Jazz Inside Magazine - April 2013 issue

November 16, 2017 | Author: Tracy Leonard Lockett | Category: Publishing, Bass Guitar, Pop Culture, Funk, Jazz
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Kevin Eubanks, guitarist, composer, is featured in the April 2013 edition of Jazz Inside Magazine (print and digital) – ...

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www.jazzINSIDEMAGAZINE.com APRIL 2013

Interviews Robin Eubanks Duane Eubanks Scott Ballin

Five Towns College Jazz

Hiromi

Blue Note, Apr. 16-21

Wayne Escoffery

Jazz Standard, Apr. 16-17

Christian Scott

Jazz Standard, Apr. 25-28

Arturo Sandoval

Kevin Eubanks

Blue Note, Apr. 26-28

Plenty of CD Reviews Comprehensive Directory of NY Club Concert & Event Listings

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New York Performances • April 9-13, 2013 (see page 4 for details)

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Jazz Tuesdays at the John Birks Gillespie Auditorium in the NYC Baha’i Center

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Mike Longo

and his 17 piece big band The NY State of the Art Jazz Ensemble World Class Jazz At Affordable Prices

All Shows on Tuesdays at 8:00 PM April 2: Lou Volpe Group April 9: Falkner Evans Quintet April 16: French Exchange Students Jazz Ensemble April 23: Gary Morgan’s Panamericana April 30: Charli Persip & Super Sound Big Band May 7: Rosemary George and group May 14: Antoinette Montague and group May 21: Mike Longo’s 17 piece NY State of the Art Jazz Ensemble The NYC Baha’i Center 53 E. 11th Street (btw. University Place & Broadway) Shows: 8:00 and 9:30 PM General Admission: $15 Students: $10

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Jazz Inside Magazine ISSN: 2150-3419 (print) • ISSN 2150-3427 (online) April 2013 – Volume 4, Number 9 Cover Design by Shelly Rhodes Cover photo of Kevin Eubanks by Ken Weiss Publisher: Eric Nemeyer Editor: John R. Barrett, Jr. Advertising Sales & Marketing: Eric Nemeyer Circulation: Susan Brodsky Photo Editor: Joe Patitucci Layout and Design: Gail Gentry Contributing Artists: Shelly Rhodes Contributing Photographers: Eric Nemeyer, Joe Patitucci, Ken Weiss Contributing Writers: John Alexander, John R. Barrett, Jr.; Curtis Davenport; Bill Donaldson; Eric Harabadian; Gary Heimbauer; Alex Henderson; Rick Helzer; Mark Keresman; Nora McCarthy; Joe Patitucci; Ken Weiss.

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CONTENTS CLUBS, CONCERTS, EVENTS 15 Calendar of Events, Concerts, Festivals and Club Performances

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COPYRIGHT NOTICE Copyright © 2013 by Eric Nemeyer Corporation. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied or duplicated in any form, by any means without prior written consent. Copying of this publication is in violation of the United States Federal Copyright Law (17 USC 101 et seq.). Violators may be subject to criminal penalties and liability for substantial monetary damages, including statutory damages up to $50,000 per infringement, costs and attorneys fees.

27 Clubs & Venue Listings 30 Around Town INTERVIEWS 12 Duane Eubanks 14 Robin Eubanks 32 Scott Ballin — Five Towns

44 Christian Scott FEATURE 4 Kevin Eubanks Arturo Sandoval NOTEWORTHY PERFORMANCES CDS & RECORDINGS 42 Bad Plus with Bill Frisell 34 Aaron Diehl Ralph Lalama; Kings Of The Vince Ector Crescent City 35 Kevin Eubanks 43 Hiromi; Wayne Escoffery 36 Nilson Matta, Chris Potter 37 Shamie Royston 38 Alexander von Schippenbach Allen Vizzutti 39 Eli Yamin

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Feature

Kevin Eubanks By John R. Barrett Jr.

Photo by Ken Weiss

Jazz Messengers. “Art Blakey just kind of baptized me into the whole thing ... He would take young cats and just throw them into the pool and say swim and he just had a knack of being able to feel the people that would be able to swim and he ... had a way of knowing it by the way you walked.” Following the stint with the Messengers

Kevin Eubanks new album on the Mack Avenue label is entitled The Messenger. Hear Kevin Eubanks at Birdland in New York City, April 9-13. Due to his long association with the Tonight Show band, Kevin Eubanks may be the most famous jazz guitarist living today; he is undoubtedly one of the most talented. With a style inspired largely by Wes Montgomery, his notes have a percussive attack seldom found in Wes’ work, delivered with a speed and precision that would make many envious. His musical vocabulary is broad, encompassing many other musicians: besides Wes’ chief inspiration Charlie Christian, one can find elements of George Benson, Kenny Burrell, even Django Reinhardt in Kevin’s sound. His spectrum of moods matches that of his influences: a bluesy vamp, for example, may lead to a flamenco-like outburst, and lead from there to a cycling rumination of a type found in folk music. He is a good composer, a great improviser, and as a technician nearly unbeatable – and it stems from a musical background hard to beat. It was probably no surprise that music would play such a large part in Kevin’s life. Born in 1957 to a music teacher mother, he would have encouragement in this area not only from his three brothers, but also his un4

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cles, Ray and Tommy Bryant. As the Eubankses owned a piano, Ray and his group would practice there while in Philadelphia. “So we had all these wonderful musicians coming through the house and all it was to Robin and myself was ‘you all had to get out of the living room while Ray rehearses’ and we always said okay, but Papa Jo Jones would always come and play with us and do magic tricks and stuff like that, so that’s how I remember him the most.” All four brothers began music at an early age, with Kevin starting on violin. The transition to his present instrument came in 1969 from an unlikely source: seeing James Brown at the Uptown Theater. “[F]or some reason I remember coming out on Broad Street and looking down at the curb and just thinking to myself I’m going to play guitar.” To that point, Kevin had spent seven years taking violin lessons; now, on another stringed instrument, he was teaching himself – and in a year he was playing professionally in Philly’s clubs. That led to Boston and Berklee College of Music, where he first met Branford Marsalis and landed an audition with Art Blakey’s

came other key apprenticeships: spots with Roy Haynes, Slide Hampton, and a lengthy sojourn with Sam Rivers. “One time, sitting in a restaurant in Munich, he told me: ‘Just take the chains off your mind. Nothing you play is wrong. Don’t worry about making any sense of what you’re playing.” The crucible of these high-profile gigs focused Kevin’s playing and brought him offers to record: his first disc as a leader was 1982’s Guitarist, for Elektra/ Musician, followed by a long series of albums for GRP, for whom he began to explore his funk impulses with the aim of finding more of an audience. Like many releases on the GRP label, 1988’s The Searcher was designed for radio rotation and to go down sweetly. This aim is clear from the first bars of “The Storyteller”, our opener: rows of gentle strings in a parallel shimmer, balanced by the drummer’s rim clicks. Edward Simon floats with gentle bursts of piano, then gains force on the chorus, joined by snapping bass and bluesy lines from the leader. His low-register notes spar well with Kenny Davis’ bass funk, and the two

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work it out briefly before returning to the blissful theme. Adopting a more metallic tone on his solo, Eubanks begins with a Metheny-like wash of sound, bending some long notes before switching approaches. Now picking up speed, he ripples in melodious circles, a bluesy run that ends in a Charlie Christian phrase. While his attack sharpens, Simon jabs some tangy chords, but this is mostly Kevin, and mostly it works. The theme returns too soon, and its placid contours are uneasily joined to the funky mid-section, but the effect is pleasant: the guitar stands out, even if the tune does not. “Cookin’”, a scat workout complete with human beat box, lets Kevin play his instrument like a bass, including what sounds like thumbwork on the low notes. Mark Ledford sings the theme, a strutting blues, with guitar in parallel: the high notes ring, and the low absolutely hum. Ledford’s solo, saxlike in tone, moves much without going anywhere; best part is a three-note shuffle at the end, deliciously repeated by Eubanks. Kevin goes next, rumbling the greasy funk beneath a raft of tongue-clicks, fingerpops, and percussive breath. (Prize on this piece might belong to Duane Broadnax, the beat-boxer; the variety of sound on a track with one instrument is astonishing.) This is followed by “Forbidden Romance”, whose theme could work on daytime TV. Ledford is here too, now breathy and flutelike but still wordless; Kevin, now on acoustic, ruminates slowly as the orchestra bathes him. (I may dislike synthesized strings, but this arrangement is tasteful and helped by dabs of piano.) Kevin’s strings snap nicely, rippling over the glassy surface; the tune isn’t much but the guitar is worth hearing. That could be said for much of this album: more skill than substance, leading to pleasant if not demanding listening. Things get meatier on “Strait Jacket”: ferocious bass on top, joined by Kevin’s thin wispy lines and the cloudy chords of Simon. The theme may start gentle, but that bass maintains a late-night feeling, driven home hard come the solos. An angular bass riff is copied by Eubanks, with Montgomery chords and bell-like single notes. As the drums get to boiling, Kevin hits overdrive: tiny little riffs, endlessly repeated over the creeping bass. Simon’s mannered solo is well-constructed but its mood doesn’t match the others’; Kevin follows it well with thin stinging notes, returning in time to the theme. “Sandra”, part ballad and part tango, blends one of the disc’s more attractive themes to a rather cloying synth part. (As with the rest of the album, Simon’s piano is exemplary, but the synth here is bland and layered on with a trowel.) Kevin takes the theme at a slow amble; during Simon’s solo he strikes a bossa-like comp as the synth threatens to drown everything. On Eubanks’ solo it all turns warm: crisp wiry lines, at times in a Reinhardt-like flurry, never far from the theme but enough to sound fresh. The players do their part but the sleek production was a mistake; one hopes for a straight-ahead rendition, so the beauty of “Sandra” could be seen unadorned. With its insistent bass and serpentine theme, “In Search of the Searcher” takes an already breezy thought and runs with it. After a somewhat pedestrian opening, Kevin lands the disc’s strongest solo: clustered, detailed phrases as the pace ever tightens, Simon helps by feeding strong chords; his own solo continues the horse race, with a looser feel than usual for him – that helps a lot. “Forgotten Future” returns Kevin to the acoustic – or rather two, thanks to an overdub. In both mood and touch reminiscent of Oregon’s Ralph Towner, Eubanks interweaves folky textures with smoother riffs; Ledford’s falsetto scat is a distraction, and dropped after the early minutes. For a full chorus he plays with the strings very taut, as if picking above his chord hand – a percussive, earthy sound, well fit for the mood at hand. “Blue Woven Dreams” is a sonic cloud blending light blue guitar, waves of rumbling cymbals, dollops of keyboards, and a whispering Ledford, on perhaps his best turn on the album. The synth solo does the twittering-bird thing a tad too long, and Kevin never gets a true solo, but the mood is there and worth hearing. Such also goes for “Poem for a Sleeping Child”, an all-guitar piece where Kevin’s (Continued on page 8) 6

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It is clear that he has a much larger musical vision however, on many levels—and as we have discovered over time, he has been able to express that prolifically. (Continued from page 6)

meditative lead trades rich single notes and Montgomery voicings over an echoed backdrop which is sometimes a samba and sometimes a dream. In all, the tracks with moreinvolved textures and lengthier solos are the ones to hear; the pop trappings and attempts at sweetening often interfere with the talents of the guitarist. This may not be the album of his to hear first, but there are moments. The same band, minus Mark Ledford, was present of 1989’s Promise of Tomorrow, a decidedly more muscular affair. (The “muscular” part certainly applies to the album’s cover, a pinup portrait worthy of a romance novel.) The title piece wraps Gene Jackson’s thick bass around a breakneck theme, told in lines that crackle while staying gentle. For his solo, the guitarist turns faster, taking swift climbs, sliding wickedly, and repeating the process as the keys swell forward. His forceful touch is attractive in these calm surroundings; not much else happens of note, though the drums rumble nicely. On “Eyes of a Lost Child,” the story is told by glassy swoops, repeated by Simon in one of his better turns on the synth. While its funk-lite mood is repeated throughout the disc, here Kevin’s runs are enhanced by echo, a soft-focus sheen that fits the ambiance. A triple-time flurry at solo’s end is a surprise, as are the sweet gliding notes as the piece fades. Jackson struts with authority on “Cullerton Street,” a funk riff by drummer Kenny Davis that everyone digs into. Eubanks’ turn is more energetic than anything heard to this point, with blurry notes (and a lot of them) stepping deftly among Jackson’s leaps. In a great foggy moment he taps muffled high notes as Simon’s piano goes joyous. In a very staid, planned album like this such efforts are noticed … and fondly remembered. “Haze” is titled well, as Kevin gives his own composition a reggae-like bomp and some grit in his tone. Simon’s whistling-synth

“The highest form of ignorance is when you reject something you don’t know anything about.”

- Wayne Dyer

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part is beyond silly, but it’s quickly gone; The guitar’s greasy feel shifts on the solo, where the sound goes blunt and reaches a rocker’s intensity. (Seems somewhat misplaced while the background stays sunny, but it’s mighty fun.) Simon’s drawing-room piano on “Passage of the Prince” is his highlight for the album; on the solo he shakes off the powdered wig and has a wistful little romp. (Hearing him stretch like this, you wish he would play in a format less strictured.) During this, Kevin circles, with tiny clicks, glowing metallic arcs, and quiet electrified growls. Impatient, the guitarist starts soloing while Simon stays busy; they rhythmically duel as the fade comes abruptly. The end-piece is the session’s only cover, a rendition of Duke’s “In a Sentimental Mood”: Kevin’s notes come wrapped in felt, decorated by Wes’ octaves. The synth is its most string-like, and most annoying, on the bridge; there Kevin sounds like a cello as he softly plucks, while an overdubbed electric hovers over the scene and slowly takes over. Simon’s effort is dignified, echo-filled, and not overly memorable; the last chorus switches sound from Montgomery to Eubanks and back as the synthesizer ties a sugary bow over all. An expansion over The Searcher, this album still finds Kevin compressing his skills to fit a more commercial-jazz idiom. It was a nice idea, and resulted in some decent songs. It is clear that he has a much larger musical vision however, on many levels—and as we have discovered over time, he has been able to express that prolifically. Kevin has for many years been playing in concert settings with the British bassist Dave Holland. The 1989 album Extensions offered him a superlative group to play against, and open-form tunes that encourage rambling. The theme to “Oracle” barely counts as such, being a two-bar up-and-down riff played by Holland at the top of his range. Marvin “Smitty” Smith adds a cuica, cawing softly at odd intervals; to this Steve Coleman adds a drawling alto, drifting up like smoke as he seems to yawn through his instrument. Kevin’s role starts by a series of indistinct bleeps in the background, there more for texture than anything else. As Coleman’s intensity starts to build, Kevin does some birdchirps for a rain-forest feel – a mood bolstered by Smitty’s woodblocks and the persistent cuica. There is no sense of a pecking order here, no sense of any player subordinate to another – all are equal, forming a whole. (“I won’t record as a side man. I won’t play the side man but I will play as a part of somebody’s band if my contribution to the band is equal to everybody else’s contribution to the band then yeah, I’d like to do that.”) Amidst this unity, by Holland playing his riff a few

octaves down, the aura turns menacing. Now we get the theme proper, a boppish lick done strongly by Coleman; his endstatement is repeated by Eubanks, who melds it into his own solo. Splashy notes work their way upward, dashing among cowbells, cymbals, and Holland’s own rhythmic impulses. First he sketches wide zigzags, then he spirals inward, occasionally with a bluesy slide thrown in but mostly cold and clear. As he did with Coleman’s exit, so Holland does with Kevin’s: back among the high notes, dense clusters of notes hovering in a tight range, and more bird sounds from Kevin. At this point he’s almost an organ, playing in brief chordal bursts. Coleman comes back for seconds, a touch more edge to his sound; behind are Smith’s brushes and Morse code comping from Eubanks. With little warning it turns quiet and the players singly leave - and you realize fifteen minutes have gone by. This is an arid, atmospheric landscape: from such simplicity are great things made. A great honor visited Kevin in 1992: participation in a seven-guitar tribute to Wes Montgomery, led by none other than Kenny Burrell. Released in two discs, the second volume features Eubanks on a single track, a take on the 1958 tune “Bock to Bock”, in duet with his old teacher, Ted Dunbar. Rufus Reid begins the excitement with a burly bass-walk; this, and the gentle brushes of Akira Tana, set the stage for the guitars. While the liner notes offer no indication of who plays what, I believe it is Dunbar with the theme and first solo. His notes are sleek, with rounded edges; Kevin responds on the bridge with Wes’ octaves and a touch of rasp. The solos give some nice contrast, with Dunbar rippling gentle phrases between bluesy chords (hear Kevin play behind his teacher with a quiet rhythm part, something Wes rarely did) and Eubanks responding with slashing rapidity, a definite snap to his notes, and lots of frantic wiggling. Reid’s solo is similarly agile, slinking with style at the top of his range. Ted wraps us in warmth with his return to the theme, and it all feels less like a cutting contest than an admiration society. As Eubanks said at the time, “No one tried to dominate the space. In the end, our egos were buffered by our respect for Wes.” Given Kevin’s proclivities for funk, the format for 1994’s Live at Bradley’s may seem unlikely: piano, bass, and guitar, the Nat Cole lineup. But don’t dismiss it on those grounds this is neither sedate nor sleepy. “Speak Low” ignores its title: the theme comes from Kevin, straight and Wes-like. From there it goes to James Williams, who begins his solo with flashes of dissonance; makes his romantic excursions seem sweeter. On a repetitious

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(Continued from page 8)

skipping riff, Eubanks adds chordal swoops, and taut hammered notes when Williams quotes “Milestones #2”. Robert Hurst’s walking bass is strong and no-nonsense; his brief interlude before Kevin’s solo brings the first applause. (In fact, the first indication of an audience; for a live album, the crowd seems anything but.) The guitar solo shifts between rich strummed chords and rapid-fire single notes; in this section I hear bits of “I Want to Be Happy,” and I am. Hurst’s solo is agile and well-executed, but close enough to his walking part that it leaves little impression. Kevin’s comps during this solo are delicate, almost invisible, and quite wonderful; repeat those two words for the exchanges, where Williams and Eubanks complete each others’ phrases. It ends with some nice guitar filigrees, and crowd speaks too low for my liking. Hurst’s lively skip on “June in January” is quickly copied by Kevin, who from it springboards to a sprightly theme and an even faster solo. His voicings here sparkle, with a dull thunk on the low notes and a firm snap on the high ones. At times the Montgomery-isms reappear, but are never intrusive; he even slashes the chords like Freddie Green at one point. Kudos to Williams for keeping up with the parade: no slouch himself on speed or invention – and Kevin still keeps the heat on with percussive comps! As with “Speak

Low”, he dabs in the occasional sour note to keep us attentive; it’s great in this context. Hurst does his a little slower than the others, but not but much – it is tangy, stately, and packs a good punch. For the solo feature, we return to “Sentimental Mood”, which in terms of tone and technique is miles beyond the version on Promise of Tomorrow. Its preface reminiscent of Burrell, Kevin blends the main theme with block chords, echoed ripples, and stunning fast sequences that threaten to collapse and never do. At times too eager to show us what he can do (the flag-waver section, amazing as it is, seems out of place in a ballad), Kevin reels it back in for the dreamy finale, accented by a flourish from Williams as it all turns to silence. A sentimental – and lasting – mood indeed. Williams’ tune “Alter Ego” sounds quite different from when James and Kevin played it the first time, when it was the title tune of Williams’ 1984 debut as a leader. On the earlier rendition Eubanks did not solo, and was restricted to a few showy comps between the sax solos; here Kevin gets the theme statement as the song’s composer strikes a montuno behind him. Following this, Williams goes grand: a quote of “Spartacus”, a skip down the keyboard, a gallop back up it – and the guitar providing a chunky drumbeat. When his turn comes, the notes come fast with a down-home twang; Williams’ backing turns fast as a re-

sult, briefly resuming the montuno. Kevin’s high-note clusters include a lot of percussive pops and slowly wend downwards; by solo’s end he decelerates and the lines acquire a Metheny-like glow, which he retains for the end-theme and the slow fade. A grand display of Kevin’s efforts in a club setting, you may be surprised at how little the crowd responds … but that doesn’t stop you from applauding at home. After a long absence from the recording studio, Kevin struck a new deal with the Mack Avenue label, the first result being 2010’s Zen Food. Recorded in his self-built home studio (“I modeled it after a studio that I liked in LA and we just didn’t build as many booths,”) the disc was recorded with his working group of the day, constructed song by song whenever had a new song to tape. In an interview Eubanks said regarding this album: “Music is … I’m not sure if it’s nourishment for the soul or if it comes from the soul, but somehow you write a song, you play it, you share it with other musicians and then you share it with everybody else.” He describes life as a circular process, where the ideas and products one consumes are given back when someone else reacts to and benefits from whatever it is you give the world. This circularity is felt warmly in “Spider Monkey Cafe”, where a nervous theme is repeated by humming strings, revised by Billy’s Pierce’s soprano and Gerry Atkins’

