Jetgala Magazine Issue 8

June 3, 2016 | Author: Jetgala Magazine | Category: Types, Magazines/Newspapers
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JETGALA is a bi-monthly ultra luxury consumer print publication, catering to the lifestyle of Asia Pacific's absolut...

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AUD15 BND10 RMB100 HKD80 INR500 IDR80,000 KRW10,000 KWD3 MYR20 NZD20 PESOS300 QAR40 SAR40 SGD8 TWD300 BAHT250 AED40 VND100,000

September October 2011

DASSAULT FALCON 2000S

EUROCOPTER MERCEDES-BENZ HUGH HEFNER’S HARE FORCE ONE NEXTANT AEROSPACE 400XT | AERO SYSTEM

TOP VEGAS SUITES

SIR RICHARD BRANSON’S PRIVATE ISLAND PATEK PHILIPPE’S THIERRY STERN | AUBERCY CLARIDEN LEU’S JIMMY LEE

www.blancpain.com BLANCPAIN BOUTIQUES ABU DHABI · BEIJING · CANNES · DUBAI · EKATERINBURG · GENEVA · HONG KONG · MACAU · MADRID · MANAMA MOSCOW · MUMBAI · MUNICH · NEW YORK · PARIS · SHANGHAI · SINGAPORE · TAIPEI · TOKYO · ZURICH

Villeret Collection Complete Calendar Half-Hunter Patented under-lugs correctors Secured calendar and moon-phases mechanism Ref. 6664-3642-55B

NOTAM by Rainer Sigel

CARBON FINEPRINT

T

he aviation industry, business aviation in particular, is no stranger to being a target. While it strives to develop and deploy cutting-edge technology to get people safely, comfortably and expediently from A to B, it finds itself in the permanent cross-hairs of regulators, the tax man, monopolistic structures, public opinion and cranky passengers — as well as people with at times bizarre political agendas or sinister purposes. The latest assault on our industry’s operations — and wallets — is the EU-ETS, the European Union Emission Trading Scheme. Like most government-run things in Europe, it is a hugely complex, expensive and bureaucratic programme, and the largest multi-national emissions trading scheme in the world. Launched in 2005, it is a major pillar of EU climate policy, which dictates that emitters of carbon dioxide within the EU must monitor and annually report their CO2 emissions, as well as ‘make good’ on their CO2 emissions in any given year.

"LIKE IT OR NOT, CARBON EMISSION COMPENSATION SCHEMES ARE HERE TO STAY" Aviation is its latest prey. Unless amended, from 2012 onwards EU-ETS may require any aircraft flying into the European Union to pay a carbon tax — even on the legs of a trip flown outside the EU. Non-European aircraft operators are exempt only if they are already part of an emission trading programme in their home country. Right on cue, NBAA, IATA, major airlines and the governments of the US, Australia and China strongly opposed the programme in its current form. But as always, Brussels is undeterred. Yet here is the catch: like it or not, carbon emission compensation schemes — in whatever form or shape they may launch in future — are here to stay. It may not be convenient, or look good on a balance sheet, but it is a basic fact of life and one of the pillars of all credible legal concepts that when someone’s action impacts on others, he or she has to compensate for the damage this causes. Pollution in whatever form is a part of this, and the earlier the aviation industry not only accepts the concept, but pro-actively embraces it with the aim to take it out of the hands of regulators and formulate its own solutions, the better for everyone. Carbon taxes are not going away again — ever. Back to us — the magazine issue you are holding in your hands now will be distributed at the 2011 NBAA Show in Las Vegas. Come and see us at booth C11209 at the Las Vegas Convention Center from 10-12 October. We look forward to seeing you. Rainer Sigel PUBLISHER

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For people who would never, ever wear a digital watch.

2009 winner of arguably the most famous award of the Swiss watch industry – the “Golden Hand”.

During the development of the LANG E Z EITWER K, we questioned everything – except the mechanical drive. The result is a watch with digital indications that ranks among the most progressive timepieces of our era. It boasts a jumping numerals mechanism that in a splitsecond advances a grand total of 1440 times a day. Delivering that

kind of accuracy requires the equivalent of 5 kg of torque, a probably unprecedented amount of force for such a precision timepiece. The final result means that every 60 seconds you are witness to a remarkable event. With its precisely jumping numerals, the LANGE ZEITWERK even wins the hearts of people who would never, ever wear a digital watch.

The LANGE ZEITWERK. Exclusively at:

Sincere Fine Watches:.BSJOB#BZ4BOET5FM  n/HFF"OO$JUZ5FM  n4VOUFD$JUZ5FM   7JWP$JUZ5FM  nSincere Haute Horlogerie: The Shopping Gallery at Hilton Tel: (65) 6738 9971 The Hour Glass:,OJHIUTCSJEHF5FM  n3BGGMFT)PUFM"SDBEF5FM   L’Atelier by The Hour Glass: Ion Orchard Tel: (65) 6509 9268

CONTENT

32

ontents 38 08 54

4

NOTAM

10

CREW

12

LOUNGE

Carbon Fineprint

New & Exclusive 20

WINGS

22

EVER ELEGANT

Dassault’s Falcon 2000S 28

NATURAL PROGRESSION

32

HOT & HIGH

List Jet Interiors The Nextant 400XT

46

38

SIMPLEXITY ON BOARD

Aero System Goes Beyond The Box 42

SKY SEDAN

46

HARE FORCE ONE

Eurocopter Mercedes-Benz Hugh Hefner’s Big Bunny Jet 50

UP UP & AWAY

54

AN APPETITE FOR DANGER

Blast Off Into Outer Space Aerial Dogfights For Road Warriors 56

CIRCULAR ROUTE

60

CAPTAIN SPEAKING

60 Days, Round The World In A PC-12 The Best Place On Earth 6

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CONTENT

75

62

LUXE

64

CREATIVE TENACITY

Bulgari Spans Time And Generations 68

ontents 106

FOURTH GENERATION

Patek Philippe’s CEO Thierry Stern 72

CHIME ON TIME

75

HOT METAL

Repeaters & Striking Watches Franck Muller’s Conquistador Grand Prix 76

THE EXTRA OF ECSTASY

Rolls-Royce Bespoke Services 80

BALANCE OF BEAUTY

Gray Design — From Roads to Oceans 84

HYBRID PLEASURES

Frauscher 717 GT 86

SOLE CHOICE

Aubercy Bespoke Men’s Shoes 90

SENSUAL SOUVENIR

92

INSPIRED ASSETS

Francis Kurkdjian Scents The House of Borgezie 94

GERMAN CHINA

Precious Meissen Porcelain 96

LIFE

98

SUITE LAS VEGAS

High rolling in Vegas 104 A TASTE FOR OPULENCE

Sriwijaya Fine Dining, Jakarta 106 MAKEPEACE ISLAND

Sir Richard Branson’s Island 110

PURE PLAY

Clariden Leu Private Banking 112

ONE & ONLY

Only Watch 2011 Charity 114

ROAD DREAMS

Kristian Schuller’s 90 Days One Dream 122 FADING GLORY

Werner Bartsch’s Desert Birds 129 AIRBORNE 130 BRIEFING

Business Aviation In Brief

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76

136 BUYER BEWARE

Buying A Private Jet 138 PLANE SPEAK Aviation Glossary 142 AIR SHOW DIARY 144 TAILHOOK Voyage À Trois

CREW

CONTENT EDITOR-AT-LARGE Kim Lee ONLINE EDITOR Rainer Sigel ART DIRECTOR/DESIGNER Sylvia Weimer (Spacelab Design, Sydney) EDITOR Cadence Loh ASSISTANT EDITOR Katrina Balmaceda EDITORIAL & MARKETING ASSISTANT Lynette Siew

CONTRIBUTORS Alex Unruh, Audrey Lee, Alvin Wong, Allen Roche, Carol Lee, Christine de Felice, Christie Leo, Jim Gregory, Jinesh Lalwani, Liz Moscrop, Paul Ng, Rebecca Skinner COMPANY PUBLISHER Rainer Sigel MANAGING DIRECTOR Michelle Tay ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Susan Ng OFFICE MANAGER Winnie Lim CIRCULATION & PRODUCTION MANAGER Caroline Rayney EVENTS MANAGER Lee May Ling

CONTACT 12 Prince Edward Road, #04-10B Bestway Building, Podium B, Singapore 079212 T: +65 6222 1415 F: +65 6222 1465 EMAILS ADVERTISING [email protected] EDITORIAL [email protected] EVENTS [email protected] MARKETING [email protected] CIRCULATION [email protected] ADMINISTRATION offi[email protected]

WEBSITES MAGAZINE www.jetgala.com GROUP www.orientalmediagroup.com SINGAPORE www.oriental-publishing.com VIETNAM www.oriental-ltd.com EVENTS www.oriental-exhibitions.com DIGITAL EDITIONS & DOWNLOADS www.digital.jetgala.com FACEBOOK www.facebook.jetgala.com (Luxury News) LINKEDIN www.linkedin.jetgala.com (Aviation News) TWITTER www.twitter.jetgala.com (Aviation News) RSS www.rss.jetgala.com (Aviation News) JETGALA is published bi-monthly and circulated throughout the Asia-Pacific. Opinions expressed are those of the contributors and not necessarily endorsed by the Publisher. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: All rights, including copyright, in the content of this publication are owned or controlled by Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. You are not permitted to copy, broadcast, download, store in any medium, transmit, show or play in public, adapt or change in any way the content of this publication for any other purpose whatsoever without the prior written permission of Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore.

Paris-based, Romania-born photographer, Kristian Schuller emigrated to Germany with his family at an early age. He studied fashion design under Vivienne Westwood and photography under fashion photographer FC Gundlach at the University of Fine Arts Berlin. Introduced to Condé Nast Publications in London by Isabella Blow, Kristian continues his work with magazines and commercial projects internationally. His first book, 90 Days One Dream, published in 2010 was awarded a Silver Medal in the Deutscher Fotobuchpreis 2011 (German Photo Book Prize 2011). His work was chosen by FC Gundlach as part of the More than Fashion exhibit at the Moscow House of Photography in July and August this year. www.kristianschuller.com

Werner Bartsch is based in Hamburg, Germany. He has a masters degree in design with an emphasis on photography. Werner is a member of the prestigious BFF (German Association of Freelance Photographers) and works on assignment for major German and international publications and agencies. Besides this he realises free photographic art projects like the series Desert Birds which is published by Kehrer Verlag, Germany. His works are exhibited in different galleries and museums like the Flo Peters Gallery or the German Historic Museum in Berlin. www.wernerbartsch.de

Liz Moscrop writes about private aviation, specialising in interiors, for publications all over the world, including Arabian Aerospace, Aircraft Interiors, Prestige Magazine South Africa and BART International Europe. She lived and worked in Hong Kong for several years and is a regular visitor to South East Asia. She is also co-author of The 100 Greatest Women in Aviation along with partner Sanjay Rampal.

Paul Ng is global head of aviation and aerospace at Stephenson Harwood, a leading transportation focused international law firm, where he leads a team of over 30 aviation specialists across three continents. He dispenses advice on some of the region’s largest and most complex “first in the industry” transactions relating to acquisition, financing and leasing of commercial and business jets and helicopters. Paul is also listed by Euromoney’s Guide to the World’s Leading Aviation Lawyers and Chambers Global 2010 as “one of the world’s pre-eminent aviation specialists.” www.shlegal.com

TRADEMARKS NOTICE: The masthead logo ‘JETGALA’ is a Registered Trademark of Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. All rights are cumulatively reserved by Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. Their protection will be pursued to the full extent of the law. Printed by KHL Printing Co, Singapore MICA(P)075/03/2011

PPS 1775/10/2011 (028317)

PHOTO CREDITS COVER Photographer: Kristian Schuller www.kristianschuller.com Stylist: Peggy Schuller, Models (L-R): Victoria, Miriam, Neele SECTION OPENER WINGS Image courtesy of Playboy Enterprises SECTION OPENER LIFE Image courtesy of B l a n c p a i n SECTION OPENER LUXE Image courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Ltd SECTION OPENER AIRBORNE Image courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corp

www.orientalmediagroup.com 10

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Carpenter, graphic designer, retoucher, art director, interpreter, actor, presenter, photo producer — sometimes it takes a long way to find your thing in life. Tom Sólo (Germany, 1973) explored many creative fields before he eventually became a photo artist. The multilingual globetrotter loves to travel the world facing new challenges. When not shooting, he lives in a rural hideaway near Frankfurt International Airport. www.tomsolo.com

FRANCK MULLER BOUTIQUE SINGAPORE ION ORCHARD (65) 6509 3380 MARINA BAY SANDS (65) 6634 8825 MELBOURNE COLLINS STREET (613) 9650 0288 JAKARTA PLAZA INDONESIA (6221) 310 7608 BANGKOK SIAM PARAGON (662) 610 9423 HONG KONG CENTRAL (852) 2522 8800 LEE THEATRE PLAZA (852) 3579 2525 KOWLOON PENINSULA (852) 2368 0250 OCEAN TERMINAL (852) 2314 1181 TAIWAN REGENT TAIPEI (8862) 2523 3600 MACAU VENETIAN (853) 2882 8262 SHANGHAI IFC (8621) 5012 0768 SHANGHAI PLAZA 66 (8621) 6288 6676 AUTHORISED RETAILERS SINGAPORE SINCERE FINE WATCHES NGEE ANN CITY (65) 6733 0618 MARINA BAY SANDS (65) 6634 9782 SUNTEC CITY (65) 6337 5150 VIVOCITY (65) 6278 1698 SINCERE HAUTE HORLOGERIE HILTON SINGAPORE (65) 6738 9971 WATCHES OF SWITZERLAND PARAGON (65) 6732 9793 KUALA LUMPUR SINCERE FINE WATCHES SURIA KLCC (603) 2166 2181 PAVILION KL (603) 2141 8418 THE GARDENS MID VALLEY CITY (603) 2287 1133

LOUNGE

CURVED REBIRTH

SURF WHEELS

Author and surf legend Rod Sumpter once wrote, “A surfboard is a surfer’s best friend”. So, it needs to be treated like one. Australian motorcycle company Deus Customs has released Surf Bike, a custom-made motorcycle designed specially for bike riders who also ride waves. It comes with a removable surfrack system that safely secures your surfboard and makes it easy for you to speed towards the beach. www.deus.com.au

The 1963 Jaguar E-Type, known for its classic looks, high performance and lightness, is the inspiration for the Lightweight Speedster, a new curvaceous machine by E-Type restoration specialist Eagle. With an aluminium body and aluminium engine, the car weighs only 1,008 kg. It faithfully follows the original E-Type’s twin exhaust pipes, but improves on it with a 4.7-litre engine. The Eagle Speedster comes in black cognac colour. www.jaguarspeedster.com

RHYTHM READ The world’s most elite and coveted guitars hang out together in The Guitar Collection, a limited edition collector’s book. Featuring high-definition, contemporary original photography, the book presents equal parts of music documentary and photographic odyssey. It comes in a set of three. Only 1,500 sets will be published, and they will come with a printed signature of photographer John Peden. www.theguitarcollection.com

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LOUNGE

IN TIME

THREE ROCKETS

A. Lange & Söhne chose Hong Kong for their fifth and latest mono-brand boutique which opened in June. The walls’ signature Lange shade of grey, which echoes the theme of Lange Zeitwerk watches, contrasts with warm acacia furniture used throughout the store. Nearly the entire collection of Lange timepieces are on display at the boutique. www.alange-soehne.com

Danish sports car company Zenvo has unveiled their latest limited edition exotic super car, the ST-1 50S. Exclusivity is the key, with only three units manufactured — one each in Intense Red, Crystal White and Mediterranean Blue. Tagged at USD1.8 million, the car is studded with avant-garde features including a 1,250 hp engine and a seven-speed transmission. Monogrammed seats and a dedication plaque come as part of the prized coupé. www.zenvoautomotive.com

ARM IN ARMOUR

CADDY CHOPPER

Father and son custom bike designers Paul Teutuls Sr and Jr, rival stars of reality TV show American Choppers, have once again gone hammer and tongs to outdo each other with their own twowheeled versions of the Cadillac CTS-V supercar. Teutuls Sr’s version focuses on the chopper’s make and comes with a V-twin type engine. His son, on the other hand, emphasises the chopper’s physical resemblance to the CTS-V. The choppers will be auctioned off to raise funds to fight Duchenne muscular dystrophy. www.orangecountychoppers.com

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JETGALA

To style icon Daphne Guinness, the mantra Contra Mundum (Latin for “against the world”) is best exemplified in a glove inspired by chain mail armour worn by ancient knights. Guided by Guinness’ vision, jewellery designer Shaun Leane handcrafted a glove using a delicate chain mail accessorised by 5,000 tiny pavé diamonds. The one-of-a-kind creation was moulded to fit Guinness’ arm and is displayed for sale at the White Cube gallery in London. www.shaunleane.com

TIME TO RAISE YOUR EXPECTATIONS INTRODUCING THE NEW 3,350 NM FALCON 2000S Finally, a large-cabin aircraft with the airfield agility and efficiency of a smaller jet at a midsize price. This is the one you’ve been waiting for. The new Falcon 2000S has it all. Unparalleled comfort. Unrivalled performance. And unbeatable value.

Raise your expectations. Visit www.falcon2000S.com.

Beijing +86.10.57853117

+86.13521908257

LOUNGE

TREASURE SAR

The House of Fabergé has revived an old pendant that will excite collectors, historians and lovers of haute couture — the bejewelled egg, last created by Fabergé in 1917 for the Russian Romanovs. The Les Fameux de Fabergé is an exclusive set of 12 one-off egg pendants, each one an artistic interpretation of a Russian proverb. Clients can also commission their own high jewellery egg pendant with a unique design through Fabergé’s bespoke services. www.faberge.com

KEY SECRET

CARBON LOOKS Bentley’s Continental GT has new carbon fibre enhancements. The new Mulliner Specification’s Classic Styling Pack adds visual improvements to the luxurious coupé: a side skirt, an all-gloss carbon fibre front splitter, a black carbon fibre wing, and a rear diffuser. Optional extras include side mirror caps, a rear spoiler, front grille and 53 cm alloy wheels. The Classic Pack can now be ordered at Bentley European showrooms. The optional features will arrive in the fall of this year. www.bentleymotors.com

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JETGALA

Padlocks are a thing of the past — at least for Anders Hagardzon, whose high tech savvy laptop and briefcases can be unlocked in only three ways: by using an electronic key, an electronic code or your fingerprint. Made out of carbon fibre over a Kevlar® framework, a Hagardzon case shields items from hard knocks. The exterior can be customised with your family crest or company logo.. www.hagardzon.se

PEN FASHION Chanel head designer Karl Lagerfeld lends pen company S.T. Dupont his fashion sense with Prestige & Chic, a new limited edition line of S.T. Dupont pens. It is available in two colours — Prestige in red lacquer with gold trim, and Chic in black with a palladium finish. The collection ranges from fountain to rollerball and ballpoint pens. The pens take on an asymmetrical triangular shape with rounded bevelled edges, providing a good, comfortable grip. www.st-dupont.com

LOUNGE

fine edge Zafirro Iridium prides itself as the cream of the crop where razors are concerned. Its solid white sapphire blades are sharpened with high-energy ionised particles to give an ultra-fine edge 5,000 times thinner than human hair. The handle is made of iridium, the world’s strongest and densest metal derived from meteorites, 10 times more rare than platinum, and previously used only in rocket technology. Just 99 of these razors will be made. www.zafirro.com

SUPER SPACE

Ferretti Group’s yacht maker, CRN, has launched its new Dislopen series of sleek and spacious superyachts in varying lengths of 46, 52 and 62 metres. Each yacht in the collection will have four to five decks, including an exclusive upper deck dedicated to the master suite and five VIP cabins on the main deck. Focused on maximising space, flexibility and functionality, the new yachts are poised as ‘floating palaces’. www.crn-yacht.com

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LIGHT AND FASHION Fourteen personalised Cygnet & colette cars will be made to celebrate the collaboration between Parisian fashion brand colette and Aston Martin. The car, with its lightning silver body paint and dark brown interiors, features diamond turned wheels and blue detailing by colette. Blue leather quilted cushions and engraved stainless steel door handles are among the bespoke options that are offered by Aston Martin Works Tailored. Orders can be made through the colette store in Paris. www.colette.fr

GEARED FOR GOOD Fashion designer Roberto Cavalli’s concept for Ciclotte’s new stationary bicycle is sexy and daring. The Italian bike is geared with four intensity levels to simulate real road conditions for a good workout session. Six different styles are offered in limited editions. Made of carbon fibre, steel and fibreglass, the machine is designed to endure no matter how tough one’s workout can be. www.ciclotte.com

WINGS

WINGS DASSAULT FALCON 2000S By Liz Moscrop

ELEGANT VER

A GREAT JET DEVELOPMENT RAISES EXPECTATIONS AND BENCHMARKS

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Advanced design techniques reduce the effect of shock waves at the plane’s critical Mach number All images courtesy of Dassault Falcon

