travel by tram? ‘Do ’ No, I don’t. ‘Do you have’ a bike? Do you use it a lot? ‘I have a bike and I use it in the evening. ’But I don’t cycle ‘to work. It’s too dangerous. I drive. ’

Work in pairs. Complete the questionnaire for each other. Make a note of your partner’s answers.

name train / the underground

usually travels to work by train

bus tram car motorbike bike boat plane walk STAGE 2

Now work with another pair. Take turns to tell the other pair about your partner. Choose someone to make notes and together write a brief report.

Three people in our group usually travel by train

or underground. That’s because they use it when

they go to work. Juan has a motorbike and of ten uses it. People in our group hardly ever travel by boat. When we’re on holiday, we sometimes go on a boat trip. Everyone likes boats.

 Unit 5

TASK: Write a quiz about famous people from the past.

Part 1 STAGE 1



Part 2 Work in pairs. Write descriptions of six famous people (two or three sentences is enough for each person), but don’t write the name of the person. Look online for information if you need to or ask your teacher.

In another pair or group of three, write two more (different) descriptions for the whole class to answer.

STAGE 4

Work with the whole class. A student from each pair writes their descriptions on the board for the class to copy. You now have a class quiz.

STAGE 5

Work in pairs and identify the people.

STAGE 6

Work with the whole class and give your answers to each description. The pair who wrote the descriptions say if the answers are right or wrong.

This man was in a very famous British

band. He was born in 1940 and died in 1980. One of his songs was ‘Imagine’.

STAGE 2

STAGE 3

Exchange your quiz with another pair and identify the people in their quiz. Then check your answers with them.

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Unit 6 STAGE 1

STAGE 2

TASK: Make a poster(s) with short biographies of everyone in your class.

Make notes about the most important years in your life and what happened then.



His sister Angela was born in 1971. He

remembers that very well. His first day at

Work in pairs. Interview your partner and make notes for a short biography mentioning the most important years in your partner’s life.

school was in 1974. He hated it! His parents divorced in 1980 but he saw his father

every weekend. He lef t school in 1987 and travelled round south-east Asia.

and where were you born? ‘When ’ What are the most important years in your life? ‘Can you tell me why? ’ STAGE 3

Hans was born in Michigan in 1969.

STAGE 4

Write the biography and give it to your partner to read and correct if necessary. Use this model to help you. Write the biography on a separate piece of paper with the person’s name as a heading.

Work in small groups. Stick the biographies of the group onto a large sheet of paper with a photo of each person. Exchange your posters with other groups for them to read.

 Unit 7

TASK: Make a class recipe book.

STAGE 1

Work in pairs. Think of a dish you both like and write a recipe for it.

STAGE 2

Work with another pair. Swap recipes and correct any mistakes. Then write a final version of your recipe on a separate piece of paper.

STAGE 3

Work with one or two other pairs and design a cover for the recipe book. The cover must be suitable for all the recipes in the book, but it can be abstract.

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a really big title. And why don’t we ‘callLet’sthehave book ‘…’? ’ STAGE 4

Work with the whole class. Take turns to show your cover to the class. Vote for the best cover.

is our cover. As you can see, it has a picture ‘ofThisa strawberry cheesecake on it. ’ Give your teacher your recipes and the STAGE 5

cover. He / She will put the book together.

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Unit 8

TASK: Write a list of the ten things you would most like to do in the next ten years.

STAGE 1

Think about the ten things you would most like to do and make some notes.

STAGE 2

Work in pairs and talk about your ideas.

STAGE 3

Each write your list and give reasons for your choices.



I’d like to swim with dolphins. Dolphins

Choose ten things that you all agree on and give a reason for each choice. We want to go on a trip to the North Pole ‘because it’s very different and special. ’ STAGE 5

Work with the whole class. Each group tells the class about their wishes. Choose someone to write them on the board.

STAGE 6

Find the most popular wishes.

are very intelligent and I think they’re amazing. I’d like to spend time with them.

STAGE 4

Work with another pair and read out your lists. Are any of your wishes the same?

 Unit 9 STAGE 1

STAGE 2



TASK: Write a paragraph about a photo you really like.