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Kevin Eubanks (Continued from page 9)

keys, repeated by them, soon to dissolve in a bed of Fender Rhodes, over which the guitar floats. Now in a whispering tone, Kevin hovers a while before slithering at sharp angles: his long notes are stinging, and the rapid sections positively buzz. Before long we get the theme, and a winsome Pierce whispering as the soon gently walks home. Hints of this compositional style were heard in the GRP sessions, but neither with this polish or skill. For a voice that spent 18 years familiar on TV but absent from the music stand, Zen Food is welcome indeed. Kevin’s recent release The Messenger attempts to delve deeper in his funk/soul influences, while remaining free of the commercial blandishments that marred his earlier albums. The cover sticker uses unlikely phrases (“rock-infused, blues-dipped”) to avoid calling this fusion. No need—no euphemisms necessary—all quality music that Kevin Eubanks culls from his broad vocabulary and the lexicon that comprises the various styles. A taut bass snaps hard on “Resolution”, handing off to Smitty Smith’s laid-back beat. Kevin glides his way in, first with buzzy chords, then with soft-focus notes, bouncing

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some quiet funk. Come Billy Pierce’s slippery tenor and you scratch your head: this is Coltrane’s “Resolution”, the second part of A Love Supreme, played as if it collided with James Brown’s “Soul Power”. Following this theme and a sweetly funky vamp, Pierce goes to work: a nervous hum, moving

ures that sound like a kalimba … or a music box. The theme is so simple it’s barely there, but there’s a mood, a warmth with touches of sadness … and it’s a nice place to be. Stick around for Robin’s buttery solo, a sound big as an elephant and nearly as strong. Slower and better is “The Glowing”, where Kevin’s

“Music is … I’m not sure if it’s nourishment for the soul or if it comes from the soul, but somehow you write a song, you play it, you share it with other musicians and then you share it with everybody else.” at right angles besides Eubanks’ tart chords. Kevin’s own solo goes for slippery slides, pools of echo, and a rock vibe that hints both Trane and late-’Sixties Larry Coryell. A Stax-like horn section forms the backdrop for “JB”, whose bassline invokes Mr. Superbad. As brother Robin works a burly trombone, the guitar enters outer space: we hear spiraling echoes, odd wiggly noises, Peter Frampton talk-box effects – all linked to the movements of the horn. On trumpet, Duane Eubanks takes a simpler path, floating short phrases in weary tone. Behind him, Kevin mixes it up, switching between glowing chords and flashes of wah-wah. As mood and song fade, a stronger one enters “420”: as raw-toned strings mesh in a raga-like drone, Billy’s soprano swoops, darting with swift speed and sad sound. Then the theme erupts: lots of horns, twisting Zappalike lines, and guitars at full boil. Duane’s muted strut works great in this bitches brew; like its predecessor, it exits fast before it wears out its welcome. “Led Boots” buries great snapping leads in an annoying wordless rap, while “The Messenger” gives you funk in smooth clothing. The strings keep rippling, drums and conga percolate swiftly … and Pierce at his sweetest, most confident tone. This could work on mainstream radio – and it fits your stereo as well. “M.I.N.D.” begins with a Morse-code first section, framed by straight-line horns – a pleasant theme in a cold environment. In time the mood remains as the details shift: Kevin draws slow arcs in the mode of Bill Frisell, as Billy’s tenor acquires some grit. His bitteredged solo takes little steps at quickening pace; nothing much happens but he sounds great doing it. On his turn Kevin moves energetically … nice twang and the end-licks are tasty. The ballad “Queen of Hearts” is a good deal: a slow swaying reed, with acoustic fig-

folkish strum meets Billy’s dark-end-of-thestreet moan. In time Pierce’s tone becomes warmer, the pace slower, and the lonely mood becomes romantic. As this transpires Kevin holds his notes longer, and a thick harmonic blanket covers Pierce and the listener. And you’ll want to snuggle. As good as the album’s first half is, I’d likely have changed the programming; putting all the soft tunes together makes them seem alike. “Loved One” has much the same vibe of the last two selections, only this guitar is electric and Kevin plays alone. High notes drift atop an up-and-down counterpoint; curlicue phrases end in big chords and bigger echoes. This is like a country path or the first time you held someone’s hand: the feeling is familiar even if the tune is not. And our finale is exactly what you want: a big rough-hewn slab of late-night blues. Billy is back. Kevin is strong and the album concludes leaving us with a sense of fulfillment, assimilating the lessons of the past with state-of-the-art improvisation, without any copying.

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Interview Duane Eubanks Interview by Eric Nemeyer

JI: You had the opportunity to study privately with one of the notable trumpet artists, Johnny Coles, who also hailed from Philadelphia. Talk about the mentoring that you experienced and some of the invaluable guidance you received. DE: I saw Johnny Coles every two weeks for 3 years. The information that he blessed me with is invaluable. He gave me a sense of direction when I really needed it. I was playing the trumpet but I needed that knowledgeable cat that had the experience and skills to shape the way I approach playing music. The level of respect that I have for him and his playing is through the roof. I heard first heard him at one of those all night jazz fests in Philly - I think at the Afro-American Museum. Anyway, he was performing with Bootsie Barnes and the two of them raised my awareness. I just finished college and I was listening and practicing a lot. I knew the real deal when I heard it! When I heard him, I knew immediately, if I want to play music, I’d have to get with him to learn what exactly I needed to do to see that through. He had that polish that I wanted in my playing - the warmth of his sound, his harmonic concepts really caught me. He didn’t sound like anyone that I’d heard before. He really had his own thing. I could hear the Miles influence. It wasn’t till many years later -

him I heard the track, “Child’s Play,” - he did two trumpets with Donald Byrd. So now I have that Griot-type / Master in my life - that well knowledgeable, experienced, influential person that most everyone encounters at one time in their lives. It was the perfect timing for me. Johnny got me to start thinking, when I played. He got me to focus on sound, tone, and trying to actually make a meaningful musical statement in other words: say something - when improvising. In other words, don’t play loud just because you can, don’t play fast just because you can. Make musical decisions, based on what you are trying to get across, don’t play ego. We did everything slow at our lessons. Now I realize how helpful doing something that simple was to me. I am honored and blessed to have been able to spend that much time with a Master like him. He is a major influence in my playing. I can still hear his voice when I’m practicing and his tone when I am performing. Two things he said more than often were: (1) You only need enough technique to play what you think you hear, and (2) Don’t play to impress the media, its better that the musicians talk about you. Our lessons eventually became three hour visits - even when he wasn’t in good health, I will never forget that and I try to give and help my fellow musicians and students just as he did me. He made me

“Johnny [Coles] got me to start thinking, when I played. He got me to focus on sound, tone, and trying to actually make a meaningful musical statement - in other words: say something - when improvising … don’t play loud just because you can, don’t play fast just because you can. Make musical decisions, based on what you are trying to get across, don’t play ego.” while watching a video with him, that I realized that he was actually a member of that Gil Evans / Miles Davis big band recordings. I told Sid Simmons that I heard Johnny and he suggested that I study with him. He thought it would be exactly what I needed and he was right! At another lesson, we watched Mingus with Clifford Jordan, Eric Dolphy, Jaki Byard, Dannie Richmond, and I said, “Damn the trumpeter is killing, who is he?” He says, “Thats me MF!” Then I started making other connections. I heard the Herbie Hancock recording The Prisoner, I heard some Ray Charles ... I had no idea exactly how much he did in his career. As I continued to study with 12

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realize that this information that we are blessed with is meant to be shared. JI: Could you discuss your experiences working with your brother Kevin on his new Mack Avenue CD release, The Messenger - on which you performed on trumpet on “Sister Veil,” “JB,” “420”. DE: Working with my big bro was a blast. I am so proud of him for all that he has accomplished to date. I got to see how much he works at keeping his music and image on a certain level. I am honored that he had trust in my ability and asked

me to be a part of the project. When he first moved to New York, he wound up working at a bakery to make ends meet. To go from that, to see his dreams fulfilled, and to become a musical “personality” gave me a closer look at success. It made it easier for me to see myself as being successful. I’m proud that he did the show as long as he did. A lot of musicians would initially say, “Damn! I wish I had that job.” But most wouldn’t be able to hold on to it. I’m also proud the he stayed his musical path while doing the show, he is playing his butt off these days and his band sounds incredible. He still holds onto the neighborhood funk groove concepts the he and Robin grew up playing. There were a number of neighborhood bands when they were growing up in Philly. You can hear the influence all throughout the new recording. I also got another taste of another angle of the business. We shot a video for the song “Sister Veil.” It was fun and exciting working with Kevin. Having Robin there made it even sweeter. He appears on Kevin’s new recording, The Messenger, as well. What a great feeling having my big bros by my side, doing what I love to do. Hopefully, it will happen more often. JI: What kinds of instructions or suggestions did Kevin make about this project and / or what conversations did you have that made an impact on you? DE: Kevin always has words of wisdom for me. He told me something during the recording session. I was feeling worn out about the business and I was expressing myself about the struggles of doing what we do. He said, “Man, don’t let the industry turn you into a bitter old musician. I realize how blessed I am to be able to try to spread love while doing something that I love. So these days, I try to remain grateful and thankful. I think it makes a big difference in the opportunities you get and helps with the expressiveness of your music. I think your playing becomes more tangible to others. JI: Given Kevin’s experience making music on network TV, and his being your older brother, what words of wisdom or encouragement earlier on did he offer that provided motivation or inspiration in your own artistic and career pursuits? DE: I was encouraged by simply watching my brothers slowly but surely become two of the top instrumentalists on their instruments and recognized all over the world for their accomplishments. When I was a kid, I would wonder why they practiced, what appeared to be, the same thing every day. I saw the number of hours the put practiced on a daily basis. It’s paid off. Kevin has been able to bless the stage with Roy Haynes, Sam Rivers, Dave Holland, and Art Blakey to name a few. He gave me some advice when discussing the guys he played with. I said, “I would love to hit with Roy Haynes one day.” He said, “At least you got to hit with Elvin, and he won’t be able to do that now, and to call Roy Haynes and tell him. It gave me something to think about, in this here-today / gone-tomorrow, fast-paced world we now live in. But I have yet (Continued on page 29)

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“It takes a lot more than technique to make a genuine statement playing this music.”

Interview

the distribution, online distribution, downloads, social media. It’s a whole new world—and developing and changing as we speak. It’s an ongoing learning experience. The trail is still being blazed. It’s an exciting time for musicians. But you have to be much more proactive in terms of getting your music recorded, presented and performed.

Robin Eubanks Interview by Eric Nemeyer This interview took place in March 2013 while Robin was traveling on tour with the San Francisco Jazz Collective. It was a chance to reconnect. We had both attended the same institution of higher learning, in our musical pursuits during college in Philadelphia, we had grown up in the same neighborhood, and frequently got together to play. The same pensive, thoughtful, talented and focused musician with whom I enjoyed making music in the past, continues to embody the same engaging nature and warmth. Jazz Inside: Could you discuss how your association with Dave Holland developed—one which has been prolific over the years, given your recordings and performances with his big band and other configurations? Robin Eubanks: We met back in the mid 1980s. Julian Priester who was playing in his band was leaving. Steve Coleman and Marvin “Smitty” Smith were playing with Dave at the time, and they were both good friends of mine. They recommended me to Dave. So I went to the rehearsal and he gave me the dates for the gigs, and I’ve been playing with him ever since. There was actually about a ten year gap where we didn’t play together. Then he started the quintet, that I’m still working with—and that started about fifteen years ago. It’s been an ongoing friendship and musical development. JI: What are some of the most important ideas you’ve picked up working with Dave Holland during this time? RE: One of the things is the idea of just going for what you want to do, and trusting the musicians that you’re playing with to bring their own thing to the music, and without hampering them, or giving them too many guidelines or limits, and giving them room. He obviously got that from Miles [Davis]. Just about every recording I’ve done with him except for one, I’ve contributed compositions. He always asks people in the band to bring in music to record. It was a very nurturing type of situation. Other guys were able to bring their personalities into the band and those became a part of the sound of the band. JI: That’s very supportive to be able to aspire to your highest level and allow your own voice shine through. RE: You have to start with good musicians and then let them bring what they’re going to bring. You probably get more out of musicians when you’re not trying to reign them in and maintain control over them. JI: How was playing in Dave Holland’s big band different from playing in other big bands? 14

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RE: It was a function of the material we were playing. A lot of it was the quintet material that was expanded to big band, It wasn’t as traditional sounding as other big bands—like your typical big band type music. It was big band music—but opened up with the concepts we were using in the quintet. We won a Grammy for each of the two big band albums. I’ve played in lot and lot and lots of big bands—so it was different. JI: Talk about your groups—EB3 and Mental Images—and the concepts behind each of those. RE: Mental Images is a quartet and quintet setting where I use a lot of electronics. And open it up into various configurations and formats. I also

JI: What kinds of challenges have you experienced as you’ve taken on the role of leader and business person for your projects? RE: You have to get managers and agents, find venues and avenues to have people help you present your music. In New York, for instance, the jazz club scene is nowhere near what it was like when I first got there. I used to do a week or two at Sweet Basil with Abdullah Ibrahim or Art Blakey. A number of those clubs don’t exist anymore, and the numbers of clubs that have jazz for a whole week is way down. When I explain it to young musicians now, you could see how they might be a little pessimistic. But when you’re young you think you’re going to set the world on fire, “Wait till they hear me!” It’s

“the mentoring doesn’t exist like it did when I was coming up. There were established elders like Betty Carter and Art Blakey who were mentoring younger musicians … Now people are starting out by presenting already-formed groups of your peers. So there is a certain passing down of information that is skipped.” use percussion, and electronics with the trombone. EB3 is much more experimental. It’s a trio—but everyone takes on the role of two people. There is no dedicated bass player in the band. When I use Kenwood Dennard on drums, he could play keyboards and bass as well. Sometimes I might play the keyboard bass parts to free up the others. JI: What have you discovered about business by producing and releasing your own albums, leading and being in charge of people and activities, planning and finance? RE: I think they need to have more classes at schools about this. They teach you how to play. In today’s music and business environment, there needs to be more focus on what it takes to get your music out and be performing. It’s lacking, but developing. The recording industry has changed drastically in the last ten to twenty years. The thing that’s best about it is that now you can own your own material. In the past, musicians didn’t usually own their own masters. You can do a lot on your own to cut costs and enter into relationships with people who can help you out. It’s much more of a hands on thing. In the past, you went to record, and maybe you got to mix the recording, and you might have even been limited with that. Now musicians are much more involved in the whole process—including

still possible, But the supply and demand curve is way in the promoters; or club owners’ advantage. JI: I agree that among the advantages are the opportunities to control one’s own music and its presentation. As you referenced, the marketplace for this music is supply-side heavy. So while there are more opportunities to control one’s art, there is less filtering out of not-yet-ready-forprime-time musicians and recordings—which has to muddy the waters, and make it more difficult for far more advanced professionals. RE: True. Some are so anxious to put their stuff out there, they’ll play for free. JI: And, then what’s the inducement on the part of promoters, venue operators, business people—once they are conditioned to know that they can get it free? RE: That’s a problem. On the other hand, people do find ways to navigate through the muddied waters, as you put it—and rise above it. But it takes a lot of perseverance and dedication and sacrifice to make it through. The other side of things is that the mentoring doesn’t exist like it did when I was coming up. There were established elders like Betty Carter and Art Blakey who were mentoring younger musicians. You’d (Continued on page 30)

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Calendar of Events How to Get Your Gigs and Events Listed in Jazz Inside Magazine Submit your listings via e-mail to [email protected] Include date, times, location, phone, tickets/reservations. Deadline: 15th of the month preceding publication (Apr 15 for May) (We cannot guarantee the publication of all calendar submissions.

ADVERTISING: Reserve your ads to promote your events and get the marketing advantage of controlling your own message — size, content, image, identity, photos and more. Contact the advertising department: 215-887-8880 [email protected] NEW YORK CITY  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Woody Allen and the Eddy Davis New Orleans Jazz Band at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 PM. 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600. www.thecarlyle.com  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Kat Gang with Joe Young at Arcane Bistro, 7:00 PM. 111 Avenue C. 212-777-0477.  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Richie Cannata Jam Session at The Bitter End, 11:45 PM. 147 Bleecker Street (bet. Thompson and LaGuardia.) 212-673-7030. www.bitterend.com  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Grove Street Stompers at Arthur’s Tavern, 7:00 PM. 57 Grove Street. 212-675-6879.  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Cole Ramstad and the Chinatown All Stars at Apotheke, 10:30 PM. 9 Doyers Street. 212-406-0400  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Tom Abbott Big Bang Big Band at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554.  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks at Sofia’s, Edison Hotel, 8:00 PM. 228 West 47th Street, 212-840-5000. www.edisonhotelnyc.com  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Swing Dance Night with the Cotton Club All Stars at The Cotton Club, 8:30 PM. 656 West 125th Street. 212-663-7980. www.cottonclub-newyork.com  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Jam Session with Iris Ornig at Kitano, 8:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119.  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Bemelmans’ Bar, Hotel Carlyle.