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L

eave it to the French to understand and best express the concept of style, be it in fashion, food or jets. The elegant Falcon 2000S, the latest addition to Dassault Aviation’s family of business jets, was the centre of attention at the European Business Aviation Conference and Exhibition this May in Geneva, Switzerland. The airframer has updated its 2000 jet once again to create what it describes as a “large cabin jet for the super midsize market.” The result is a medium range aircraft capable of flying about 3,500 nautical miles — enough to connect Singapore to Mumbai, Seoul or Perth, or Beijing to Delhi or Singapore — with a cabin large enough for passengers to relax in comfort and stylish surroundings. John Rosanvallon, Dassault Falcon’s CEO explained, “After speaking with our customers and performing a thorough market study, our research confirmed that the ideal platform for a wide-body business jet in this range segment was 24

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THE NEW ROCKWELL COLLINS CABIN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM TRANSFORMS THE AIRCRAFT INTO AN OFFICE IN THE SKY

The 2000S is fitted with special sound-dampening engine mounts and advanced acoustic insulation for a quieter environment to work, play and sleep in Artfully conceived, the galley allows for on board meal preparation, with an adjacent closet for carry-on items

An app on an iPod Touch or an iPhone lets passengers control cabin comfort

The fully-equipped cabin has 18 large windows, club seating for 10, and an advanced cabin management system

indeed our very successful Falcon 2000.” He stated that Dassault has added a long list of standard options, and cuttingedge technology to design an aircraft that he says “burns 10 per cent less fuel than aircraft 20 per cent smaller, while offering a very competitive price.” The 2000S offers the same spacious cabin as the Falcon 2000 with a maximum width of 92 inches, and a height of over six feet. It is available in a standard floor plan with seating for up to 10 passengers. The completely revamped interior design springs from Dassault’s partnership with BMW Group DesignworksUSA, which also created the award-winning interior on the company’s flagship Falcon 7X. There are three elegant colour and design fusions from which to choose. ‘Sedona’ features a warm environment of earthy beige colours. ‘Havana’ is an extremely masculine look with a palette of browns, while ‘Alpine’ offers mountain freshness in a contrast between bright shades of forest greens and snow whites, mixed with darker colours of earth and rock. >> JETGALA

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WINGS

Efficient aircraft design ensures swift climbing above traffic and turbulent weather, and access to airports with short runways

>> On-board design elements visually elongate the cabin, providing an easy flow through the space. Up-wash and down-wash ambient lighting, as well as contrast between fabrics and materials used for décor, further enhance the illusion of spaciousness. Another standard option is the new Rockwell Collins Cabin Management System, which transforms the aircraft into an office in the sky. Features include high definition viewing via Blu-ray media on widescreen monitors of up to 19 inches. All functions can be controlled throughout the cabin by using an application (app) on an iPod Touch or iPhone. The app allows control of video playback, operation of the optional electronic window shades, and adjustments to lights and temperature. Of course, a key factor for many executives using business aviation is the ability to stay in touch with their offices on the ground. The 2000S enables them to make calls and use the Internet thanks to the AirCell Axxess II Satcom system installed as a standard feature. The system is modular in order to provide connectivity for today’s customers, while offering the ability to upgrade as new technologies become available. STRONG LINEAGE From the outside, the most noticeable development on the 2000S are inboard slats on the wing that improve takeoff and landing speeds. This helps the aircraft to land at challenging airports. London City Airport, for example, is literally in the heart of London and has a short runway surrounded on three 26

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BMW Group DesignworksUSA helped to conceptualise the Falcon 2000s’s new interior

sides by water. Aircraft must be able to navigate the extremely steep approach and land quickly while adhering to noise reduction rules. The Falcon 2000S can cope with such an approach at the relatively low speed of 108 knots, and is equipped with an autobrake that reduces landing distances by as much as 300 feet. Another important feature in terms of eco-friendliness is the two Pratt & Whitney 308C engines, which already power the aircraft’s predecessor, the Falcon 2000EX. The newest generation of this engine is even more environmentally friendly, thanks to new technology that produces 20 per cent less poisonous nitrous oxide emissions than the previous generation, without losing power. According to Dassault, the 2000S will also be 40 per cent ‘greener’ than required by new international Committee On Aviation Environmental Protection regulations, which are in the pipeline. The aircraft rides on Dassault’s strong pedigree. Dassault Aviation also produces the Rafale fighter jet as well as the complete line of Falcon business jets. This means that the technology on the 2000S fuses the best of both military and civil aviation. In order to keep its customers’ aircraft flying, the French manufacturer has service facilities all over the world. The first Falcon 2000S flew on 17 February 2011 in Mérignac, France. The test campaign will encompass 500 flight hours before certification. It is expected to be certified by the end of 2012 and arrive in style by early 2013.

THE TECHNOLOGY ON THE 2000S FUSES THE BEST OF BOTH MILITARY AND CIVIL AVIATION

Tests show superb aerodynamics of the 2000S for a capable, versatile and efficient aircraft

SPECIFICATION

IMPERIAL

METRIC

LENGTH (EXTERNAL)

66.33 FT

20.23 M

WINGSPAN

70.17 FT

21.38 M

HEIGHT (EXTERNAL)

23.17 FT

7.06 M

CABIN LENGTH

26.17 FT

7.98 M

CABIN WIDTH

92 IN

2.34 M

CABIN HEIGHT

74 IN

1.88 M

MAXIMUM RANGE (1)

3,470 NM

WITH IFR RESERVES MAXIMUM (PASSENGER) SEATING

10

MAXIMUM CRUISE SPEED CERTIFIED CEILING

MACH 0.862 47,000 FT

14,325.6 M

TAKE-OFF DISTANCE

4,450 FT

1,356.36 M

MAXIMUM TAKE-OFF WEIGHT

41,000 LBS

18,597.29 KG

TECHNOLOGY RULES Fully fuelled, the Falcon 2000S will have the largest payload in its class at 1,850 lbs; a maximum takeoff weight of 41,000 lbs; and a cruise speed of Mach 0.8. The aircraft can climb directly to 41,000 feet in 19 minutes, reach a mid-cruise altitude of 45,000 feet and offers a certified ceiling of 47,000 feet. Since the rollout of the first Falcon 20 in 1963, over 2,100 Falcon jets have been delivered to 67 countries worldwide. The Falcon family of jets currently in production includes the tri-jets, the Falcon 900LX and the 7X, as well as the twin-engine Falcon 2000LX and the new 2000S.

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WINGS

LIST JET INTERIORS Liz Moscrop

NATURAL PROGRESSION LIGHT DESIGN CONCEPTS FOR PRACTICAL LUXURY

The Bombadier Global 5000 outfitted by List, exuding class and luxury with their innovative veneers

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The pioneering company innovated ultra-thin, featherweight and flame-retardant materials

ASIDE FROM FUNCTION, FORM AND FINISH, THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT REQUIREMENT FOR JET INTERIORS is that, once done, everything has to pass some of the most stringent certification tests on the planet. List components & furniture GmbH (List Group) of Austria, which traces its carpentry roots back to the 1950s, aims to master all of the above. Its thirdgeneration family management has taken functionality to another level by merging plush interiors with natural materials and a feel-good factor, while ensuring all meet certification and flammability requirements. List Group’s focus on product innovation, such as flame-retardant wood and a new type of carbon and metal-effect finishes, make new design accents certifiably possible. Outstanding lightweight veneers are just one aspect of their expertise, such as a 0.8 mm granite film, touted as “stone as thin as skin”. It can be applied to virtually any surface, flat or curved, and for the first time in aviation history made it possible for an aircraft cabin to be fitted with stone flooring. The innovation, with its weight-saving capability and flexibility, opened new possibilities for the decoration of counter tops in galleys, lavatories, installing wall and ceiling panels, partitions and tables — even seating handles. >>

OUTSTANDING LIGHTWEIGHT VENEERS ARE JUST ONE ASPECT OF THEIR EXPERTISE, SUCH AS A 0.8 MM GRANITE FILM

The full-scale Legacy 500 mock-up allows customers a true-to-life experience of the unique interior of the aircraft Images courtesy of List Group

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List’s research and development team is already working on new developments for new materials and processes

>> Such innovative elements have brought List several new clients in search of a new look for the often plain vanilla jet interiors. Their client list now includes names such as Bombardier, Embraer, Pilatus and Airbus. Embraer, for example, commissioned the company to create and install granite stone flooring for its Legacy 600 and 650 aircraft. The 2.5 mm thick floor features mainly in the entrance, galley and lavatory areas, and the first stone flooring was installed in 2009 on a Legacy 600 refurbishment project. Franz List, List CEO and president, said, “We invested in the research and development of a new flooring design, based on the use of natural stone and weight reduction, and we succeeded in bringing a world’s first into the market.” The manufacturing process is based on a stone slab, cut to 1.2 mm, which is mounted to a backplate and then polished. In collaboration with the BMW Group subsidiary Designworks, List also executed a spacious and inviting interior for the first fullscale Embraer Legacy 500 mock-up, which made its debut last May at EBACE, the European Business Aviation Convention and Exhibition in Geneva, Switzerland. The mock-up uses a combination of actual and non-aircraft parts and has been touring the world since. Helmut Wiesenberger, List’s director of business development of components and furniture, states, “We are very proud to have been awarded for the construction and integration of the Legacy 500 sales mock-up.” List received the contract last December, and went on to develop and produce a true-tolife model of a complete Legacy 500 fuselage in a record time of only four months. The mock-up presents three sections — cockpit, main cabin and aft fuselage baggage compartment. The cream-coloured club configuration in the main cabin reveals seats that can fully recline for in-flight napping. These can also become two full-flat berths on longer trips. The large windows recessed into the cabin walls show just how airy the cabin will be during flight. With List’s eye on the future and a philosophy of perfection, we can expect more from them in the near future.

INSIDE ALLIANCE In the spirit of innovation and improvement, List has teamed up with three other leading companies to design the next generation aircraft interior environments for top-level business jets, VVIP aircraft and first class airline cabins. Lufthansa Technik, List, DesignQ and Schott founded the Inairvation alliance. Acting under the brand Inairvation, they will share their knowledge and assist each other in gaining access to new markets. “We trust in the pioneering spirit of the involved companies,” said Helmut Wiesenberger, Director Business Development at LIST. “We believe that the Inairvation alliance will allow us to bring cabin interior innovations and complete cabin solutions to the next level and generation.”

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List has more than 150 different types of super-thin wood veneers that are safety-approved for onboard use

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RIGHT The Rockwell Collins Pro Line 21 avionics system was designed with an eye on future NextGen airspace requirements BELOW The Rockwell Collins Venue Cabin Management System gives passengers control of cabin ambience and entertainment choices through an iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad

>> The Nextant 400XT was designed to operate in mountainous terrain. Its new Williams engines exhibit a lower ‘thrust lapse’ with altitude, enabling the airplane to maintain higher thrust when taking off from elevated airports, which also allows better performance on hot days. Nextant’s new 400XT has the same cabin size of the base aircraft, but can fly more than 2,000 nautical miles with four passengers and a crew of two. It climbs to 10,668 metres (35,000 feet) in a mere 13 minutes, and hits a top cruise speed of 460 knots. Nextant also offers optional winglets which further enhance performance. The latest in aerodynamics gives new life to the jet that was designed over a generation ago. Computational fluid dynamics helped redevelop the engine pylons and cowlings. The improved design helped reduce aerodynamic drag for better performance. Inside, Nextant offers a number of seating options. The most popular is a three-place divan and a legroomfriendly four-place club seating with retractable work tables and individual workstation amenities. Each custom cabin is crafted to match the owner’s preferences down to the paint scheme. Passengers can also avail of the latest in high-definition cabin management systems that allow them to control lighting and temperature. 36

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Options include electronic window shades, LED lighting and Internet access. Low development costs, with savings passed on to customers, and comparatively short delivery schedules are key to the aircraft’s future success. It appears there is something worthy in the old yet — so much so that Hawker Beechcraft announced it will offer its own upgrade package as well. We will be watching.

A MAKEOVER PRIMER Certified by the US Federal Aviation Administration, Nextant’s remanufacturing procedure involves more than 6,000 labour hours for each airplane. The Ohio-based company strips the old paint and dismantles the aircraft down to the component level to inspect for any damage or corrosion, and perform necessary repairs or replacements. This includes removing and replacing all wiring to accommodate the new electronic systems, and installing new quieter, more fuel-efficient engines from Williams International, in place of older Pratt & Whitney Canada engines. The interiors are gutted and refitted with all-new accommodation for passenger comfort and the latest in cabin technology. New cockpit avionics are installed. Each plane then gets a customised paint job and is test-flown before delivery to customers. Nextant hopes to deliver up to four aircraft a month.

WINGS AERO SYSTEM by Jim Gregory

S I M PLEX I T Y ON BOARD A NEW DESIGN APPROACH BREAKS WITH TRADITIONAL VIP AIRCRAFT INTERIORS

The Aero System introduces the aircraft design industry to a new level of luxury with its uncomplicated, clean lines

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Presented in an A319 CJ, the Simplexity design principle may be adapted to all aircraft types based on individual needs The fluid design creates an atmosphere of openness throughout the aircraft

THE OVERALL EFFECT IS OF AN ELEGANTLY LAYERED LANDSCAPE WITH DYNAMIC LINES

DESIGNING AIRCRAFT INTERIORS often boils down to making the most out of an unglamorous pipe-like structure. How far can you push the envelope, particularly for the more discerning of VIP aircraft users? Paris-based aircraft maintenance company Sabena technics set out to explore this with Ora-Ïto, the French design house founded by iconoclastic designer Ito Morabito, also known as Ora Ïto. What they have come up with is like a breath of fresh air. Together, Sabena and Ora-Ïto introduced the Aero System at the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport last June. The Aero System brings inspired modern design — lean functional luxury — to VIP aircraft design, in a clear break from traditional interiors. The interior fit-out of an Airbus Corporate Jet 319 created the most buzz as it revealed to the world the first interpretation of the Aero System. The system is based on Morabito’s philosophy of Simplexity, the art of clean, fuss-free design in interiors with complex functions. As conceptualised by the Ora-Ïto team and implemented by Sabena, Simplexity goes beyond hiding the complexities of an interior behind a minimalist façade. It aesthetically combines design with complex systems into a simple appearance, using intelligent design to lead the eye and body to specific and dedicated functions within the interior >> JETGALA

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Visionary French designer Ito Morabito

FAKES & FORTUNE

Design focuses on the principles of harmony, consisting of lines and strips where the flow leads naturally to dedicated functions

>> environment — in this case, the inside of a business jet. As the foundation of the innovative Aero System, this first aircraft interior design stands out in a market where many VIP conversions get lost in a sea of sameness because so many of them use similar materials and often the same ideas. The overall effect is of an elegantly layered landscape with dynamic lines. The functional lines flow and unite seating areas, lights, windows and tables throughout the aircraft’s lounge, meeting and rest areas. They logically define material choices and contrast. The cabin interior comes across as singularly fluid, open space, timeless and universal. Ora-Ïto developed the entire interior structure with architectural flair by using monoblocks for design cohesion with leatherupholstered furniture and harmonious integration. The monoblock approach is also in line with what is being called third millennium aircraft design — ecofriendlier industrial style and methods. Designer Morabito worked directly with Sabena’s engineers to refine the fit of the Aero System for an uncluttered, restful passenger environment, and ensure it complied with aviation’s stringent safety requirements. “Given Sabena technics’ dynamics, an association with a bold and forward looking designer like Ora Ïto seemed natural,” said Sabena’s Chairman and CEO Christophe Bernardini. “The combination of our skills and his visionary approach enabled us to present a unique design adaptable to all aircraft types in the completion industry.” Sabena is looking to its relationship with Ora-Ïto to increase its mark in the VIP conversion business and become a larger player in the industry. Jet buyers will surely be watching. 40

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At barely 35 years of age, French designer Ito Morabito’s claim to fame is a product of our dynamic times, where images and ideas can transverse the globe in an instant. Thrown out of design school, Morabito joined a nowdefunct magazine called Crash, where he created virtual products for internationally recognised brands. The idea, he explained later to the New York Times Magazine, “was to make fake publicity for fake products that looked real.” When these virtual products were uploaded for ‘launch’ on the Internet, the website was overwhelmed by people wanting to buy the fake products. The ensuing Internet fame brought the then 21-year-old to the attention of the international brands that his virtual products were based on. Impressed by his talent, he got some real design commissions, which he executed with several award-winning successes. Now working through Ora-Ïto, the Parisian design house he founded under his career name, his creative collaborations run the gamut from fashion, beauty and perfume to sports, beer, hospitality, electronics, residences, and now aviation with the Aero System.

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EUROCOPTER MERCEDES-BENZ by Jinesh Lalwani

LUXURY AND AESTHETICS ELEVATE AN ICONIC HELICOPTER

Eurocopter’s EC145 Mercedes-Benz cuts more than a dash with German automobile design

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The executive style and aerial expedience of the EC145 Mercedes-Benz perfectly complements business travel needs. All images courtesy of Eurocopter

I

f you took German automobile design and gave it wings, it would probably turn out just like the Eurocopter’s EC145 MercedesBenz, a stylish helicopter that marries the aerial expedience of helicopters with Mercedes-Benz’s design intuition. The original Eurocopter EC145 is a twin engine utility helicopter used for emergency rescue services and passenger transport. The MercedesBenz variant, on the other hand, is aimed at corporate transportation needs and boasts the same light frame, adding a configurable cabin. First unveiled in Geneva at the European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition 2011, the aircraft sports Mercedes-Benz’s signature silver exterior. Mercedes-Benz has always set its sights on taking to the skies. The threepointed star of its logo symbolises the car company’s ambition of universal motorisation — “on land, on water and in the air”.

For this project, designers at Mercedes’ Advanced Design Studio in Como, Italy, translated the design philosophy of the German automobile maker into luxury on rotors. Taking design cues from Mercedes’ premium S- and E-Class sedan cars, customers have the option to kit out the EC145’s upholstery in leather from a selection of colours. A choice of woods is available for the floors and ceiling panels, and ambient lighting, adjustable in intensity and colour, highlights the sensuous curves of the interior.

The automaker’s touches go beyond aesthetics. The helicopter’s body is a study in attention to ergonomics and transformability. The EC145 offers a modular seating system with the ability to seat up to eight passengers, which has its genesis in Mercedes’ R-Class range of spacious cars. Seats are rail-mounted in these modules, which can be easily configured to host a board meeting or to let busy corporate honchos catch 40 winks. >>

THE MERCEDES-BENZ VARIANT IS AIMED AT CORPORATE TRANSPORTATION NEEDS AND BOASTS THE SAME LIGHT FRAME, ADDING A CONFIGURABLE CABIN JETGALA

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The turbine-powered aircraft features the company’s latest developments in cockpit design, avionics and a sophisticated electrical system

SPECIFICATION

IMPERIAL

METRIC

OVERALL HEIGHT (EXTERNAL)

43 FT

13M

OVERALL LENGTH ROTORS

36 FT

11M

TURNING ROTOR DIAMETER

36 FT

11M

FUSELAGE LENGTH

34 FT

10.2M

ENGINE TYPE/POWERPLANT

2 TURBOMECA ARRIEL 1E2 TURBINE ENGINES

SHAFT HORSEPOWER

770 SHP

MAXIMUM RANGE MAXIMUM (PASSENGER) SEATING

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423 MILES

680 KM

4-8 PASSENGERS, DEPENDING ON CONFIGURATION

MAXIMUM CRUISE AIRSPEED

153 MILES/H

246 KM/H

MAXIMUM TAKE-OFF WEIGHT

7904

3,585 KG

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The arrangement also incorporates multipurpose boxes with coolers, tables and 15-inch monitor screens, allowing occupants compelling options for both business and leisure travel. The EC145 Mercedes-Benz Style helicopter is a sky sedan with several customisation options that takes into account the unique structure of a helicopter. For instance, in the wall separating the cockpit from the passengers, space-saving storage drawers are possible. Even the tail of the helicopter does double duty fitted with multifunctional storage space. It is capacious enough to store several luggage trunks, and paraphernalia like a bag of golf clubs, a bicycle and even surfboards for sporty getaways. These items are secured with various mounts to the structure of the helicopter. If needed, seats can be removed to make room for more storage space. Eurocopter is recognised for its cutting-edge contributions to avionics, such as noise reducing rotor technology. With the Mercedes-Benz design of the EC145, Eurocopter has given itself an aesthetic advantage that may just be unrivalled in the luxury helicopter market today. Best of all, equipped with an infraredsuppression system, it is literally impossible for anyone with missiles to get a lock on you so you can fully enjoy your helicopter.

THE HELICOPTER’S BODY IS A STUDY IN ATTENTION TO ERGONOMICS AND TRANSFORMABILITY WITH THE ABILITY TO SEAT UP TO EIGHT PASSENGERS Elegance and style is complemented by a luxurious arrangement of wood panels for the ceilings

Eurocopter and Mercedes-Benz show off their collaboration at EBACE 2011, Geneva, Switzerland

FLYING IN STYLE

Discover features such as a cool box, cup holder, table, monitor and DVD player along with extra storage space

All seats are mounted on rails and can be quickly reconfigured for different seating configurations, or removed to make room for luggage

Mr Renaud Lambert, the man behind the EC145 Mercedes-Benz Style project, shares insights into Eurocopter’s collaboration with Mercedes-Benz. The creation of ‘designer helicopters’ such as this EC145 Mercedes-Benz Style and the EC135 Hermes, is a natural progression in aviation design. A large number of Eurocopter customers use luxury cars everyday, with Mercedes-Benz being one of the preferred brands, particularly for discerning customers who appreciate the finer things in life. The EC145 MercedesBenz Style is a winner among automotive fans, while the EC135 Hermes will appeal to the fashion-conscious. As for plans in Asia, Mr Lambert reveals that Eurocopter will be supplying a Chinese company engaged in automobile manufacturing, sales and real estate. The helicopters will be assembled in Europe, while the VIP cabin interior equipment will be installed in China according to customers’ requirements. Eurocopter will provide technical support and assist in obtaining related approvals whenever feasible.