Find a photo you really like and bring it to class. If you want, it can be a photo from the Student’s Book. Write some notes describing it and say why you like it, then write a full paragraph, eg

wearing a really crazy hat. I love the hat and I think it’s great that she wore it. I have a crazy hat too! STAGE 3

Work in pairs. Show each other your photos and talk about them.

STAGE 4

Put your photos and descriptions on the classroom wall for everyone to read. The class then votes for a) the best photo b) the best description.

I like the photo of the young woman on

page 81. She’s Princess Beatrice and

she’s at a wedding. She’s smiling and she’s

 Unit 10

TASK: Design a pamphlet for a sports centre.

STAGE 1

Work in small groups. Decide on these things and put them in your pamphlet:



• the name of the sports centre



‘Let’s call it …’

• the size and number of pictures and headings and where you want to put them

‘ ‘Let’s put the map here.’

I think we should have a main picture and some smaller pictures. And we need a map.



the text for the pamphlet. Think about an interesting general statement to begin the text, then briefly describe the sports centre.



The spor ts centre has a large gym, a



Classes at the Centre include Pilates, …



swimming pool, …



• the opening times • contact details and address

STAGE 2

Put your pamphlets on the wall. The class then votes for the best pamphlet.

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Unit 11 STAGE 1



TASK: Describe an inspirational person.

Write a paragraph about someone famous who is inspirational. Say why this person is an inspiration to others, but don’t say the name. Use the present perfect tense at least once. Ask your teacher to help you with information if necessary or look online.

STAGE 2

Work in pairs and exchange your descriptions. Your partner must guess who the person is and then help you with corrections if necessary.

STAGE 3

Work with two other pairs. Each take turns to talk about the person you chose. Only look at your written description if it’s really necessary. Again, ask people to say who it is. (Your partner mustn’t answer.)

STAGE 4

Give your opinion of the other inspirational people.



I agree that … is amazing. But I don’t like … at all!

This woman is very inspirational. She’s an

American actress and is married to a

very famous man. She does a lot of work for many humanitarian causes, and has

visited many countries as a result of this work. She has six children.





 Unit 12 STAGE 1

STAGE 2



STAGE 3

TASK: Make a radio programme about ‘terrible holidays’.

Make notes about the worst holiday or trip you have ever had.



Work in groups of five or six. Take turns to talk about your trip. As a group, vote for the worst experience.

and I went to New York last summer ‘Myawife for week. It was a really awful holiday. Everything went wrong! ’ Work as a class. The student in each



group with the worst experience tells the class about it. Students make notes about each experience as they listen. STAGE 4



Work in your groups again. You’re going to make a short radio programme. • Choose a presenter and write a short introduction to the programme for him / her.







224



• •

From your notes, choose five of the worst experiences from the class. Choose one person to read out each experience. Take turns to practise doing this and help each other. Write a sentence or two as an introduction for each experience for the presenter to read out. Han Yang had a two-week holiday in New York with his girlfriend. It wasn’t f un!



• Write a short ending for the programme for the presenter.

STAGE 5

Perform the radio programme for another group.

Hi. Most people have had a really

terrible holiday. In this programme,

five people talk about the worst holiday they’ve ever had.

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Technique banks Using the video You will not necessarily want to work through all three stages described here every time, nor will you always want to work through all the sub-stages. It depends how fast you and your class want to go and how much practice they need. But if your goal is for students to act out a conversation, then – especially in the early days – you will need to build up their confidence (and take away their support) gradually rather than suddenly. This structure of gently developing a conversation from reception to production is ideal for exploiting many of the conversations in Everyday English but it will also work well with other conversations in the book. (See also Shadow reading in Five fun techniques on page 232.)

Stage 1 Watch, listen to and / or read the conversation. • Students watch or listen to* and / or (silently) read the conversation once or twice. Make sure they understand any new words or expressions. • They listen to and repeat sentences from the conversation, either after you or the audio / video. • You read one part of the conversation, students read the other in chorus. Swap roles. • Divide the class in half, each with one role. Open pairs: two students read the conversation while the rest of the class listen. Closed pairs: students read the conversation in pairs. *Different ways of using video / audio • Play the video sequence with sound and vision (S+V) in the normal way. You can do this with or without the subtitles. • Play the video sequence with vision only (VO) – and ask students to imagine what is being said. Then play the sequence S+V so they can check.