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Earl Rose at 5:30 PM; Earl Rose Trio at 9:00 PM. 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600. www.thecarlyle.com Mon 4/1, 4/15, 4/29: Shoshana Bush at Anyway Cafe, 8:30 PM. 34 East 2nd Street (corner of 2nd Avenue.) 212-533-3412. Tue 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30: Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks at Sofia’s, Edison Hotel, 8:00 PM. 228 West 47th Street, Tue 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30: Bemelmans’ Bar, Hotel Carlyle. Chris Gillespie at 5:30 PM; David Budway Trio at 9:30 PM. 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600. www.thecarlyle.com Tue 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30: Yuichi Hirakawa House Band at Arthur’s Tavern, 7:00 PM. 57 Grove Street. 212-675-6879. Tue 4/2, 4/9: Michika Fukumori Solo Piano at Kitano, 8:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com Tue 4/2 – Sat 4/6 Pat Martino Organ Trio at Birdland, 8:30 and 11:00 PM. 315 West 44th Street. Tue 4/2 Jerry Costanzo CD Release Party: ‘Invitation’ at The Metropolitan Room, 7:00 PM. 34 West 22nd Street. 212-2060440. www.metropolitanroom.com Tue 4/2 Paquito D’Rivera with Juilliard Jazz Ensemble at Paul Hall, The Juilliard School, 8:00 PM. 60 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023. 212-799-5000. events.juilliard.edu Tue 4/2 Lou Volpe Group at NYC Baha’i Center, 8:00 and 9:30 PM. 53 East 11th Street. 212-222-5159. www.bahainyc.org/Page/ Jazz-Night.aspx Tue 4/2 Ralph Lemon and Arturo O’Farrill Perform John

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Cage’s “How to Get Started” at Leonard Nimoy Thalia, Symphony Space, 7:30 PM. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street. 212-8645400. www.symphonyspace.org Tue 4/2 Somethin’ Jazz. Troy Roberts Quartet at 7:00 PM; Alex DeZenzo Trioat 9:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Ave.) 212-371-7657. www.somethinjazz.com Tue 4/2 Joe’s Pub. Ryan Keberle and Catharsis CD Release Party at 7:00 PM; J. P. Jofre Hard Tango Chamber Band at 9:30 PM. 435 Lafayette Street. 212-539-8778. www.joespub.com Tue 4/2 Peter Bernstein Quintet with Jimmy Cobb, Harold Mabern, and Frank Wess at 54 Below, 7:00 and 9:15 PM. Lower level, 254 West 54th Street. 646-476-3551. www.54below.com Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Louis Armstrong Centennial Band at Birdland, 5:30 PM. 315 West 44th Street. Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Julie Milgram Trio at Lime Leaf Restaurant, 7:00 PM. 128 West 72nd Street. 212-501-7800. Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Jazz Vocalist Series at Zeb’s, 8:00 PM. Martina da Silva on 4/3, Laura Brunner on 4/10, TBA on 4/17, Rachelle Collins and Jay Leonhart on 4/24. Second Floor, 223 West 28th Street. 212-695-8081. Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Reggie Woods with Greg Lewis at Sapphire, 7:00 PM. 333 East 60th Street. 212-421-3600. Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Los Hacheros at Pulqueria, 9:00 PM. 11 Doyers Street. 212-227-3099. www.pulquerianyc.com Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Tiger Town Five and The Stan Rubin Orchestra at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Roger Davidson at Caffe Vivaldi, 7:30 PM. 32 Jones Street. 212-691-7538. www.caffevivaldi.com Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Smokin’ Billy Slater at Edison Rum House, 8:30 PM. 228 West 47th Street. 646-490-6924. Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Jason Marshall Organ Trio at American Legion Post #398, 7:30 PM. 248 West 132nd Street. 212283-9701. www.colchasyoungharlempost398.com Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Avalon Jazz Quartet at Apotheke, 8:00 PM. 9 Doyers Street. 212-406-0400. www.apothekenyc.com Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Kat Gang at The Rose Club, Plaza Hotel, 9:00 PM. Corner of Fifth Avenue and Central Park South. 212-759-3000. www.fairmont.com/the-plaza-new-york/ Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Arthur’s Tavern. Eve Silber at 7:00 PM; Alyson Williams with Arthur’s House Band at 10:00 PM. 57 Grove Street. 212-675-6879. www.arthurstavernnyc.com

 Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Pedrito Martinez Band at Guantanamera, 9:00 PM. 939 Eighth Avenue. 212-262-5354.  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Bemelmans’ Bar, Hotel Carlyle. Chris Gillespie at 5:30 PM; David Budway Trio at 9:30 PM. 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600. www.thecarlyle.com  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/24: Cafe Jazz at Myers Recording Studio, Manhattan School of Music, 8:00 PM. (4/3 show at 7:30 PM; 4/10 show at Ades Performance Space.)120 Claremont Avenue. 212-749-2802. www.msmnyc.edu  Wed 4/3 Jim Ridl Trio at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com  Wed 4/3 Oscar Peñas at Casa Mezcal, 8:30 PM. 86 Orchard Street. 212-777-2600. www.casamezcalny.com  Wed 4/3 The Stingers at Club Groove, 9:00 PM. 125 MacDougal Street. 212-354-9393. www.clubgroovenyc.com  Wed 4/3 Somethin’ Jazz. Scott Albertson Trio at 7:00 PM; Harrison Young Quartet at 9:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Ave.) 212-371-7657. www.somethinjazz.com  Wed 4/3 Melanie Marod at Flute Bar Gramercy, 7:00 PM. 40 East 20th Street. 212-529-7870. www.facebook.com/flutegramercy  Wed 4/3 Xiomara Laugart at Joe’s Pub, 9:30 PM. 435 Lafayette Street. 212-539-8778. www.joespub.com  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Lauren Henderson Trio at Millesime, 7:00 PM. 92 Madison Avenue. 212-889-7100.  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Lapis Luna at The Rose Club, Plaza Hotel, 8:30 PM. Corner of Fifth Avenue and Central Park South. 212-759-3000. www.fairmont.com/the-plaza-new-york/  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Dandy Wellington and His Band at Ella Lounge, 6:30 PM. 9 Avenue A (bet. 1st and 2nd Streets.) 212777-2230. www.ellalounge.com  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Tiffany Chang Trio at Lime Leaf Restaurant, 7:00 PM. 128 West 72nd Street. 212-501-7800.  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Arthur’s Tavern. Eri Yamamoto Jazz Trio at 7:00 PM; Sweet Georgia Brown with Off the Hook at 10:00 PM. 57 Grove Street. 212-675-6879. www.arthurstavernnyc.com  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Pedrito Martinez Band at Guantanamera, 9:00 PM. 939 Eighth Avenue. 212-262-5354. www.guantannmerany.com  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Bemelmans’ Bar, Hotel Carlyle. Chris Gillespie at 5:30 PM; David Budway Trio at 9:30 PM. 35 East

76th Street. 212-744-1600. www.thecarlyle.com  Thu 4/4, 4/11: Felix and the Cats at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554. www.swing46.com  Thu 4/4, 4/25: Trio Cachimba at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM. 228 West 47th Street. 646-490-6924. www.edisonrumhouse.com  Thu 4/4 Joe Russo/ Greg Lewis Trio at The Edge, 8:00 PM. 95 East 3rd Street. 212-477-2940.  Thu 4/4 Uptown Jazz at 95th Street: CCNY Jazz Students at Thalia Bar, Symphony Space, 8:30 PM. Free. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street. 212-864-5400. www.symphonyspace.org  Thu 4/4 Asako at The Metropolitan Room, 7:00 PM. 34 West 22nd Street. 212-206-0440. www.metropolitanroom.com  Thu 4/4 Juilliard Jazz Ensemble: The Jewish-African American Jazz Experience at Jewish Theological Seminary, 7:30 PM. Free tickets available to Juilliard and JTS students. 3080 Broadway. 212-678-8000. events.juilliard.edu ; www.jtsa.edu  Thu 4/4 Wilson “Chembo” Corneil at Nuyorican Poets Cafe, 9:00 PM. 236 East 3rd Street. 212-505-8183. www.nuyorican.org  Thu 4/4 Janis Siegel/ John DiMartino Duo at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119.  Thu 4/4 Fat Cat. Alex Hoffman Quintet at 7:00 PM; Saul Rubin’s ZEBTET at 10:00 PM; After Hours Session at 1:30 AM. 75 Christopher Street at 7th Avenue. 212-675-6056.  Thu 4/4 The Bar Next Door. Kevin Wang Trio at 6:30 PM; Varmus/Thomson/Assadullahi, 8:30, 10:30. 129 MacDougal St.  Thu 4/4 Julian Fleisher at Joe’s Pub, 9:30 PM. 435 Lafayette Street. 212-539-8778. www.joespub.com  Thu 4/4 Somethin’ Jazz. Shoko & Friends at 7:00 PM; Billy Carrion Jr. at 9:00 PM; Minority of One featuring German Gonzalez at 11:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Ave.) 212-371-7657. www.somethinjazz.com  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Birdland Big Band at Birdland, 5:00 PM. 315 West 44th Street.  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Gerardo Contino y sus Habaneros at Guantanamera, 9:00 PM. 939 Eighth Avenue. 212-262-5354. www.guantannmerany.com  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Richie Cannata at Tao Restaurant, 10:00 PM. 42 East 58 th Street. 212-888-2288. www.taorestaurant.com  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Arthur’s Tavern. Eri Yamamoto Jazz Trio at 7:00 PM; Sweet Georgia Brown with Off the Hook at

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

10:00 PM. 57 Grove Street. 212-675-6879.  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Bemelmans’ Bar, Hotel Carlyle. Chris Gillespie at 5:30 PM; David Budway Trio at 9:30 PM. 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600. www.thecarlyle.com  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Lauren Henderson Trio at Millesime, 7:00 PM. 92 Madison Avenue. 212889-7100. www.millesimenyc.com  Fri 4/5, 4/26: Ron Sunshine and Full Swing at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street.  Fri 4/5 – Sat 4/6 Portraits of the Jazz Saxophone: Branford Marsalis with special guest Ali Jackson and the YES! Trio at Rose Theater, Lincoln Center, 8:00 PM. Corner of Broadway and 60th Street. 212-721-6500. www.jalc.org  Fri 4/5 – Sat 4/6 Duduka Da Fonseca Quintet with Helio Alves at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com  Fri 4/5 – Sat 4/6 Rob Duquay at Knickerbocker Bar and Grill, 9:30 PM. 33 University Place.  Fri 4/5 Nadje Noordhuis Trio at The Metropolitan Room, 11:30 PM. 34 West 22nd Street.  Fri 4/5 Fat Cat. Tad Ronen Quartet at 6:00 PM; David Gibson/Jared Gold B-3 Organ Band at 10:30 PM; After Hours Session at 1:30 AM. 75 Christopher Street at 7th Avenue. 212-675-6056.  Fri 4/5 Wycliffe Gordon’s Within Our Gates: A Live Orchestral Accompaniment to Oscar Micheaux’ 1920 Silent Film at Peter Jay Sharp Theatre, Symphony Space, 8:00 PM. Performers include Aaron Diehl, Bria Skonberg, Brianna Thomas, Milton Suggs, and Will and Pete Anderson. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street. 212-864-5400. www.symphonyspace.org  Fri 4/5 Willie Villegas y Entre Amigos at SOB’s, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 200 Varick Street.  Fri 4/5 Drom. Allaturca with Husnu Selendirici at 8:00 PM; Ilhan Ersahin’s Wonderland with Husnu Selendiriciat 12:00 midnight. 85 Avenue A (bet. 5th and 6th Streets.) 212-777-1157.  Fri 4/5 The Hot Sardines at Joe’s Pub, 9:30 PM. 435 Lafayette Street. 212-539-8778.  Fri 4/5 Somethin’ Jazz. Ladies Day Trio at 7:00 PM; Hye-Jeung at 9:00 PM; Billy Kaye Quartet at 11:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Ave.) 212-371-7657. www.somethinjazz.com  Fri 4/5 Mimi Jones Trio at Thalia Bar, Symphony Space, 8:30 PM. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street.  Fri 4/5 Richard Boukas Trio at The Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, and 11:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street.  Fri 4/5 Battle of the Boroughs: The Bronx at The Greene Space, 7:00 PM. Artists include marieclaire and Captains of Industry. 44 Charlton Street. 646-829-4000. www.thegreenespace.org  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Arthur’s Tavern. Eri Yamamoto Jazz Trio at 7:00 PM; Alyson Williams with Arthur’s House Band at 10:00 PM. 57 Grove Street. 212-675-6879. www.arthurstavernnyc.com  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Mal Stein at Cupping Room Cafe, 9:00 PM. 359 West Broadway.  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Avalon Jazz Band at Matisse, 8:00 PM. 924 Second Avenue at 49th Street. 212-546-9300. www.matissenyc.com  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Saint Peter’s Church. New York Jazz Academy: Big Band Workshop at 10:00 AM; Vocal Jazz Workshop at 12:00 noon. 619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street. 212-935-2200. www.saintpeters.org  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Dandy Wellington and His Band at Hotel Chantelle, 12:00 noon. 92 Ludlow Street. 212-254-9100. www.hotelchantelle.com  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: The Adventures of Maya the Bee: A Jazz Puppet Show Composed by Nancy Harrow and Arranged by Roland Hanna at Culture Project Theater, 10:30 AM. 49 Bleecker Street, Suite 602. 212-925-1806. www.cultureproject.org  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Gerardo Contino y sus Habaneros at Guantanamera, 9:00 PM. 939 Eighth Avenue. 212-262-5354. www.guantannmerany.com  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Zeb’s. Cobi Narita Presents Jazz Movies – Vocalists and Tap Dancers. Film Screening at 1:00 PM. (Titles TBA); Vocal and Tap Dance Jam Session featuring The Frank Owens Singers at 3:00 PM. Second Floor, 223 West 28th Street. 212-695-8081.  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Bemelmans’ Bar, Hotel Carlyle. Chris Gillespie at 5:30 PM; David Budway Trio at 9:30 PM. 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600. www.thecarlyle.com  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20: Columbia University Student Combos at Thalia Bar, Symphony Space, 8:30 PM. Free. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street. 212-864-5400. www.symphonyspace.org  Sat 4/6 Somethin’ Jazz. New York Jazz Academy Big Band Rehearsal at 2:00 PM; Joshua Trinidad Quartet at 5:00 PM; Hiromi Kasuga Band at 7:00 PM; John Lester “Jazz?” Quartet with Dayna Stephens at 9:00 PM; Yuko Okamoto at 11:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Ave.)  Sat 4/6 Metropolitan Room. Keith Dames: Happy Birthday, Lady Day at 7:00 PM; Zig Zag Quartet and Ballroom Dancers: Latin Soul at 11:30 PM. 34 West 22nd Street. 212-206-0440. www.metropolitanroom.com  Sat 4/6 Taking a Chance on Love: The Music of Vernon Duke at Kaufmann Concert Hall, 92nd Street Y, 8:00 PM. Vocalists include James Clow, Rebecca Luker, Erin Mackey, and Matthew Scott. Corner of Lexington Avenue and 92nd Street. 212-415-5500. www.92y.org  Sat 4/6 Wadada Leo Smith and Angelica Sanchez at Greenwich House, 8:00 PM. 224 West 30th Street, Suite 302. 212-991-0003. www.greenwichhouse.org  Sat 4/6 Fat Cat. Phil Stewart Quintet at 7:00 PM; David Weiss’ Point of Departure at 10:00 PM; Aft Hours Session at 1:30 AM. 75 Christopher Street at 7th Avenue. 212-675-6056. www.fatcatmusic.org  Sat 4/6 A Walk Through Musical Harlem: A Tour Conducted by Historian John T. Reddick, beginning in front of Apollo Theater, 1:00 PM. Comfortable shoes suggested. 253 West 125th Street  Sat 4/6 Irini Res and the Jazz Mix at Sugar Bar, 8:00 PM. 254 West 72nd Street. 212-579-0222.  Sat 4/6 Crescent City Maulers at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554.  Sat 4/6 Rome Neal’s Banana Puddin’ Jazz Jam at Nuyorican Poets Cafe, 9:00 PM. 236 East 3rd Street. 212-505-8183. www.nuyorican.org  Sat 4/6 J. C. Hopkins Trio with Marintina DaSilva at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM. 228 West 47th  Sat 4/6 Melissa Aldana Trio at The Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, and 11:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street.  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Birdland Jazz Party featuring John Hart Quartet and guest vocalist (Molly Ryan on 4/7; Cyrille Aimee on 4/14, 4/21 and 4/28) at Birdland, 6:00 PM. 315 West 44th Street.  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Bob Kindred Trio at Cafe Loup, 12:30 PM. 105 West 13th Street. 212-2254746. www.cafeloupnyc.com  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: The Smithfield Sunday Session featuring the Ken Foley/ Nick Hempton Quartet at Smithfield, 8:30 PM. 215 West 28th Street. 212-564-2172. www.smithfieldnyc.com  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Avalon Jazz Band at The Lambs Club, 11:00 AM. 132 West 44th Street (bet. Broadway and 6th Avenue.) 212-997-5262. www.thelambsclub.com  Sun 4/7, 4/11, 4/21, 4/28: Forroteria at Millesime, 8:00 PM. 92 Madison Avenue. 212-889-7100.  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Jam Session at American Legion Post #398, 7:00 PM. 248 West 132nd Street. 212-283-9701. www.colchasyoungharlempost398.com  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Gabrielle Stravelli at Le Pescadeux, 12:30 PM. 90 Thompson Street. 212 Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Juan Carlos Formel y su son Radical at Guantanamera, 9:00 PM. 939 Eighth Avenue. 212-262-5354. www.guantannmerany.com  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Tony Middleton Trio at Kitano, 11AM,1PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th St  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Junior Mance Trio at Cafe Loup, 6:30 PM. 105 West 13th Street. 212-225To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

17

and his 17 piece big band The NY State of the Art Jazz Ensemble

April 2013

All Shows on Tuesdays at 8:00 PM April 2: Lou Volpe Group April 9: Falkner Evans Quintet April 16: French Exchange Students Jazz Ens. April 23: Gary Morgan’s Panamericana April 30: Charli Persip and Super Sound Big Band

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4746. www.cafeloupnyc.com  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Bemelmans’ Bar, Hotel Carlyle. Earl Rose at 5:30 PM; Jim Caruso/ Billy Stritch Trio at 9:00 PM. 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600. www.thecarlyle.com  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Harlem School of the Arts Student Combos at Thalia Bar, Symphony Space, 7:00 PM. Free. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street. 212-864-5400. www.symphonyspace.org  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Creole Cooking Jazz Band at Arthur’s Tavern, 7:00 PM. 57 Grove Street. 212-675-6879.  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Arturo O’Farrill Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra at Birdland, 9:00 and 11:00 PM. 315 West 44th Street.  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Peter Mazza Trio at The Bar Next Door, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945.  Sun 4/7, 4/21: Swingadelic at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554. www.swing46.com  Sun 4/7 – Mon 4/8 Taking a Chance on Love: The Music of Vernon Duke at Kaufmann Concert Hall, 92nd Street Y, 2:00 and 7:00 PM. (4/8 evening show at 7:30 PM.) Vocalists include James Clow, Rebecca Luker, Erin Mackey, and Matthew Scott. Corner of Lexington Avenue and 92nd Street. 212-415-5500. www.92y.org  Sun 4/7 Andrea Brachfield and Phoenix Rising Jazz at Manna House, 4:00 PM. 338 East 106th Street (bet. 1st and 2nd Avenues.) 212-722-8223. www.mannahousejazz.org  Sun 4/7 Drums of Passion Drum and Dance Troupe: A Tribute to Babatunde Olatunji at Peter Jay Sharp Theatre, Symphony Space, 6:00 PM. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street. 212-864-5400. www.symphonyspace.org  Sun 4/7 Keiko Matsui at B. B. King Blues Club, 8:00 PM. 237 West 42nd Street. 212-997-4144. www.bbkingblues.com  Sun 4/7 Deana Witkowski Trio at Park Avenue Christian Church, 11:00 AM. 1010 Park Avenue at 85th Street.  Sun 4/7 Emily Braden Trio at North Square Lounge, 12:30 and 2:00 PM. 103 Waverly Place. 212-254-1200.  Sun 4/7 David Grisman and Andy Statman at City Winery, 8:00 PM. 155 Varick Street. 212-608-0555.  Sun 4/7 Edison Rum House. “Happy Birthday, Billie Holiday!” featuring Kuni Mikami Trio and vocalists TBA at 2:00 PM; Candy Shop Boys at 9:30 PM. 228 West 47th St.  Mon 4/8 The Bar Next Door. Alex Sugerman Trio at 6:30 PM; Magos Herrera Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St  Mon 4/8 Yuhan Su with special guest Greg Osby at The Metropolitan Room, 11:30 PM. 34 West 22nd Street.  Mon 4/8 M.A.S. Featuring Michael O’Brien at Somethin’ Jazz, 9:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Ave.)  Mon 4/8 David Grisman and Frank Vignola at City Winery, 8:00 PM. 155 Varick Street. 212-608-0555.  Mon 4/8 Evening of Saxophones at Greenfield Hall, Manhattan School of Music, 7:30 PM. 120 Claremont Avenue.  Tue 4/9, 4/16, 4/23: Saul Rubin’s ZEBTET at Fat Cat, 7:00 PM. 75 Christopher Street at 7th Avenue. 212-675-6056.  Tue 4/9 – Sat 4/13 John Pizzarelli Quartet with Special Guest Bucky Pizzarelli at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 PM. (Additional 4/13 show at 10:45 PM.) 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600  Tue 4/9 – Sat 4/13 Kevin Eubanks at Birdland, 8:30 and 11:00 PM. 315 West 44th Street.  Tue 4/9 Barbara Carroll Quartet with Ken Peplowski at 54 Below, 7:00 and 9:15 PM. Lower level, 254 West 54th Street. 646476-3551. www.54below.com  Tue 4/9 Brian Culbertson at B. B. King Blues Club, 8:00 PM. 237 West 42nd Street. 212-997-4144. www.bbkingblues.com  Tue 4/9 Somethin’ Jazz. Cecilia Coleman Quintet at 7:00 PM; Chico Batera Trio with Helio Alves and Nilson Matta at 9:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Ave.)  Tue 4/9 Falkner Evans Quintet at NYC Baha’i Center, 8:00 and 9:30 PM. 53 East 11th Street. 212-222-5159. www.bahainyc.org/ Page/Jazz-Night.aspx  Tue 4/9 Avalon Jazz Band at Brasserie Beaumarchais, 7:00 PM. 409 West 13th Street. 212-675-2400.  Tue 4/9 The Bar Next Door. Alex LoRe Trio at 6:30 PM; Hendrik Meurkens Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.  Tue 4/9 Cafe Jazz at Myers Recording Studio, Manhattan School of Music, 7:30 PM. 120 Claremont Avenue. 212-7492802. www.msmnyc.edu  Wed 4/10 Lou Caputo Not-So-Big Band at Saint Peter’s Church, 1:00 PM. 619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street.  Wed 4/10 Charnett Moffett at The Metropolitan Room, 11:30 PM. 34 West 22nd Street. 212-206-0440.  Wed 4/10 Art Lande Quartet at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com  Wed 4/10 The Bar Next Door. Jeff McLaughlin Trio at 6:30 PM; Jonathan Kreisberg Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal  Thu 4/11 – Fri 4/12 Adam O’Farrill at Thalia Bar, Symphony Space, 8:30 PM. Free. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street.  Thu 4/11 Haruna Fuazawa Trio with Michika Fukumori at Tomi