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WINGS HUGH HEFNER’S BIG BUNNY JET by Rainer Sigel

HARE FO RC E O NE HARDCORE HEDONISM WAS THE HALLMARK OF HUGH HEFNER’S SOFTCORE WORLD. WHAT MORE SO THAN ON HIS LEGENDARY PRIVATE JET, THE ‘BIG BUNNY’?

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MEN IDOLISED HIM, AND SO DID LEGIONS OF BUSTY YOUNG WOMEN. Others despised him passionately, along with his raunchy magazine and bunnyeared, bushy-tailed coterie. Whatever everyone thought of him, one thing was never in dispute — for millions of male adolescents during the age of Rock ‘n’ Roll, Hugh Hefner was a cult figure. At its peak, a quarter of all American college-age men bought Playboy Magazine every month. It was a must-have part of their lives. They were glued to its pages — even those without the naughty pictures. The magazine kept a whole generation abreast of the basics of the female anatomy; it kept them sane in the jungles of Vietnam, and heralded the sexual revolution of the flower-power era. Like it or not, Hefner seemed to have the Midas touch. In 1972, he became the best-selling publisher in the United States when Playboy’s November issue sold 7.2 million copies. The magazine was read in 37 countries, and strict circulation bans in a long list of countries only served to fuel his carefully crafted public image — the maverick who knew

HEFNER’S ICONIC LIFE AND STYLE INSPIRED EQUAL MEASURES OF ADORATION AND RIDICULE what he wanted, knew how to get it, and didn’t care what others thought. For Hefner though, it was not enough. In February 1969, he took delivery of a brand new McDonnell Douglas DC-9-32 twin jet airliner, to be used as his bedroom-inthe-sky. Nicknamed ‘The Big Bunny’, the aircraft came at a cost of USD9 million, which was a staggering extravagance at that time. Yet, it was simply understood by everyone as a seamless extension of his trademark lifestyle, which in turn fed his formidable marketing machine. This was no off-the-line aircraft; it was pure Hefner. Painted black with a white Playboy logo and the number N950PB on its tail, its rear folding staircase provided direct access to Hefner’s airborne bedroom. True to expectations, it was decked out with a king-size elliptical water bed, >>

Flamboyant publisher Hugh Hefner bought the Big Bunny, his very personal bedroom-in-the-sky, in 1969

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THE JET BUNNIES WORE BLACK LEATHER MINI-DRESSES, AND A WHITE PLAYBOY AVIATOR SCARF >> complete with seat belts, and covered in Tasmanian possum fur. It even had an en suite shower. Further up front, there were 12 seats which folded into sleepers, a conference area, a bar and a projection screen for watching movies. Dinner was served on a crystal dinner set for 32. Once everyone got in the mood by whatever means used in those days, guests could dance in the ‘discotheque’, thumping to the beat from an 8-track deck complete with psychedelic disco lights. Those who remember who played the closing song at Woodstock will know what that was. The only thing missing was a swimming pool and bowling alley. Indeed, the Big Bunny really was a bit of Playboy in the skies. Not surprisingly, the cabin crew of four was selected for their looks and called ‘Jet Bunnies’. Instead

of wearing bunny ears, they wore black leather mini-dresses, and a white Playboy aviator scarf. Few appreciated that these were true professionals, trained at Continental Airlines in Los Angeles. The flight deck crew was initially fielded by the flight department of Purdue University, which also maintained the jet, before that role went to the now-defunct Ozark Airlines. Alas, as with most things of excess, the Big Bunny didn’t last. Despite all publicity stunts, Hefner’s antics and the famous guests on board which included the likes of Elvis and Sonny & Cher on tour, Playboy Magazine suffered at the hands of more raunchy competitors and a generally more liberal attitude towards all things sexual. In 1976, Hefner had to sell his beloved plane, which he did to Venezuela’s

CLOCKWISE ‘Jet Bunnies’ were true professionals trained at Continental Airlines at Los Angeles Hugh Hefner arriving at Heathrow, London in 1970 The Big Bunny comes complete with bar, lounge, disco, king-size water bed, and a full staff of Jet Bunnies

Watch the Big Bunny video on YouTube.

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The Big Bunny came more than fully equipped, including an elliptical bed with Tasmanian possum fur

Hugh Hefner never made a secret about his love of beautiful women or his mile high club endeavours

The Jet Bunny uniform was a leather mini dress and a Playboy aviator scarf, sans bunny ears

THE DREAMWEAVER

Special permission from the federal government had to be obtained to paint the Big Bunny black

Aeropostal Airlines. The plane was re-equipped for regular airline use and registered as YV-19C. When the Venezuelans re-fleeted and retired the plane, it went into storage. In 1989, Aeromexico bought it, repainted it, and used it for domestic Mexican routes under the name Ciudad Juarez with tail number XA-JEB. The Big Bunny served faithfully until 2004 when it was finally retired in Guadalajara, Mexico. Aviation lore has it that it was originally meant to be cut up for scrap. Instead, Aeromexico donated the fuselage to the city of Cadereyta, Queretaro, which decided to remove its wings, set it on blocks and use it as a children’s classroom. It’s a good thing that old planes can’t talk.

Hugh Marston Hefner was born on 9 April 1926 in Chicago. He served as a writer for a military newspaper in the US Army from 1944 to 1946, and later graduated from the University of Illinois with a BA in psychology and a minor in creative writing and art. First working as a copywriter for Esquire in 1953, he mortgaged his furniture and took small loans from 45 investors — including his mother — to launch Playboy. The first issue was published in December 1953 with a scantily clad Marilyn Monroe on the cover, and sold over 50,000 copies. The rest is media history. In 2011, Playboy Enterprises was acquired by a private equity firm associated with textile magnate Suhail R Rizvi. Hefner continues to serve as its Editor-in-Chief and Chief Creative Officer.

Photos courtesy of Playboy Enterprises

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WINGS ORBITAL SPACEFLIGHT by Cadence Loh

UP UP & AWAY IN SPACE, NOBODY CAN HEAR YOU DREAM

Spaceflight participant Charles Simonyi (left) with crew fully geared in Sokol space suits

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S CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT All training is conducted with the Soyuz simulator The Soyuz spacecraft is seven metres long, with a maximum diameter of 2.7 metres and weighs 7,100 kg A close look at the Soyuz’s rockets Rocketing off into outer space to spend 12 days in orbit, circling the Earth at an estimated speed of 27,000 km/h All photos courtesy of Space Adventures

oviet cosmonaut Yuri permanent place in the National Air Gagarin took man’s first trip and Space Museum in Washington DC. into outer space on Fast forward to the year 2010: 12 April 1961, unleashing a Civilians who want to be space race unlike any other — travellers have even more options a race for the stars. Ever for a real taste of outer space, in full since, more than 500 cosmonauts cosmonaut tradition. Space Adventures and astronauts have left the Earth’s Ltd aims to “open spaceflight and the atmosphere on a wide range of missions. space frontier to private citizens by Until the early 2000s however, space building a series of successful, privately travel was strictly the domain of funded spaceflight missions,” says government agencies, and the civilian Eric C Anderson, Space Adventures’ world had to satisfy themselves by president and CEO. watching the action on TV screens. The US-based space tourism In 2004, that all changed. The company claims to be the only outfit privately funded suborbital spaceplane in the world to offer private space SpaceShipOne offered the first manned flights. It conducts the ventures with space flights taking civilians into the Russian Soyuz TMA, a spacecraft sub-orbit, 100 kilometres above the originally designed to transport crew Earth. Developed and flown by Mojave to space stations in support of lunar Aerospace Ventures, it did not yet landings. Participants who manage go the last miles to take travellers to earn a cosmonaut certification into outer space, but it did mark the actually get to spend time in orbit advent of commercial space tourism. — 322 kilometres above the Earth. The venture made history, so much Programmes offered include zeroso that when SpaceShipOne was gravity atmospheric flights, orbital decommissioned in 2005, it earned a space flights with an option to >> JETGALA

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A section of the International Space Station, with a view of Earth in the background

>> space walk, and other space flight related activities. These trips though are no whimsical joyrides, and are available only to those who can afford the USD15 million or more for the cost of passage. These would-be cosmonauts have to be medically fit and also commit to almost seven months of rigorous training, which includes learning basic Russian. Training is a rigorous schedule at the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre in Star City, Russia, involving a full set of facilities, simulators and methodology.

Inside Soyuz simulator

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The intensity and duration of the training is tailored to individual needs and availability, and based on one’s health, prior knowledge and how quickly one learns. Each training level programme must be completed before progressing to the next. The two-week Orbital Pre-qualification training includes zero-gravity flights, centrifuge runs, neutral buoyancy sessions and a series of medical examinations. Next, participants are familiarised in-depth with the Soyuz TMA. They learn to carry out mock launches and re-entry simulations. Other skills like

Yuri Gagarin, a Russian, became the first man to successfully venture into outer space at only 27 years of age

FIRST SPACE What does it take to have a date named after you? For Yuri Gagarin, it was to be the first man in space in 1961. 12 April 2011 marked the 50th anniversary of Gagarin’s historic first flight. For this, 12 April is known as Yuri’s Night. Gagarin’s monumental success made him so famous that his face was immortalised on posters, coins, statues and even tattoos. However, unknown to many, he was relegated to earth-bound tasks because his country would not risk losing a national hero in a second mission, should it go wrong. The man was denied what he loved best, and died seven years after his space flight at the age of 34, during a routine training mission. On Yuri’s Night, people in 34 countries come together to celebrate the milestones of space exploration. Its objective is to increase public awareness and inspire a new generation’s interest in space exploration. Events are created to develop responsible innovators with a global perspective and platforms for youth to commit to space exploration.

Participants are subject to a series of medical checks on top of their rigorous training at the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre

Participants accustom themselves to a zero-gravity environment in the simulator

SUCH SPACE TRAVEL USUALLY GOES BEYOND PURE PERSONAL PLEASURE, AS COSMONAUTS CARRY OUT SPECIFIC MISSIONS ON THEIR FLIGHTS learning to live and operate aboard a gravity-free environment are taught, well before certified participants get to fly to the International Space Station (ISS) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. No less than the Federal Space Agency of the Russian Federation certifies that a participant is ready for space flight. Participants who make the grade go on to live aboard the space station that orbits the Earth at approximately 27,000 km/h. Such space travel usually goes beyond pure personal pleasure, as cosmonauts carry out specific missions on their flights. In 2002, the ‘First African in Space’, Mark Shuttleworth, used his 10-day journey to “encourage students in South Africa to embrace mathematics, science and technology.” In 2005, Gregory Olsen from Princeton, New Jersey, joined a research programme with the European Space Agency to

study the human body’s response to the microgravity environment. The next year saw the first female space tourist, Iranian-American Anousheh Ansari. She conducted experiments during her eight-day space flight, such as the mechanics of anaemia, how muscle changes affect lower back pain and the consequences of space radiation on ISS crew members. As an ambassadress, Ansari aim to create public awareness and inspire youth to do more than dream about space exploration. Other more recent space travellers include Hungarian-American Charles Simonyi whose goals centred around advancing civilian space flight, assisting space station research and getting young people involved in the science of space travel. Meanwhile, British-American entrepreneur Richard Garriott firmly believes there is huge commercial potential in

private space exploration and strives to further understand space. On 9 October 2009, Canadian Guy Laliberté, CEO of Cirque du Soleil, took to space in the Soyuz TMA to spread the message in a two-hour online broadcast about water-related issues in 14 cities, including Montreal, Rio de Janeiro, New York, Mumbai, Tokyo, Paris, London and Moscow. The mission, called Moving Stars and Earth for Water, fused art and science, and rallied the support of former Vice President of the United States Al Gore, Man Booker Prize winner Yann Martel and celebrities like Salma Hayek, Shakira and Bono, among others. If you have a dream to take flight into outer space, there is one thing you should be aware of — once you have tasted flight in space, earth-bound flights will never be the same again. JETGALA

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WINGS AIR COMBAT USA by Cadence Loh

AN APPETITE FOR DANGER THE DOGFIGHT SCHOOL FOR EVERYDAY TOP GUNS OUTWIT. OUTPLAY. OUTLIVE. This is no back-biting survival game show, it is a high-speed game of an aerial dogfight, trying to get an ‘enemy’ into the crosshairs of your onboard weapons system. And live to tell about it. This is the mission of Air Combat USA, with a promise to get you home safely at the end of it to share details of every hair-raising thrill. You as a fighter pilot. For a day with no prior experience required, not even a pilot’s licence. Established in 1988, Air Combat USA is the original civilian dogfighting school that has given close to 50,000 guest pilots their Top Gun dream. Basic air combat manoeuvres, as taught in the air force, are introduced at Phase I, along with an understanding of the physiological effects of G-force and overall safety regulations. More complex manoeuvres come in at PhaseII, like high side attacks and defensive moves. Phase III teaches high-speed fighter tactics, and Phase IV reviews all lessons with six combat engagements that put the rules of engagement into actual aerial practice. It is one thing to learn basic fighter manoeuvres, but quite another to use them to gain a gun angle on the ‘enemy’. The man behind Air Combat is Captain Mike ‘Mav’erick’ Blackstone, its founder and president. Armed with an aerospace engineering degree and 46 years of aviation experience, including 30,000 hours of flight time, Blackstone set out to offer a complete, once-in-a-lifetime experience. This commitment led him to develop and patent the electronic tracking system and recording devices that verify each ‘kill’ in the sky. The three high-end digital cameras in the cockpit not only record the action but also deliver sound effects. The recorded air combat is reviewed after each flying session and given to participants as a memento of their adventure. The best part about Air Combat’s fighter pilot experience is spending time in the air with experienced instructor pilots with military fighter and aerobatic experience. The aircraft of choice is the Italian SIAI Marchetti SF260. There are good reasons for this.

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You will get to fly 90 per cent of the time, having the assurance of an instructor with actual combat experience beside you

Flying magazine once dubbed it “an aerial Ferrari with an on-board intercept capability for acquiring targets beyond visual range”. Still in production, the aircraft is built as a high-performance combatready fighter aircraft, capable of withstanding high Gs and threedimensional aerobatics, with a full fuel tank and two people equipped with parachutes. More importantly, its unique side-by-side cockpit allows

Learn to perform aerial stunts and engage in dogfights — no prior experience required

for close guidance by Air Combat instructors, yet yields control easily to participants when required. The other aircraft used at Air Combat is the Extra 300L. This 300 horsepower, six-cylinder acrobatic aircraft has been the choice of champion aerobatic performer Patty Wagstaff for its structural integrity and handling predictability. It has an extremely high roll-rate and cockpit characteristics somewhat similar to the F-16.

Air Combat USA’s success has encouraged a proliferation of similar adventure aviation set-ups. How is the pioneering company keeping its edge on the competition? “By exceeding the customer’s expectations every time with an experience that is as real as it gets without the bullets,” says Blackstone. “We want you to walk away with overwhelming satisfaction and saying ‘I can’t believe what I just did!’” We say bring it on.

“AS REAL AS IT GETS WITHOUT THE BULLETS”

Aerial ‘kills’ are recorded on three high-end digital cameras for debrief and a take-home memento All photos courtesy of Air Combat USA

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WINGS ROUND THE WORLD IN PC-12 by Cadence Loh

CIRCULAR ROUTE

THE TRIP OF A LIFETIME - AROUND THE WORLD IN 60 DAYS

Flying over one of French Polynesia’s numerous atolls All images courtesy of Tom Sólo

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The Smiling Flyer Team lining up at Faa’a International Airport, Tahiti

THE ONLY REASON FOR THE TRIP WAS "TO SHOW THAT IT COULD BE DONE"

TOM SÓLO, A GERMAN PHOTOGRAPHER known for his work in portraiture and reportage, was given an opportunity every aviation enthusiast would grab in a heartbeat. In 2007/8, a group of friends invited him to come along on a 60-day flying adventure through 18 countries across the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The group clocked a total of 145 hours on a Pilatus PC-12 named Smiling Flyer by owner Morten Sondergaard, while Sólo documented the trip with over 30,000 photographs. There were no hard and fast rules. According to Sólo, “there was no plan — just to get the plane around the globe,” and the only reason for the trip was “to show that it can be done”. The crew traversed the globe, visiting Spain, Egypt, Dubai, the Maldives, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Australia and New Caledonia, followed by the Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Easter Island, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Cape Verde and Morocco. To master such a schedule, a sturdy and reliable aircraft is needed, and their Pilatus stood up to the test. The group flew the executive version of the PC-12, complete with leather seats, making the ride relatively comfortable, smooth and efficient. Within hours on his first private flight, Sólo observed that he “was sure that this Swiss aircraft is the perfect single engine plane to get around the world with. The Pilatus is really fun, it is a comfortable plane with enough space for eight passengers — there were six of us — and everybody was comfortable. Noise within the plane is low, so we could chat easily, discussing what to do, as our route was not fixed.” >> JETGALA

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Departing from Cairo with the view on the Nile

A SPECIAL HIGHLIGHT WAS THEIR LANDING AT THE TINY TOTEGEGIE AIRSTRIP ON MANGAREVA ISLAND

An unforgettable moment and shot of adrenaline: Approaching Totegegie Airport on the Mangareva atoll, French Polynesia

View from one of Bangkok’s skyscrapers towards the river

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>> For Sólo, the trip soon became a race against time. Treating the trip as more work than play, he became anxious of losing daylight, as they flew continuously eastward. In between flights, the group would rest, discuss the next destination, listen to music or play backgammon. For Sólo, rest became elusive as he saw himself always on duty, taking photographs, backing up files, selecting the best images and blogging about them in between. Taking in “new impressions every day — cultural differences, new countries, different languages, new people” was a learning experience for the whole group. The thrills and joys of meeting new people and having exciting experiences in different environments every day were counterbalanced by unexpected difficulties. Brushes with local authorities were commonplace, so the group had to learn quickly how to deal with officers from vastly different cultural and political backgrounds. One such incidence was a stop in Kalimantan, Indonesia, where they were denied permission to land, but for operational reasons had to do so anyway. Predictably, local authorities were not amused and it took “hours of negotiations and satellite calls” until the aircraft was allowed to continue to Jakarta. Accommodation ranged from five-star

SPECIFICATION

IMPERIAL

METRIC

LENGTH (EXTERNAL)

47.3 FT

14.4 M

WINGSPAN

53.4 FT

16.27 M

HEIGHT (EXTERNAL)

14 FT

4.26 M

CABIN LENGTH

16.11 FT

5.16 M

CABIN WIDTH

5 FT

1.53 M

CABIN HEIGHT

4.1 FT

1.47 M

MAXIMUM RANGE (1)

1,573 NM

2,915 KM

WITH IFR RESERVES MAXIMUM (PASSENGER) SEATING MAXIMUM CRUISE SPEED

9 280 KTAS

519 KM TAS

CERTIFIED CEILING

30,000 FT

9,144 M

TAKE-OFF DISTANCE

2,650 FT

808 M

MAXIMUM TAKE-OFF WEIGHT

10,450 LBS

4,740 KG

Preparing for take-off at Son Bonet Airport, Palma de Mallorca The comfortable executive version of the PC-12 with six seats — spacious enough for relaxing during long flights

Flying over Fogo Island, Cape Verde

The Pilatus on the airstrip of Santos Dumont Airport, Rio de Janeiro, with Sugar Loaf in the background

LOG BOOK Kilometres flown:

60,000

Photos taken:

30,496

Internet connections: Flight hours:

1,392 140

Satellite phone calls:

82

Days of travelling:

60

Landings:

39

luxury resorts with private pools to wooden cottages on small Pacific islands, which the group had to share with each other, as well as many “small animals”. Another brush with the law came when they found themselves stranded on an airstrip in Papua New Guinea, sitting in complete darkness next to their aircraft. Their passports were confiscated and they were surrounded by curious civilians, policemen in shorts and armed military, waiting for the unknown. Eventually, they were cleared of any charges and released. Sólo encountered many firsts during his trip, such as long flights between remote islands with panoramic views of oceans, atolls and islands. A special highlight was their landing at the tiny Totegegie airstrip on Mangareva Island, French Polynesia. Built right on top of the atoll, with the vast ocean on the left and the right, this particular stop was utterly unforgettable. “We all knew that landing there was a risk, and so was getting away again,” Sólo states. When the time came to head home, Sólo found it difficult to resume what used to be his normal life. He refers to his time with the Smiling Flyer as “mind changing”. Sólo is now a multilingual globetrotter and private aviation enthusiast, having discovered the perfect way to live his dream. Plans are in the works for another record breaking trip on a private aircraft, as well as an international photo exhibition and an illustrated book on the Smiling Flyer. But then, who needs plans anyway? www.tomsolo.com JETGALA

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WINGS

by Alex Unruh

CAPTAIN SPEAKING... THE BEST PLACE ON EARTH

P

eople unfamiliar with private aviation often ask pilots like me: “Which is your favourite place on earth?” I am always a bit lost for a good answer. While I do love to travel, there is a large disparity between travelling for leisure and doing so for business, especially for pilots. I realised the difference on one of my first international expeditions as a private pilot. A colleague and I picked up an aircraft in New Zealand and spent 23 days flying it around the Asia-Pacific, before we finally left it in Thailand. Only three days out of those 23 we had to ourselves to play tourist. While the people we met were engaged in idyllic leisure activities, museum-hopping and putting a tick to every item in their guide book, we were busy going through the three-page checklist we use to prepare for an international trip. Like “Is the aircraft safe to fly? Is there enough fuel for the mission? Is the handling for departure and arrival confirmed?” And so on. Over the past six months, I have been to five of the seven continents on our planet, taking off from and touching down in 20 countries. Many people only dream of seeing the places I have been fortunate enough to visit. I used to be one of them. When I began my journey as a pilot, I assumed my career would consist of flying around the United States. Never had I imagined that one day I would be criss-crossing the world. Many of my peers have a hard time understanding the distances I travel within such a short time, and to cope, I have evolved a different perspective of time and

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“NEVER HAD I IMAGINED THAT ONE DAY I WOULD BE CRISS-CROSSING THE WORLD”

Photo courtesy of Tom Sólo www.tomsolo.com

distance. Few can relate to this, unless they themselves also travel extensively. So when I find myself in moments of contemplation on where I am or where I am going next, I focus on what it takes to operate my aircraft in so many diverse countries. Regulations, customs, immigration, slots and permit requirements — to name just a few — vary from country to country. Regardless, the crew’s duty is to ensure a positive and productive experience for their passengers. A successful mission is when all of this is transparent and easy for the people in the back. After all, if they wanted to be hassled, they would fly commercial. Every place has something unique to offer a traveller, be it for leisure or business. My idea of the best place on earth is one where I’m able to give my passengers a smooth experience, easiest done in countries with a long history of private aviation. Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Canada and Europe stand out, whereas countries such as China, India and Russia are less flexible when dealing with people like us. Handling and resolving issues there is always challenging, yet strangely rewarding. Aside from sitting at the controls of an aircraft going somewhere new and exciting, my idea of the best place on earth is the raw wilderness of a game drive in the African bush. It is one of the few places left on our planet where one can feel the power, beauty and danger of nature. It is an experience hard to beat when viewing it from a panoramic perspective of 41,000 feet, with a cup of good coffee at hand. So, where is “the best place on earth” for you?