• Play the video sequence with sound only (SO) (or just play the audio) – and ask students to guess: o how many characters there are o where they are o what they look like o what the situation is Then play the sequence S+V so they can check, or look at the photo if you’re using audio. • Play part of the video / audio sequence (S+V / VO / SO) and pause it. Ask students to guess: o what X is going to say next o what is going to happen next Play the next part for students to see if they were right. Note: Any time you play the video S+V, you can do so with or without the subtitles and you can vary the order you do this, ie first without, then with, or first with, then without. It’s very flexible!

Stage 2 Practise using the ‘Look, look up and speak’ technique. This is a great technique to help students move from listening / reading to acting out a conversation. Working in pairs, students ‘read’ the conversation in the following way. • A looks at their line, then looks up at B, makes eye contact and says it. • B then looks at their line, looks up at A, makes eye contact and says it. And the conversation continues in this way. It takes a little longer than just reading it, but it helps to gently take students away from the support of the written word and build up their confidence. You will need to demonstrate this technique with a student in front of the whole class the first few times you use it.

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Stage 3 Act it out. When you and your students feel they are ready, students can close their books and have a go on their own. They can do this first sitting down, then standing up and adding gestures. It doesn’t matter if the words aren’t exactly the same as in the video. At this stage, fluency is more important than accuracy. (If students are making a lot of mistakes, go through stages 1 and 2 again.)

If some students are happy to come to the front and ‘perform’ in front of the class, that’s great. If not, don’t pressurise them. Let them ‘perform’ in small groups. Variations 1 Suggest students take on different moods or ways of behaving: quiet and shy / noisy and enthusiastic / happy / grumpy / angry / confused / tired, etc. 2 Bring props into the classroom if you think they’re appropriate (and you can get hold of some).

Using stories You can use the stories at the back of the Student’s Book in an unstructured or a structured way: Unstructured: Suggest students read them as and when they feel they would like to. Structured: Set a particular story to be read by the whole class – outside class. (The stories can come after every third unit, so after units 3, 6, 9 and 12.) If you choose the second way, then you may or may not wish to introduce the story in class beforehand and do some work on it afterwards. But be careful! Stories are for pleasure and motivation. If you do too much ‘work’ on them, you are in danger of killing them dead and putting students off reading altogether. Do enough to help them, but no more. You might also encourage students to keep a vocabulary notebook for useful words, expressions and idioms they find in the stories.

Introducing a story before students read it Here are some of the things you could use with the stories (or any other stories) to elicit ideas from the students before they read. Not only does this help to prepare them for reading, but it also motivates them to want to read and to give them a reason for reading. Because of this, it’s important that you don’t tell students if their predictions are correct or not. Let them read the story and find out. You can use … • the picture(s) illustrating the story • the title of the story • music, song, sound effects • real object(s) 226

• mime (you mime part of the story) • words from the story: in order or out of order (especially any new ones likely to cause difficulty) • the first or last line(s) • possible message(s): This is a story about X • one or more of the characters • the setting(s) • question(s) • a synopsis

Exploiting a story after students have read it Here are some things you could ask students to do in the next lesson. • give a personal response Did you like the story? Why? / Why not? Which part did you like best / least? Could this story take place in your country? If not, why not? Is there anything you would like to change in the story? What? Imagine you are making a film. Which famous actors would you like to play the roles? What theme song or music would you like for the film? You could also ask them to do one or more of the following: • answer questions (but not too many) • decide on true / false statements (again, not too many) • complete sentences from the story, eg Sam is in … • tell you who said a particular thing • write a question on the story for the rest of the class to answer

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• retell the story or write it – possibly using key words as guidance • tell chain stories around the group / class, with each student adding a sentence • retell or rewrite the story from the point of view of one of the characters • continue the story – what what do you think happened next? (or five / ten years later) • change the ending (or the beginning or middle) and create their own ending • fill in gaps in the story, eg What happened between X and Y? • mime or act out part of the story (or a word or a character from the story) for other students to guess and describe

• • • • •

suggest similar stories they know draw a picture or abstract painting create a movie poster or book cover design rewrite it as a conversation / play retell the story in their mother tongue – or translate key words (for monolingual classes only) • stand up for their word (see page 231) Note: The stories are too long to do this for the whole story, so maybe just take the first paragraph. Suitable words might be:

hospital friend / bed The Poet / book Grace Darling / lighthouse a ‘grate’ idea / school

Using memory games Use it or lose it! That’s what fitness instructors say about our muscles. And it’s what psychologists say about our memory too. If we want to be good at remembering things, then we need to practise as often as possible. The more we practise, the better we get. And as remembering is a very large part of successful language learning, it’s crucial that we give our students plenty of opportunities to exercise their memory. Some memory games are already indicated in the lessons, wherever you see this symbol: . Here are some more, very simple, ideas if you would like to do more. You can do them as whole-class activities or, once they are familiar to students, do them in pairs or small groups. They need only take a few minutes, so make them a regular part of your routine if you can.