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Jazz, 9:00 PM. Lower level, 239 East 53rd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Avenues.) 646-497-1254. www.tomijazz.com Thu 4/11 Jeron White Quartet at The Metropolitan Room, 11:30 PM. 34 West 22nd Street. 212-206-0440. Thu 4/11 Bob Rodriguez Trio at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com Thu 4/11 Joe’s Pub. Hot Club of Cowtown at 7:30 PM; Chicha Libre: Cuatro Tigres EP Release Party at 9:30 PM. 435 Lafayette Street. 212-539-8778. www.joespub.com Thu 4/11 Somethin’ Jazz. Yuka Mito at 7:00 PM; Rob Reich at 9:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street Thu 4/11 Mark Whitfield and James Genus at 78 Below, 10:00 PM. 380 Columbus Avenue. 212-724-7800. www.78below.com Thu 4/11 Emily Asher’s Garden Party at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM. 228 West 47th Street. Thu 4/11 Cafe Jazz at Myers Recording Studio, Manhattan School of Music, 7:30 PM. 120 Claremont Avenue. Thu 4/11 The Bar Next Door. O’Farrill Brothers Trio at 6:30 PM; Jonathan Greenstein Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Thu 4/11 Charnett Moffett at Birdland, 6:00 PM. 315 West 44th St Fri 4/12, 4/19: George Gee Swing Orchestra at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554. www.swing46.com Fri 4/12 – Sat 4/13 Steve Ash at Knickerbocker Bar and Grill, 9:30 PM. 33 University Place. 212-228-8490. www.knickerbockerbarandgrill.com Fri 4/12 – Sat 4/13 The Bad Plus with Bill Frisell at Rose Theater, Lincoln Center, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. Corner of Broadway and 60th Street. 212-721-6500. www.jalc.org Fri 4/12 – Sat 4/13 Dick Hyman/ Ken Peplowski Duo at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com Fri 4/12 Grupo Arcano at SOB’s, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 200 Varick Street. 212-243-4940. www.sobs.com Fri 4/12 Fred Hersch at Jazz and Contemporary Music Performance Space, The New School, 4:00 PM. Free. Fifth Floor, 55 West 13th Street. 212-229-5682. www.newschool.edu/jazz/ Fri 4/12 Afro-Latin-Caribbean Dance Party: Aurelio Martinez at SOB’s, 12:00 midnight and 2:00 AM. 200 Varick Street. 212-2434940. www.sobs.com Fri 4/12 Hunter College Choir and West Point Cadets: An Ellington Sacred Concert at Hunter College Assembly Hall, 7:30 PM. Vocalists include Alexis Cole. North Building, corner of 68th Street and Lexington Avenue. Fri 4/12 Broadway Brassy with Broc Hempbel at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM. 228 West 47th Street. 646-490-6924. Fri 4/12 Nir Felder Trio at The Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, and 11:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945. Fri 4/12 The Art of the Duo: Jane Ira Bloom and Fred Hersch at Wollman Hall, The New School, 1:00 PM. Free; reservations required. 65 West 11th Street. 212-229-5682. Sat 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Peter Sparacino at Harlem Tavern, 12:00 noon. 2153 Frederick Douglass Boulevard (at 116th Street.) 212866.4500. www.harlemtavern.com Sat 4/13 Paul Bollenback Trio at The Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, and 11:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945. Sat 4/13 April May and Eternity at Sugar Bar, 8:00 PM. 254 West 72nd Street. 212-579-0222. www.sugarbarnyc.com

  Sat 4/13 Swingadelic at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554. www.swing46.com  Sun 4/14, 4/28: Ray Abrams Big Band at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554. www.swing46.com  Sun 4/14, 4/28: Roz Corral Trio at North Square Lounge, 12:30 and 2:00 PM. 103 Waverly Place. 212-254-1200.  Sun 4/14 Azande Cummings’ Aze Jazz Band at The Metropolitan Room, 11:30 PM. 34 West 22nd Street. 212-206-0440.  Sun 4/14 Jazz Vespers: Deanna Witkowski Quartet at Saint Peter’s Church, 5:00 PM. 619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street. 212-935-2200. www.saintpeters.org  Sun 4/14 Klezmer Brunch: Matt Temkin’s Yiddishe Jam Band at City Winery, 11:00 AM. 155 Varick Street. 212-608-0555.  Sun 4/14 Charnett Moffett CD Release Party at Joe’s Pub, 9:30 PM. 435 Lafayette Street. 212-539-8778. www.joespub.com  Mon 4/15 The Bar Next Door. Tom Finn Trio at 6:30 PM; Linda Ciofalo with John Hart and Harvie S at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945. www.lalanternacaffe.com  Mon 4/15 Convergence by Karen Chilton: A Staged Reading by Sharon Washington and Reg E. Cathey with Music by Xavier Davis at Joe’s Pub, 6:30 PM. 435 Lafayette Street. 212-5398778.  Tue 4/16 – Sat 4/20 John Scofield ‘Hollow Body Band’ featuring Mike Stern at Birdland, 8:30 and 11:00 PM. 315 West 44th St.  Tue 4/16 – Sat 4/20 John Pizzarelli Quartet with Special Guest Bucky Pizzarelli at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 PM. (Additional 4/20 show

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

at 10:45 PM.) 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600  Tue 4/16 The Bar Next Door. Aleksi Glick Trio at 6:30 PM; Tom Tallitsch Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street.  Tue 4/16 B. B. King at B. B. King Blues Club, 8:00 PM. 237 West 42nd Street. 212-997-4144. www.bbkingblues.com  Tue 4/16 Stephen Feifke Solo Piano at Kitano, 8:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com  Tue 4/16 Juilliard Jazz Ensembles at Paul Hall, the Juilliard School, 8:00 PM. 60 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023. 212-799-5000. events.juilliard.edu  Tue 4/16 French Exchange Students Jazz Ensemble at NYC Baha’i Center, 8:00 and 9:30 PM. 53 East 11th Street. 212-2225159. www.bahainyc.org/Page/Jazz-Night.aspx  Tue 4/16 Eddie Palmieri Septet at 54 Below, 7:00 and 9:15 PM. Lower level, 254 West 54th Street. 646-476-3551.  Wed 4/17 Manhattan School of Music Chamber Jazz Ensemble with special guest Dave Liebman at Ades Performance Space, Manhattan School of Music, 7:30 PM. 120 Claremont Avenue. 212-749-2802. www.msmnyc.edu  Wed 4/17 Melissa Hamilton/ Ratzo Harris Duo at Saint Peter’s Church, 1:00 PM. 619 Lexington Ave at 54th Street. 212-935-2200.  Wed 4/17 Tyshawn Sorey Quartet at Greenwich House, 8:00 PM. 224 West 30th Street, Suite 302. 212-991-0003.  Wed 4/17 Shoshana Bush at The Lambs Club, 7:30 PM. 132 West 44th Street (bet. Broadway and 6th Avenue.) 212-997-5262. www.thelambsclub.com  Wed 4/17 The Bar Next Door. Ben Flocks Trio at 6:30 PM; Jonathan Kreisberg Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal  Wed 4/17 The Duke Ellington Society at Saint Peter’s Church, 7:00 PM. 619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street. 212-935-2200.  Wed 4/17 Andrea Veneziani Trio at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com  Thu 4/18, 4/25: Manhattan School of Music Guitar/Bass Duos at Thalia Bar, Symphony Space, 8:30 PM. Free. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street. 212-864-5400. www.symphonyspace.org  Thu 4/18 Joe Temperley Celebrates Duke Ellington at Leonard Nimoy Thalia, Symphony Space, 8:00 PM. Artists include Richard Wyands, Warren Vache, Brianna Thomas, John Webber, and Leroy WIlliams. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street. 212-864-5400. www.symphonyspace.org  Thu 4/18 The Bar Next Door. Nick Finzer Trio at 6:30 PM; Ben Monder Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212529-5945. www.lalanternacaffe.com  Thu 4/18 Grand Street Stompers at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM. 228 West 47th Street. 646-490-6924. www.edisonrumhouse.com  Thu 4/18 Hector Martignon at Nuyorican Poets Cafe, 9:00 PM. 236 East 3rd Street. 212-505-8183. www.nuyorican.org  Thu 4/18 Daryl Sherman Trio with Harvie S at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com  Fri 4/19 – Sat 4/20 Kings of the Crescent City featuring Victor Goines, Marcus Printup, and others at Rose Theater, Lincoln Center, 8:00 PM. (Free discussion preceding the concert at 7:00 PM) Corner of Broadway and 60th Street. 212-721-6500. www.jalc.org  Fri 4/19 Jazzmobile Big Band directed by Jimmy Heath at Peter Jay Sharp Theatre, Symphony Space, 8:00 PM. 2537 Broadway at 95th Street. 212-864-5400. www.symphonyspace.org  Fri 4/19 Jim Snidero Quartet with Paul Bollenback at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119.  Fri 4/19 Lenore Raphael Trio with Jack Wilkins, Hilliard Greene, and surprise guest at New York Society for Ethical Culture, 7:00 PM. 2 West 64th Street. 212-874-5410. www.nysec.org  Fri 4/19 Lucas Pino’s Birthday Celebration: Lucas Pino Trio at The Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, and 11:30 PM. 129 MacDougal  Sat 4/20 Double Down at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554. www.swing46.com  Sat 4/20 Afro-Latin Jazz Workshop with Arturo O’Farrill at Harlem School of the Arts, 12:00 noon. 645 St. Nicholas Avenue. 212-926-4100. hsanyc.org ; symphonyspace.org  Sat 4/20 Arturo O’Farrill Trio at Ginny’s Supper Club, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 310 Lenox Avenue. 212-421-3821. www.ginnyssupperclub.com  Sat 4/20 A Louis Armstrong Tribute with “Hot Lips” Joey Morant and Catfish Stew at Lucille’s, B. B. King Blues Club, 8:00 PM. 237 West 42nd Street. 212-997-4144.  Sat 4/20 John DiMartino Trio with special guests Warren Vache and Marion Cowings at Kitano, 8PM. 66 Park Avenue at  Sat 4/20 Akiko Tsuruga at Showmans, 9:30 PM. 375 West 125th Street. 212-864-8941. www.showmansjazzclub.com  Sat 4/20 Ed Cherry Trio at The Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, and 11:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945. To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

 Sun 4/21 Somethin’ Jazz. Ralph Lalama Quintet featuring Nicole Pasternak at 7:00 PM; 212 E. 52nd Street (  Mon 4/22 The Bar Next Door. Andrew Van Tassel Trio at 6:30 PM; Chris McNulty’s Magic Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945. www.lalanternacaffe.com  Tue 4/23 – Sat 4/27 Yellowjackets at Birdland, 8:30 and 11:00 PM. 315 West 44th Street.  Tue 4/23 Sing! Sing! Sing! The 75th Anniversary of Benny Goodman’s Historic Carnegie Hall Concert featuring Ken Peplowski, Bucky Pizzarelli, Jay Leonhart and others at 54 Below, 7:00 and 9:15 PM. Lower level, 254 West 54th Street. 646476-3551. www.54below.com  Tue 4/23 Samba Meets Jazz Workshop Open House featuring Nilson Matta, Fernando Saci and Other Special Guests at Kitano, 8:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com  Tue 4/23 Alphonso Horne Trumpet Recital at Morse Hall, The Juilliard School, 8:00 PM. 60 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023. 212-799-5000. events.juilliard.edu  Tue 4/23 Gary Morgan’s Panamerica at NYC Baha’i Center, 8:00 and 9:30 PM. 53 East 11th Street. 212-222-5159. www.bahainyc.org/Page/Jazz-Night.aspx  Tue 4/23 The Bar Next Door. Austin Day Trio at 6:30 PM; Caleb Curtis Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street.  Wed 4/24 – Thu 4/25 Elegant Ellington: The Songs of Duke Ellington Performed by Michael Feinstein, Brianna Thomas, Kurt Elling, Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton, and Tedd Firth at The Allen Room, Lincoln Center, 7:00 PM. (Free 4/25 pre-concert festival at 6:30 PM.) Corner of Broadway and 60th Street. 212-7216500. www.jalc.org  Wed 4/24 Somethin’ Jazz. Tal Gur Quartet at 7:00 PM; Martin Terens Group at 9:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Ave.) 212-371-7657. www.somethinjazz.com  Wed 4/24 Daniel Smith with Bassoon & Beyond at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th St  Wed 4/24 Gene Bertoncini/ Michael Moore Duo at Saint Peter’s Church, 1:00 PM. 619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street. 212-9352200. www.saintpeters.org  Wed 4/24 The Bar Next Door. Benny Benack III Trio at 6:30 PM; Jonathan Kreisberg Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal  Thu 4/25 – Sat 4/27 Celebrating Duke Ellington: Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra Perform the Music of Duke Ellington at Rose Theater, Lincoln Center, 8:00 PM. (Additional 4/27 show at 2:00 PM; free 4/25 pre-concert festival at 6:30 PM.) Corner of Broadway and 60th Street. 212-7216500. www.jalc.org  Thu 4/25 The Bar Next Door. Daan Kleijn Trio at 6:30 PM; Kevin McNeil Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212529-5945. www.lalanternacaffe.com  Thu 4/25 Somethin’ Jazz. Randy Johnston’s NYU Ensemble at 7:00 PM; Nelson Riveros at 9:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd  Thu 4/25 Samora Abayomi Pinderhughes Piano Recital at Morse Hall, The Juilliard School, 8:00 PM. 60 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023. 212-799-5000. events.juilliard.edu  Thu 4/25 Vadim Neselovskyi and Friends at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street.  Thu 4/25 Senri Oe/ Jim Robertson Duo at Tomi Jazz, 9:00 and 10:30 PM. Lower level, 239 East 53rd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Avenues.) 646-497-1254. www.tomijazz.com  Thu 4/25 Tower of Power at B. B. King Blues Club, 7:30 and 10:00 PM. 237 West 42nd Street. 212-997-4144.  Thu 4/25 Harlem Renaissance Orchestra at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554. www.swing46.com  Fri 4/26 – Sat 4/27 Mark Sherman Quintet with Mitchel Forman and Adam Nussbaum at Kitano, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 66 Park Av  Fri 4/26 Emily Wolf Project at Upstairs Lounge, Pianos, 9:00 PM. 158 Ludlow Street. 212-505-3733. www.pianosnyc.com  Fri 4/26 Sheryl Bailey Trio at The Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, and 11:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945.  Fri 4/26 Somethin’ Jazz. Veronica Nunn Trio at 7:00 PM; Somethin’ Vocal with Matt Baker Trio at 9:00 PM; The Grautet featuring Andrew Grau at 11:00 PM. 3rd Floor, 212 E. 52nd Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Ave.) 212-371-7657. www.somethinjazz.com  Sat 4/27 Metropolitan Room. Rob Fulton: Just Friends at 4:00 PM; Nick Sanders and Logan Strosahl at 11:30 PM. 34 West 22nd Street. 212-206-0440. www.metropolitanroom.com  Sat 4/27 Vijay Iyer: Solo Trio, Sextet at Zankel Hall, Carnegie Hall, 9:30 PM. Corner of 57th Street and 7th Avenue.  Sat 4/27 Love Dogs at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 West 46th Street. 212-262-9554. www.swing46.com  Sat 4/27 Cobi Narita Presents The Four of Us: Traci Mann, Al Heyward, Jeff Sorg, and Natalie Raimondi with The Frank Owens Trio at Zeb’s, 7:00 PM. Second Floor, 223 West 28th Street. 212-695-8081. www.zebulonsoundandlight.com

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

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 Sat 4/27 Mark Cocheo Trio at The Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, and 11:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945.  Sun 4/28 Tower of Power at B. B. King Blues Club, 7:00 and 9:30 PM. 237 West 42 nd Street. 212-997-4144. www.bbkingblues.com  Mon 4/29 The Bar Next Door. Angela Davis Trio at 6:30 PM; Mika Hary Trio at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945. www.lalanternacaffe.com  Mon 4/29 Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks at Grand Ballroom, Plaza Hotel, 8:30 PM. Corner of Fifth Avenue and Central Park South. 212-759-3000. www.fairmont.com/the-plaza-new-york/  Tue 4/30 The Project Trio at Caffe Vivaldi, 7:30 PM. 32 Jones Street. 212-691-7538. www.caffevivaldi.com  Tue 4/30 Paul Williams at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 PM. 35 East 76th Street. 212-744-1600. www.thecarlyle.com  Tue 4/30 Charli Persip and Super Sound Big Band at NYC Baha’i Center, 8:00 and 9:30 PM. 53 East 11th Street. 212-2225159. www.bahainyc.org/Page/Jazz-Night.aspx  Tue 4/30 Angelo DiLoreto Solo Piano at Kitano, 8:00 PM. 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street. 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com  Tue 4/30 Somethin’ Jazz. Lyric Fury featuring Cynthia Hilts, Jack Walrath, and Lisa Parrott at 7:00 PM; Kevin Harris at 0PM  Tue 4/30 The Bar Next Door. Quentin Angus Trio at 6:30 PM; Ed MacEachen Trio with Elliot Zigmund at 8:30 and 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal Street. 212-529-5945. BROOKLYN  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Brain Cloud at Barbes, 7:00 PM. 376 Ninth Street, Park Slope. 347-422-0248.  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Tatsuya Nakamura at Manhattan Inn, 7:30 PM. 632 Manhattan Avenue, Greenpoint.  Mon 4/1 Quartet East featuring Andrew Raffo Dewar and Mary Halvorson at Roulette, 8:00 PM. 509 Atlantic Avenue at 3rd Avenue. 917-267-0363. www.roulette.org  Tue 4/1 Luca Nostro Quartet with Michael Attias at Shapeshifter Lab, 8:00 PM. 18 Whitwell Place, Park Slope. 646820-9452. www.shapeshifterlab.com  Tue 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30: Jam Session at The Fifth Estate, 7:00 PM. 506 Fifth Avune (bet. 12th and 13th Streets), Park Slope.