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LUXE

LUXE

THE HOUSE OF BULGARI by Alvin Wong

TENACITY

CONSTANT REINVENTION AND ARTISTIC CONSISTENCY, THE KEYS TO BULGARI’S LONGEVITY The characteristic magnificence of Bulgari jewellery comes through bold designs with coloured gemstones

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E

very young man hopes to make his mark in the world, as did a young silversmith named Sotirio Bulgari from the village of Epirus, Greece. And so started a ripple that now surges strong amongst the most exclusive names in the international luxury world. Sophisticated celebrities love Bulgari, and their dalliances with it are well-documented — Sophia Loren, Andy Warhol and the late Elizabeth Taylor were noted fans. Taylor’s most frequent love interest — a young, working-class Richard Burton — acknowledged his initiation into the elite circle of wealth and beauty with amusement: “I introduced Liz to beer and she introduced me to Bulgari.” But behind the glitz is a story of humble, creative tenacity. In the 1880s, Sotirio left Greece for Italy and eventually settled in Rome, where he displayed his goods in the corner of a Greek merchant’s shop window. His original designs caught eyes. Within five years, Sotirio discovered he had the means to open his own store, which he did, with savvy. ns In 1905, wanting to draw Americans ved and Britons touring Rome, he moved here his store to Via dei Condotti 10, where it stands to this day, and dubbed itt the ‘Old Curiosity Shop’ after a Charles es Dickens novel. In the lull summer days, he followed wealthy tourists to the Swiss resort town of St Moritz, where he set up ed his another shop. He eventually focused efforts on Rome and jewellery making king — and this became the nucleus of the company’s legendary success. After his death, Sotirio’s sons Giorgio and Constantino, who appeared to have n, inherited his creativity and acumen, took over the shop and enlarged it.. ulgari The jewellery creations that the Bulgari name is now synonymous with is owed to the brothers’ foresight: in 1915, they m diversified the company’s craft from

silver to jewellery with precious stones. As a creative force, the duo developed the brand’s signature classical GrecoRoman aesthetic and made sure it adapted well to the design trendss of the ensuing eras, from the geometrically cally pleasing Art Deco styles of the 1930s to the extravagant floral motifs of the 1950s. Beyond bold designs, Bulgari’s ari’s evolution as a global modern luxury force is also the result of creative tive and production control, an impetus us driven by Sotirio’s great-grandson, Bulgari’s current CEO Francesco Trapani. pani. Under Trapani since 1984, Bulgari has proven its business savvy again and d again. There was the company’s 2004 acquisition cquisition of Crova, a luxury jewellery making facility in Piedmont. In the same year, Bulgari entered a partnership with ith a subsidiary of the Leviev Group, the world’s largest supplier lier of cut diamonds, thus ensuring uring a continuous supply of the he precious stones Bulgari ri is famous for. >>

“I INTRODUCED LIZ Z TO BEER AND SH HE INT TRO ODUCED ME E TO O BULGARI”” RICH HARD BURTO ON

Bulgari has a reputation for clever use of rare and precious stones All images courtesy of Bulgari SpA

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LUXE Silversmith Sotirio Bulgari (1857-1932), founder of the Bulgari empire

Bulgari shows off its style in its timepieces, like this 2011 Endurer Chronosprint All Blacks, which uses Daniel Roth’s signature double-ellipse case

>> The company’s drive for autonomy has since filtered to its watchmaking arm, which today counts for almost 29 per cent of its business. Acclaimed for its iconic Bulgari-Bulgari and Tubogas watches in the 1960s and 1970s, the company committed itself fullsteam to high-end timepiece production by forming the Bulgari Time subsidiary in the early 1980s. Watch factory buy-outs and brand mergers followed. Two important acquisitions took place at the turn of the millennium, when Bulgari took over notable Swiss watch brands Daniel Roth and Gerald Genta. Both had production plants capable of producing high-end complication movements. Last year, the two brands were co-opted as part of Bulgari’s main collection. Over the last decade, Bulgari Time also bought over dial, case and bracelet making factories. Drawing parallels to its jewellery division, Trapani is convinced that production autonomy will bring “credibility and prestige” to Bulgari watches. At this year’s Baselworld, Bulgari unveiled several watches emblematic of its horological ascent. There was a reprise of the Serpenti watch, which débuted last year featuring the signature coiled bracelets inspired by the Tubogas watch of the 1970s. Last year, the brand proved its technical abilities when it unveiled its first proprietary movement — the automatic Calibre 168, designed and produced entirely in-house. “As with our jewellery, we needed to acquire the necessary watchmaking savoir faire because it was important for us to offer products with credibility,” says Guido Terreni, managing director of Bulgari’s watch business unit. He hopes the acquisitions and internal adjustments will make Bulgari watches as lauded as the brand’s jewellery creations, which have evolved into a style distinctly Bulgari. 78 66

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THE COMPA ANY CO OMMITT TED IT TSE ELF FULL L-ST TEAM TO HIG GH-EN ND TIMEP PIE ECE PRODU UCTIO ON BY FO ORMIN NG THE BUL LGARI TIME SU UBSID DIA ARY

The iconic Tubogas Snake watch in yellow gold, produced in 1972

BULGARI IN NUMBERS

IN 19 905, WANTIN NG TO DRAW MERIICANS S AN ND BR RITO ONS AM RING G ROME, HE MOVED HIS S TOUR ORE AND DU UBBED IT T THE STO ‘OL LD CURIO OSIT TY SHOP’ AFTE ER ES DIC CKENS NOVEL L A CHARLE

USD15.7 million

: The ‘Bulgari Blue’ diamond ring, which was made in the 1970s, set a world-record price per carat for a blue diamond at last year’s Christie’s auction, fetching USD15.7 million (or USD1.4 million per carat). It features a triangularshaped 9.87-carat colourless diamond and a triangular-shaped Fancy Vivid 10.95-carat blue diamond.

174

: The Bulgari Group currently operates through 41 companies in 24 countries, among which 174 global stores are under its direct management.

168

: The number of components that make up Buglari’s first proprietary automatic watch movement, the BVL 168. The movement is a breakthrough for Bulgari as it represents the brand’s capacity for full in-house watch production.

18.61

: The carat count of Bulgari’s famous emerald-and-diamond platinum pendant, which Richard Burton gave Elizabeth Taylor as an engagement present in 1964.

The Bulgari flagship store in Rome’s fashionable Via dei Condotti has been open for 105 years

Through the decades, Bulgari jewellery has become distinguished for its combination of coloured gemstones and precious metals with rounded shapes and symmetrical lines. The brand’s contemporary offerings carry on this aesthetic exuberance. The Sapphire Flower and Elisia collections feature sapphire-set floral motifs and elliptical shapes, respectively; while the B.Zero 1 range is famed for matching gold with strong, contrasting colours. Terreni adds, “To Bulgari, a product can be welldesigned, but it isn’t considered to be a luxury item if it is not produced with integrity.” Such integrity the company can be proud of. This year, Bulgari marks 125 years since Sotirio first set out for Italy. It will celebrate this milestone with a retrospective exhibit to be held in Beijing, China. What better proof that the mark and vision of the Greek silversmith in Via dei Condotti 10 has, indeed, gone around the world.

The Diagono Calibro 303, an automatic chronograph sports watch released in Baselworld 2011

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LUXE THIERRY STERN

FOURTH GENERATION FOLLOWING HIS GREAT GRANDFATHER’S PATH AND FILLING IN HIS FATHER’S SHOES, IT’S PATEK PHILIPPE CEO THIERRY STERN’S TURN TO KEEP TRADITION ALIVE AND VIBRANT 5=SYFIGEQITVIWMHIRXMRMRXLIQMHWXSJKPSFEPIGSRSQMGXYVQSMP;LEX[IVI ]SYVXSTXLVIITVMSVMXMIWEXXLIXMQIERHLS[HMH]SYQEREKIXLIQ# 8LIKPSFEPIGSRSQMGXYVQSMP[EWEGLEPPIRKMRKTIVMSHJSV4EXIO4LMPMTTIFYXJSVXYREXIP][I [IVIPIWWEJJIGXIHGSQTEVIHXSSXLIVGSQTERMIW;MXLXLIWXSGOQEVOIXMRXLIHYQTWGEWL VMGLTISTPIHMHR¸XORS[[LIVIXSKVS[XLIMVQSRI]MRXLEXX]TISJYRWXEFPIIRZMVSRQIRX 3RISJXLIWMHIIJJIGXWSJXLIWMXYEXMSR[EWXLEXHIQERHJSVLMKLZEPYIGSQTPMGEXIH XMQITMIGIWKVI[IZIRWXVSRKIV4EXIO4LMPMTTIXMQITMIGIWVITVIWIRXEWEJIMRZIWXQIRX STTSVXYRMX]SJJIVMRKPEWXMRKZEPYI 1]XSTXLVIITVMSVMXMIWXLIR[IVIERHWXMPPEVIPSRKXIVQVIPEXIHMRHITIRHIRGI TVSHYGXWERHVIXEMPIVW´XLEXMWTVIWIVZMRKXLIMRHITIRHIRGISJXLIGSQTER]JMRERGMEPP] ERHXIGLRMGEPP]VIMRJSVGMRKXLIUYEPMX]SJSYVTVSHYGXWERHI\XIRHMRKXLITVSHYGXSJJIV[MXL MRRSZEXMSRRI[QSHIPWRI[QIGLERMWQWERHXSGSRXMRYIVIMRJSVGMRKSYVVIPEXMSRWLMT[MXL SYVVIXEMPIVW(YVMRKHMJJMGYPXTIVMSHWMXMWGETMXEPJSVYWXSKMZIJYPPWYTTSVXXSSYVXVYWXIH VIXEMPTEVXRIVW 68

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Thierry Stern studied in the Watchmaking School of Geneva and gained the respect of Patek Philippe employees when he began his career as a blue collar worker in his family’s own company

OPPOSITE PAGE Patek Philippe’s Ref 5208P shows its ability to work with complications. It has a minute repeater, monopusher chronograph, perpetual calendar, and moon phases ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF PATEK PHILIPPE SA

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JVSQER]WLEVILSPHIVW%WEJEQMP] S[RIH[EXGLGSQTER]JSVJSYV KIRIVEXMSRW4EXIO4LMPMTTILEWFIIR MRXLILERHWSJQ]JEQMP]WMRGI 8LIWIRWISJJEQMP]MWEZEPYI[IPMZI HEMP]MRXLIGSQTER]OIITMRKEPMZI XVEHMXMSREPLERHGVEJXWGVIEXMRKXMQIPIWW HIWMKRWRYVXYVMRKVIPEXMSRWLMTW[MXL PSRKXIVQVIXEMPIVWERH[MXLSYVGPMIRXW [LSWLEVIXLMWZEPYIERHXLMWIQSXMSREP EXXEGLQIRXXSXLIFVERH

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Since 1941, Patek Philippe has been creating chronographs with perpetual calendars, one of the latest models being the Ref 5270

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LUXE Patek Philippe is also popular with females, with grand complication watches like the Ladies First Split-Seconds Chronograph Ref 7059

UP CLOSE What was your childhood ambition? Live my passion for Patek Philippe What is the best gift you’ve received? My two sons and the gift of passion for the company my grandfather and father gave me What belonging would you never throw away? My family photo albums Your favourite home cooked meal? Peking duck (although this is not home cooked) Your favourite method of relaxing? Spending time with my children, my friends

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ONE OF THE SIDE EFFECTS OF THE (RECESSION) WAS THAT DEMAND FOR HIGH VALUE COMPLICATED TIMEPIECES GREW EVEN STRONGER

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ZZZ]\GRLW

LUXE REPEATERS & STRIKING WATCHES by Katrina Balmaceda

CHIME ON

TIME WATCH MAKERS HIT HIGH NOTES WITH HOROLOGY’S OLDEST COMPLICATION

BEFORE THERE WAS LIGHT, there was sound. In the old days, when darkness prevented men from reading clocks and watches at night, clock makers created gongs. The number of times a clock or pocket watch chimed corresponded to the number of hours, half-hours, quarter-hours, five-minute periods and minutes. With the advent of electricity, two kinds of chiming timepieces developed: repeaters and striking clocks. The latter was widely used to announce time in public squares. Repeaters, on the other hand, could chime time on demand using a push button or slide. Today, electricity and artificially illuminated watches negate the need for striking mechanisms, and only the visually impaired rely on them. Yet these chiming timepieces are valued as one of watchmaking’s most fascinating complications. Here are some contemporary examples from the world’s top manufacturers.

A. Lange & Söhne Lange Zeitwerk Striking Time A. Lange & Söhne’s first watch with an acoustic mechanism capitalises on the trademark ZEITWERK design, which tells time with numeral discs. When time advances, the movement of the discs unleashes a force vector that produces energy reserves for the striking mechanism. The gongs are seen on the dial — a low-pitched one chimes the hours and another high-pitched one strikes the quarter-hours. The pushpiece at 4 o’clock mutes the watch. To adjust the time, pull back the crown, which retracts the gongs to avoid activating and jamming the chiming mechanism.

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Audemars Piguet Millenary Hand-wound Minute Repeater Audemars Piguet excited connoisseurs earlier this year when it unveiled this watch, which sports a double balancespring to enhance time-telling precision. Power is packed into the thin watch, with two movement barrels giving it a seven-day power reserve, and a large third barrel powering the striking mechanism. To prevent damage to the delicate complication, a mechanism forbids time from being adjusted while the minute repeater is chiming.

Blancpain Carrousel Répétition Minutes Le Brassus Blancpain’s original Le Brassus watch broke new ground with its one-minute flying carrousel when it first came out in 2008. Last year, Blancpain added to it a cathedral gong minute repeater, increasing the wristwatch’s complexity as seen through the open dial centre and sapphire caseback. A red gold case houses the timepiece, which has 65 hours of power reserve.

THESE CHIMING TIMEPIECES ARE VALUED AS ONE OF WATCHMAKING’S MOST FASCINATING COMPLICATIONS

Breguet Classique Grande Complication, Minute Repeater An 18-karat rose gold case houses this handwound minute repeater with an entirely handengraved movement. The 18-karat silvered gold dial, with open-tipped Breguet hands in blued steel, features running seconds at 9 o’clock in addition to the function of hours and minutes. The movement can be admired through the dial’s skeletonised centre and sapphire crystal caseback.

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Bulgari Octo Répétition Minutes Retro Both acoustics and aesthetics figure in this timepiece’s technical merits. The minute repeater strikes the hours in a low pitch, quarter-hours in two low-/high-pitched notes and minutes in a high pitch. Bulgari chooses a medium succession speed, with the watch taking 15 seconds to strike 11:59, the time that requires nearly the most number of chimes. The dial displays retrograde minutes at the right side while a jumping hours display is positioned at 9 o’clock.

Franck Muller Aeternitas Mega 4 A minute repeater is one among 36 complications packed into the Mega, the pinnacle of the Aeternitas line. It uses the Westminster Chimes, the melody played by the Big Ben bells on quarterhours. Aside from the minute repeater for hours, quarter-hours and minutes, the Mega also strikes Grand Sonnerie (hours and quarter-hours) and Petite Sonnerie (quarter-hours only). Some functions seen on the dial are a chime power reserve indicator, tourbillon, perpetual calendar, chronograph, equation of time and two time zones.

Patek Philippe Ref. 5216 The Ref. 5216, an updated version of the 18-year-old Ref. 5016, ranks fourth among Patek Philippe’s most complicated wristwatches. It contains a minute repeater, tourbillon, perpetual calendar and moon phases. The new watch boasts increased sonority thanks to its 39.5 mm case — nearly 3 mm larger than that of its predecessor. It uses a low pitch for sounding hours, double high-low notes for quarter-hours and a high pitch for minutes. Each Patek Philippe minute repeater has to be heard and assessed by its president before being approved.

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LUXE FRANCK MULLER by Katrina Balmaceda

HOT METAL

ON THE COUNTDOWN TO THE SINGAPORE GRAND PRIX

The Conquistador Grand Prix Tourbillon in rose gold and titanium

SINGAPORE IS GEARING UP FOR ITS ANNUAL GRAND PRIX EXTRAVAGANZA, and so is watchmaker Franck Muller. As hotels, transport providers, security officers and retailers welcome an ever growing influx of racing fans who come to watch the world’s only Formula 1 night race, Franck Muller unveils its corresponding Conquistador Grand Prix collection. Masculine and sporty, the watches in this special collection make use of a material commonly found in F1 cars and in specialised aeronautics — Ergal, an ultra-light aluminium alloy treated to decisively resist corrosion and abrasion. The watch cases come in the brand’s signature Cintrée Curvex shape. This year’s range is an update of the Conquistador Singapore Grand Prix 2009 Racing Chronograph and now includes Central Seconds, Chronograph and Tourbillon versions. The self-winding, mechanical Conquistador Grand Prix Central Seconds displays seconds in the centre of the dial, minutes and hours, plus a date window at 6 o’clock. It packs 42 hours of power and a frequency of 28,800 vibrations per hour. The Conquistador Grand Prix Chronograph also uses a self-winding mechanical movement. It displays hours, minutes and small seconds at 9 o’clock, as well as a 30-minute counter at 3 o’clock and the date at 6 o’clock. Three push-pieces serve to start and stop the chronograph; to bring back the chronograph to zero; and to adjust the date. At 28,800 vibrations per hour, power reserve is 48 hours. A flying tourbillon on ceramic ball bearings is seen on the dial of the Conquistador Grand Prix Tourbillon. The watch, with a manually wound mechanical movement, displays hours, minutes and seconds. It boasts a 60-hour power reserve with a frequency of 18,000 vibrations per hour. All three watches come with choices for cases in Ergal and titanium, and rose gold and titanium. The central seconds and tourbillon watches add a titanium only case option.