Using pictures 1 Ask students to look at a picture in the book for 30 seconds then close their books. 2 Ask them questions about the picture. Obviously the questions you ask will be dependent on the picture but here are some possibilities:

Is there a …? Are there any …s? How many …s are there?



Where is X? What is in / on / under / behind the …? What is on the left / right?



What colour is X? What is Y wearing?

Variations 1 Students write a list of people or objects in the picture. 2 Students do a sketch of the picture. (We use the word sketch rather than drawing because it’s somehow less stressful. Some people find the word drawing a bit scary!) 3 Students test each other in pairs. One has their book open, the other has their book shut.

Using texts 1 Students re-read a text they’ve already worked on in class, perhaps a while ago, then close their books. 2 Ask them questions on the text or make true / false statements for them to confirm or correct. Variations Can they remember the following? • the title • the very first word in the text • the last word • the first line • the last line • the most frequent word • any words that occur more than once

Using conversations 1 Students re-read a conversation or listen to it again, then close their books. 2 Say a line from the conversation. Students reply with the line that comes next. Technique banks

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Variations 1 Read the conversation saying just the first part of each line. Students complete the rest of the line. 2 Choose lines from a conversation and ask students who says them.

Using vocabulary Ask questions, eg Can you remember ten words from the last lesson? How many words can you remember beginning with …? How many places / countries / adjectives / irregular verbs, etc can you remember?

A couple of other activities

Note: According to memory experts, we readily forget 70% of what we learn in 24 hours unless we recycle it before that 24-hour period is up. You can facilitate that as a teacher by doing two things (which you may already be doing!): 1 Make sure you leave five minutes at the end of a lesson for students to recap what they’ve learnt in the lesson. 2 Tell students just to take five or ten minutes to go through the lesson at home that evening … and tell them why it’s important to do that. You have control over the first one but not the second! Because of that, revising the previous lesson at the beginning of the next one is also crucial.

Repeat my sentence This is an exercise in very careful listening as well as remembering. Students work in pairs. Student A says a sentence (or reads one from a text or conversation). Student B must repeat it word for word. They swap. They should do this five or six times, with the sentences getting a little longer every time. I, I, I, you, you, you! Another exercise in careful listening as well as remembering. Students work in pairs. Student A makes statements about themselves beginning with ‘I’. Student B listens carefully. After five or six statements, Student B must repeat as many of Student A’s statements as they can remember, beginning with ‘you’. Then they swap over. This exercise can have a grammatical focus and function as a very personal repetition drill and it lends itself to many different structures. Some possible kinds of statements: I like + noun I like + activity Every day I + present simple Last year I + past simple I’ve never + present perfect In the future I’d like to …

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20 easy games – no preparation required These games are useful whenever you have some time to spare or notice that the group needs a change of activity. Many of them will already be familiar to you, but it’s nice to have them all in one place. The suggestions here are written for a teacher playing the game with the whole class, but once students know the games, they can of course be played in pairs or small groups and as such are useful for early finishers. Game 1 Introductions

Focus Memory game I’m / He’s / She’s … My / His / Her name’s …

Instructions Students introduce themselves round the class: A I’m Mary. B My name’s John, her name’s Mary. C I’m Frank, he’s John, she’s Mary.

2 Simon says …

Following instructions

Students follow instructions only if you say Simon says, eg Simon says put your hands on your head.

3 Hangman

Alphabet / spelling

Think of a word and write a line for each letter on the board, eg cat = _ _ _ Students guess the word by asking questions about letters, eg Is there an ‘e’? If they are correct, write the letter. If they are incorrect, the student loses one of their ten lives.