718-840-0089. www.fifthestatebar.com  Tue 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30: Manhattan Inn. Jo Shornikow at 7:30 PM; Joe McGinty at 10:30 PM. 632 Manhattan Ave  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Joel Forrester at Manhattan Inn, 7:00 PM. 632 Manhattan Avenue, Greenpoint. 718-383-0885.  Wed 4/3 Roulette. Connie Crothers: Entirely Improvised at 8:00 PM; Allen Lowe: Music for All Occasions at 10:00 PM. 509 Atlantic Avenue at 3rd Avenue. 917-267-0363.  Thu 4/4 Roulette. Sylvie Courvoisier/ Mark Feldman Quartet at 8:00 PM; Vinny Golia: Music for Strings, Piano and Woodwinds at 10:00 PM. 509 Atlantic Avenue at 3rd Avenue. 917-2670363. www.roulette.org  Thu 4/4 Shapeshifter Lab. J. C. Maillard’s ‘Grand Baton’ with Ari Honig at 7:00 PM; Honey Ear Trio with Allison Miller at 8:00 PM; Jerome Sabbagh Quartet featuring Ben Monder at 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Place, Park Slope. 646-820-9452.  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Jam Session with Gerry Eastman Quintet at Williamsburg Music Center, 10:00 PM. 367 Bedford Avenue. 718-384-1654. www.wmcjazz.org  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Smokin’ Billy Slater at Manhattan Inn, 8:00 PM. 632 Manhattan Avenue, Greenpoint. 718-383-0885. www.themanhattaninn.com  Fri 4/5 Lezlie Harrison at Brownstone Jazz, Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast, 9:00 PM. 107 Macon Street (at Nostrand Avenue.) 917-704-9237. www.sankofaaban.com  Fri 4/5 The New Cookers at BAMcafe, Brooklyn Academy of Music, 9:00 PM. Free. 30 Lafayette Place. 718-636-4100. www.bam.org  Fri 4/5 Sonny Fortune at Jazz 966, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 966 Fulton Street. 718-638-6910. www.jazz966.com  Fri 4/5 Avenida B at Cubana Social, 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00 PM. 70 North 6th Street, Williamsburg. 718-782-3334.  Fri 4/5 Michele Rosewoman and New Yor-Uba’s 30th Anniversary and Birthday Celebration at Roulette, 8:00 PM. 509 Atlantic Avenue at 3rd Avenue. 917-267-0363. www.roulette.org  Fri 4/5 Donald Malloy Trio at Williamsburg Music Center, 8:00 PM. 367 Bedford Avenue. 718-384-1654. www.wmcjazz.org  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Manhattan Inn. Jo Shornikow at 11:00 AM; Smokin’ Billy Slater at 8:00 PM. 632 Manhattan Avenue, Greenpoint. 718-383-0885. www.themanhattaninn.com

 Sat 4/6 T. C. III (William Theodore Carney III) at Brownstone Jazz, Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast, 9:00 PM. 107 Macon Street (at Nostrand Avenue.)  Sat 4/6 Yusef Lateef/ Adam Rudolph at Roulette, 8:00 PM. 509 Atlantic Avenue at 3rd Avenue. 917-267-0363. www.roulette.org  Sat 4/6 I Beam Music Studio. Ehran Elisha Ensemble at 8:30 PM; EYECORE at 9:30 PM. 168 7th Street. ibeambrooklyn.com  Sat 4/6 New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival at Shapeshifter Lab, 12:00 noon, 3:00 PM, and 8:00 PM. 18 Whitwell Place, Park Slope. 646-820-9452. www.shapeshifterlab.com  Sat 4/6 Hamiet Bluiett at Sistas’ Place, 9:00 and 10:30 PM. 456 Nostrand Avenue. 718-398-1766. www.sistasplace.org  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Greg Bandy/ Marvin Horne/ Stanley Banks at The Heights Bar and Lounge, 6:00 PM. Free. 316 Stuyvesant Avenue, Bedford Stuyvesant. 347-955-4444. [email protected]  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Manhattan Inn. Michael Leviton at 11:00 AM; Joel Forrester at 7:00 PM. 632 Manhattan Avenue, Greenpoint. 718-383-0885. www.themanhattaninn.com  Mon 4/8, 4/22: Adam Rudolph’s GO: Organic Orchestra at Shapeshifter Lab. Open rehearsal at 8:00 PM; Concert at 9:00 PM. 18 Whitwell Place, Park Slope. 646-820-9452.  Mon 4/8 Brooklyn Jazz Warriors at The Way Station, 10:00 PM. 683 Washington Avenue, Prospect Heights. 347-627-4949.  Tue 4/9 Shapeshifter Lab. Kenny Werner with NYU Student Ensembles at 7:00 PM; Kenny Werner’s CHANT featuring Gilad Hekselman and Billy Drewes at 8:00, 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl  Tue 4/9 Nicole Zuraitis at Spike Hill, 10:00 PM. 184 Bedford Avenue, Williamsburg. 718-218-9737. www.spikehillmusic.com  Tue 4/9 Korzo. Matt Mitchell Trio at 9:00 PM; Kirk Knuffke Duo CD Release Party at 10:30 PM. 667 5th Avenue (bet. 19th and 20th Streets.) 718-285-9425. konceptionsmusicseries.wordpress.com ;  Thu 4/11 Cadence Magazine Presents Cadencefest at Shapeshifter Lab, 7:00 PM. Artists include David Arner Trio, Thomas Ulrich’s Cargo Cult, Adam Lane Full Throttle Orchestra, and Primitive Arkestra #1. 18 Whitwell Place, Park Slope.  Thu 4/11 Quartet Collective: Dancers Rachel Bernsen and Melanie Marr/Composer-Performers Abraham Gomez-Delgado and Taylor Ho Bynum at The Firehouse Space, 8PM. 246 Frost  Fri 4/12 Kathy Farmer at Brownstone Jazz, Sankofa Aban Bed

(Continued on page 23) 20

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Wednesday, april 24 @ 8 pm

Thursday, April 25 @ 8 pm

Tedeschi Trucks Band Their joyful, spontaneous energy, and overflowing musical talent, have helped Tedeschi Trucks Band reach pinnacles of accomplishment that most bands spend a career trying to reach.

Average White Band

Their infectiously danceable, funky soul based on the sounds of Memphis, Motown and Philadelphia have made Average White Band one of the bestselling soul and funk bands in the history of music. Tickets: $40

Tickets: Orch $150, Mezz/Balcony $125

Friday, april 26 @ 8 pm

saturday, may 4 @ 8 pm

Jarrod Spector

Steve MarchTormé

After more than 1000 performances as “Frankie Valli” in the hit musical Jersey Boys, Jarrod Spector is taking audiences on the ride of HIS lifetime. Spector covers everything from The Jackson 5 to Led Zeppelin.

Singer-songwriter Steve March-Tormé (son of legend Mel Tormé) performs classic standards, original songs and shares personal stories from his never boring life. From Broadway to The Beatles, from Mercer to Mel, Steve always entertains.

Tickets: $45

Tickets: $35

80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, CT

203.438.5795 • www.ridgefieldplayhouse.org

Calendar of Events

Louis Armstrong At Freedomland USA 1961, 1964 Exhibit - April, LAHM 85 years ago, Louis Armstrong recorded one of his all-time masterpieces, “West End Blues,” one of the most influential recordings in jazz history. For Jazz Appreciation Month, the Museum’s historic house tours will feature a rare recording of Louis Armstrong performing “West End Blues” live at Freedomland in 1961. This performance was recently donated to the Museum’s Archives by the son of Freedomland sound engineer Peter Denis. Previously unissued and not in any discographies, it will be featured only during Jazz Appreciation Month! This recording compliments the Museum’s current exhibit, Louis Armstrong at Freedomland that closes April 30, 2012. The Louis Armstrong at Freedomland exhibit, which runs through April 30th, is the story of the early 1960s and is in many ways a story of freedom. In the United States, African-Americans were growing more vocal in their struggle for Civil Rights. A nation turned with hope to young president John F. Kennedy to lead them through the Cold War. The Berlin Wall was constructed in August 1961, splitting one of Europe’s biggest cities in half. The Vietnam War was beckoning. On June 19, 1960, Freedomland U.S.A., “The World’s Largest Entertainment Center,” opened in the Bronx in front of a crowd of 63,000 guests. Though the 85-acre park was larger than Disneyland, it was already in debt by its second year and would close in 1964 after just five seasons. Louis Armstrong performed there in 1961 and 1964. The Louis Armstrong House Museum’s vast collections contain many precious artifacts and previously unseen photographs by Jack Bradley, helping “Louis Armstrong at Freedomland” to paint an intimate portrait of Armstrong on stage and off during this turbulent time in history, spreading joy to fans young and old with his integrated band of All Stars. Louis Armstrong House Museum, 34-56 107th Street, Corona, Queens; Tuesday – Friday from 10AM-5PM; Saturday/Sunday, 12PM–5PM  

“Apathy can be overcome by enthusiasm, and enthusiasm can only be aroused by two things: first, an ideal, which takes the imagination by storm, and second, a definite intelligible plan for carrying that ideal into practice.”

- Arnold J. Toynbee, Historian 22

APR

Blue Note 131 W Third St. (east of 6th Ave) 212-475-8592 www.bluenote.net

Cleopatra’s Needle 2485 Broadway (betw. 92nd & 93rd St.) 212-769-6969

Cornelia St. Café 29 Cornelia St. (bet. W 4th & Bleecker) 212-989-9319 corneliastreetcafe.com

Deer Head Inn 5 Main Street Delaware Water Gap, PA 18327 www.deerheadinn.com

1 - Mon

Imani Uzuri

Nial Djuliasro 3; Jam Session

Amram & Co.

2 - Tue

Monterey on Tour

Marc Devine 3; Jam Session

Charenee Wade; Christine Correa 3

3 - Wed

Monterey on Tour

Les Kurtz 3; Joonsam Lee

Jeff Denson, Secret World

4 - Thu

Monterey on Tour

Joel Forrester 3; Kazu 3

Life Size

5 - Fri

Monterey on Tour; Theo Croker

Masami Ishikawa 3; Robert Mostly Other People Do the Erin McClelland Band Rocker 3 Killing

6 - Sat

Monterey on Tour; Aziza

Cathy Harley 3; Jesse Simpson

7 - Sun

Chris Potter & NYU Ensem- Keith Ingham; Michika ble; Monterey on Tour Fukumori 3

8 - Mon

BANN

Nial Djuliasro 3; Jam Session

9 - Tue

Al DiMeola & Gonzalo Rubalcaba

Marc Devine 3; Jam Session

Split Cycle; Paul Jones 4

10 - Wed

Al DiMeola & Gonzalo Rubalcaba

Les Kurtz 3; Joonsam Lee

Emilie Weibel

11 - Thu

Al DiMeola & Gonzalo Rubalcaba

Kate Cosco 3; Kazu 3

Water Sign

Bill Goodwin Jazz Jam

12 - Fri

Al DiMeola & Gonzalo Rubalcaba; Water Seed

Dan Furman 3; Robert Rocker 3

Ryan Blotnick

Jesse Green

13 - Sat

Al DiMeola & Gonzalo Rubalcaba w/Toussaint Liberator

Alan Rosenthal 3; Jesse Simpson

Rez Abbasi 3

Warren Vache

14 - Sun

Al DiMeola & Gonzalo Rubalcaba

Keith Ingham; Michika Fukumori 3

Nacho Arimany

Argentinean Duo

15 - Mon

Ralph Peterson 6

Nial Djuliasro 3; Jam Session

16 - Tue

Hiromi 3

Marc Devine 3; Jam Session

Joelle Lurie 3; Gian Slater; Nicky Schrire

17 - Wed

Hiromi 3

Les Kurtz 3; Joonsam Lee

Anna Webber

18 - Thu

Hiromi 3

Champian Fulton 3; Kazu 3 Claudia 5

Jay Leonhart

19 - Fri

Hiromi 3; Gizmo

Solls Puoane 3; Robert Rocker 3

Ellington Legacy Band

20 - Sat

Hiromi 3; Suga Bush

Kayo Hiraki 3; Jesse Simp- Deborah Latz; Claudia 5 son

21 - Sun

Hiromi 3

Keith Ingham; Michika Fukumori 3

Mauricio Maestro

22 - Mon

Maceo P arker

Nial Djuliasro 3; Jam Session

Azusa Ueno

23 - Tue

Maceo P arker

Marc Devine 3; Jam Session

Benjamin Scheuer; Jean Rohe

24 - Wed

Maceo Parker

Les Kurtz 3; Joonsam Lee

Peter Evans 3

25 - Thu

Maceo P arker

Art Lillard 3; Kazu 3

Mat Maneri 3

Bill Goodwin Jazz Jam

26 - Fri

Arturo Sandoval; Super HiFi

Chip Shelton 3; Robert Rocker 3

Scott Wendholt/Adam Kolker 4

Marianne Solivan

27 - Sat

Arturo Sandoval; In the Spirit of Miles

George Stella 4; Jesse Simpson

Ariadna Castellanos; Endangered Blood

Bucky/Ed/Walt Guitar 3

28 - Sun

Arturo Sandoval

Keith Ingham; Michika Fukumori 3

Nandita Sriram & Shiv Subramaniam

29 - Mon

Purchase Orchestra featur- Nial Djuliasro 3; Jam Sesing Jon Faddis sion

30 - Tue

Michel Camilo

Bill Goodwin Jazz Jam

Tomas Fujiwara & the Hook Vic Juris, Kate Baker & Up Dave Liebman Danielle Eva Schwob; Dan Weiss & Miles Okazaki

Claudia 5

Dixie Gents

Bobby Avey

COTA All Stars

Marc Devine 3; Jam Session

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Calendar of Events Dizzy’s Club Coca Cola APR

B’dwy &t 60th, 5th Fl. 212-258-9595 jazzatlincolncenter.com

1 - Mon

Rodney Green 3

2 - Tue

MSM Afro Cuban Jazz Orch

3 - Wed

Dizzy’s Club After Hours Broadway at 60th St. 5th Floor 212-258-9595

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Garage 99 Seventh Ave. S (at Grove St.) 212-645-0600 www.garagerest.com

The Jazz Gallery 290 Hudson St. (below Spring St.) 212-242-1063 www.jazzgallery.org

Jazz Standard 116 E 27th St 212-576-2232 www.jazzstandard.net

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Howard Williams Orchestra

Mingus Big Band

Yasushi Nakamura 4

Paul Francis 3

John Hollenbeck Large Ensemble

LeBouef Brothers

Yasushi Nakamura 4

Anderson Brothers

Aaron Diehl 4

4 - Thu

Manhattan School of Music Combo Night

Yasushi Nakamura 4

Champian Fulton 4

5 - Fri

Manhattan School of Music Combo Night

Yasushi Nakamura 4

Hide Tanaka 3; Jason Ben van Gelder Prover Orchestra

Randy Weston 5

6 - Sat

Manhattan School of Music Swing Band

Yasushi Nakamura 4

Larry Newcomb 4; Catherine Toren; Akiko Tsuruga 3

Randy Weston 5

7 - Sun

Manhattan School of Music Jazz Orchestra

Jerry Costanzo; David Coss 4

Randy Weston 5

8 - Mon

Dimitri Vassilakis 4

Lou Caputo Band

Mingus Orchestra

9 - Tue

Eli Yamin 4

Peter & Will Anderson Guy Mintus 3

Jeremy Pelt

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10 - Wed

Tessa Souter

Peter & Will Anderson Marc Devine 3

Jeremy Pelt

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11 - Thu

Juilliard Jazz 4

Peter & Will Anderson Adrian Cunningham 4 Camille Thurman

Eric Harland

12 - Fri

Juilliard Jazz 4

Peter & Will Anderson Michika Fukumori 3; Kevin Dorn

Greg Ward 4

Eric Harland

13 - Sat

Juilliard Jazz 4

Peter & Will Anderson Brooks Hartell 3; Virginia

Stranahan/Zaleski/ Rosato

Eric Harland

14 - Sun

Juilliard Jazz 4

David Coss 4

Eric Harland

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15 - Mon

Julian Lage 4

Howard Williams Orchestra

Mingus Big Band

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16 - Tue

Richard Galliano/ Christian Howes 5

Vitaly Golovnev

Ray Blue 4

Wayne Escoffery 5

17 - Wed

Richard Galliano/ Christian Howes 5

Vitaly Golovnev

John Chin 3

Wayne Escoffery 5

18 - Thu

Richard Galliano/ Christian Howes 5

Vitaly Golovnev

Dre Barnes 3

19 - Fri

Richard Galliano/ Christian Howes 5

Vitaly Golovnev

Ben Benack 4

20 - Sat

Richard Galliano/ Christian Howes 5

Vitaly Golovnev

Mark Marino 3; Daylight Blues Band

Steve Wilson 5

21 - Sun

Richard Galliano/ Christian Howes 5

Lou Caputo 4; David Coss 4

Steve Wilson 5

22 - Mon

Purchase Jazz Orchestra

Kyle Athayde Dance Party

Mingus Big Band

23 - Tue

Organ Monk 4

Evan Sherman

Benjamin Drazen

Osmany Paredes

24 - Wed

Grant Stewart 4

Evan Sherman

Rob Edwards 4

Ben Sidran

25 - Thu

Catherine Russell

Evan Sherman

Rick Stone 3

Chad Lefkowitz-Brown Christian Scott 6

26 - Fri

Catherine Russell

Evan Sherman

Nick Moran 3; Kevin Dorn

Dayna Stephens

Christian Scott 6

27 - Sat

Catherine Russell

Evan Sherman

Marsha Heydt; Champian Gilad Hekselman Fulton; Virginia Mayhew Project

Christian Scott 6

28 - Sun

Catherine Russell

Iris Ornig 4; David Coss 4

Christian Scott 6

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29 - Mon

Black Art Jazz Collective

Cecilia Coleman Band

Mingus Orchestra

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30 - Tue

Black Art Jazz Collective

Dylan Meek 3

Edward Simon 3

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Kassa Overall

Randy Weston 5

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Mayhew 4; Alex Layne 3

Jaleel Shaw

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Sirius 4

Steve Wilson 5

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Claudia Acuna

Steve Wilson 5 

Alexander Claffy

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

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April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

& Breakfast, 9:00 PM. 107 Macon Street (at Nostrand Avenue.) 917-704-9237. www.sankofaaban.com Fri 4/12 Shapeshifter Lab. Dave Perowsky Trio at 8:00 PM; Chris Speed Trio at 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Place, Park Slope Sat 4/13 Shapeshifter Lab. Matt Mitchell Trio at 8:15 PM; Miles Okazaki Quartet with Donny McCaslin at 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Place, Park Slope. 646- 820-9452. www.shapeshifterlab.com Sat 4/13 Philip Harper at Sistas’ Place, 9:00 and 10:30 PM. 456 Nostrand Avenue. 718-398-1766. www.sistasplace.org Sat 4/13 Maurice Brown at NYCHA-Farragut Houses, 2:00 PM. Free. Corner of Navy and York Streets, Vinegar Hill. 718230-0492, ext. 113. www.mocada.org Sat 4/13 Kenny Wolleson and Wollesonic Laboratories Present SONIC MASSAGE at Roulette, 1:00 PM. 509 Atlantic Avenue at 3rd Avenue. 917-267-0363. www.roulette.org Sat 4/13 The Fascinators at The Way Station, 10:00 PM. 683 Washington Avenue, Prospect Heights. Sat 4/13 Dead Language at The Firehouse Space, 8:00 PM. 246 Frost Street. www.thefirehousespace.org Sat 4/13 Mamie Minch at Barbes, 10:00 PM. 376 Ninth Street, Park Slope. 347-422-0248. www.barbesbrooklyn.com Sat 4/13 East River Latin Jam at Cubana Social, 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00 PM. 70 North 6th Street, Williamsburg. 718-7823334. www.cubanasocial.com Sun 4/14 Williamsburg Salsa Orchestra at Brooklyn Bowl, 8:00 PM. 61 Wythe Avenue. 718-963-3369. www.brooklynbowl.com Sun 4/14 Steve Cromity Trio at Two Steps Down, 6:00 PM. 240 DeKalb Ave. 917-685-3508. www.twostepsdownrestaurant.com Sun 4/14 The Firehouse Space. Tom Blatt at 8:00 PM; Parias Ensemble at 9:30 PM. 246 Frost Street. Mon 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Chicha Libre at Barbes, 9:30 PM. 376 Ninth Street, Park Slope. 347-422-0248. www.barbesbrooklyn.com Tue 4/16 Korzo, Cropduster with Curtis MacDonald at 9:00 PM; TBA at 10:30 PM. 667 5th Avenue (bet. 19th and 20th S t r e e t s . ) 7 1 8- 2 85- 9 4 2 5 . k o nc e pt io n s m us i c s er ies.wordpress.com Tue 4/16 Joel Beaver Trio at Radegast Hall and Biergarten, 8:00 PM. 113 N. 3rd Street, Williamsburg. 718-963-3973. www.radegasthall.com Wed 4/17 Emily Asher’s Garden Party at Radegast Hall and Biergarten, 9:00 PM. 113 N. 3rd Street, Williamsburg. Thu 4/18 Andy Statman at Barbes, 8:00 PM. 376 Ninth Street, Park Slope. 347-422-0248. www.barbesbrooklyn.com Thu 4/18 Tomas Fujiwara Red Carpet Trio at I Beam Music Studio, 8:30 PM. 168 7th Street. ibeambrooklyn.com Thu 4/18 Arturo O’Farrill with Papo Vazquez and Brooklyn College Jazz Ensemble at Studio 312, Roosevelt Hall, Brooklyn College, 7:00 PM. Free. 2900 Bedford Avenue. 718-951-5655. www.hisam.org Thu 4/18 Chris Dingman Solo Vibes at The Firehouse Space, 8:00 PM. 246 Frost Street. www.thefirehousespace.org Fri 4/19 Devin Collins Quartet with Chris Ward and Felix Pastorius at Cubana Social, 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00 PM. 70 North 6th Street, Williamsburg. 718-782-3334. Fri 4/19 Hot Club of Flatbush at Radegast Hall and Biergarten, 9:00 PM. 113 N. 3rd Street, Williamsburg. 718-963-3973. Fri 4/19 Bill Carney’s Jug Addicts at Barbes, 10:00 PM. 376 Ninth Street, Park Slope. 347-422-0248 Sat 4/20 Ted Daniel and IMBC at Sistas’ Place, 9:00 and 10:30 PM. 456 Nostrand Avenue. 718-398-1766. Sat 4/20 Jazz! The Women’s Viewpoint at Skylight Gallery, Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration, 1:00 PM. Performance by Bertha Hope’s Hope-Tet; panel discussion by Nikita White, Renee Manning, Cynthia Holiday, Azania, and Monique Ngozi Nri. 1368 Fulton Street. 718-773-2252. www.centralbrooklynjazzconsortium.org Sat 4/20 Will Arvo Trio at I Beam Music Studio, 8:30 PM. 168 7th Street. ibeambrooklyn.com Sun 4/21 Littlefield. Dance Cartel at 7:30 PM; Pitch Blak Brass Band at 8:00 PM; BatalaNYC at 9:00 PM. 622 Degraw Street. 718-855-3388. www.littlefieldnyc.com Sun 4/21 FluiDensity with Tonino Miano and Brian Groder at The Firehouse Space, 8:00 PM. 246 Frost Street. www.thefirehousespace.org Tue 4/23 Rad Trads at Radegast Hall and Biergarten, 8:00 PM. 113 N. 3rd Street, Williamsburg. 718-963-3973. Tue 4/23 Korzo. Adam Nussbaum 3 at 9:00 PM; Alexis Marcelo Quartet at 10:30 PM. 667 5th Avenue (bet. 19th and 20th Streets.) 718-285-9425. Wed 4/24 Arun Ramamurthy Trio at The Way Station, 9:00