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The Ghost Extended Wheelbase model had its world début in Shanghai in April this year All images courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Ltd

ROLLS-ROYCE BESPOKE SERVICES by Christie Leo

BESPOKE SERVICES FROM SUBTLE TO SENSATIONAL, FOR A WORLD CLASS MARQUE WHEN SIR HENRY ROYCE BEGAN MAKING CARS, well over a hundred years ago, his most remembered marketing quote was: “Strive for perfection in everything you do. Take the best that exists and make it better. When it does not exist, design it.” This kind of direct, can-do confidence is still seen today in the Rolls-Royce bespoke team. Personalising a Rolls-Royce can be as subtle as applying a darker shade to a dial or as visible as an exposed exhaust. The Spirit of Ecstasy emblem on the hood can be goldplated or jewelled, and illuminated. One can have hidden humidors, storage space for wine, and even beverage holders measured to snugly fit a favourite drink. 32 76

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT A bespoke Phantom Drophead Coupé, with picnic set, champagne service set and fridge The built-to-order four-seat Ghost Extended wheelbase is available only in limited numbers for 2011 until full production begins next year A mother-of-pearl instrument dial, or a bejewelled Spirit of Ecstacy hood ornament (above) are small details that Rolls-Royce Bespoke can customise

COLOUR IS NO ISSUE — THE ROLLS-ROYCE TEAM WORKS WITH A PALETTE OF 44,000 SHADES Colour is no issue — the Rolls-Royce team works with a palette of 44,000 shades, so one can be sure the designers can show the difference between royal blue and midnight blue. Clients can match the car’s body paint and interiors to their favourite tie or suit. One can even ‘create’ a colour and give it a specific name. There is no lack of material choices either. Instrument and control dials can have mother-of-pearl accents. Leather finishes include a natural grain hide for seating and textured ‘tipped’ leather for door panniers and centre consoles. Lambswool rugs cover deep-pile carpets. Metal surfaces can be finished in satin or high-polish sterling. Woodwork veneers can be done in Figured Mahogany, Burr Walnut, Birdseye Maple, Black Tulip, Oak Burr and Elm Cluster. Quirkier Rolls-Royce designs have thrilled the market. Last year, the company launched the four-person picnic set, a fold-out kit hidden in the boot. It came in polished aluminium, teak veneer and leather — but clients can use other materials, of course. Specially designed hand-blown and cut stemware, David Mellor cutlery, and design touches like magnets inside the chopping boards for holding knives in place are presented on fold-out Indian rosewood tables. Another car presented in 2010 in a one-off shade of blue included a refrigerated cabinet hidden beneath the luggage compartment floor. >> JETGALA

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LUXE >> If asked, the Rolls-Royce team has many suggestions to offer, but it welcomes customers’ ideas. One client had his Rolls-Royce Phantom’s veneer made with wood from a tree grown in his estate, engraved with his initials. Another wanted the car painted in lilac, with interiors to match. Even daring, bright colours are accepted if a client wishes to use them. From being just a small part of the company, the Rolls-Royce bespoke team has grown to a significant size, propelled by an increasing number of buyers opting for bespoke features. The Phantom and Ghost are the two models highly personalised by Rolls-Royce owners. Three-fourths of all Phantoms sold in 2009 contained bespoke

LAST YEAR, IT LAUNCHED THE FOUR-PERSON PICNIC SET, A FOLD-OUT KIT HIDDEN IN THE BOOT A four-person picnic set is one of Rolls-Royce’s most impressive bespoke concepts Behind innovative original concepts and details are a small team of design, engineering and manufacturing personnel

Clients can virtually add bespoke elements to their cars with the Phantom App, such as picking a personal colour

VIRTUAL FACTORY Earlier this year, Rolls-Royce launched the Phantom App for iPad, iPhone and iPod, which lets customers virtually design their Rolls-Royce. One can play around with interior trim combinations and exterior finishes, and combine different shades for two-toned paint. He can also use the iPad to take a photo of his favourite suitcase or tie and, using the App, extract the colour and apply it to the car. An image gallery lets the user add extras like special veneer, humidors or picnic sets.

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A Phantom Extended Wheelbase at the Paris Motor Show in 2010 boasted bespoke elements such as custom Sunrise leather interior, mother-ofpearl centres for instrument dials and unique Gunmetal metallic paint

THREE-FOURTHS OF ALL PHANTOMS SOLD IN 2009 CONTAINED BESPOKE ELEMENTS elements, compared to just half in 2005. Middle East patrons make up the largest percentage of clients who choose to customise this car model. Dubai’s Burj Al Arab, the world’s most luxurious hotel, uses 18 Phantoms, two of which are special editions — they match the hotel’s design and colour. For this, a designer from the Rolls-Royce bespoke department studied the hotel’s interior design and architectural elements. “Ghost is a more approachable Rolls-Royce that is bringing an entirely new type of customer to the brand,” says CEO Torsten Müller-Ötvös. “We are also demonstrating how we continue to strengthen our position as the pinnacle luxury brand, thanks to the enduring appeal of the Phantom family and the depth of our bespoke personalisation service.” Superlatives in Rolls-Royce are found in the details. Each car is hand-built and hand-finished, taking approximately 260 hours of labour to produce. This should be enough to satisfy most motorists. Yet, time and again, the discerning client chooses a bespoke Rolls-Royce because he knows that — literally and figuratively — he deserves that extra mile. JETGALA

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GRAY DESIGN by Christine de Felice

BALANC E DESIGN IDEAS MOVE SEAMLESSLY FROM OPEN ROADS TO OPEN OCEANS

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THIS PAGE The Stand Craft 166’s interior features chrome highlights, rich red leather and walls treated with polished gunmetal automotive lacquer OPPOSITE PAGE The high-performance Strand Craft 122 yacht can speed through open seas at over 50 knots The Stand Craft Limousine Beach Cruiser designed by Gray Design is optimised for maximum visibility in sun-soaked regions All images courtesy of Gray Design AB

WHAT DOES IT REALLY TAKE TO CREATE A VEHICLE THAT BOTH TURNS HEADS YET LEAVES A LASTING IMPRESSION? Eduard Gray, the man behind Sweden-based Gray Design, is very clear. “It is not by doing crazy or vanguard designs. You just have to get the proportions, surfaces and graphics right to create a beautiful object — and that balance will make a design stand out from the rest and get noticed.” “Uniqueness through beauty” is a philosophy central to Gray’s wide repertoire of projects and concepts — superyachts, sports cars, motorcycles, helicopters and even a magnetic levitation machine (see sidebar). The University of Coventry graduate in industrial design travelled along many avenues to prove his vision. He has animated films, visualised concept cars for Volvo, and engineered vehicles for Mercedes, BMW and Ford. Car design was Gray’s first job after graduation. It was something he excelled at, and

CRUISERS CAN ROLL OUT OF THE YACHT GARAGE ONTO THE PORT IN A MUSCULAR VEHICLE after joining several online design contests, he won the Michelin Challenge Design competition. That exposure expanded his drawing board from cars to superyachts. “Kurt Strand (of Strand Design) saw some of my designs online and asked me if I would like to design a yacht. He gave me a free hand to create something amazing.” The result was the 38-metre Strand Craft 122 superyacht with a supercar styled specifically to match the lines of the boat, something that the Strand Craft company claims is a first in automotive design history. The project led to the birth of the SC 122’s bigger sister, the Strand Craft 166. This daring 50-metre vessel can streak across oceans at speeds of up to 40 knots. Whether docked at a marina or speeding over open seas, it commands attention with its length, low stance, clean lines and curled haunches, much like a sleek sports car. The automotive theme is carried through from the >> JETGALA

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WHAT IF YOU NEED A CAR TO PULL YACHTS OF UP TO FIVE TONNES AND 15 METRES?

The powerful Dartz Prombron’ Nagel is an armoured sportback capable of towing a yacht

>> cockpit-like glasshouse on the upper deck to the rich red leather upholstery — or bullet-proof Japanese Samurai tread leather, if you wish — replete with sparkling chrome finishes. Guests may throw parties at any time of the day on the sun deck, which has a Jacuzzi and a built-in bar. Accommodation is found in five double staterooms equipped with top-of-the-line entertainment systems, mood lighting and an iPad information and control centre. The SC 166 also has a supercar tender made to match the boat. With this, cruisers can roll out of the yacht garage and into port in a matching muscular vehicle with a 620 hp V8 engine under its hood, and a top speed of 305 km/h. What if you need a car to pull yachts of up to five tonnes and 15 metres? Superyacht owners will soon find the answer in the 2012 Dartz Prombron’ Nagel, the world’s first armoured Sportback designed for pulling yachts. Gray made the car to commemorate the 100th anniversary of racers Andrey Nagel and Vadim Mikhailoff’s 1912 Monte Carlo Rally feat, in which they drove the C24/55 Monaco RussoBalt sportscar to achieve the longest distance. The RussoBalt brand is the ancestor of the Dartz Prombron’ company. Although a heavyweight, the commemorative car pushes a top speed of 250 km/h with a 2,000 hp engine. “Our cars are built by a small team of engineers here in Trolhättan and certain models are based on the world’s fastest production car, the Ultima GTR,” explains Gray. On the other hand, he usually designs yachts in collaboration with Strand Craft, though each client’s preferences are always considered. One of Gray Design’s projects with Strand Craft, the Empress Crest yacht range, is now in Asia. This gives clients in the region the chance to join others across the globe who have been seduced by the unique designs of Gray — clients who know that the key to uniqueness is beauty. 32 82

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A racer from the future, Gray’s Maglev is inspired by Peugeot’s low forward stance and flowing feline lines

MAGNETIC RACER Marty McFly better watch out — a new dimension in speed could open up one day with the Gray-designed Peugeot Maglev Racer. For manual driving, a steering wheel emerges from the dashboard logo. On super highways, the car retracts its wheels and is propelled to speeds of up to 350 km/h by magnetic levitation tracks. A 3D monitor acts as a lookout for heavy traffic around the Racer. In convoy mode, vehicles are connected by electromagnetic strips at the front and rear. Passengers in different cars in the convoy can then share media and destination coordinates or hold a holographic conference. The Maglev Racer is still a concept for now, but Gray Design is ready to manufacture it should an interested party come forth.

Rare and desirable ...sealed with a kiss

GLAJZ Collection Privée exclusively at 7KH+RXU*ODVV0DOPDLVRQ.QLJKWVEULGJH2UFKDUG5RDG6LQJDSRUH

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FRAUSCHER 717 GT by Audrey Lee

A GENTLEMAN’S WATERCRAFT FIT FOR SERIOUS RACING AND LEISURE OUTINGS

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OPPOSITE PAGE The 717 GT’s vintage form and style is reminiscent of 1920s powerboats THIS PAGE A boat made for both racing thrills and leisure Elegant teak and plush leather make for elegance in this powerboat All images courtesy of Frauscher Boats

FRAUSCHER BOATS PAY HOMAGE TO THE GOOD OLD DAYS OF BOAT RACING

THERE WAS A TIME IN THE EARLY 1900s when ‘gentlemen’s runabouts’ — small, fast boats made of varnished wood — were the craft of choice for powerboat racers and pleasure seekers. Austria’s Frauscher Boats pays homage to these good old days with its newest hybrid yacht, the 717 GT. It was named 2010 European Powerboat of the Year, an award given by an international jury led by German powerboat magazine Boote. Adhering closely to the traditional runabout design, the 717 GT’s framework is stylishly minimalist. A stand-out feature of the series is its intricately designed mahogany and chrome-plated deck. Stretching to slightly over seven metres in length, its elongated bow offers a spacious storage room and a long lounge deck. There are two choices for upper deck design — classic and elegant teak, or a personalised sportive graphic design complemented by the series’ signature bathing platform and inner teak floors. The interior comes with deep leather seats, while the frameless tinted windshield provides just enough protection for pilots in the cockpit. Although designed for pleasure, the 717 GT gets down to

business with an impressive power package, emulating the essence of the gentlemen’s racers of the 1920s. While the central motorisation brings out a proportionate composition, its classic shaft propulsion lets the vessel glide efficiently or cut through waves when the going gets a bit rough. Like other Frauscher watercraft, the 717 GT can be fitted with a petrol, electric or hybrid engine to produce 250-500 hp. This power is complemented by a runabout hull with a hydrofoillike design, which creates forces that lift the boat as it gains speed. The boat then skims the water, minimising drag and increasing overall speed. As a hybrid yacht, the 717 GT can speed silently through inland waters and nature reserves. Its electric engine allows the driver to manoeuvre it through shallow waters and navigate tricky harbours. It also powers other equipment on board the vessel, removing the need for additional power generators. The environmentally-friendly boat produces zero emission. Such environmental vigilance proves that it is not only serious racers who can derive pleasure from powerboats. Leisure boaters who believe in marine preservation can too.

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AUBERCY by Katrina Balmaceda

SO LE H I E

HANDMADE SHOES MIX PARISIAN ELEGANCE, ENGLISH QUALITY STANDARDS AND ITALIAN PASSION

IF YOU FIND YOURSELF thinking that a shoe looks rather like a squashed car as you walk past a shoe shop in Paris’ rue Vivienne, it may not be a trick of your imagination. Aubercy, a shoemaking house since 1935, is accustomed to designing shoes according to clients’ requests — even if it means imitating a compacted Bugatti Atlantic 57, as one client requested. The family-run company did not always offer bespoke shoe design, but it was recognised for its quality and elegance even in its early days. The store began during a lull between wars in post-Industrial Revolution Paris, when Frenchman André Aubercy married Renée, who had been tutored in the art of making handcrafted shoes for men. It was, for André, the best of times — the previous century’s craze for machinemade items had led to a longing for the bygone days of handmade couture. Among the Parisian elite, who loved extravagant balls and dressing up in elaborate costumes, the Aubercys found a demand for elegant, high quality French shoes that no one was supplying. A trip to London to observe English attention to quality and materials, a study of Italian passion for detail, and a suffusion of Parisian style made Aubercy shoes the choice of the day.

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The company’s independence from outside investors gives it freedom to experiment with different colour and material combinations

Each shoe is finished and polished to a fine lustre by hand All images courtesy of Aubercy

IT TAKES AT LEAST 390 PROCESSES CARRIED OUT OVER A MONTH TO CREATE ONE PAIR OF SHOES

Some models in the Classical collection are based on shoe designs by the pioneering Aubercys

These qualities live on in modern day Aubercy shoes. The company is now run by its third generation of shoemakers, led by André’s grandson Xavier. It was Xavier who introduced Aubercy’s bespoke services in 1995. While many clients ask the company to help design a shoe, others come knowing exactly the look they want. Xavier welcomes this. Aside from shape and form, clients also request specific materials. There is the widely used calfskin leather, as well as exotic materials like crocodile, shark, lizard, ostrich and stingray skins. Colour can also be adjusted — the atelier has 50 hues in its range but can modify shades to match a client’s preference. Xavier shares that a client once “had a special shade of red he dreamed of, to be perfectly coordinated with a Ferrari he had received.” The client even helped pick the crocodile skins he wanted for the shoes.

Other customers simply want to personalise an existing Aubercy shoe design. One can choose from the Classical range, which has several models based on the company’s earliest designs. This proves the classics’ timelessness, remaining stylish despite changing fashion trends. Members of the Aubercy family also create new styles from time to time, with a recent result being the Weekend range. The Weekend shoes come with rubber soles for a more casual approach to elegance and for all-weather wear. Velvet veal skin is widely used throughout the line. Styles range from low, laced shoes to high-laced ankle boots, knee boots and derby boots. Classical and Weekend shoes can be adjusted for personal preferences according to shape, lining colour, stitching pattern, pinhole placement and more. >>

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LUXE The atelier has a wide range of colours to choose from, but can also match a client’s desired shade

Today, the company still uses the same handcrafting processes it used in the 1930s Each shoe is assessed for approval by Aubercy family members, led by Xavier Aubercy

>> Beyond French flair, the company prides itself in its products’ excellence, which is inspired by English and Italian craftsmanship. The atelier has eight to 10 craftsmen who stick to the processes used by the pioneering Aubercys. It takes at least 390 processes carried out over a month to create one pair of shoes — more if it is a commissioned order. Aubercy shoemakers have been with the company for decades, which means that the firm is familiar with regular customers’ shoe sizes, foot shapes, personal tastes and special needs. Xavier says this quality and creativity has come through independence. “We have always refused shareholders,” he says, and this gives the family freedom to experiment. Family members get personally involved, from shoe design to selection of top grade skins, and see the footwear through from idea conception to the last step of creation. They give their mark of approval by signing the shoes. A more appreciated sign of approval, though, is when clients return and bring their sons, who eventually bring their own children. They come to add to their collection, not to replace old shoes. Xavier shares that a client who recently visited the shop brought along a pair of Aubercy shoes he had bought 25 years ago — which he still wears. Perhaps the French product that ‘gets better with age’ lies not only in Bordeaux. It may also lie in a small family-run shoe shop in Paris’ rue Vivienne.

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WALK OF FAME There is no lack of lustre to the list of Aubercy fans — this includes former French president Vincent Auriol, World War II French General Charles de Gaulle, actor and playwright Sacha Guitry and novelist Paul Meurice, a close friend of Victor Hugo. As for today: “We never talk of our current customers. They give us their confidence and we try to be worthy,” says thirdgeneration shoemaker, Xavier Aubercy. “We have customers worldwide, on every continent, in many countries... presidents of republics, politicians, business leaders, prominent doctors and lawyers, famous actors.” Many Parisian auctioneers and antique collectors walk in Aubercy shoes, as do patrons of art and entertainment. Xavier explains, “There is no typical customer, just lovers of beautiful objects.”

Aubercy can design a shoe based on a client’s specific requests

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FRANCIS KURKDJIAN by Rebecca Skinner

SENSUAL SOUVENIR WHEN FRAGRANCE BECOMES THE MUSIC OF A PASSIONATE MIND

FOR THE PERSON WHO HAS EVERYTHING, HERE’S SOMETHING NO OTHER CAN HAVE — AN EXCLUSIVE SCENT, created just for one’s skin, with the formula locked away to keep the fragrance unique. Doing just that has made heads turn in Paris for bespoke perfumer Francis Kurkdjian. He began to make a name as a fragrance artist when he was 25, after he created Jean Paul Gaultier’s famous Le Mâle fragrance. The buzz over this drove the spicy scent into pubs, clubs, gyms and conference rooms across the globe. The French-Armenian went on to create Dior’s Eau Noire, Elizabeth Arden’s Green Tea, Guerlain’s Rose Barbare and Armani’s Mania, and gained recognition in 2001 with the Prix François Coty award for perfume artistry. Eight years later, Kurkdjian was named Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French Ministry of Culture. In that same year, he opened his own boutique in Paris, Maison Francis Kurkdjian. This avant-garde artist has so far made around 50 bespoke fragrances “for people I shall not name,” says he. “Some of them are famous, others aren’t, and all of them are not necessarily wealthy. But they are all passionate about perfume.” 90

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KURKDJIAN VISITS THE CLIENT WITH A TRAVELLING CHEST THAT CAN HOLD 200 BOTTLES OF SCENTS

EVERY FRAGRANCE CREATED IS A CHARACTER ROLE

OPPOSITE PAGE The buyer will create a name for this unlabelled limited edition perfume, created by Kurkdjian to celebrate 10 years of bespoke perfumery Photo by Nathalie Baetens

THIS PAGE LEFT TO RIGHT Kurkdjian has created over 50 bespoke scents for various clients, with each perfume taking six months to develop Photo by Nathalie Baetens

This travelling chest is essential to the bespoke perfume making process, which involves several visitations and tests with clients Photo by Jacques Boulay

Kurkdjian’s personal passion for scents is contagious. “I love being able to fulfil certain requests with things as impalpable as perfumes. Every fragrance created is a character role. It is like acting or endorsing a role onstage.” Kurkdjian oversees every possible element himself, from typography to flacon design. Each bespoke creation starts with a phone call to discuss olfactory preferences. Then Kurkdjian visits the client — wherever he or she may be in the world. Kurkdjian takes with him a travelling chest that can hold 200 bottles of scents, created for him by French trunk maker Pinel et Pinel. “Then starts a long process of trials,” says the perfumer. “Just like an haute couture gown, you have to alter it until you reach perfection. The trials are worn by my customer and the alterations done once he or she has lived with it. It usually takes at least six months for this kind of creation.” Despite his apparent immersion in the world of perfume, Kurkdjian does not come from a line of perfumers. “My father was kind of a pioneer in computing. My mother raised us and happens to be an amazing seamstress. Her father was a men’s tailor; she inherited a love for beautiful things. Nothing from their activities ever prompted me to become a perfumer.” Kurkdjian initially vied for the haute couture world. But drawing was not his strong point and this blocked his

way to fashion school. His interest in perfume was sparked by the discovery of his sister’s perfume collection, and magazines that “ultimately showed me that there was a trade between luxury and creation, and it was perfumery.” It gave his dreams new direction, and the impetus to seek training at the ISIPCA perfumery school and Quest, a leading edge flavour and fragrance company. He added to these achievements a Masters in Luxury Marketing. Perfume sits well with the other pleasures in Kurkdjian’s life — love for literature and the power of words, and enjoyment of music, theatre and dance. His penchant for wordplay apparently resulted in the fragrances Lumière Noire (Black Light) for men and women, and APOM (an acronym for A Piece of Me, inspired by the colours and flavours of the Middle East). As a boy, he played the piano, and it shows in his last creation, the unisex eau de toilette, Aqua Universalis forte, inspired from the nuances in music. Today, Kurkdjian celebrates 10 years of custom-making perfumes and collaborations in many artistic genres and olfactory performances with dancers, artists and even chefs. His influence goes past perfumery, and his scents waft beyond Europe to perfume the world with, as he hopes, “a little moment of happiness every day, and great souvenirs in your mind”.