4 I went to the supermarket and I bought …

Memory game The game can be used for a variety of tenses and vocabulary sets, eg I like dancing. I like dancing and eating pasta. … The example here is for past simple and food and drink vocabulary.

One student starts by saying what they went to buy (or what they like, etc), then each student adds something else to the list. A I went to the supermarket and I bought a lettuce. B I went to the supermarket and I bought a lettuce and some potatoes. C I went to the supermarket and I bought a lettuce, some potatoes and …

5 Ten questions

Asking questions in the present or past

Think of a person (alive or dead) or an object. Students ask ten yes / no questions to find out who or what it is.

6 What’s my job?

Asking present simple questions with Do …?

Think of a job and mime a typical action. Students ask ten yes / no questions to guess it.

7 Where’s the mosquito?

Prepositions

Imagine a mosquito somewhere in the classroom. Students guess where it is. Is it in my bag? Is it under your foot? …

8 Don’t say yes or no! Short answers

Students must answer questions without using the words yes or no. A Do you like broccoli? B I don’t. Not at all. A Are you enjoying this? B I am. Very much!

9 Whose is it?

Two students go out of the room. Other students decide on an object belonging to one of them. Students come back in and must find the owner. Is it Pedro’s phone? Is it his ...?

Possessive adjectives and pronouns

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10 Describe someone

Be, have, descriptive adjectives, parts of the body

Each student writes a short description of someone in the class, then reads it out for others to guess who it is.

11 Mime an action

Present, past and future tenses

Students mime an activity that they like doing (or do every day / did last night / are going to do, etc). Others ask yes / no questions to guess.

12 What’s he / she wearing?

Present continuous

Students mingle and stand back to back with someone. They describe what the other person is wearing, then look and check.

13 I-spy

Vocabulary: classroom (or based on a picture)

Say: I see something beginning with B. Students must guess: Is it a bee? Is it a bin?

14 Word hunt

Prepositions

Decide on a specific word on a page and students must ask yes / no questions to guess it. Is it at the top of the page? Is it a long word? Is it in the third line? Is it a noun?

15 Change of appearance

Present perfect

A student leaves the classroom, alters something in their appearance and comes back in. Other students ask yes / no questions to find out. Have you taken off a ring? Have you undone your shoelace?

16 Banana

Numbers

Students count (fairly quickly) around the class but must not say any number which has a 3 in it or is a multiple of 3 (eg 3, 6, 9, 12, 13, etc). Instead of these numbers, they must say banana. If they make a mistake, they’re out.

17 Jetstream! Make 10 Vocabulary (or 20!) words

How many words can students make from the word Jetstream in a given time limit? You can use any other nice long word or choose a word from the lesson you’re working on, eg conversation, information, grandmother.

18 Words that begin with ‘m’

Memory game

How many words beginning with a letter can students list in a given time limit?

19 Name ten!

Vocabulary: countries, sports, types of transport, etc

Students say or write a list of ten things from a particular lexical set – and get a point for every item nobody else has thought of.

20 Potato ping pong

Vocabulary: vegetables (or any other lexical set)

Divide the class into two teams. Team A says the name of a vegetable, then Team B says one. They continue back and forth until one team runs out of ideas and can’t hit it back! The other team wins the point.

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Five fun techniques to use with a flagging class You can use these techniques again and again over time in different ways – students always enjoy them and feel energised by them.

1 ‘True for me’ drills Make true statements about yourself. You can link the statements to your teaching focus or else use a variety of language, eg present simple + adverbs of frequency: I always get up early. I sometimes go jogging before breakfast. Students must repeat only those statements that are also true for them. This means that they need to listen carefully and think before they speak – and they get lots of repetition practice. And when they get it wrong, it usually causes lots of laughter. These drills are a great way to start a lesson: I’m feeling tired today. I had trouble getting here. I missed the bus! They are also brilliant for breaking the ice and getting to know a new group of learners and for getting them to know a bit about you: My name’s Pat. I’m a woman. I’m a teacher. I was born in March. I like dancing.