(Continued on page 24) 23

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PM. 683 Washington Avenue, Prospect Heights. 347-627-4949. waystationbk.blogspot.com Wed 4/24 CBJC Benefit Gala at Sugar Hill Supper Club, 5:00 PM. Artists include Denroy Morgan and the Anthem Reggae Band, Jeff King Band, and Dr. Mambo and the Experience Ensemble. 609 DeKalb Avenue, Bedford Stuyvesant. 718-7971727. www.centralbrooklynjazzconsortium.org Wed 4/24 Grand Street Stompers at Radegast Hall and Biergarten, 9:00 PM. 113 N. 3rd Street, Williamsburg. 718-963-3973. www.radegasthall.com Thu 4/25 Emilio Teubal at The Firehouse Space, 8:00 PM. 246 Frost Street. www.thefirehousespace.org Thu 4/25 Regional de NY at Barbes, 10:00 PM. 376 Ninth Street, Park Slope. 347-422-0248. www.barbesbrooklyn.com Thu 4/25 Lucky Dog Jazz Band at Radegast Hall and Biergarten, 9:00 PM. 113 N. 3rd Street, Williamsburg. 718-963-3973 Fri 4/26 Bob Cunningham at Jazz 966, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 966 Fulton Street. 718-638-6910. www.jazz966.com Fri 4/26 Attention Screen with Liam Sillery at The Firehouse Space, 8:00 PM. 246 Frost Street. Fri 4/26 Cynthia Holiday at Brownstone Jazz, Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast, 9:00 PM. 107 Macon Street (at Nostrand Avenue.) 917-704-9237. www.sankofaaban.com Sat 4/27 The Firehouse Festival at The Firehouse Space, 6:00 PM. (Music begins at 7:00 PM.) Featuring art and video installations, and music from Curtis Hasselbring, Robert Dick, The Guindonian Hand Trombone Quartet, The Emily Danger Band, and others. 246 Frost Street. Sat 4/27 Greg Lewis and Organ Monk at Sistas’ Place, 9:00 and 10:30 PM. 456 Nostrand Avenue. 718-398-1766. Sat 4/28 Wycliffe Gordon Quartet at Emmanuel Baptist Church, 3:00 PM. Free admission; offering suggested. 279 Lafayette Avenue. 718-622-1107. www.ebcconnects.org Tue 4/30 J. C. Hopkins Combo at Radegast Hall and Biergarten, 8:00 PM. 113 N. 3rd Street, Williamsburg.

QUEENS  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Larry Luger Trio at Sac’s Place, 7:00 PM. 2541 Broadway, Astoria. 718-204-5002.  Tue 4/2 Ben Winkelman Trio at Terraza 7, 9:30 PM. 9 Gleane Street, Elmhurst. 718-803-9602. www.terrazacafe.org  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: The Fellows from Carmicheals at The Proper Cafe, 7:00 PM. 217-01 Linden Boulevard, Cambria Heights. 718-341-2223. http://dowtwins.com/index.php? option=com_content&task=view&id=80&Itemid=218  Wed 4/3 Flushing Town Hall. Jazz Clinic at 5:00 PM; Jam Session at 7:00 PM. Free to musicians and students. 137-35 Northern Blvd. 718-463-7700 ext. 222. www.flushingtownhall.org  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Larry Luger at Veslo, 7:00 PM. 32-11 Broadway, Astoria. 718-728-0549. www.veslonyc.com  Fri 4/5 Jay Rattman Trio with Marianne Solivan at The Astor Room, 7:00 PM. 34-12 36th Street, Astoria.  Sat 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27: Dandy Wellington and His Band at The Astor Room, 12:00 noon. 34-12 36th Street, Astoria.  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Jam Session at Blackbird’s Bar & Restaurant, 10:00 AM. 41-19 30th Avenue, Astoria. 718-943-6899.  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Dandy Wellington and His Band at The Astor Room, 11:30 AM. 34-12 36th Street, Astoria.  Sat 4/13 Antoinette Montague and Her Quintet: Here’s to the Ladies Who Bling and Swing! at Flushing Town Hall, 8:00 PM. 137-35 Northern Blvd. 718-463-7700 ext. 222.  Fri 4/19 Manuel Valera and The New Cuban Express at Terraza 7, 9:30 PM. 9 Gleane Street, Elmhurst. 718-803-9602.  Fri 4/26 Marvin Stamm with FSSA Jazz Ensemble at Tony Bennett Concert Hall, Frank Sinatra School of the Arts, 7:00 PM. 35-12 35th Avenue (bet. 35th and 36th Streets), Astoria. 718392-5022. www.franksinatraschoolofthearts.org  Sat 4/27 Flushing Town Hall. Queens Jazz Over Ground Jazz Fest, starting at 12:00 noon. All events free. Amanda Monaco’s Formula One at 6:00 PM; Mark Wade Trio at 6:30 PM; Josh Deutsch’s Pannonia at 7:00 PM; Darius Jones’ Big Gurl Trio at 7:30 PM; James Spaulding with QJOG Trio at 8:30 PM; Mike Baggetta Band at 9:00 PM; Brian Woodruff Sextet at 9:30 PM. Workshops and clinics throughout the day. 137-35 Northern Blvd. 718-463-7700 ext. 222. www.flushingtownhall.org

APR

24

Smalls

The Stone

Village Vanguard

183 W. 10th 212-252-5091 smallsjazzclub.com

Ave. C & Second St. thestonenyc.com

178 Seventh Ave. S (below W 11th St.) 212-255-4037 villagevanguard.net

1 - Mon

FFP; Fractal Attraction; Noah MacNeil

2 - Tue

Enrico Solano; Thomas Heflin; Dorian Allen

Spike Wilner 3; Jim Rotondi5 Kyle Poole

Matt Shipp 3

Enrico Pieranunzi 3

3 - Wed

Kari Antile; The Flowdown; Skunk Mello; DJ Bisou

Michela Lerman; E.J. Strickland; Fabien Mary 5

Matt Shipp & Ivo Perelman; Matt Shipp & Darius Jones

Enrico Pieranunzi 3

4 - Thu

Peter Honan; Makia Denby; Nafsi Groove; La Sovietika

Jon Roche; E.J. Strickland; Matt Shipp & Steve Dala- Enrico Pieranunzi 3 Carlos Abadie chinsky; Matt Shipp & Rob Brown

5 - Fri

Rakiem Walker; Plena Sin Fronteras; Pork Chop Willie

Tardo Hammer 3; Jonathan Matt Shipp 3 Kreisberg; Anthony Wonsey

Enrico Pieranunzi 3

6 - Sat

DJ Madi; Jacques & Marie; Passero; Awa Sangho

Dwayne Clemons & Sasha Perry; Jonathan Kreisberg

Matt Shipp 3

Enrico Pieranunzi 3

7 - Sun

Shrine Jazz Jam Session; Shrine Big Band Jazz

Marion Cowings; Jonathan Matt Shipp 3 Greenstein; Hilary Gardener

Enrico Pieranunzi 3

8 - Mon

Sean Clapis; Antoine Cara

Charnett Moffett; Ari Hoenig Frank London Band 3; Spencer Murphy

Vanguard Jazz Orchestra

9 - Tue

Neuropath; Kathryn F. Hoxie; Spike Wilmer 3; Smalls Val & the Devil’s Saw Legacy Band; Kyle Poole

Jon Madof’s Zion80

Jeff Ballard 5

10 - Wed

Jane Lee Hooker; North Side Michela Lerman; Brian Jon Madof’s Zion80 Music Collective; DJ Bisou Charette 6; Jamale Davis 4

Jeff Ballard 5

11 - Thu

Jussi Reijonen; Digg Deep; Bob Syvarth

Jon Roche; Brian Charette 6; Emmet Cohen 3

Jeff Ballard 5

12 - Fri

Rakiem Waler; Jack Lords Orchestra; P.I.C.

Alex Graham 4; David Shanir Ezra Blumenkranz; Jeff Ballard 5 Stoler 3; Lawrence Leathers Yoshie Fruchter’s Pitom

13 - Sat

Matt Heister Band; Sould’Out; LaFayette Harris; Alex Isaac Katalay; DJ Take Graham 4; Philip Harper

Jon Madof’s Urim; The Flail

14 - Sun

Shrine Jazz Jam Session; Brett Walberg

Marion Cowings; Michael Blanco; Lezlie Harrison

Jon Madof & Marion Sobol Jeff Ballard 5

15 - Mon

Quentin Angus 4; The Gathering; Home Cookin’

Peter Bernstein; Aaron Parks 3; Spencer Murphy

Frank London Band

Vanguard Jazz Orchestra

16 - Tue

Larry Corban; Casimir Libersk; Hillary Barleaux

Spike Wilner 3; Smalls Legacy Band; Kyle Poole

Slobber Pup

Gerald Clayton 3

17 - Wed

Natalie Galey; Maria Davis

Michela Lerman; Diego Urcola 6; John Raymond

Gerald Fletcher Memorial Grindcore Explosion

Gerald Clayton 3

18 - Thu

Lehman College Fundraise; Plasma in the Ukraine

Pasquale Grasso; Diego Urcola 6; Carlos Abadie

Jamie Saft; Jerry Granelli & Jamie Saft

Gerald Clayton 3

19 - Fri

Rakeim Walker; Frankie Favasuli; The Apostles

Sam Raderman; John Eckert; Ralph Lalama

Jamie Saft 3

Gerald Clayton 3

20 - Sat

Ryoko Fujimoto; New Pony; ROTIMI; DJ Take

Dwayne Clemons; David Schnitter; Ralph Lalama 4; Philip Harper

Jamie Saft 3

Gerald Clayton 3

21 - Sun

Shrine Jazz Jam Session; Penny Sings the Hits

Marion Cowings; Marianne Solivan; Jon Roche 3

Jamie Saft 3; Kingston Yard

Gerald Clayton 3

22 - Mon

Enrico Solano 3; Leni Stern; Abstract Vibes

Peter Bernstein; Ari Hoenig Frank London Band 3; Spencer Murphy

Vanguard Jazz Orchestra

23 - Tue

Eric Maltz; Sonji; Hutch & Scott Simon; Aaron Pfeiffer

Spike Wilner 3; Smalls Legacy Band; Kyle Poole

Steve Coleman & Five Elements

Terell Stafford 5

24 - Wed

Squelch; Publio Delgado; Ekah Kim; Dio Kacou

Michela Lerman; George Burton; Craig Wuepper

Steve Coleman & Five Elements

Terell Stafford 5

25 - Thu

Rodrigo Bonelli; Sleeper Hit; Ujima Jazz Collective

Pasquale Grasso; Harold O’Neal 3; Nick Hempton

Steve Coleman & Five Elements

Terell Stafford 5

26 - Fri

Rakeim Walker; Kenny Young; Sinner Man

Sam Raderman; Grant Steve Coleman & Five Stewart; Flail; Ehud Asherie Elements

Terell Stafford 5

27 - Sat

Nick Di Maria; Emanuele Tozzi

Joe Magnarelli 4; The Flail; Steve Coleman & Five Brooklyn Circle Elements

Terell Stafford 5

28 - Sun

Shring Jazz Jam Session; Native Sun; Natty Dreadz

Marion Cowings; Ehud Asherie; Johnny O’Neal

Steve Coleman & Five Elements

Terell Stafford 5

29 - Mon

RendezVous

Ari Hoenig; Spencer Murphy

Frank London Band

Vanguard Jazz Orchestra

Spike Wilner 3; Smalls Legacy Band; Kyle Poole

Cyro Baptista & Banquet of the Spirits

Bill McHenry 4

STATEN ISLAND  Tue 4/2, 4/9, 4/26, 4/23, 4/30: Mark Sganga and Larry d’Albero at Bayou, 7:30 PM. 1072 Bay Street. 718-273-4383.  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Jam Session featuring The Wolfpack at Adobe Blues, 9:00 PM. 63 Lafayette Avenue (two blocks from Snug Harbor.) 718-720-BLUE. www.silive.com/sites/adobeblues  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/25: Greg Murphy Solo Piano at Lorenzo’s, Hilton Garden Inn, 7:00 PM. 1100 South Avenue at Lois Lane. 718-477-2400, ext. 3222. www.lorenzosdining.com  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Arturo Vera at Bayou, 12:00 noon.

Shrine 2271 Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. 212-690-7807 www.shrinenyc.com

30 - Tue

Vanguard Jazz Orchestra

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

Jon Madof’s Zion80

Jeff Ballard 5

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

1072 Bay Street. 718-273-4383. www.bayounyc.com  Sun 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28: Mark Sganga Bossa Nova Brunch at Beso, 12:30 PM. 11 Schuyler Street.  Fri 4/19 Greg Murphy Solo Piano at Lorenzo’s, Hilton Garden Inn, 7:00 PM. 1100 South Avenue at Lois Lane. 718-477-2400, ext. 3222. www.lorenzosdining.com LONG ISLAND  Sat 4/6 Joe Tranchina Trio at Grasso’s, 7:30 PM. 134 Main Street, Cold Spring Harbor.  Sun 4/7 Count Basie Orchestra at Suffolk Theater, 2:00 PM. 118 E. Main, Riverhead. 631-727-4343  Sat 4/13 Film Screening: “A Great Day in Harlem” at Hempstead Public Library, 2:00 PM. Admission free; registration required. 115 Nichols Court, Hempstead. 516-481-6990  Sun 4/14 Tribute to Henry Mancini: Days of Wine of Music at Suffolk Theater, 2:00 PM. Featuring The Lou Caputo Not-So-Big Band and guest vocalists.118 East Main St, Riverhead. 631-727-4343.  Mon 4/15 Stan Kenton Reunion Band at Suffolk Theater, 8:00 PM. 118 East Main Street, Riverhead.  Sat 4/20 Steven Maglio Performs the Frank Sinatra Songbook at Dix Hills Performing Arts Center, 7:30 PM. 305 North Service Road, Dix Hills. 631-424-7000. www.dhpac.org  Sun 4/21 Napoleon Revels-Bey: The Golden Global Drum from Al-Andalusia to Dizzy at East Islip Public Library, 3:00 PM. 381 East Main Street, East Islip. 631-581-9200. www.revels-bey.com  Sun 4/21 Hofstra Jazz Ensemble at Helene Fortunoff Theater, Hofstra University South Campus, 7:00 PM. California Avenue, Hempstead. 516-463-6600. www.hofstra.edu WESTCHESTER  Tue 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30: Jam Session at Pete’s Saloon and Restaurant, 9:30 PM. 8 West Main Street, Elmsford. 914-592-9849. www.petessaloon.com  Tue 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30: Jam Session featuring The Wolfpack at Lucy’s, 9:00 PM. 446 Bedford Road, Pleasantville. 914-747-4740. www.lucys-lounge.com  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Jam Session at The Bassline Club, 9:00 PM. 130 East 1st Street, Mount Vernon. 914-433-1052. www.basslineclub.com  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Bill Crow Quartet at Red Hat Bistro, 6:00 PM. One Bridge Street, Irvington-on-Hudson. 914-591-5888.  Thu 4/4 Z. Z. Berman and Rich Kelly at Pete’s Saloon and Restaurant, 9:30 PM. 8 West Main Street, Elmsford. 914-592-9849. www.petessaloon.com  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Takeshi Ogura Trio at The Bassline Club, 9:00 PM. 130 East 1st Street, Mount Vernon. 914-433-1052. www.basslineclub.com.  Fri 4/5 John Hart with Steve Wilson at Carnegie Room, Nyack Library, 7:30 PM. 59 South Broadway, Nyack. 845-608-3593.  Sat 4/6 Fred Smith Jazz Ensemble with Tom Kohl, Bill Crow, and surprise guest at BeanRunner Cafe, 7:30 PM. 201 South Division Street, Peekskill. 914-737-1701.  Sat 4/13 Meta-Four with Eric Person at BeanRunner Cafe, 7:30 PM. 201 South Division Street, Peekskill. 914-737-1701.  Sat 4/13 Leslie Pintchik Trio at Watercolor Cafe, 8:30 PM. 2094 Boston Post Road, Larchmont.  Wed 4/17 Hugh Masekela at Tarrytown Music Hall, 8:00 PM. 13 Main St, Tarrytown. 877-840-0457.  Fri 4/19 Alan Broadbent, Don Falzone, Nyack Library, 7:30 PM. 59 South Broadway, Nyack.  Sun 4/21 Greg Westhoff’s Westchester Swing Band at 12 Grapes, 5:30 PM. 12 North Division Street, Peekskill. 914-737-6624. www.12grapes.com  Fri 4/26 Gil Parris Band at Pete’s Saloon, 10:30 PM. 8 W Main, Elmsford. 914-592-9849.  Sat 4/27 Westchester Jazz Orchestra with special guests Marvin Stamm and Paquito D’Rivera at Tarrytown Music Hall, 8:00 PM. 13 Main Street, Tarrytown. 877-840-0457  Sat 4/27 Lines of Reason with Joe Ford, Marcus McLaurine, and Clifford Adams at BeanRunner Cafe, 7:30 PM. 201 South Division Street, Peekskill. 914-737-1701. NEW JERSEY  Mon 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29: Full Count Big Band Open Rehearsal at Church of the Assumption, 7:30 PM. Admission free; refreshments available for donation. 333 West Westfield Avenue (Route 28), Roselle Park. 908-347-0648. www.fullcountbigband.com  Mon 4/1, 4/15: Rowan Jazz Workshop at Bus Stop Music Cafe, 4:30 PM. 148 South Broadway, Pitman. 856-582-0009. www.busstopmusiccafe.com  Tue 4/2 Sandy Sasso Big Band at Sayerville Cultural Center, 7:30 PM. Dancing encouraged. 423 Main Street, Sayreville. 732-254-4299. www.sandysasso.com  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Jam Session with Mike Lee at Hat City Kitchen, 8:00 PM. 459 Valley Street, Orange. 862-252-9147. www.hatcitykitchen.com  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Richard DiPaolo and the Booglerizers at 16 Prospect Wine Bar and Bistro, 8:00 PM. 16 Prospect Street, Westfield. 908-232-7320. www.16prospect.com  Wed 4/3, 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Mitch Herzog at Rod’s Steak and Seafood Grille, 9:00 PM. One Convent Road, Morristown. 973-539-6666. www.rodssteak.com  Wed 4/3. 4/10, 4/17, 4/24: Janice Wiggins: Jazz and Gospel Inspiration at Hibiscus Restaurant, 6:30 PM. 270 South Street, Morristown. 973-359-0200. www.hibiscuscuisine.com  Wed 4/3 Warren Vache Trio at Shanghai Jazz, 7:00 PM. 24 Main Street, Madison. 973-822-2899.  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Carrie Jackson at 16 Prospect Wine Bar and Bistro, 8:00 PM. 16 Prospect Street, Westfield. 908-232-7320. www.16prospect.com  Thu 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25: Curtis Lundy Jam Session at Phoebe’s Place, 7:30 PM. 445 Cedar Lane, Teaneck. 347-230-2388. www.phoebespl.com  Thu 4/4 Chris Brown Quartet at Makeda, 7:30 PM. 338 George Street, New Brunswick.  Fri 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26: Michelle Wiley at DeAnna’s Restaurant, 7:00 PM. 54 North Franklin Street, Lambertville. 609-397-8957. www.deannasrestaurant.com  Fri 4/5 Enrico Granafei at Salt Creek Grille, 7:00 PM. 1 Rockingham Row, Princeton. 609-419-4200.  Fri 4/5 Sandy Sasso with Rio Clemente at Jazz Cafe, Eckert Auditorium, South Brunswick Municipal Complex, 8:00 PM. 540 Route 522, Monmouth Junction. 732-329-4000. www.sbarts.org/jazz-cafe/  Sat 4/6 Dave Stryker and Blue to the Bone CD Release Party at Robin’s Nest Rhythm and Blues, 9:00 PM. 3103 Tremley Point Road, Linden. 908-275-3043.  Sat 4/6 Clifton Anderson Quintet at Bethany Baptist Church, 6:00 PM. 275 West Market Street, Newark. 973-623-8161.  Sat 4/6 Count Basie Orchestra at Shea Center Auditorium, William Paterson University, 8:00 PM. 300 Pompton Rd, Wayne.  Sat 4/6 Joe Frame at La Tavola Cucina, 7:00 PM. 700 Old Bridge Turnpike, South River. 732-2382111. www.latavolacucinanj.com  Sat 4/6 WBGO KidsJazz Presents Bobby Sanabria: What Is Latin Jazz? at Newark Symphony Hall, 12:30 PM. Free; all adults must be accompanied by a child. 1020 Broad Street, Newark. 973-6438014. www.newarksymphonyhall.org To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