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LUXE HOUSE OF BORGEZIE by Carol Lee

INSPIRED

ASSETS TODAY’S ACCESSORIES, TOMORROW’S INVESTMENTS

Generously studded with diamonds, the House of Borgezie accessories are valuable assets

IS JEWELLERY JUST FOR SHOW? Not according to Christopher Michael Shellis, founder of the House of Borgezie, who says, “I firmly believe that jewellery should be things of great beauty — but designed to be used, not shown.” There is another reason to call Borgezie jewellery practical — not every man is endowed with the ability to guess exactly what a woman wants for her birthday. So Shellis, whose designs hint that he possesses this elusive skill, offers choices. Borgezie’s latest set, the Treasures collection, covers all bases. In it are four unapologetically glittering accessories — the Stamen Lipstick Holder, Eternal Diamond Stiletto, Crown Clutch Bag and the Oyster Compact Mirror. All have practical uses, and it does not hurt that they can be flaunted as well. Shellis draws on more than 30 years of experience in jewellery design and manufacture with Treasures. Each item in the collection is handcrafted by in-house goldsmiths and stone setters. The entire set took more than four years of intense development. On the inspiration behind Treasures, Shellis says, “My designs for this elegant collection have been heavily influenced by forms found in nature, including the delicate lily and the mysterious oyster.” The lily is mimicked in the 18-karat lipstick holder, which features diamond-set star-burst stamens, and is secured by a diamond encrusted lid. The lipstick holder is sized to hold any brand of lipstick. The lily inspiration continues in the 18-karat Eternal Diamond Stiletto shoes, whose patented fluted heels 92

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look like the stamens of a lily and lend an elegant balance and symmetry to the entire stiletto. The golden base of each pair of heels is customised to match the wearer’s foot, while the sole comes with a patented removable heart-shaped sole and heel. Topped with 30 carats (about 2,200 pieces) of brilliant-cut diamonds, these are the world’s most expensive shoes. Enquiries have been plenty although there have been no takers as of writing. Whilst the stilettos instantly jazz up an otherwise simple outfit, some ladies consider bags their favourite accessory. The Crown Clutch Bag, sculpted in 18-karat gold and iced with 86.16 carats of diamonds, fills this role. It has enough room to hold a few of a well-dressed woman’s essentials, such as the Oyster Compact Mirror. The round mirror is framed in 18-karat gold and set with up to 1.92 carats of diamonds. On one side is a magnifying mirror. On the other, a normal mirror. These are protected by golden palm leaf sculptures that come together in a Brazilian blue butterfly clasp. For its quality and individuality, Borgezie has an enthusiastic clientèle willing to wait up to three months for delivery. It all begins with a meeting to discuss design and measurements for customisation. All items are sold with a 1,000-year guarantee, making them precious beyond their owners’ years. Described as “genuine fashion investments that last a lifetime”, the items are destined to be heirlooms passed down through many generations. Among all the arguments for the practical use of jewellery, this is the clincher.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Gold and diamonds abound in the Stamen Lipstick Holder, Oyster Compact Mirror and Eternal Diamond Stiletto shoes All images by Simon Winnall

SHELLIS DRAWS ON MORE THAN 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN JEWELLERY DESIGN

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LUXE MEISSEN PORCELAIN by Alvin Wong

GERMAN CHINA A EUROPEAN PORCELAIN POWERHOUSE REIGNS IN INVESTMENT VALUE

AT A RECENT BONHAMS AUCTION IN LONDON IN JULY, tensions ran high when a few aficionados of antique porcelain tussled in a bidding war over a tiny snuff box. When the hammer fell, the item sold for USD1.38 million, setting a world record price. The collectible in question — a gold-mounted royal snuff box from 1755, embellished with an intricate miniature painting of a Dresden landscape — hails from the 301-yearold house of Meissen, Europe’s first and oldest porcelain factory. Bonhams calls the auction price a “deserved” outcome, as investors once again justified Meissen porcelain as among the world’s most valued art curios. The record-price snuff box was made for Augustus III, the son of Augustus the Strong, legendary elector of Saxony and the man behind the founding of the Meissen porcelain factory. An 18th century royal with a self-professed ‘porcelain malady’, Augustus the Strong had pushed for the production of European porcelain and patented its process after years of importing Chinese and Japanese porcelain at inflated prices.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT A finely-detailed Snowball Flowers Teapot; a Red Rose Tea Set; and a Limited Edition Semper Vase painted with a Dresden scene. The vase is a reconstruction — its original, created for Meissen by architect Gottfried Semper over 200 years ago, was lost during the war

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The Zen Tea Set is one of Meissen’s more minimalist pieces All images courtesy of Meissen

The finely painted Comedian With Lute is a Meissen classic, and one of the most acclaimed works of modeller Alexander Struck

Meissen products gradually proved more popular among the European elite than imports from the Far East, even though the company’s early designs imitated Chinese and Japanese pieces. But Meissen soon found its own artistic niche, evolving from Baroque and Rococo to Art Deco and Art Nouveau. While adaptable in style, Meissen held fast to its centuries-old manufacturing traditions of handcrafting each piece. Today, its porcelain continues to be made in its namesake town, and the material required is unearthed from a nearby cavern, the oldest kaolin mine in Europe. Workers still mix raw materials in precise proportions and fire them in high-temperature kilns that produce Meissen’s signature hard and pristine porcelain, just as their predecessors did centuries ago.

INVESTORS INCREASINGLY NOTE THAT ORIGINAL MEISSEN PORCELAIN HAS SHOWN GREATER APPRECIATION THAN GOLD, EQUITIES OR REAL ESTATE OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS Figurine painters hand-decorate sculptures and dinnerware with a colour palette comprising over 10,000 secret formulas honed throughout Meissen’s history. The finishing touch, as has been since 1722, is a swish of blue strokes — the company’s trademark depicting a pair of crossed swords from August III’s coat of arms. Most objects created over the company’s three-century history are still in production, from miniature animals and life-sized sculptures to cutlery and chandeliers. Amongst the myriad styles and embellishments, Meissen’s most recognisable pattern is the Blue Onion. The cobalt-on-white floral motif originated in 1740, when Meissen successfully duplicated the Asian technique of painting on absorbent porcelain rather than on top of glaze to achieve the distinctive blue hue. Investors increasingly note that original Meissen porcelain has shown greater appreciation than gold, equities or real estate over the past 20 years. Auction results include a life-sized pair of herons from 1730 which sold for USD7.8 million in 2005; and a tom turkey sculpture for which the Getty Museum paid nearly USD1.8 million in 2002. Even as Meissen continues to add new products to its repertoire each year, such as minimalist cutlery from its Black & White range, to contemporary Asian dinnerware judiciously embellished with dragon motifs, the company also offers made-to-order creations and one-off pieces that purport to appreciate in value. Meissen’s annual Artworks limited edition collections, introduced in 2005, is another area where collectors can seek out potential investment pieces. This year’s range comprises 42 new items including falcon figurines and folded-form vases in vivid colours. The choices for Meissen’s Artworks 2011 collection may seem varied and abundant now, but if past records are anything to go by, serious collectors can do no worse than put their choice item on reserve if circumstances permit. If they don’t, well, there’s always the next auction.

PRIME PICKINGS New investment-worthy limited edition Meissen porcelain: Collector (Peter Strang Edition) A commemorative 50-piece figurine celebrating Meissen’s erstwhile head sculptor’s 75th birthday, the Collector was originally inspired by the film Utz, which premiered at the 1992 Berlin Film Festival. Strang modelled the figurine after the film’s lead actor Armin MüllerStahl, and the miniature models in the Collector’s hands are replica figurines designed by artist Johann Kaendler in 1772. Comedian with Lute (Artworks 2011) Expressing lifelike caprice, this 25-piece edition is based on the work of ceramic modeller Alexander Struck, who was born in 1902 and spent 88 years of his life with the company. The Comedian with Lute highlights Struck’s dexterity at the Baroque porcelain sculptural style. Bolognese Terrier (Artworks 2011) Perhaps no Meissen artist is as celebrated as Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706 –1775), who is credited with Meissen’s most evocative creations in the company’s early years. The Bolognese Terrier is among Kaendler’s pet motifs and this 50-piece limited edition was originally made in the Baroque style between 1740 –1750.

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The world-famous Las Vegas Strip, said to be the brightest place on Earth Photo courtesy of Las Vegas News Bureau

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VEGAS SUITES by Jinesh Lalwani

SUITE

LAS VEGAS ROLLING HIGH ON DESIGNER SUITES

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RISING ABOVE THE SCORCHED NEVADA LANDSCAPE IS LAS VEGAS, AMERICA’S GAMBLING HAVEN AND BILLIONAIRE PLAYGROUND. IT IS NOT THAT LONG AGO SINCE THE CITY’S BOOM PERIOD IN THE LATE 1980S WHEN VEGAS WAS AN EASY BYWORD FOR ALL THINGS TACKY — KITSCH HOTEL LOBBIES, DRIVE– IN WEDDING CHAPELS AND GOLDPLATED EVERYTHING. BUT TODAY’S VEGAS IS A DIFFERENT KIND OF CITY, HAVING PULLED BACK ON THE OUTRÉ GAMBLING HALLS AND BRASH NEON FAÇADES. This isn’t to say that Vegas has become a minimalist commune overnight. The extravagance at the Baccarat table still carries over into sumptuous rooms, out-there furnishings and majestic views. But contemporary Vegas design manages to be grand by eschewing gimmicks, a new look welcomed by the most kitsch averse traveller. Sin City’s rebirth is most evident in hotel suites so elegant that they can give top hoteliers around the world a run for their designer money. Here are our top five picks.

East meets West in The Venetian Chairman Suite’s design theme

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The Skylofts’ designer Tony Chi describes the suite as “a piece of New York, Tokyo, Hong Kong, or London, re-created to fit the dynamism and energy of Las Vegas”

SKY LOFT The three-bedroom Skylofts at MGM Grand Las Vegas shoot for the stratosphere when it comes to luxe living. A Maybach whisks you from the airport to a private checkin facility leading to the rooms, which open up to a large foyer and an extended dining area. The lofts’ award-winning designer Tony Chi, who worked on Alan Ducasse’s Spoon restaurant in Hong Kong and top hotels worldwide, brings much of his restaurant design repertoire into the space, evident in minimalist black coffee tables, timber chairs and walk-in wardrobe/storage spaces. Guests get benefits like preferred seating at Joël Robuchon fine dining restaurant and MGM Grand’s Crazy Horse Paris cabaret, personalised stationary, in-loft massages, and a fog-resistant TV that masquerades as the bathroom mirror.

The Venetian Las Vegas Chairman Suite is a bountiful, alternate universe where the credit crisis seems to never have happened. The 10,000 sq ft hideaway, accessible only via private elevator, is perched 36 floors above the Las Vegas Boulevard and comes with antique and contemporary Asian décor. Hand-woven Tibetan tapestries and carpets, rich wood floors inlaid with brass chrysanthemums, and rice paper wall panelling hark to the Orient, while Western desi gn is expressed in Italian Anichini linens, imported Italian marble and zebrawood. The suite has a private fitness room, steam room, en suite massage parlour and karaoke rooms. A chauffeured Rolls-Royce or Maybach is part of the entitlement of a guest at the suite, as are packing and unpacking services — possibly all to ensure that guests always have their fingers free to roll the dice at the private gaming parlours of the Paiza Club.

A self-playing piano is the focal point of the Caesar’s Palace Constantine Villa’s grand living room

Made to look and feel like a mansion, the Constantine Villa is the largest the Caesar’s Palace Las Vegas Hotel & Casino has to offer. The 9,930 sq ft space is robed in Grecian grandeur, with a marble foyer, marble-like columns and decorative amphoras. The living room spills out onto the patio that comes with a dining table, fire pit, private Jacuzzi and views of the hotel’s famed Garden of the Gods pool. Silk-draped walls and gold-plated fixtures decorate the master bedroom. Almost everything that can be automated is automated — the toilet is remote-controlled, mirrors turn into wall-mounted TVs and the piano plays itself. The guest can control these through an integrated system, but with a butler on hand around the clock, that won’t be necessary. >>

Caesar’s Palace reportedly spent USD15 million to create the opulent ambiance of its Constantine Villa

ALMOST EVERYTHING THAT CAN BE AUTOMATED IS AUTOMATED — MIRRORS TURN INTO WALL-MOUNTED TVS AND THE PIANO PLAYS ITSELF

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LIFE A PERSONAL PATIO OFFERS GUESTS A CHOICE OF A JACUZZI, POOL OR OUTDOOR RAINFALL SHOWER

The Palazzo Chairman Suite looks stately, but its complete entertainment system can transform it into the best venue for after-casino fun

>> Of similar theme and perks is the Chairman Suite of The Palazzo Las Vegas, The Venetian’s sister hotel. The same mix of European and Eastern tastes — handmade tapestries, antique artwork and precious sculptures — runs throughout this 8,000 sq ft suite. Its unique feature is its personal patio that offers guests a choice of a Jacuzzi, pool or outdoor rainfall shower. There is no lack of pleasant distractions with its four bedrooms, fitness room, steam room and massage room, and an entertainment system that includes 25 flat-screen TVs, Bose stereos, video game media, a Steinway & Sons grand piano, karaoke and disco lights.

The Oriental meets Art Deco in the Mandarin Oriental, Las Vegas Mandarin Suite. At 3,100 sq ft, the intimate two-bedroom space offers views of The Strip from 22 floors up. A bubble-ringed, metallic screen separates the bedroom from the Jacuzzi. The Mandarin gives exercise buffs their endorphin fix in the suite’s personal fitness amenities, which include a Technogym Kinesis Wall and an exercise bike. Guests can get themselves in the mood with the Bang & Olufsen sound system before heading out to the hotel’s Tao nightclub. Sean Combs or Will Smith, both previous occupants of the suite, may have done likewise. There are plenty of pleasures to be had at the Mandarin Oriental Mandarin Suite, be it a gym, Jacuzzi or a grand view of The Strip

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The Bellagio’s famous fountain show is a grand play of water, music and lights The Bellagio Chairman Suite combines a nature-themed design with state-of-the-art electronics

CONTACTS

The Bellagio Resort and Casino Chairman Suite seems to have been the work of wood nymphs and druids with its nature-themed design. Guests enter through a suspended walkway and come to an indoor garden and fountain that invite them to venture further in to a private world with an outdoor solarium, therapeutic bath and rainforest steam showers. While these natural touches are a welcome break from the sleek lines of modern design, the suite also has an impressive array of electronic luxuries. These include a 50-inch plasma television and home theatre entertainment system with surround sound, automatic drapery and sheet controls, and a sunken full-service bar with seating for six. The suite is also prepared for business needs, with a conference room, workstation amenities, a formal dining room and roundthe-clock butler service.

Caesar’s Palace Las Vegas Hotel & Casino 3570 Las Vegas Boulevard South Las Vegas, NV 89109 T: +1 702 731 7110 F: +1 702 731 7172 The Venetian Las Vegas 3355 Las Vegas Blvd. South Las Vegas, NV 89109 T: +1 702 414 1000 F: +1 702 414 1100 E: [email protected] The Palazzo Las Vegas 3325 Las Vegas Boulevard South Las Vegas, NV 89109 T: +1 702 414 4100 F: +1 702 414 3636 E: [email protected] palazzolasvegas.com The Mandarin Oriental 3752 Las Vegas Boulevard South Las Vegas, NV 89158 T: +1 702 590 8888 F: +1 702 590 8880 E: [email protected] mohg.com

With views of the Red Rock Canyon, the Four Seasons Presidential Suite is an oasis of calm in the midst of buzzing Las Vegas

Bellagio Las Vegas 3600 Las Vegas Blvd South Las Vegas, NV 89109 T: +1 888 987 6667 F: +1 702 693 8585 E: [email protected]

While many hotel suites boast a view of The Strip, the Four Seasons Hotel Las Vegas has two Presidential Suites that look out to Nevada’s natural wonder, the Red Rock Canyon. Guests can choose a suite on the 38th or 39th floor, expandable in size from 3,400 sq ft to 4,400 sq ft. If travelling alone or with a partner, the suite can be configured as a onebedroom enclave. Those with visitors can have the space turned into a three-bedroom suite, and entertain in the media and dining rooms. If one must attend to business, there is an executive study — plus a sense of calm to work in, owing to the absence of gambling facilities in the hotel. When ready to dally with Lady Luck, one can head out to the adjacent Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, to which Four Seasons guests get free access.

Four Seasons Hotel Las Vegas 3960 Las Vegas Boulevard South Las Vegas, NV 89119 T: +1 877 632 5000 F: +1 702 632 5195 SKYLOFTS at MGM Grand 3799 Las Vegas Boulevard South Las Vegas, NV 89109 USA T: +1 702 891 3832 F: +1 702 891 3822 E: [email protected] lv.mgmgrand.com

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LIFE SRIWIJAYA by Allen Roche

A TASTE for OPULENCE FRENCH FINE DINING BLENDS WITH TRADITIONAL SUMATRAN AMBIANCE

Sriwijaya’s succulent Wagyu beef dish is one of the special items on the menu All images courtesy of The Dharmawangsa

A SEA EMPIRE WHOSE GLORY was forgotten until the 1920s, the Sriwijaya kingdom is said to have been Indonesian Sumatra’s dominant power in the 8th century. It was also the seat of royalty, long before Dutch colonial rule. This ancient kingdom is the inspiration for the modern-day Sriwijaya fine dining restaurant, located in The Dharmawangsa hotel in Jakarta, Indonesia. As befits its theme, Sriwijaya has an opulent room reserved for guests who prefer privacy. Private diners receive special treatment in the form of individual attention from head chef Vindex Valentino Tengker. Tengker meets guests as they enter the private dining room and explains each gastronomic creation throughout the different courses of the menu, which is personalised to suit private diners’ tastes and preferences. 104

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PRIVATE DINERS RECEIVE INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION FROM HEAD CHEF VINDEX VALENTINO TENGKER

Chef Vindex Tengker has gained fame in Indonesia for his culinary talent and his role as judge in cooking competitions, including the TV show Master Chef Fresh Turbot a la Pancha, one of Sriwijaya’s seafood specialities

Tengker joined Sriwijaya in July after a long stint as Executive Chef at Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts in various locations. His talents have led him to fame as a judge on the Indonesian version of Master Chef, a TV show in which chefs compete in culinary creation. Sriwijaya patrons have access to the specialities that Tengker introduces into the menu. The restaurant is already famed in Jakarta for signature dishes such as pan-fried foie gras with blood orange reduction sauce, caramelised Thai mango and gingerbread crumbs. Another dinner favourite is the lobster ravioli with braised wagyu beef cheek, black truffles and seared langoustine. The Welsh salt marsh lamb is another highlight, featuring a confit fillet with eggplant caviar and baby vegetables, pan-fried chops with crispy potatoes, parmesan and anchovy dressing. Harking back to the sea empire that inspired its name, the restaurant also prides itself in its Fresh Turbot a la Plancha, a grilled fish dish.

The private dining room, with an ambiance recalling ancient royalty, seats only nine diners. It is accentuated with traditional Sumatran artefacts such as an extravagantly gilded octagonal lacquered box and a gold-plated water vessel. The rest of the restaurant mimics this theme — the walls are a shade of red reminiscent of the ikat fabric woven by the ladies of Palembang, a city once part of the Sriwijaya kingdom. Just as the ikat was embroidered with gold thread, the walls feature gilt stencilling of a pattern found on an old 19th century Palembang lacquered box. An ornamental collection of blue and white plates brings refreshing contrast. Sriwijaya restaurant may be Sumatran themed, yet the hotel that houses it takes a Javanese structure. The Dharmawangsa, a five-star hotel in Jakarta’s prestigious Kebayoran Baru residential district, is a contemporary interpretation of the area. With these two Indonesian design themes and top French cuisine, Sriwijaya takes diners on a trip through different eras and regions; while a menu presented in traditional silence, with impeccable service amid a romantic ambiance, offers a culinary journey through all five senses — with taste being the all important destination.

Sriwijaya’s private dining room comfortably accommodates nine guests

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MAKEPEACE ISLAND by Audrey Lee

M AV ER I C K RETREAT

A HEART-SHAPED ISLAND WINS VISITORS FOR ITS FORESTS,, WATERS AND OWNERS FAME

The island was named after Hannah Makepeace, a housekeeper who arrived in 1924 to take care of the 1911 Queenslander residence there

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FROM TOP Villa balconies are a tempting spot to dine in Business maverick Sir Richard Branson, one of the island’s owners, opened Makepeace to guests in July this year Accommodation comes in Balinese-style villas

LAZY RIVERS AND THICK FORESTS, A CALM PACE AND PRIVATE SPACE — Makepeace Island is all you could expect of an Australian retreat. Yet, however beautiful and serene, perhaps its biggest attraction is the fact that its owner is none other than Sir Richard Branson. Nestled in the Noosa region in Australia’s Sunshine Coast, Makepeace Island was previously reserved for family and friends of owners Branson and Brett Godfrey, business magnates and Virgin Australia founders. Only recently did the duo decide to share their 10-hectare heart-shaped hideaway with the rest of the world. “When neither Brett nor myself are visiting Makepeace, we will make the island and its facilities available for others to enjoy the tranquillity of what is a very special place,” Branson announced in July this year. The island features Balinese architecture and interior design, with teak, granite and natural stone meticulously sourced from Bali, Java and elsewhere throughout Indonesia. The interiors of the villas boast giant sculptures, while bold and striking works of art are scattered throughout the rooms. Authentic volcanic boulder bathtubs, ornamental lighting and wooden furniture complete the look. Up to 22 guests can stay in the island’s four-bedroom Bali House and three distinct, individually decorated bures. Branson’s personal villa is the riverfront Bali House, which can host a maximum of eight guests. Each bedroom in this house has an en suite bathroom and a private deck that overlooks the Noosa River that the island sits in, and the rainforest. Two of the bedrooms have queen-sized beds, while the other two rooms are furnished with twin king singles. Airconditioning and heating units help ensure comfort all year round. >>

GETTING THERE Whether for one or 22 people, booking for Makepeace Island is for the entire isle, not individual villas. To get to Makepeace, international guests can fly to Brisbane Airport. Local flights can land at Sunshine Coast Airport (also called Maroochydore Airport). Guests are then chauffeured to Noosa Marina where a boat will take them to Makepeace Island.