2 True / false drills You can do this with any picture in the Student’s Book, eg page 10 (jobs), page 18 (Van Gogh’s bedroom). Make true and false statements about the picture. If what you say is true, students repeat it. If it’s false, they must say: That isn’t true! You could do this first with books open, then with them closed, as a memory game. You can continue the activity by getting students to provide the sentences themselves. Each student writes one sentence about the picture which can be true or false. Students take turns to read out their sentence and the rest of the class responds. Variations 1 Instead of using a picture, you can make true or false statements about real things, especially relating to a topic you have been dealing with in your classes, eg They speak French in Canada. / They speak Dutch in Germany. 2 Students could also or instead be asked to use some kind of physical movement, eg they raise their right hand if something is true, their left if it’s false.

3 Stand up for your word This is a great way of raising energy in a group when you notice they are getting tired – and a good way of revising too. Take a text that they have read or listened to recently and select a word from it, eg SB page 11 (people in The World Has Talent) or page 19 (bedroom or living room in Unusual houses). Tell students to close their books and tell them the word. Then read them the text. They must stand up every time they hear the word. What’s the point? Apart from being lots of fun, it’s a great way of ensuring unconscious learning – another feature of Accelerated Learning (see page 22). While consciously listening out for a specific word, students are unconsciously exposed to the whole text without the stress of having to do anything particular with it. These are ideal conditions for the unconscious mind to acquire language. Variations 1 If standing up is too disruptive or noisy, then just get students to raise one or both arms. 2 Select two or three words and give different groups of students a different word. At the end of this activity, ask the groups what words the other groups had.

4 Dictopuzzles These are like dictations – with a purpose. 1 Students note down what you say in order to find the answer(s) to a question. It’s important to tell them not to shout out the answer once they’ve found it, but just to put up their hand (or stand up) to let you know they know. That way, other students can go on thinking.

In fact, the example below has four possible answers, so you can ask students to go on searching for the others. (Make sure they realise that the name of both the country and its capital are the names in English.)



It’s a country in Europe. It’s in the EU, but it isn’t one of the countries in the UK. There are seven letters in the English name of this country and six letters in the English name of its capital city. What country is it?



(Key: Ireland / Dublin, Germany / Berlin, Austria / Vienna, Croatia / Zagreb)

2 As soon as enough students have put their hand up, check their answers. If they haven’t found the correct answer – or all the answers – Technique banks

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rather than tell them, give clues to help them, eg The first letter is A, It’s near Italy. 3 Elicit a correct version of the text to write on the board. 4 Using the model text on the board, students work individually or in pairs to create a similar text about another country – not necessarily in Europe. 5 Students work in small groups and take turns to dictate their puzzle for the others to solve. Other possible subjects: • famous people, contemporary or historical • well-known places: cities, buildings, monuments • everyday objects • animals • sports and games • words (It’s an adjective. It begins with a B.)

5 Shadow reading Not only is this a great revision exercise, it’s challenging and a lot of fun. 1 Go back to a listening conversation you have done recently and play the recording so students can listen to it again. 2 Divide the class into the number of roles and allocate each half (or group) one of the people in the conversation. 3 When you play the conversation again (quite loudly), students should speak (quite softly) at the same time as their character (so they can still hear the conversation even while they are speaking). This is quite a challenge – and usually causes a lot of laughter because although the speakers in the conversations speak reasonably slowly, their speed will still be faster than that of the students.

Extra questions and tasks for Movies & Music Given the motivational impact of this section, there are deliberately very few questions on the page. A few more questions are always suggested in the unit-by-unit teacher’s notes, which you can use or ignore as you see fit. And here you can find a full range of questions that could apply to almost any film or song.

Movies Note: An excellent website to find the information is the Internet Movie Database at www.imdb.com or also www.rottentomatoes.com. • Have you seen this film? What did you think of it? • What’s the title of the film in your language? • Name two more films with a particular actor (eg Daniel Craig). • Name two more films with a particular director (eg Katia Lund). • Who are the main actors? • Who composed the music for the movie? • Who plays X? Who is the hero / villain? • Find out something else about: the director, the actor, the composer. • What’s the film’s rating? (on IMDb or Rotten Tomatoes) • Watch a trailer for the film. Does it look interesting? 232

• Find out one extra / interesting piece of information about this film. Note: Students could actually do this last task as a matter of course. It’s great because it forces them to read more extensively to search for the information.

Music Note: A good website to find lyrics is www. metrolyrics.com or just type in the title or first line into a search engine. • Do you know this song? Do you like it? • What’s the name of the song? • Who’s the singer / group? Do you like him / her / them? • Who wrote the song? When? • What’s the next line? What comes next? • What word occurs more than ten times in the song? • What’s the chorus? • What other songs do you know by this singer / group / songwriter? • Find the words and listen to the song and sing the chorus if you want to. • What’s the message of the song – in one sentence?