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 Sat 4/6 Al DiMeola and Gonzalo Rubalcaba at Victoria Theater, New Jersey Performing Arts Center, 6:00 and 8:30 PM. One Center Street, Newark. 973-642-8989. www.njpac.org  Sat 4/6 Jam Session at Smokey’s Tavern, 9:00 PM. 2 Vernon Crossing Road, Vernon. 973-764-2600. www.smokeystavern.com  Sat 4/6 Ben E. King at South Orange Performing Arts Center, 8:00 PM. One SOPAC Way, South Orange. 973-275-1114.  Sat 4/6 Paul Abler’s Birthday Gig at Trumpets, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600.  Mon 4/8, 4/22: Gil Lewis Trio at Bus Stop Music Cafe, 6:00 PM. 148 South Broadway, Pitman. 856-582-0009.  Mon 4/8 Randy Reinhart with Mark Shane and James Chirillo at Bickford Theatre, Morris Museum, 8:00 PM. 6 Normandy Heights Road, Morristown. 973-971-3706.  Tue 4/9 Seton Hall University Faculty Jazz Ensemble at South Orange Performing Arts Center, 7:30 PM. One SOPAC Way, South Orange. 973-275-1114. www.sopacnow.org  Tue 4/10 Diana Moser’s Composers Big Band at Meadowlands Environment Center, 8:00 PM. Program includes the world premiere of Diane Moser’s Music of the Spheres suite and selections from George Russell’s Jazz in the Space Age. 2 De Korte Park Plaza, Lyndhurst. 201-460-8300. www.njmeadowlands.gov  Thu 4/11 Vince Ector Quartet at Makeda, 7:30 PM. 338 George Street, New Brunswick. 732-545-5115. www.makedas.com  Thu 4/11 10 Jazz West at The Publick House, 7:00 PM. 111 Main Street, Chester. 908-879-6878.  Fri 4/12 – Sat 4/13 Billy Drummond Trio at Shanghai Jazz, 6:30 and 8:30 PM. (4/13 shows at 6:15 and 6:35 PM.) 24 Main Street, Madison. 973-822-2899. www.shanghaijazz.com  Fri 4/12, 4/19: Lauren Hooker at Phoebe’s Place, 8:00 PM. 445 Cedar Lane, Teaneck. 347-230-2388. www.phoebespl.com  Fri 4/12 Kazzrie Jaxen Quartet at Trumpets, 8:00 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. www.trumpetsjazz.com  Fri 4/12 B. D. Lenz with Lelica at Bea McNally’s Pub, 10:00 PM. 109 Grand Avenue, Hackettstown. 908-813-1900.  Fri 4/12 Diana Krall at Prudential Hall, New Jersey Performing Arts Center, 8:00 PM. One Center Street, Newark. 973-642-8989. www.njpac.org  Fri 4/12 Mauricio De Souza and Bossa Brasil at Matawan Aberdeen Public Library, 7:00 PM. 165 Main Street, Matawan. 782-583-9100. http://www.lmxac.org/mata/  Fri 4/12 Daniela Schaechter Duo at Metuchen Inn, 7:00 PM. 424 Middlesex Avenue, Metuchen. 732-494-6414.  Fri 4/12 WBGO Presents Mauricio De Souza and Bossa Brasil at Gateway Newark II, 12:00 noon. 2 Gateway Center, Newark. 9 7 3 - 5 6 5 - 3 2 4 5 . h t t p s : / / w w w . w e l l s f a r g o . c om / l oc a t or / bank/2__GATEWAY__CENTER_NEWARK_NJ_07102/  Sat 4/13 Dave Stryker and Blue to the Bone CD Release Party at Hat City Kitchen, 9:00 PM. 459 Valley Street, Orange. 862252-9147. www.hatcitykitchen.com  Sat 4/13 Gerald Hayes at Candlelight Lounge, 3:30 PM. 24 Passaic Street, Trenton. 609-695-9612. www.jazztrenton.com  Sat 4/13 Eric Mintel Quartet at Alba Vineyard, 1:30 PM. 269 Route 627, Milford. 908-995-7800. www.albavineyard.com  Sat 4/13 WBGO KidsJazz Presents Mimi Jones: We All Get the Blues at Montclair Art Museum, 12:30 PM. Free; all adults must be accompanied by a child. 3 South Mountain Avenue, Monclair. 973-746-5555. www.montclair-art.com ; www.wbgo.org/kidsjazz/  Sat 4/13 Mike Freeman ZonaVibe at Memorial Hall, Cathedral of the Woods, 7:30 PM. 100 Stokes Road, Medford Lakes. 609654-4220. www.jazzandbluesshowcase.com  Sat 4/13 Jam Session at Makeda, 9:00 PM. 338 George Street, New Brunswick. 732-545-5115. www.makedas.com ;  Sat 4/13 Blue Soul at Rod’s Steak and Seafood Grille, 9:00 PM. One Convent Road, Morristown. 973-539-6666.  Sat 4/13 Darla and Rich Jazz Quartet at Wall Library, Monmouth County Library, 2:00 PM. 2700 Allaire Road, Wall Township. 732-449-8877. www.monmouthcountylib.org  Sat 4/13 Carrie Jackson at The Mill, 8:00 PM. 101 Old Mill Road, Spring Lake Heights. 732-449-1800. www.themillnj.com  Sat 4/13 Audrey Welber at Salt Creek Grille, 7:00 PM. 1 Rockingham Row, Princeton. 609-419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com  Sat 4/13 Seth Tieger at Maggie’s Uptown, 9:00 PM. 145 Country Club Drive, Lakewood. 732-363-8125, ext. 14.  Sat 4/13 Joe Vitaliano at La Tavola Cucina, 7:00 PM. 700 Old Bridge Turnpike, South River. 732-238-2111.  Sat 4/13 Hernan Romero at Trumpets, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. www.trumpetsjazz.com  Sun 4/14 Marlene VerPlanck at South Orange Performing Arts Center, 7:00 PM. One SOPAC Way, South Orange. 973-2751114. www.sopacnow.org  Sun 4/14 Sixth Street Trio at Alba Vineyard, 1:30 PM. 269 Route 627, Milford. 908-995-7800. www.albavineyard.com  Sun 4/14 John Barry Group at Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 2:00 PM. 46 Yard Road, Pennington. 609-737-4465.  Sun 4/14 S.O.F.I.A. Fundraiser at Trumpets, 2:00 PM. Artists include Betty Liste, Cynthia Holiday, Enrico Granafei, and others. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600.  Sun 4/14 Jon Faddis and The Red Bank Orchestra at Count 26

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Basie Theatre, 4:00 PM. Program includes a re-creation of the Miles Davis/Gil Evans album Porgy and Bess.99 Monmouth Street, Red Bank. 732-842-9000. www.countbasietheatre.org Sun 4/14 Sherrie Maricle’s DIVA Jazz Orchestra at Mayo Performing Arts Center, 3:00 PM. 100 South Street, Morristown. 973-539-8008. www.mayoarts.org Mon 4/15 West Orange High School Jazz Band at Trumpets, 7:00 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. Tue 4/16 Tumulty’s Pub. Jarrett Walser Group at 8:00 PM; Jam Session at 9:30 PM. 361 George Street, New Brunswick. 732545-6205. www.tumultys.com ; www.nbjp.org Thu 4/18 Dick Gratton at New Cedar Pub,Cedar Gardens, 8:00 PM. 661 Route 33, Mercerville. 609-587-1511. Thu 4/18 Filthy Rich and the Poor Boys at Shipwreck Grill, 7:00 PM. 720 Ashley Avenue, Brielle. 732-292-9380. Thu 4/18 Sharel Cassity Quartet at Makeda, 7:30 PM. 338 George Street, New Brunswick. 732-545-5115. www.makedas.com ; www.nbjp.org Fri 4/19, 4/26: Blue Soul at Rod’s Steak and Seafood Grille, 9:00 PM. One Convent Road, Morristown. 973-539-6666. Fri 4/19 – Sat 4/20 Alice and Cecile at Trumpets, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. Fri 4/19 B. D. Lenz Trio at Whole Foods Princeton, 5:00 PM. 3495 US Route 1 South, Princeton. 609-799-2919. Fri 4/19 The Four Freshmen at The Newton Theatre, 7:00 PM. 234 Spring Street, Newton. 973-383-3700. Fri 4/19 Kevin Hildebrandt at Maggie’s Tiki Bar, 5:30 PM. 145 Country Club Drive, Lakewood. 732-363-8125, ext. 32. Fri 4/19 Emmet Cohen Trio at Shanghai Jazz, 6:30 and 8:30 PM. 24 Main Street, Madison. 973-822-2899. www.shanghaijazz.com Sat 4/20 Nat Janoff at Session Bistro, 7:30 PM. 245 Maywood Avenue, Maywood. 201-880-7810. www.sessionbistro.com Sat 4/20 WBGO KidsJazz Presents Lenny White: Jazz for Kids, Performed with Kids at Newark Museum, 12:30 PM. Free; adults must be accompanied by a child. 49 Washington Street, Newark. 973-596-6550. www.newarkmuseum.org Sat 4/20 Dave McCarthy at Maggie’s Uptown, 5:30 PM. 145 Country Club Drive, Lakewood. 732-363-8125, ext. 14. Sat 4/20 Mr. Chris and Alley at Small World Coffee, 8:30 PM. 14 Witherspoon Street, Princeton. 609-924-4377. Sat 4/20 Jerry Topinka Quartet at The Mill, 8:00 PM. 101 Old Mill Road, Spring Lake Heights. 732-449-1800. www.themillnj.com Sat 4/20 Nilson Matta Brazilian Jazz Trio at Shanghai Jazz, 6:15 and 8:35 PM. 24 Main Street, Madison. 973-822-2899. Sat 4/20 ‘History of Jazz’ with Gordon James and Matt King: A Lecture with Musical Examples at Mahwah Public Library, 2:00 PM. 100 Ridge Road, Mahwah. 201-529-READ. Sat 4/20 Carrie Jackson at Townley Presbyterian Church, 6:00 PM. 829 Salem Road, Union. 908-686-1028. Sat 4/20 Jack Kennan and Mike Lawton at La Tavola Cucina, 7:00 PM. 700 Old Bridge Turnpike, South River. 732-238-2111. www.latavolacucinanj.com Sun 4/21 Jane Stuart Sings A Tribute to the Great Ladies of Jazz at Mahwah Public Library, 2:00 PM. Free. 100 Ridge Road, Mahwah. 201-529-READ. www.mahwahlibrary.org Sun 4/21 R&B Goes Jazz: Don Braden Quartet featuring Brandon McCune and Cecil Brooks III at Luna Stage, 7:30 PM. 555 Valley Road, West Orange. 973-395-5551. www.lunastage.org Sun 4/21 Gary Mazzarulli at Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 2:00 PM. 46 Yard Road, Pennington. 609-737-4465. Sun 4/21 Carrie Jackson at Hotel Tides, 10:00 PM. 408 Seventh Avenue, Asbury Park. 732-897-7744. www.hotaltides.com Tue 4/23 Boney James at Bergen Performing Arts Center, 8:00 PM. 30 North Van Brunt Street, Englewood. 201-816-8160. www.bergenpac.org Tue 4/23 Tumulty’s Pub. Hank Mason Group at 8:00 PM; Jam Session at 9:30 PM. 361 George Street, New Brunswick. 732545-6205. www.tumultys.com ; www.nbjp.org Tue 4/23 Tommy Pass Quintet at Amici Milano, 7:00 PM. 600 Chestnut Avenue, Trenton. 609-396-6300. www.amicimilano.com Tue 4/23 Andre and Cirell: A Musical Varietal Dinner and Show at Solari’s, 8:00 PM. 61 River Street, Hackensack. 201-487-1969. Wed 4/24 Anderson Twins Salute The Dorsey Brothers at Bickford Theatre, Morris Museum, 8:00 PM. 6 Normandy Heights Road, Morristown. 973-971-3706. www.morrismuseum.org ; Wed 4/24 One More Once Big Band and Saddle Brook High School Jazz Band at Trumpets, 7:30 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. www.trumpetsjazz.com Thu 4/25 Ralph Peterson Fo’tet at Makeda, 7:30 PM. 338 George Street, New Brunswick. 732-545-5115. Thu 4/25 Amy Coleman Quartet at Trumpets, 7:30 and 9:15 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. www.trumpetsjazz.com Thu 4/25 Gina Fox at Shipwreck Grill, 7:00 PM. 720 Ashley Avenue, Brielle. 732-292-9380. www.shipwreckgrill.com Fri 4/26 Peter Furlan at Trumpets, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. www.trumpetsjazz.com Fri 4/26 Esperanza Spalding: Radio Music Society at Mayo Performing Arts Center, 8:00 PM. 100 South Street, Morristown. Fri 4/26 Hopewell Valley Vineyards Jazz Ensemble at Hopewell

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Valley Vineyards, 6:00 PM. 46 Yard Road, Pennington. 609-7374465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com Fri 4/26 Jerry Vivino Quartet at Shanghai Jazz, 6:30 and 8:30 PM. 24 Main Street, Madison. 973-822-2899. Fri 4/26 Frank Piombo and Rod Williams at Crossfire Lounge, Stanhope House, 7:00 PM. 45 Main Street, Stanhope. Sat 4/27: Red Bank Blues Band at Giamano’s, 8:00 PM. 301 Main Street, Bradley Beach. 732-775-4275. www.giamanos.com Sat 4/27 Kevin Hildebrandt Trio at Delta’s, 6:30 PM. 19 Dennuis Street, New Brunswick. 732-249-1551. www.deltasrestaurant.com Sat 4/27 Dave Mullen at Smokey’s Tavern, 9:00 PM. 2 Vernon Crossing Road, Vernon. 973-764-2600. www.smokeystavern.com Sat 4/27 Enrico Granafei Quartet at Trumpets, 8:00 and 10:00 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. Sat 4/27 Christian Sands Trio at Shanghai Jazz, 6:15 and 8:35 PM. 24 Main Street, Madison. 973-822-2899. Sat 4/27 James Cotton at Stanhope House, 6:00 PM. 45 Main Street, Stanhope. 973-347-7777. www.stanhopehousenj.com Sun 4/28 Jazz 4 Kids: A Lecture and Concert Explaining the Origin and Elements of Jazz at Tenafly Public Library, 2:00 PM. Featuring The Lauren Hooker Quartet with Vince Ector. 100 Riveredge Road, Tenafly. 201-568-8680. tenafly.bccls.org Sun 4/28 Wenonah Brooks with special guest Houston Person at Off-Broadstreet Theatre, 7:00 PM. 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com Sun 4/28 Barbara Rose at Hotel Tides, 7:00 PM. 408 Seventh Avenue, Asbury Park. 732-897-7744. www.hotaltides.com Sun 4/28 Virginia Mayhew Quartet at Monmouth County Library, 2:00 PM. 125 Symmes Drive, Manalapan. Sun 4/28 Wonderland featuring Angela Ware at Trumpets, 7:30 and 9:15 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. Sun 4/28 Cyrille Aimee at Shanghai Jazz, 5:15 and 7:15 PM. All seats by reservation only. 24 Main Street, Madison. 973-822-2899. Sun 4/28 Darla and Rich at Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 2:00 PM. 46 Yard Road, Pennington. 609-737-4465. Sun 4/28 Russ Kassoff Trio at Rutherfurd Hall, 3:00 PM. 1686 Route 517, Allamuchy. 908-852-1894, ext. 334. Mon 4/29 Gordon Webster at Bickford Theatre, Morris Museum, 8:00 PM. 6 Normandy Heights Road, Morristown. 973-971-3706. Tue 4/30 Chris Botti at Count Basie Theatre, 8:00 PM. 99 Monmouth Street, Red Bank. 732-842-9000. Tue 4/30 Bergen Academies Jazz Band at Trumpets, 8:00 PM. 6 Depot Square, Montclair. 973-744-2600. www.trumpetsjazz.com

...AND BEYOND  Fri 4/5 Buttonwood Tree Performing Arts and Cultural Center. 8th Annual Connecticut Jazz Composers and Improvisers Festival: Steve Dalachinsky with Gebhard Ullman and Joe Fonda at 7:30 PM; Terry Jenoure at 8:30 PM; Michael Jefry Stevens Quartet at 9:30 PM. 605 Main Street, Middletown, CT. 860-347-4957. www.buttonwood.org  Mon 4/8 Jeff Ballard Fairground featuring Eddie Henderson and Kevin Hays at The Falcon, 7:00 PM. 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro NY. 845-236-7970. www.liveatthefalcon.com  Thu 4/11 Bill Frisell at Bridge Street Live, 9:00 PM. 41 Bridge Street, Collinsville CT. 860-693-9762. www.41bridgestreet.com  Sun 4/14 Jeff Lorber Fusion featuring Jimmy Haslip and Eric Marienthal at Bridge Street Live, 4:00 PM. 41 Bridge Street, Collinsville CT. 860-693-9762. www.41bridgestreet.com  Mon 4/15 Roland Vazquez at The Falcon, 7:00 PM. 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro NY. 845-236-7970. www.liveatthefalcon.com  Wed 4/17 Purchase Jazz Orchestra at The Falcon, 7:00 PM. 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro NY. 845-236-7970. Thu 4/18 Pablo Aslan Quintet with Oscar Feldman at The Falcon, 7:00 PM. 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro NY. 845-236-7970.  Sat 4/20 BANN featuring Seamus Blake and Adam Nussbaum at The Falcon, 7:00 PM. 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro NY.  Sun 4/21 Fundraiser for 2013 Hudson Valley Jazz Festival at Seligman Studios, 4:00 PM. Artists include Jeff Ciampa, Richie Morales, Steve Rubin, Rick Savage. 23 White Oak Drive, Chester NY. 917-903-4380. www.hudsonvalleyjazzfest.org  Mon 4/22 Larry Willis Quartet with Steve Davis at Black Eyed Sally’s 8:00 PM. Jam Session to follow. 350 Asylum Street, Hartford CT. 860-278-7427. www.blackeyedsallys.com  Wed 4/24 Jack Wilkins and Peter Bernstein at Route 7 Music, 7:30 PM. 355 Federal Road, Brookfield CT. 203-775-6377.  Thu 4/25 Ali Ryerson Quintet with Pete Levin and Mark Egan at The Falcon, 7:00 PM. 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro NY.  Fri 4/26 Wayne Escoffery Quintet at Firehouse 12, 8:30 and 10:00 PM. 45 Crown Street, New Haven CT. 203-785-0468.  Fri 4/26 T. S. Monk Quartet at Oasis Room, Garde Arts Center, 8:00 PM. 325 State Street, New London CT. 860-444-7373.  Mon 4/29 Connecticut College Showcase featuring students from Jackie McLean Institute of Jazz (University of Hartford), Western Connecticut State University, and University of Connecticut at Black Eyed Sally’s 8:00 PM. 350 Asylum Street, Hartford CT. 860-278-7427. www.blackeyedsallys.com  