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Take a dip in the island’s 500,000litre lagoon pool or a helicopter tour of Noosa

>> For recreation, there is a full-sized tennis court, games room, two-storey wantilan (Balinese pavilion), 500,000-litre lagoon pool, indoor bar and spa facilities, to name a few. The island also has a Hobie Cat sailboat, kayaks, canoes and fishing equipment for active guests who enjoy being out on the water. With Makepeace’s location near the mouth of the Noosa River, it takes only a few minutes to reach the vibrant and bustling Noosa Heads precinct, where chic restaurants and shopping places abound. From there, it is easy to get to the 4,000-hectare Noosa National Park, where curious hikers can find rare and endangered animals like koala bears, and adventurers can fish, surf, snorkel or climb rock walls.

COORDINATES OFFICIAL AIRPORT NAME: Brisbane Airport TIME: UTC+10 CIQ FACILITIES: Yes IATA CODE: BNE ICAO CODE: YBBN LATITUDE: 27° 23’ 03.00” S LONGITUDE: 153° 07’ 03.00” E ELEVATION: 13 feet (4 metres) RUNWAY: 01/19, length 11,680 feet (3560 metres ) x 148 feet (45 metres) 14/32, length 5577 feet (1700 metres) x

WITH MAKEPEACE’S LOCATION NEAR THE MOUTH OF THE NOOSA RIVER, IT TAKES ONLY A FEW MINUTES TO REACH THE VIBRANT AND BUSTLING NOOSA HEADS PRECINCT Makepeace staff can arrange a private flight to Lady Elliot island as well. Just an hour away, Lady Elliot sits on the Great Barrier Reef, and boasts year round visibility in its 15 dive sites rich with turtles, manta rays, moray eels, coral gardens and even a sunken sailboat. Guests of Makepeace can request a helicopter tour of the region, or arrange for a round of golf on any of the various courses in the area. Branson called Noosa his “favourite place in Australia”. After a stay at his house, you might just agree with him.

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98 feet (30 metres) RUNWAY PCN: Asphalt, 108FDWT (Runway 01/19), 015FAYT (Runway 14/32) TOWER FREQUENCY: 120.5 LIGHTING SYSTEM: T-VASI NAVAIDS: TYPE:

VOR-DME / NDB

ID:

BN / BN

NAME:

BRISBANE

CHANNEL:

079X / -

FREQUENCY:

113.2 / 302

DISTANCE FROM FIELD:

1.6 NM / 1.7 NM

BEARING FROM NAVAID: 215.4 / 26.8 JET A-1:

Yes

P +61 7 3406 3000 F +61 7 3406 3111 E [email protected] www.bne.com.au

COME FLY WITH US AT: www.twitter.jetgala.com www.facebook.jetgala.com www.linkedin.jetgala.com www.rss.jetgala.com

LIFE CLARIDEN LEU

PURE PLAY

IN CONVERSATION WITH JIMMY LEE, CEO FOR ASIA, CLARIDEN LEU

Photo courtesy of stock.xchng

EACH CENTURY BRINGS WITH IT A NEW CENTRE OF GLOBAL ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL ACTIVITY. The 21st century will be dominated by Asia, with countries like China and India leading the way. By 2013, according to the most recent Merrill Lynch Capgemini World Wealth Report, the Asia-Pacific region is set to surpass the US, currently home to the biggest population of wealthy individuals with combined worth of about USD13.5 trillion. The report expects that Asia will continue to enjoy strong wealth creation underpinned by solid economic growth, outstripping other regions. Today, broadly speaking, the Asian private banking client is much more 110

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educated, experienced, perceptive and demanding. Many of our HNWI (High Net-Worth Individual) clients in Asia have built their wealth over the past two to three decades through risk taking and entrepreneurial spirit. Asian clients generally have higher risk profiles than their Western counterparts. To add to this, we are seeing the next generation of Asian HNWIs becoming more conservative with their investments, in order to protect this wealth. They want to be more involved in selecting the right investment portfolio to not only protect but grow their assets in an orderly fashion. We see the issue of succession planning and intergenerational wealth

With more than 20 years experience in private wealth management, Jimmy Lee, CEO for Asia at Clariden Leu, oversees the bank’s Singapore and Hong Kong operations, and implementation of its business strategy across the region Photo courtesy of Clariden Leu

WE SEE THE ISSUE OF SUCCESSION PLANNING AND INTERGENERATIONAL WEALTH TRANSFER GAINING TRACTION transfer gaining traction, facilitated by personalised and value-creating solutions. This includes how clients prefer to hold their assets and how they want them transferred to future generations. We need to listen intently to clients, as it’s often the smaller details they offer us — sometimes unknowingly – which become key to our planning. It takes time, patience and tact and after having worked with a number of first generation clients, we are now working with the second generation on their needs for today and tomorrow. All private banking clients everywhere demand that their private bankers place their best interests — and not the bank’s sales targets — at the centre of any investment strategy. And we agree; they are absolutely right to do so. Clients also expect and deserve discretion, reliability, security, privacy and confidence in the longterm stability of their bank because they are looking for sustainable performance. They want intelligent insights and effective solutions tailored to their needs — not off-the-shelf advice which they can get anywhere. In these respects, Western and Asian clients are no different. In terms of investment preferences however, no two clients are alike. There never is and never can be a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach, so our focus needs to stay on identifying and meeting specific needs through a highly collaborative approach. Regular communication and feedback is a core part of this for us, as it has always been. Clariden Leu established its presence in Asia over 25 years

Clariden Leu, one of Switzerland’s leading private banks, is further expanding its position in the Asia market through its offices in Hong Kong and Singapore Photo courtesy of Google

ago. We have developed a deep understanding of the market and culture, insightful industry knowledge and close relationships with Asia’s HNW and UHNW individuals. And we work hard to stay relevant to all of them. This includes the planning of intergenerational wealth transfer and hands-on advice on structuring family trusts. These are key issues most clients in Asia face, yet quality advice can only be given if there is a solid understanding of the issues impacting the client. Our policy of a sustainable client-tobanker ratio ensures that our bankers have deep relationships with the clients and are better able to understand

their long-term needs. Investment and product specialists at Clariden Leu work with relationship managers on a daily basis, to analyse specific client requirements through a precisely defined advisory process to build tailormade and risk-adjusted portfolios. Today, we have a fast expanding private banking platform out of Singapore, home of our Asian booking centre, as well as an asset management company in Hong Kong to give full access to our international network of services. As a pure play private bank, the concerns of our clients is the only ball we juggle — and the reason for Clariden Leu’s success for over 250 years. JETGALA

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LIFE ONLY WATCH 2011 by Katrina Balmaceda

ONE & ONLY ONE-OF-A-KIND TIMEPIECES TO HELP COMBAT A RARE DISEASE

FOR WATCH COLLECTORS, RARITY IS A BLESSING. But for sufferers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), it is not. DMD — a genetic illness that weakens muscles, makes walking and breathing difficult, and kills victims in their teens or early 20s — afflicts one in 3,500 boys. This relatively low number places DMD outside the priority of many medical research groups, which toil to prevent and cure more widespread diseases. This makes the hunt for a DMD cure more specialised and expensive. This year, 40 of the world’s top watchmakers are rallying to the cause. Each watch brand has created a timepiece for the Only Watch charity auction on 22 September at Hotel Hermitage, Monaco. All pieces are either one-of-a-kind or the first of a series. Organised by the Monaco Association Against Muscular Duchenne Dystrophy, the auction’s proceeds are channelled into DMD research. Bids will be accepted from the floor as well as from online and telephone bidders. To get connoisseurs acquainted with the timepieces, the auction collection tours nine countries — including Shanghai, Tokyo and Singapore — from 30 August to 17 September, and will be exhibited during the Monaco Yacht Show on 20-21 September. Here is a preview of some of these fine timepieces.

AUDEMARS PIGUET’S JULES AUDEMARS GSTAAD CLASSIC

The one-of-a-kind Jules Audemars Gstaad Classic is a self-winding 18-karat pink gold chronograph with a vintage-looking 1920s dial. Two subdials contain a 90-minute counter and a small seconds counter. The label ‘Audemars Piguet Only Watch — Gstaad Classic — 2011’ is engraved on the caseback.

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BLANCPAIN VILLERET GRANDE DÉCORATION

Blancpain’s offering is an exclusive edition of the Villeret Grande Décoration. The red gold watch runs on the ultra-thin, hand-wound, 117-part Calibre 15B. The movement’s bridges, seen through the caseback, are engraved by Blancpain’s renowned master engraver MarieLaure Tarbouriech and depict the famous Rock of Monaco scene.

BREGUET CLASSIQUE GRANDE COMPLICATION, RÉVEIL MUSICAL

The unique 18-karat white gold Réveil Musical watch by Breguet plays Castle in the Sky on-demand or at a pre-set time, like an alarm. As it plays, the dial — engraved with a child reaching out — rotates in a complete revolution. The beginning and end of the melody positions the dial with the child’s outstretched hand meeting an adult hand sculpted on the flange.

FRANCK MULLER TOTALLY SWITZERLAND

Franck Muller honours Monaco’s large Swiss community with its Totally Switzerland watch, which has a red dial and strap to symbolise Helvetica, Switzerland and Monte Carlo, Monaco. A white cross in the middle of the dial mimics the Swiss flag. The Totally Switzerland watch features Franck Muller’s Crazy Hours display, in which hour numerals are arranged unconventionally. It comes in an 18-karat white gold Long Island case.

PATEK PHILIPPE REF 3939A

In 2009, a rare Patek Philippe broke the record for the highest price paid for a stainless steel watch — CHF1.24 million (USD1.13 million). This feat has collectors buzzing about Patek Philippe’s 2011 Only Watch creation — an understated one-off steel version of the Ref 3939. The mechanical 33.3 mm case diameter watch has a hidden tourbillon and a minute repeater activated by a slide piece in the case.

VACHERON CONSTANTIN MÉTIERS D’ART PERSPECTIVES D’ART “DOVE”

Reflecting the red and white motif of the Only Watch event, Vacheron Constantin created an 18-karat white gold watch with red and white enamelled doves taking flight on the dial. One bird is set with 40 brilliant-cut diamonds. The watch uses the mechanical self-winding Calibre 2460 SC.

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Photography by Kristian Schuller Text by Katrina Balmaceda

RACING AGAINST THE CLOCK FOR 90 DAYS, photographer Kristian R Schuller embarked on his dream project. It was to colour landscapes — from S one of Africa’s Big Five countries to the biggest and brashest US cities — with o bright, b loud fashion (created by his wife Peggy) and whimsical sets (designed by his h brother Hannes). The team worked night and day to make it “a visual fashion rroad movie”. But, like a circus, the shoot took on a life of its own. “We started iin a general direction and the shoots developed along the way,” Schuller says. “It was the strongest stron experience that I have ever had.” The result is the award winning book 90 Days One Dream, published in 2010 and now available electronically through the iBookstore. The book is a candy-coloured peek into the playful imagination of the Schuller couple, who met while studying fashion design under Vivienne Westwood at the University of Fine Arts Berlin. Schuller started taking pictures of his own fashion projects when he got his first sewing machine at 12 years old. He has since produced work for Harper’s Bazaar, Tatler, Vogue Hellas and rock band Duran Duran. Former Victoria’s Secret Angels Heidi Klum and Gisele Bündchen have modelled in front of his lens. Now that 90 Days One Dream is out, Schuller is fired with new desire to produce another book. What drives him? Says Schuller: “The crazy life surrounding us.” www.kristianschuller.com

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Models (L-R): Leyla, Victoria, Miriam, Neele JETGALA

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"IT WAS A TOUR DE FORCE OF

FASHION"

Model: Alisar JETGALA

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Model: Neele

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"I HAD A DEADL INE OF

90 DAYS"

Model: Lara

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INSPIRATION?

"THE CR AZY LIFE SURROUNDING

US"

Model: Neele JETGALA

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Photography by Werner Bartsch Text by Cadence Loh

L LED BY INTUITION AND AN ENDURING FASCINATION FOR T THINGS UNCONVENTIONAL, German photographer Werner Bartsch developed an eye for art — even in forlorn and discarded B o objects. When Bartsch chanced upon an aircraft storage field in the desert d of south-west USA a few years ago en route from Las Vegas to Los L Angeles, he was struck by the fading splendour of the old aircraft ruins gleaming in the desert light. r Preparation for this shoot took seven months. Bartsch covered a wall with Google Earth maps to help him get acquainted with the terrain. The on-location work to bring his vision to fruition covered another month. He had to become familiar with desert wildlife like rattlesnakes and spiders, and listened to howling coyotes during a full moon shoot. The trials of heat and dust vanished into the background with the success of his images. Desert Birds was recently exhibited at the Flo Peters Gallery in Hamburg and the Gallery Schuster in Berlin. The works of the series Desert Birds printed on baryt paper in two sizes (40x55 inch / 24x31.5 inch) are available upon request. www.wernerbartsch.com Werner Bartsch’s subsequent photographic book, Desert Birds, published by Kehrer Verlag (German/English, ISBN 978-3-86828-179-8), sold out within six months of its release. The second edition will launch in Europe, the US and Canada in September. © Werner Bartsch www.facebook.com/WernerBartsch.Photography [email protected]

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“I LOVE TO BE INSPIRED BY ALL KINDS OF OUTSTANDING, UNCONVENTIONAL, UNTAMED, HILARIOUS, UNBELIEVABLE,

FASCINATING THINGS”

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STRICTLY SECLUDED

FROM THE OUTSIDE WORLD

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ARE ABSOLUTELY PROHIBITED”

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“IT IS NO LONGER THEIR FUNCTION THAT COUNTS — BUT RATHER THE AESTHETIC THAT RESULTS

FROM THE INTERPLAY OF SHAPES,

STRUCTURES AND LIGHT”

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AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF under the Aerostar’s wings. Performance goals include a maximum cruise speed of 400 knots and a range of 1,000 nautical miles. If market interest is sustained, it will be manufactured as a new aircraft with the PW615s, at a conversion price tag estimated at USD1.2 million. Bombardier Aerospace announced on 29 July that it has selected EMS Aviation Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. received type certificate validation for its G150 aircraft on 2 August from the Civil Aviation Administration of China, allowing the company to register the wide-cabin, high-speed business jet in the country. Larry Flynn, senior vice president, Marketing and Sales, Gulfstream, said: “It demonstrates our commitment to ensuring that Gulfstream ownership continues to be a smooth and simple process, regardless of where the aircraft is registered.” The G150 has also received type certification validation from the Ukraine, Israel, United States, Chile, the European Union, Philippines, Canada and Brazil.

Effective 1 August, Changi Airport Group extended Jet Quay Pte Ltd’s tenancy for another three years to operate the JetQuay Commercial Important Persons Terminal at Changi Airport. Personalised services include limousine transfers from private jets to the terminal, buggy services to gate holdrooms, baggage pickup and delivery, and personal shopping. Jet Quay expects a growing number of customers in the next few years, with more than 40,000 passengers having used the facility in the first six months just this year.

Aerostar Aircraft Corp debuted its newly converted Aerostar 601P at the EAA AirVenture 2011 held from 25-31 July. It features two Pratt & Whitney PW615F engines of 1,460 lbst mounted 130

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to provide new increased high-speed Internet connectivity for Global 5000 and Global 6000 business jets. The new setup features a ViaSat Ku-band communication system and EMS router equipment, allowing time-strapped passengers to make the most of their on-flight time. With Yonder high-speed Internet service, the Global 5000 and Global 6000 business jets will feature full Internet connectivity, Virtual Private Network, e-mail with attachments via laptops, voice-over IP and will allow the use of other Wi-Fi devices. On 28 July, Dassault Aviation reported an encouraging first-half performance that points to a tentative recovery of the large-cabin business jet market. From January to June, Dassault received a net order for 22 Falcon jets, compared to just two orders in the first half of 2010, but still less than the 56 orders it received in the first half of 2009. China is the largest market for Falcon jets. Group chairman Charles Edelstenne shares that the American and European markets remain “cautious”, while the Middle East has seen “positive signals, but recent unrest clearly affects shortterm international trade adversely”.

Bye Energy, previously known as Beyond Aviation, completed the

initial taxi tests on its electric-powered

Cessna 172, conducted on 22 July at Centennial Airport in Englewood, Colorado, USA. “We will be announcing our first flight date soon,” said Charlie Johnson, president of the company. The company’s goal is to develop practical, cost-effective electric and hybrid propulsion systems that can easily work as a replacement for internal combustion engines in the 150 to 200 horsepower range. Beyond Aviation will continue the former company’s relationships with key sponsors such as Cessna, Jeppesen, Garmin and others. On 27 July, Hawker Beechcraft (HBC) awarded the ExecuJet Aviation Group (EAG) an Authorised Service Centre status at six of its worldwide MRO facilities — Lanseria and Cape Town, South Africa; Dubai, UAE; Melbourne and Sydney, Australia; and Lagos, Nigeria. EAG increased its engineering staff to fulfil its duties for the HBC contract, which includes line and base maintenance on Hawker series aircraft such as the Hawker 4000, Hawker 900XP, Hawker 750 and Hawker 400XP.

Piper Aircraft announced on 26 July that it has started fabrication of the first conforming flight test article of the new single engine PiperJet Altaire business jet. Assembly will commence in August. The inaugural flight of the Altaire is targetted at 2012 with certification and deliveries in 2014. The Altaire is an average 25 per cent less expensive to operate per hour compared to very light jets. According to Piper president and CEO Geoffrey Berger, “Piper’s advantage lies in a solid commitment by Imprimis to appropriately fund the >> programme and see it through.”

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OCTOBER 20-22, 2011

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AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF A key contributor to the safety of pilots and passengers is a highly functional and well-designed pilot headset. BMW Group DesignworksUSA teamed up with audio specialist Sennheiser to develop the S1 Digital general aviation headset, launched at AirVenture 2011 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, USA on 25 July. “Safety, excellent speech intelligibility and comfort for fatigue-free listening were our top priorities,” explained Jörg Buchberger, Sennheiser Business Segment Manager, Aviation.

Gulfstream Aerospace Corp

announced on 18 July that its super midsized Gulfstream G250 aircraft has been renamed as the Gulfstream G280, citing sensitivity to some Asian cultures where certain number sequences can be interpreted in various ways. The business jet offers the largest cabin, longest range, and fastest speed in its class. It is capable of travelling 3,400 nautical miles at Mach 0.80, and has a maximum operating speed of Mach 0.85.

Updated in 2011, the National Business Aviation Association publication

Jet Aviation announced new leadership

is a must read for those in the private aviation industry. It includes information for charter uses; updates on procedures for selecting a charter operator and broker; information on audit contractors; sample pre-screening questions for consumers; and proposal templates used to obtain and evaluate quotes for charter flights.

in EMEA and Asia on 14 July. Johannes Turzer, Former VP and general manager at Jet Aviation Düsseldorf, is now vice president of maintenance at Jet Aviation Basel. Taking over Turzer’s former post is Sebastian Groeger, previously vice president and general manager at Jet Aviation Singapore. Filling Groeger’s former role is Philippe Crevier, a 30-year aviation industry veteran who once served as VP of marketing for business aircraft in Montreal, Canada. Paulo Penido Pinto Marques is Embraer’s new CFO, effective 18 July.

Embraer signed a Memorandum of

Understanding (MoU) on 20 July with Minsheng Financial Leasing Co. Ltd. (MFL) for the latter to purchase up to 20 Embraer executive jets. Deliveries are scheduled to commence in 2011.“This MoU laid a solid foundation for Minsheng Financial Leasing to be the top executive aviation leasing institution in Asia, and for Embraer to strengthen its penetration of China’s executive aviation market,” said Kong Linshan, Chairman, MFL. 132

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Penido replaces Cynthia Marcondes Ferreira Benedetto and brings to the company his broad experience and market recognition in the financial system, with previous involvement in organisations such as Citibank and J.P. Morgan; and in large Brazilian industries such as Usiminas and CSN. “Paulo is a significant hire for Embraer. His experience and professional capabilities will be of great value to the Company’s growth process,” stated Embraer President and CEO Frederico Fleury Curado.