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Working with mixed-ability classes It’s inevitable that there will be students with different levels of English (though not necessarily ability) in your class, especially in larger classes. Some students will need extra support, some will need less. So here are some ideas to help you tackle this issue. You will also find ideas in the unit-by-unit notes, where you see this symbol: MA. Note: We’ve used the terms ‘stronger’ and ‘weaker’ for the sake of convenience but of course those terms are not completely accurate. • Use stronger students to correct weaker students. Make sure that you praise weaker students for their successes just as much as stronger ones. • Direct more difficult questions at stronger students and easier ones at weaker students. • Sometimes pair and group students of the same ability so they feel comfortable with each other. • And sometimes pair up students of different levels and encourage the stronger student to help the less confident one. • Group weaker students together for an activity and give them extra attention, leaving stronger students to work alone. • Use stronger students as group leaders and give them more responsibility for activities, like

being the group ‘scribe’ and keeping a written record, for example. • When appropriate, give weaker students slightly easier tasks. The teacher’s notes may suggest these – look for the MA icon. • Note weaker students’ errors and give them extra homework

Fast finishers If some students complete an activity more quickly than others, have some extra activities ready that they can do. Ideally, these activities should be short, fun things that are easy to set up. Students shouldn’t feel punished for finishing quickly by being given something boring to do! • Many of the 20 Easy games on page 229 would work, especially games 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 17, 18 and 19. • Also suitable are the Memory games using pictures on page 227, once students have played them in class and know how they work. • Online research is another task you can give, using the Movies & Music box or an Explore suggestion, for example. • And finally, you can offer them lots of different e-zone activities to choose from.

Ensuring learner autonomy and using technology What is learner autonomy? As defined by Henri Holec in 1981, learner autonomy is ‘the ability to take charge of one’s own learning’. It is crucial because when you give learners more choices (and therefore more responsibility) in how and what and how fast they learn, then they are also a lot more motivated and they learn better. They also gain more selfawareness about their skills and more awareness of the learning process itself.

How can we provide it? One of the key tools we have nowadays of course is technology, which can take students beyond the limits of the classroom and allow them the freedom to choose what topics they want to explore, and what language areas they want to focus on.

Jetstream on e-zone offers a wealth of digital tools for this purpose giving students plenty of options: • Online Training on e-zone provides hundreds of online practice activities for extra listening, reading, grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation, as well as practice activities that help to prepare for a range of international exams. • Cyber Homework lets the teacher assign homework to the student. The teacher has the possibility to allow the student to see their score after they complete the tasks. They can keep practising and improve their score until a deadline. This way homework becomes more of a learning experience and the student can take on more responsibility for his / her results. Students can do Cyber Homework offline and submit their results once they go back online. Technique banks

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• Projects enable students to learn collaboratively. They can vote and comment on each other’s work, and thus learn from and with each other. Students can choose to take on a more or less active role in this collaboration. • Cloud Book allows students to download the Student’s Book and the Workbook as well as the audio and video by using the access code at the back of the Student’s Book. This way the student can practise anytime, anywhere, offline on their desktop computers as well as their mobile devices. These devices will sync with each other once the student goes online. In the Student’s Book and the Workbook, there is also scope for learner autonomy.

What else can the teacher do? • Ask students to keep a record of their problems and their successes. They might do this as a written diary or logbook or else keep an online diary or write a blog. Dedicate some classroom time for them to compare notes with a partner from time to time. • Give students choices in classroom tasks, even in a small way. If an exercise has six questions, for example, ask them to choose four. (They still have to read all of them to make that decision.) • If they’re having a discussion or playing a game, encourage them to change the instructions sometimes.

• In the Student’s Book, both the Explore and the Movies & Music sections invite students to go online and use their language skills to find out more about particular subjects if they want to. • In the Workbook, the Check your progress pages give students the opportunity to assess themselves. • The DIY (Do It Yourself) wordlist at the back of the Workbook allows students to make choices about which words they translate and record. (It is not intended that they should write down every single word. Unless they want to, of course!)