On 13 July, President Barack Obama called for a tax increase on companies with private jets, hitting a manufacturing industry that is just coming up for air after years of slumping sales and job losses. Obama’s proposal would scale back a tax break on private jet owners and consequently raise USD3 billion over the next decade. However, the amount remains a tiny fraction of the USD4 trillion in deficit reductions that economists reckon the US needs to get its economy back on sound footing. Falcon Aviation Services (FAS) is adding its Abu Dhabi-based helicopter charter service partner to the ‘Premium Connect’ travel service of Etihad Airways, the national airline of the United Arab Emirates. FAS operates from Al Bateen Executive Airport, ideally located for quick transfers from the Etihad terminal at Abu Dhabi International Airport to a wide range of destinations within the UAE. FAS offers corporate jet charter, helicopter tourism, aerial photography and filming, aerial banner advertising, offshore/onshore oil and gas support, aircraft maintenance and aircraft management. Cessna Aircraft

launched a new mobile version of its Citation Customer Service website on 27 June. Customers can go to Cessna.mobi on their smartphone, iPad or tablet to access contact points for technical information, Cessna Service Parts & Programmes, Citation Service Centers, field service reps, customer care, authorised service facilities and Customer Service. “This enables a Citation pilot anywhere in the world to quickly and easily access the full range of Cessna Customer Support services through a mobile Internet device,” said Brad Thress, Cessna’s senior vice president of Customer Service. >>

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AIRBORNEBRIEFING

BUSINESS AVIATION IN BRIEF On its 50th birthday on 18 July 2011, Air Partner relocated its UK headquarters to larger modern offices alongside London Gatwick Airport. Said Mark Briffa, Air Partner CEO: “It gives us a much more contemporary home, befitting our image and brand as a leading aviation company, a Royal Warrant holder and a public listed company that is fully listed on the London Stock Exchange.” The headquarters also house Air Partner’s international in-house training academy that trains its 200-strong team. Gulfstream Aerospace

Corp. announced on 27 June its appointment of 30-year aviation veteran Paul Lu as director, Product Support Asia. Lu speaks Cantonese and some Mandarin. Based in Hong Kong and reporting to Barry Russell, vice president, Customer Support, Lu’s duties include all aspects of Product Support, helping operators within and transitioning through Asia. He supports new aircraft sales, materials, certifications and Gulfstream’s relationship with the Civil Aviation Administration of China.

The all-electric Cri-Cri, jointly developed by EADS Innovation Works, Aero Composites Saintonge and the Green Cri-Cri Association, made its official maiden flight at Le Bourget airport near Paris on 23 June. The pioneering four-engine all-electric aerobatic plane’s 134

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take-off and climb were smooth; no vibrations were felt and manoeuvrability was deemed excellent. All systems performed well and the plane returned safely after seven minutes. The event was supported by the French Musée de l’Air et de l’Espace (French Air and Space Museum). Developed by European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company, the EADS VoltAir concept plane is a zero-emission passenger aircraft that uses lithium-air batteries, which will be powered by an ultra-high density superconducting electric engine that promises to be nearly silent and super efficient. As a lightweight craft, the EADS VoltAir commuter jet is designed to only make short trips carrying just 50 to 70 passengers.

A Gulfstream G450 became the first business jet to cross the Atlantic using biofuels on 22 June. The aircraft flew from North America to Europe using a 50/50 blend of Honeywell Green Jet Fuel and petroleum-based jet fuel powering one of its Rolls-Royce Tay Mk 611-8C engines. The G450 is also

the world’s first business jet to be powered by a biofuel, derived from camelina, an inedible crop. Leading organisations representing general aviation (GA) operators challenged the US Department of Transportation’s (DOT’s) decision on 22 June to dismantle the Block Aircraft Registration Request programme, which blocks public dissemination of aircraft movement information upon request, and established a fund to support the legal fight. A formal notice of appeal has been filed with the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, followed by a motion to prevent the DOT from making any changes to the current practice pending the court’s consideration of the appeal. Unprecedented travel times linking New York to Paris in under two hours and New York to Sydney in five hours could become reality within the next decade, says supersonic business jet developer Hypermach Europe. At the recent Paris Air Show, the UKheadquartered company unveiled its 20-seat SonicStar concept, designed to fly at Mach 3.5 with no sonic boom overland. “We will fly at twice the speed of Concorde, so that the other side of the world feels like it’s just down the road,” said Richard Lugg, Hypermach chief executive and chief scientist.

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AIRBORNEJETOPTIONS BUYING A PRIVATE JET by Paul Ng

BUYER BEWARE

WHAT IS THE NATURE OF AIRCRAFT OWNERSHIP AND WHAT SHOULD FIRST-TIME BUYERS LOOK OUT FOR BEFORE SIGNING THE DEAL?

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THERE IS PRESENTLY NO INTERNATIONAL REGISTER THAT TRACKS PEOPLE HOLDING “ABSOLUTE” OWNERSHIP RIGHTS IN AIRCRAFT Who has title to the aircraft? A buyer should make sure that the seller has a “good and marketable” title, transferable to the buyer free and clear of encumbrances and third party claims. However, the task of establishing a seller’s title to a movable asset like an aircraft is not straightforward. There is presently no international register that tracks people holding “absolute” ownership rights to aircraft. The best a buyer can do is ask for evidence of a continuous and unbroken chain of titles of sale, starting with the airframe and/or engine manufacturer and ending with the current seller. This would have to show the seller at the end of a chain of purportedly valid title transfers, as evidenced by the bills of sale. Note that it is not uncommon to have an incomplete set of original bills for older aircraft. Therefore, it is important for buyers to ensure that their purchase agreement carries a provision requiring the seller to transfer title with “full title guarantee”. These magic words, under English law, imply that: s

the aircraft is free from any third party encumbrances (like a mortgagee, which could interfere with a buyer’s ownership rights);

s

the seller has the power to sell the aircraft;

s

the seller agrees to take any required further action to ensure the above, including defending against any claims to title by third parties.

Transferring aircraft title There are three ways of passing an aircraft’s title to the buyer: 1. Delivering a bill of sale – This is the most common method which involves handing over a document signed by the seller that evidences conveyance of title to the buyer; 2. Physical delivery – This method is commonly used to avoid paying stamp duty on the bill of sale. Due to the nature of the market, a special practice has developed for

such delivery, akin to taking marriage vows. Both parties stand either inside or outside the aircraft, physically touch some parts of the plane and recite to each other at the requisite time, in the presence of witnesses, a prescribed script where buyer and seller declare their desire to pass the title and actually speak certain words to confirm the passing of title and acceptance. This physical delivery is then evidenced in writing with an acknowledgement of a delivery note or bill of sale. 3. Attornment – Under English law, title transfer can happen where the person in physical possession of the aircraft acknowledges (usually) in writing that he holds the aircraft for and on behalf of the buyer. This method is used when both buyer and seller are unable to come together to pass the title or when possession lies with a third party, for instance, the manager of the aircraft. Depending on the laws of the country in which the aircraft is located (lex situs) at the time of title transfer and where the aircraft is registered (lex registri), the law may require additional steps for the title transfer to the buyer to be recognised in that country. If the steps required under the lex situs or lex registri are onerous, too costly or attract hefty taxes, one solution is to complete the title transfer while the aircraft is flying over international waters (no lex situs). Unfortunately, rules imposed by the lex registri dictate that aircraft require a national registration to operate and, without such registration, an aircraft should be grounded. The sole exception would be if you were transferring the title in an unregistered seaplane that can be floated in international waters, as this would avoid the rules and taxes of any lex registri and there would be no lex situs. When it comes to title transfers, a buyer should clearly agree with the seller on the method, location and terms upfront. If not, the buyer risks being exposed to costs and avoidable taxes, or paying for an asset with a defective or non-marketable title. JETGALA

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AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

PLANE SPEAK ABSOLUTE ALTITUDE Measurable height of an aircraft above the actual terrain. ABSOLUTE CEILING The maximum altitude above sea level at which an aircraft can maintain level flight under Standard Air conditions. AGL (Above Ground Level) Altitude expressed as feet above terrain or airport elevation (see MSL). AILERONS An aircraft control surface hinged to the rear, outer section of each wing for banking (‘tilting’) the aircraft. AIRCRAFT MANAGEMENT Comprehensive services provided by a management company for an aircraft owner. Details vary. AIRFOIL The shape of any flying surface, but principally a wing, as seen in side-view (cross section). AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE Official notification to aircraft owners/operators of a known safety issue with a particular model of aircraft. ALTIMETER A highly sensitive barometer that shows an aircraft’s altitude above mean sea level by measuring atmospheric pressure. ANGLE OF ATTACK The angle between the airfoil’s chord line and the direction in which the aircraft is currently moving. AOG (Aircraft on Ground) Aircraft unfit to fly, in need of repair. Owner’s worst nightmare. APPROACH (DEPARTURE) CONTROL Radar-based air traffic control, usually at an airport tower, providing traffic separation up to 40 miles. APRON Hard-surfaced or paved area around a hangar. Also, ‘ramp’. ATC (Air Traffic Control) Service providing separation services to participating airborne traffic and clearances to land, take off or taxi at airports. AVIONICS The electronic control systems airplanes use for flight such as communications, autopilots, and navigation. BLOCK RATES Pre-paid hours for air charter at a contracted price. CARBON OFFSET Monetary contributions to renewable energy research and production projects to ‘offset’ carbon emissions of an airplane. 138

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CHARTER The ‘renting’ of an aircraft with crew for a personal, business, or cargo flight from one point to another.

FBO (Fixed Base Operator) A business operating an airport terminal for non-airline, general aviation aircraft.

CHARTER CARD Pre-paid air charter plan, either for a block of charter hours at a pre-defined fee, or a set debit balance in dollars.

FERRY FLIGHT A flight for the purpose of returning an aircraft to base or delivering an aircraft from one location to another.

CLASS I NAVIGATION Operation of aircraft under visual meteorological conditions (VFR) primarily based on ‘see and avoid’ procedures. CLASS II NAVIGATION Any en route flight operation that is not Class I, i.e. instrumentbased navigation (IFR). CLEARANCE Formal instructions from air traffic control authorising a specific action (climb or descend, entry into controlled airspace).

FLAPS Hinged surfaces on the inboard rear of wings, deployed to increase wing curvature (and thus, lift). FLIGHT PLAN Filed by radio, telephone, computer, or in person with Flight Service Stations. FLIGHT TIME Portion of the trip actually spent in the air. FRACTIONAL OWNERSHIP The purchase of a ‘share’ of an aircraft.

CONTRAILS Streaks of condensed water vapour created in the air by aircraft flying at high altitudes; a.k.a. vapour trails.

FUSELAGE An aircraft’s main body structure housing the flight crew, passengers, and cargo.

CONTROLLED AIRSPACE An airspace of defined dimensions within which air traffic control service is provided.

GENERAL AVIATION Part of civil aviation comprising all facets of aviation except scheduled air carriers.

CRUISE SPEED The normal speed attained at altitude once the aircraft is no longer climbing and is en route.

GLASS COCKPIT See FIS.

CRUISING ALTITUDE A level altitude maintained by an aircraft while in flight. DEADHEAD To fly the return leg of a trip without cargo or passengers. DRAG Resisting force exerted on an aircraft in its line of flight opposite in direction to its motion. Opposite of thrust. DUTY TIME That portion of the day when a crewmember is on duty in any capacity (not just in the air), limited by regulations. EFIS (Electronic Flight Information Systems) Glass cockpit avionics that integrate all flight parameters into one optimised instrument. ELEVATOR An aircraft control surface hinged to both rear horizontal stabilisers, changing the aircraft pitch attitude nose-up or nose-down. EMPTY LEG Also known as ‘one-way availability’. Usually posted as available for travel between two airports during a certain time period. FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) The Department of Transportation’s agency for aviation.

GPS (Global Positioning System) Satellitebased navigation system operated by Department of Defence. GPWS (Ground Proximity Warning System) System designed to alert pilots if their aircraft is in immediate danger of flying into the ground. GROUND SPEED Actual speed that an aircraft travels over the ground also called ‘shadow speed’. HANGAR An enclosed structure for housing aircraft. Originated with lakebased floating homes of the original German Zeppelin airships. HEAVY JETS See ‘Large-Cabin Jets’. HORSEPOWER The motive energy required to raise 550 lbs. one foot in one second, friction disregarded. HUD (Head-Up Display) A transparent display that presents data without requiring the user to look away from his or her usual viewpoint. IATA CODE International aviation code for international airports. ICAO CODE Civil aviation codes for airports.

AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) Rules for flights into clouds and low visibility, by reference to cockpit instruments and radio navigation. ILS (Instrument Landing System) A precision instrument approach system permitting aircraft to land with low ceilings or poor visibility. JOINT OWNERSHIP Purchase or lease of an aircraft by a number of owners, often through a partnership or limited company. KNOT (Nautical Mile per Hour) Common measure of aircraft speed equalling 6,080 feet or about 1.15 miles. (For mph, multiply knots by 1.15.) KTAS True airspeed, in knots. LARGE-CABIN JETS The largest size aircraft that doesn’t require a major airport runway. Typical capacity 9-15 passengers. LAYOVER A night spent in the middle of the trip in a city other than home base for the aircraft and crew. LEG Describes one direction of travel between two points. Commonly used in referring to a planned itinerary. LIGHT JETS See ‘Small-Cabin Jets’. MACH SPEED A number representing the ratio of the speed of an airplane to the speed of sound in the surrounding air. MAYDAY An international distress signal to indicate an imminent and grave danger that requires assistance. MID-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 7-9 passengers. MRO (Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul) Company licensed to provide services for the upkeep and airworthiness of airplanes. NAUTICAL MILE Defined internationally as equivalent to 1,852 metres or 1.15 statute miles. NDB (Non-Directional Beacon) A radio transmitter at a known location, used as an aviation or marine navigational aid. PAN PAN International call signal for urgency, indicating uncertainty and usually followed by the nature of the alert. PART 91 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering corporate flight departments. PART 121 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on scheduled airline operations, including the publication of a schedule.

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PLANE SPEAK

PART 135 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering charter carriers.

TARMAC A paved airport surface, especially a runway or an apron at a hangar.

PART 145 Certificate allowing an organisation to perform maintenance and alterations on US-registered aircraft.

TAXI TIME Portion of the trip spent rolling between the gate, terminal, or ramp and runway.

PATTERN The path of aircraft traffic around an airfield, at an established height and direction.

THRUST The forward force produced in reaction to the gases expelled rearward from a jet engine. Opposite of drag.

PAYLOAD Anything that an aircraft carries beyond what is required for its operation during flight.

TRAILING EDGE The rearmost edge of an airfoil.

POSITIONING Ferrying aircraft for departure from other than originating airport.

TRANSPONDER An airborne transmitter that responds to automated air traffic control interrogation with accurate position information.

RADAR System that uses electromagnetic waves to identify the range, altitude, direction, or speed of moving and fixed objects. RAMP The apron or open ‘tarmac’ in front of an FBO or terminal facility. This space is busy, used for deplaning, parking of aircraft, etc. ROLL One of three axes in flight, specifying the action around a central point. ROTATE In flight, any aircraft will rotate about its centre of gravity, a point which is the average location of the mass of the aircraft. RUDDER Aircraft control surface attached to the rear of the vertical stabiliser (fin) of the aircraft tail. Forces the plane to veer left or right. RUNWAY HEADING Magnetic direction corresponding to the centre line of the runway. SLATS Small, aerodynamic surfaces on the leading edge of the wings of fixed aircraft which allow the wing to operate at a higher angle of attack. SLIPSTREAM The flow of air driven backward by a propeller or downward by a rotor. SMALL-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 5-8 passengers. SQUAWK A four-digit number that a pilot dials into his transponder to identify his aircraft to air traffic controllers.

TURBINE Engine that uses compressed air to generate thrust to spin a metal shaft inside the motor, used in jet engines and turboprop aircraft. TURBOPROP An aircraft in which the propeller is driven by a jet-style turbine rather than a piston. VERY LIGHT JETS (VLJ) Small jet aircraft approved for single-pilot operation, maximum take-off weight of less than 10,000 lb (4,540 kg). VFR (Visual Flight Rules) A defined set of FAA regulations covering operation of aircraft flying by visual reference to the horizon. VOR (VHF Omnidirectional Range) Ground-based radio navigation aid. VORTICES Regions of high velocity that develop at the tip of a wing as it flies through the air. WIND SHEAR Large changes in either wind speed or direction at different altitudes that can cause sudden gain or loss of airspeed.

STATUTE MILE A unit of length equal to 5,280 feet.

WINGLET A small, stabilising, rudder-like addition to the tips of a wing to control or employ air movement, thereby increasing fuel economy.

SVS (Synthetic Vision System) A technology that uses 3D to provide pilots with intuitive means of understanding their flying environment.

YAW One of the three axes in flight, specifying the side-to-side movement of an aircraft on its vertical axis.

TAIL NUMBER An airplane’s registration number.

YOKE The control wheel of an aircraft, akin to an automobile steering wheel.

AIRBORNESHOWDIARY

EBACE 2011 Geneva SEPTEMBER 2011 14-15 SEP

BAE 2011 (Business Aircraft Europe)

14-16 SEP

JET EXPO 2011 (Russian International Vnukovo-3 Business Aviation Centre, Moscow, Russia Business Aviation Exhibition)

London Biggin Hill Airport, UK

www.miuevents.com/bae2011 2011.jetexpo.ru

NBAA 2011 (National Business Aviation Association)

Las Vegas Convention Center and Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, NV, USA

www.nbaa.org/events/amc/2011

DUBAI AIRSHOW 2011

Airport Expo, Dubai, UAE

www.dubaiairshow.aero

LIMA 2011 (Langkawi International Maritime & Aerospace Exhibition)

Mahsuri International Exhibition Centre, Langkawi, Malaysia

www.lima.com.my

BIAS 2012 (Bahrain International Airshow)

Sakhir Airbase, Kingdom Of Bahrain

www.bahraininternationalairshow.com

OCTOBER 2011 10-12 OCT

NOVEMBER 2011 13-17 NOV DECEMBER 2011 06-10 DEC

JANUARY 2012 19-21 JAN

FEBRUARY 2012 14-19 FEB

SINGAPORE AIRSHOW 2012

Changi Exhibition Centre, Singapore

www.singaporeairshow.com.sg

22-23 FEB

BUSINESS AIRPORT WORLD EXPO 2012

Palais Des Festivals, Cannes, Cote d’Azur, France

www.businessairportworldexpo.com

ABACE 2012 (Asian Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition)

Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Service Centre, Shanghai, China

www.abace.aero/2012

SIBAS 2012 (Shanghai International Business Aviation Show)

Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport, Shanghai, China

www.shanghaiairshow.com

14-16 MAY

EBACE 2012 (European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition)

Palexpo, Geneva, Switzerland

www.ebace.aero

24-25 MAY

ABA 2012 (Asian Business Aviation)

Macau Business Aviation Centre, Macau

www.asianbusinessav.com

25-27 MAY

AEROEXPO UK 2012

Sywell Aerodome, UK

www.expo.aero/uk

WADDINGTON INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW

Royal Air Force Waddington, UK

www.waddingtonairshow.co.uk

FARNBOROUGH INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW

Farnborough Airport, UK

www.farnborough.com

LABACE 2012

São Paulo, Brazil

www.abag.org.br/labace2011/ schedule.htm

ILA BERLIN AIR SHOW 2012

Brandenburg Airport, Berlin, Germany

www.ila-berlin.com

MARCH 2012 27-29 MAR

APRIL 2012 11-13 APR

MAY 2012

JUNE 2012 30 JUN – 1 JUL

JULY 2012 9-15 JUL

AUGUST 2012 16-18 AUG

SEPTEMBER 2012 11-16 SEP

142

JETGALA

MAKE YOUR PLANS & BE THERE WHEN THE WORLD OF BUSINESS AVIATION RETURNS TO THE WEST COAST!

LAS VEGAS CONVENTION CENTER WITH STATIC DISPLAY RIGHT OUTSIDE IN THE PARKING LOT AND HENDERSON EXECUTIVE AIRPORT LAS VEGAS, NV

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT

www.nbaa.org

AIRBORNETAILHOOK

VOYAGE À TROIS by Rainer Sigel

HERE IS SOMETHING YOU DON’T SEE EVERY DAY. It is not a case of two aircraft engines having been very naughty, with unexpected consequences. Instead, this is how aviation technology companies like Honeywell test new engine designs and control systems, both for commercial and business aircraft. This modified Boeing 757-225 flies tail number N757HW and is the world’s only aircraft of its type configured as such a testbed. It was first delivered to Eastern Airlines as N504EA, which flew it from February 1983 until 1991, when the airline retired the plane at McCarren Airport in Las Vegas. In February 1995, Airtours International Airways bought and flew it as G-JALC, until Honeywell took over in late 2005. It was flown to Pinal Airpark for repainting and structural modifications and made its first flight with three engines on 20 December 2008. The idea itself is not new. Honeywell previously flew a Boeing 720-051B in a similar configuration, which it had bought from Allied Signal in 2002. When it was finally retired in December 2007, it was the oldest Boeing 720 still flying. In 2008, it was broken up for scrap at Sky Harbor Airport in Arizona.

This modified Boeing 757-225 flies tail number N757HW and is the world’s only aircraft of its type configured as such a testbed Photo courtesy of Peter van Dyke

144

JETGALA

Above The Clouds:

Aviation Business Index

Know more about aircraft ownership at your single best source: aviationbusinessindex.com

Know More. 800.553.8638

+1.315.797.4420

JETNET.COM

Worldwide leader in aviation market intelligence.

VISIT THE JETNET EXHIBIT AT THE NBAA CONVENTION, OCTOBER 10-12 IN LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, BOOTH #3335

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