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De-stress cartoons

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

Unit 6

Unit 7

Unit 8

Unit 9

Unit 10

Unit 11

Unit 12

De-stress cartoons

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HELBLING LANGUAGES www.helblinglanguages.com JETSTREAM Elementary Teacher’s Guide by Ingrid Wisniewska with Jane Revell and Mary Tomalin © HELBLING LANGUAGES 2015 First published 2015 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior written permission of the publishers. ISBN 978-3-85272-977-0 The publishers would like to thank the following for their kind permission to reproduce the following photographs and other copyright material: The Photolibrary Wales p21 (Tanni Grey-Thompson) /Alamy; Djtaylor p13 (river), Daniel Raustadt p16 (camera), A J Cotton p16 (woman on mobile), Jennifer Pitiquen p16 (Apple logo), Sommai Sommai p17 (fish), Marylooo p17 (turtleneck) / Dreamstime.com; JPC-PROD p19 (toothache), iceteastock p19 (woman in gym) - Fotolia.com; ©iStockphoto.com/ hocus-focus p16 (laptop), Erdal Bayhan p16 (Email), LifesizeImages p21 (piñata); REUTERS/Eddie Keogh p20 (Diversity); Toa55 p12, Pavelk p17 (goat), Action Sports Photography p21 (Obama), JStone p21 (Malala Yousafzai), s_bukley p21 (David Beckham), OkPic p235 (mandala) /Shutterstock.com; USIA / National Archives and Records Administration Records of the U.S. Information Agency Record Group 306 p15 (Rosa Parks); Wikimedia Commons p14 (Rosa Park being arrested; Rosa Parks bus), Pete Souza - The White House p14 (Barack Obama in the Rosa Parks bus), Matt Yohe p16 (Steve Jobs), © 2007 AngMoKio p17 (Mercedes), Chris Hakkens p17 (Bob Dylan, June 23 1978), USAF p21 (The Pave Low helicopter). Commissioned Photography & Production by Matt Devitt & Charlotte Macpherson p19. Illustrated by Davide Besana, Giovanni Da Re, Giovanni Giorgi Pierfranceschi. Edited by Clare Nielsen-Marsh Designed by Greg Sweetnam Cover by Capolinea Printed by Athesia Every effort has been made to trace the owners of any copyright material in this book. If notified, the publisher will be pleased to rectify any errors or omissions.

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elementary

elementary

beginner

Real language & memory training

Real language & memory training

Jeremy Harmer ∙ Jane Revell

Student’s Book

Student’s Book

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

Student’s Book

Real language & memory training

Everyday English videos

Everyday English videos

Student’s Book

Student’s Book

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

advanced

Everyday English videos JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

• Grammar to go

The right grammar at the right time plus a full grammar reference

• Emphasis on speaking

Real language & memory training

Student’s Book

Teacher’s Guide

Your opinion, your voice - right from the start of the lesson

Mary Tomalin

advanced

intermediate

Real language & memory training

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

upper intermediate upper intermediate

intermediate

• Personalisation

Everyday English videos

Student’s Book

Jeremy Harmer ∙ Jane Revell

Get you interested and communicating Helps you find the right words

Real language & memory training

Dialogue karaoke videos

JETSTREAM Cloud with LMS

elementary

• Motivating topics

• Focus on vocabulary

Student’s Book

Dialogue karaoke videos

with Jane Revell and Mary Tomalin

pre-intermediate pre-intermediate

beginner

Jane Revell ∙ Mary Tomalin

Student’s Book

Engaging activities to get you talking

• Thinking & Memory

Encourages thinking and memory training

• Cross culture

Maximise your social and cultural awareness

Comprehensive introduction and overview elementary

Jane Revell ∙ Mary Tomalin

Student’s Book

Amanda Maris

Student’s Book

Student’s Book

JETSTREAM is the brand new Helbling Languages 6-level course for adult learners. Its carefully balanced pace and challenge offer a learning experience that is fun and motivating and which prepares students to use their English effectively in work and life.

Ingrid Wisniewska



Extension activities



Culture notes



Ideas for mixed ability classes



Photocopiable games and tasks



Technique Banks

• Stories

Lively stories for extra reading practice

• Dialogue karaoke videos on • Cloud Book

• Pronunciation

• Cyber Homework

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With Audio CDs 9783852729770_cvr.indd 1

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