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Clubs & Venues 55 Bar, 55 Christopher St. (betw 6th & 7th Ave.), 212-929-9883, www.55bar.com 92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10128 212.415.5500, www.92ndsty.org Aaron Davis Hall, City College of NY, Convent Ave., 212-6506900, www.aarondavishall.org Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center, Broadway & 65th St., 212-8755050, www.lincolncenter.org/default.asp Allen Room, Lincoln Center, Time Warner Center, Broadway and 60th, 5th floor, 212-258-9800, www.lincolncenter.org/default.asp American Museum of Natural History, 81st St. & Central Park W., 212-769-5100, www.amnh.org Arthur’s Tavern, 57 Grove St., 212-675-6879 or 917-301-8759, www.arthurstavernnyc.com Arts Maplewood, P.O. Box 383, Maplewood, NJ 07040; 973-3782133, www.artsmaplewood.org Avery Fischer Hall, Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave. & 65th St., 212-875-5030, www.lincolncenter.org Backroom at Freddie’s, 485 Dean St. (at 6th Ave.), Brooklyn, NY, 718-622-7035, www.freddysbackroom.com BAM Café, 30 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn, NY, 718-636-4100, www.bam.org Bar 4, 7 Ave and 15th, Brooklyn NY 11215, 718-832-9800, www.Bar4.net Bar on Fifth — Jazz at the Bar on Fifth, Music every night 8:00 PM - 11:00 PM, No cover charge, one drink minimum The Bar on Fifth at the Setai Fifth Avenue Hotel, 400 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, 212-695-4005—www.capellahotels.com/newyork/ Barbes, 376 9th St. (corner of 6th Ave.), Park Slope, Brooklyn, 718-965-9177, www.barbesbrooklyn.com Barge Music, Fulton Ferry Landing, Brooklyn, 718-624-2083, www.bargemusic.org B.B. King’s Blues Bar, 237 W. 42nd St., 212-997-4144, www.bbkingblues.com Beacon Theatre, 74th St. & Broadway, 212-496-7070 Bickford Theatre, on Columbia Turnpike @ Normandy Heights Road, east of downtown Morristown. 973-744-2600 Birdland, 315 W. 44th St., 212-581-3080 Blue Note, 131 W. 3rd St., 212-475-8592, www.bluenotejazz.com/newyork Bluestone Bar & Grill, 117 Columbia St., Brooklyn, NY, 718403-7450, www.bluestonebarngrill.com Bourbon Street Bar and Grille, 346 W. 46th St, NY, 10036, 212-245-2030, [email protected], [email protected] Bowery Poetry Club, 308 Bowery (at Bleecker), 212-614-0505, www.bowerypoetry.com Brooklyn Public Library, Grand Army Plaza, 2nd Fl, Brooklyn, NY, 718-230-2100, www.brooklynpubliclibrary.org Buttonwood Tree Performing Arts & Cultural Center, 605 Main St., Middletown, CT. 860-347-4957, www.buttonwood.org. Café Carlyle, 35 E. 76th St., 212-570-7189, www.thecarlyle.com Café Loup, 105 W. 13th St. (West Village) , between Sixth and Seventh Aves., 212-255-4746 Cafe Mozart, 308 Mamaroneck Ave., Mamaroneck, NY Café St. Bart’s, 109 E. 50th St. (at Park Ave.), 212-888-2664, www.cafestbarts.com Caffe Vivaldi, 32 Jones St, NYC; www.caffevivaldi.com Candlelight Lounge, 24 Passaic Street, Trenton. 609-695-9612. Carnegie Club, 156 W. 56th St., 212-957-9676, www.hospitalityholdings.com Carnegie Hall, 7th Av & 57th, 212-247-7800, www.carnegiehall.org Casa Dante, 737 Newark Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, www.casadante.com Cecil’s Jazz Club & Restaurant, 364 Valley Rd, West Orange, NJ, Phone: 973-736-4800, www.cecilsjazzclub.com Charley O’s, 713 Eighth Ave., 212-626-7300 Chico’s House Of Jazz, In Shoppes at the Arcade, 631 Lake Ave., Asbury Park, 732-774-5299 City Winery, 155 Varick St. Bet. Vandam & Spring St., 212-6080555. www.citywinery.com Cleopatra’s Needle, 2485 Broadway (betw 92nd & 93rd), 212-769-6969, www.cleopatrasneedleny.com Cobi’s Place, 158 W. 48th (bet 5th & 6th Av.), 516-922-2010 Copeland’s, 547 W. 145th St. (at Bdwy), 212-234-2356 Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia St., 212-989-9319, www. corneliastreetcafe.com Creole Café, 2167 Third Ave (at 118th), 212-876-8838. Crossroads at Garwood, 78 North Ave., Garwood, NJ 07027, 908-232-5666 Crossroads – 78 North Avenue, Garwood, NJ Cutting Room, 19 W. 24th St, Tel: 212-691-1900, www.thecuttingroomnyc.com Destino, 891 First Ave. & 50th St., 212-751-0700 Detour, 349 E. 13th St. (betw 1st & 2nd Ave.), 212-533-6212, www.jazzatdetour.com Division Street Grill, 26 North Division Street, Peekskill, NY, 914-739-6380, www.divisionstreetgrill.com Dizzy’s Club Coca Cola, Broadway at 60th St., 5th Floor, 212258-9595, www.jalc.com DROM, 85 Avenue A, New York, 212-777-1157, www.dromnyc.com/ The Ear Inn, 326 Spring St., NY, 212-226-9060, www.earinn.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

El Museo Del Barrio, 1230 Fifth Ave (at 104th St.), Tel: 212-8317272, Fax: 212-831-7927, www.elmuseo.org The Encore, 266 W. 47th St., 212-221-3960, www.theencorenyc.com The Falcon, 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro, NY., 845) 236-7970, Fat Cat, 75 Christopher St. (at &th Ave.), 212-675-7369, www.fatcatjazz.com Feinstein’s at Loew’s Regency, 540 Park Avenue (at 61st Street), NY, 212-339-4095, feinsteinsattheregency.com Five Spot, 459 Myrtle Ave, Brooklyn, NY, 718-852-0202, www.fivespotsoulfood.com Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Blvd., Flushing, NY, 718-463-7700 x222, www.flushingtownhall.org For My Sweet, 1103 Fulton St., Brooklyn, NY 718-857-1427 Frank’s Cocktail Lounge, 660 Fulton St. (at Lafayette), Brooklyn, NY, 718-625-9339, www.frankscocktaillounge.com Galapagos, 70 N. 6th St., Brooklyn, NY, 718-782-5188, www.galapagosartspace.com Garage Restaurant and Café, 99 Seventh Ave. (betw 4th and Bleecker), 212-645-0600, www.garagerest.com Garden Café, 4961 Broadway, by 207th St., New York, 10034, 212-544-9480 Ginny’s Supper Club, 310 Malcolm X Boulevard Manhattan, NY 10027, 212-792-9001, http://redroosterharlem.com/ginnys/ Glen Rock Inn, 222 Rock Road, Glen Rock, NJ, (201) 445-2362, www.glenrockinn.com Greenwich Village Bistro, 13 Carmine St., 212-206-9777, www.greenwichvillagebistro.com Harlem Tea Room, 1793A Madison Ave., 212-348-3471, www.harlemtearoom.com Hat City Kitchen, 459 Valley Street, Orange. 862-252-9147. www.hatcitykitchen.com Havana Central West End, 2911 Broadway/114th St), NYC, 212-662-8830, www.havanacentral.com Hibiscus Restaurant, 270 S. Street, Morristown, NJ, 973-3590200, www.hibiscusrestaurantnj.com Highline Ballroom, 431 West 16th St (between 9th & 10th Ave. www.highlineballroom.com, 212-414-4314. Hopewell Valley Bistro, 15 East Broad St, Hopewell, NJ 08525, 609-466-9889, www.hopewellvalleybistro.com Hyatt New Brunswick, 2 Albany St., New Brunswick, NJ IBeam Music Studio, 168 7th St., Brooklyn, ibeambrooklyn.com Iridium, 1650 Broadway, 212-582-2121, iridiumjazzclub.com Jazz 966, 966 Fulton St., Brooklyn, NY, 718-638-6910 Jazz at Lincoln Center, 33 W. 60th St., 212-258-9800, www.jalc.org Frederick P. Rose Hall, Broadway at 60th St., 5th Floor Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, Reservations: 212-258-9595 Rose Theater, Tickets: 212-721-6500 The Allen Room, Tickets: 212-721-6500 Jazz Gallery, 290 Hudson St., Tel: 212-242-1063, Fax: 212-2420491, www.jazzgallery.org The Jazz Spot, 375 Kosciuszko St. (enter at 179 Marcus Garvey Blvd.), Brooklyn, NY, 718-453-7825, www.thejazz.8m.com Jazz Standard, 116 E. 27th St., 212-576-2232, www.jazzstandard.net Joe’s Pub at the Public Theater, 425 Lafayette St & Astor Pl., 212-539-8778, www.joespub.com John Birks Gillespie Auditorium (see Baha’i Center) Jules Bistro, 65 St. Marks Place, Tel: 212-477-5560, Fax: 212-4200998, www.julesbistro.com Kasser Theater, 1 Normal Avenue, Montclair State College, Montclair, 973-655-4000, www.montclair.edu/arts/ performancefacilities/alexanderkasser.html Key Club, 58 Park Place, Newark, NJ, (973) 799-0306, www.keyclubnj.com Kitano Hotel, 66 Park Ave., 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com Knickerbocker Bar & Grill, 33 University Pl., 212-228-8490, www.knickerbockerbarandgrill.com The Knitting Factory, 74 Leonard St., Tel: 212-219-3132, www.knittingfactory.com La Famiglia Sorrento, 631 Central Ave, Westfield, NJ, 07090, 908-232-2642, www.lafamigliasorrento.com La Lanterna (Bar Next Door at La Lanterna), 129 MacDougal Street, New York, 212-529-5945, www.lalanternarcaffe.com Le Grand Dakar Cafe, 285 Grand Ave, Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/le-grand-dakar/ Le Madeleine, 403 W. 43rd St. (betw 9th & 10th Ave.), New York, New York, 212-246-2993, www.lemadeleine.com Lenox Lounge, 288 Lenox Ave. (above 124th St.), 212-427-0253, www.lenoxlounge.com Les Gallery Clemente Soto Velez, 107 Suffolk St. (at Rivington St.), 212-260-4080 Live @ The Falcon, 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY 12542, Living Room, 154 Ludlow St. (betw Rivington & Stanton), 212-533-7235, www.livingroomny.com The Local 269, 269 E. Houston St. (corner of Suffolk St.), NYC Makor, 35 W. 67th St. (at Columbus Ave.), 212-601-1000, www.makor.org Lounge Zen, 254 DeGraw Ave, Teaneck, NJ, (201) 692-8585, www.lounge-zen.com Makeda, George St., New Brunswick. NJ, www.nbjp.org Maxwell’s, 1039 Washington Street, Hoboken, NJ, 201-653-1703, www.maxwellsnj.com

McCarter Theater, 91 University Pl., Princeton, 609-258-2787, www.mccarter.org Merkin Concert Hall, Kaufman Center, 129 W. 67th St. (betw Broadway & Amsterdam), 212-501-3330, www.ekcc.org/ merkin.htm Metropolitan Room, 34 West 22nd Street New York City, NY 10012, 212-206-0440, MetroTech Commons, Flatbush & Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, NY, 718-488-8200 or 718-636-4100 (BAM) Mirelle’s, 170 Post Ave., Westbury, NY, 516-338-4933 Mixed Notes Café, 333 Elmont Rd., Elmont, NY (Queens area), 516-328-2233, www.mixednotescafe.com Mo-Bay Uptown, 17 W. 125th St., 212-876-9300, www.mobayrestaurant.com Montauk Club, 25 Eighth Ave., Brooklyn, NY, 718-638-0800, www.montaukclub.com Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Ave. (between 103rd & 104th St.), 212-534-1672, www.mcny.org Musicians’ Local 802, 332 W. 48th St., 718-468-7376 or 860-231-0663 Newark Museum, 49 Washington Street, Newark, New Jersey 07102-3176, 973-596-6550, www.newarkmuseum.org New Jersey Performing Arts Center, 1 Center St., Newark, NJ, 07102, 973-642-8989, www.njpac.org New School Performance Space, 55 W. 13th St., 5th Floor (betw 5th & 6th Ave.), 212-229-5896, www.newschool.edu. New School University-Tishman Auditorium, 66 W. 12th St., 1st Floor, Room 106, 212-229-5488, www.newschool.edu New York City Baha’i Center, 53 E. 11th St. (betw Broadway & University), 212-222-5159, www.bahainyc.org Night of the Cookers, 767 Fulton St., Brooklyn, NY, Tel: 718-7971197, Fax: 718-797-0975 North Square Lounge, 103 Waverly Pl. (at MacDougal St.), 212-254-1200, www.northsquarejazz.com Novita Bistro & Lounge, 25 New St, Metuchen. Nublu, 62 Ave. C (betw 4th & 5th St.), 212-979-9925, www.nublu.net Nuyorican Poet’s Café, 236 E. 3rd St. (betw Ave. B & C), 212505-8183, www.nuyorican.org Oak Room at The Algonquin Hotel, 59 W. 44th St. (betw 5th and 6th Ave.), 212-840-6800, www.thealgonquin.net Oceana Restaurant, 120 West 49th Street, New York, NY 10020 212-759-5941, www.oceanarestaurant.com Opia, 130 East 57th St, New York, NY 10022, 212-688-3939 www.opiarestaurant.com Orchid, 765 Sixth Ave. (betw 25th & 26th St.), 212-206-9928 Palazzo Restaurant, 11 South Fullerton Avenue, Montclair. 973746-6778. www.palazzonj.com Performance Space 122, 150 First Av., 212-477-5829, www.ps122.org Pigalle, 790 8th Ave. 212-489-2233. www.pigallenyc.com Priory Restaurant & Jazz Club: 223 W Market St., Newark, NJ 07103, 973-639-7885 Private Place, 29 S. Center Street, South Orange, NJ, 973-6756620 www.privateplacelounge.com Proper Café, 217-01 Linden Blvd., Queens, 718-341-2233 Prospect Park Bandshell, 9th St. & Prospect Park W., Brooklyn, NY, 718-768-0855 Prospect Wine Bar & Bistro, 16 Prospect St. Westfield, NJ, 908-232-7320, www.16prospect.com, www.cjayrecords.com Puppets Jazz Bar, Puppet Jazz Bar, 481 5th Avenue, NY 11215, 718- 499-2622, www.PuppetsJazz.com Red Eye Grill, 890 Seventh Ave. (at 56th St.), 212-541-9000, www.redeyegrill.com Ridgefield Playhouse, 80 East Ridge, parallel to Main St., Ridgefield, CT; ridgefieldplayhouse.org, 203-438-5795 Rockwood Music Hall, 196 Allen St, New York, NY 10002 212-477-4155 Rose Center (American Museum of Natural History), 81st St. (Central Park W. & Columbus), 212-769-5100, amnh.org/rose Rose Hall, 33 W. 60th St., 212-258-9800, www.jalc.org Rosendale Café, 434 Main St., PO Box 436, Rosendale, NY 12472, 845-658-9048, www.rosendalecafe.com Rubin Museum of Art - “Harlem in the Himalayas”, 150 W. 17th St. 212-620-5000. www.rmanyc.org Rustik, 471 DeKalb Ave, Brooklyn, NY, 347-406-9700, www. rustikrestaurant.com Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl, Brooklyn, 646-820-9452. www.shapeshifterlab.com St. Mark’s Church, 131 10th St. (at 2nd Ave.), 212-674-6377 St. Nick’s Pub, 773 St. Nicholas Av (at 149th), 212-283-9728 St. Peter’s Church, 619 Lexington (at 54th), 212-935-2200, www.saintpeters.org Salon at Rue 57, 60 West 57th Street, 212-307-5656, www.rue57.com Sasa’s Lounge, 924 Columbus Ave, Between 105th & 106th St. NY, NY 10025, 212-865-5159, www.sasasloungenyc.yolasite.com Savoy Grill, 60 Park Place, Newark, NJ 07102, 973-286-1700 Schomburg Center, 515 Malcolm X Blvd., 212-491-2200, www.nypl.org/research/sc/sc.html Session Bistro. 245 Maywood Avenue, Maywood. 201-880-7810. Shanghai Jazz, 24 Main St., Madison, NJ, 973-822-2899, www.shanghaijazz.com

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

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Clubs & Venues ShapeShifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Place, Brooklyn, NY 11215 www.shapeshifterlab.com Showman’s, 375 W. 125th St., 212-864-8941 Sidewalk Café, 94 Ave. A, 212-473-7373 Silver Spoon, 124 Main St., Cold Spring, NY 10516, 845-2652525, www.silverspooncoldpspring.com Sista’s Place, 456 Nostrand Ave. (at Jefferson Ave.), Brooklyn, NY, 718-398-1766, www.sistasplace.org Skippers Plane Street Pub, 304 University Ave. Newark NJ, 973733-9300, skippersplanestreetpub Smalls Jazz Club, 183 W. 10th St. (at 7th Ave.), 212-929-7565, www.SmallsJazzClub.com Smith’s Bar, 701 8th Ave, New York, 212-246-3268 Sofia’s Restaurant - Club Cache’ [downstairs], Edison Hotel, 221 W. 46th St. (between Broadway & 8th Ave), 212-719-5799 Somethin’ Jazz Club, 212 E. 52nd St., NY 10022, 212-371-7657 Sophie’s Bistro, 700 Hamilton St., Somerset. www.nbjp.org South Gate Restaurant & Bar, 154 Central Park South, 212-4845120, www.154southgate.com South Orange Performing Arts Center, One SOPAC Way, South Orange, NJ 07079, sopacnow.org, 973-313-2787 South Street Seaport, 207 Front St., 212-748-8600, www.southstseaport.org. Spoken Words Café, 266 4th Av, Brooklyn, 718-596-3923 Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse, 165 W. 65th St., 10th Floor, 212-721-6500, www.lincolncenter.org The Stone, Ave. C & 2nd St., www.thestonenyc.com Sugar Bar, 25 4 W. 72nd St ., 212-579-0222, www.sugarbarnyc.com Swing 46, 349 W. 46th St.(betw 8th & 9th Ave.), 212-262-9554, www.swing46.com Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, Tel: 212-864-1414, Fax: 212932-3228, www.symphonyspace.org Tea Lounge, 837 Union St. (betw 6th & 7th Ave), Park Slope, Broooklyn, 718-789-2762, www.tealoungeNY.com Terra Blues, 149 Bleecker St. (betw Thompson & LaGuardia), 212-777-7776, www.terrablues.com Theatre Row, 410 W. 42nd, 212-714-2442, www.theatrerow.org Tito Puente’s Restaurant and Cabaret, 64 City Island Avenue, City Island, Bronx, 718-885-3200, titopuentesrestaurant.com Tomi Jazz, 239 E. 53rd St., lower level. 646-497-1254, www.tomijazz.com Tonic, 107 Norfolk St. (betw Delancey & Rivington), Tel: 212358-7501, Fax: 212-358-1237, tonicnyc.com

Town Hall, 123 W. 43rd St., 212-997-1003 Trash Bar, 256 Grand St. 718-599-1000. www.thetrashbar.com Triad Theater, 158 W. 72nd St. (betw Broadway & Columbus Ave.), 212-362-2590, www.triadnyc.com Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers Street, 10007, [email protected], www.tribecapac.org Trumpets, 6 Depot Square, Montclair, NJ, 973-744-2600, www. trumpetsjazz.com Tumulty’s Pub, 361 George St., New Brunswick Turning Point Cafe, 468 Piermont Ave. Piermont, N.Y. 10968 (845) 359-1089, http://www.turningpointcafe.com/ Village Vanguard, 178 7th Avenue South, 212-255-4037, www.villagevanguard.net Vision Festival, 212-696-6681, [email protected], www.visionfestival.org Watchung Arts Center, 18 Stirling Rd, Watchung, NJ 07069, 908-753-0190, www.watchungarts.org Watercolor Café, 2094 Boston Post Road, Larchmont, NY 10538, 914-834-2213, www.watercolorcafe.net Weill Receital Hall at Carnegie Hall, 57th & 7th Ave, 212-247-7800 Williamsburg Music Center, 367 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11211, (718) 384-1654 www.wmcjazz.org Zankel Hall, 881 7th Ave, New York, 212-247-7800 Zebulon, 258 Wythe St., Brooklyn, NY, 11211, 718-218-6934, www.zebuloncafeconcert.com Zinc Bar, 82 West 3rd St. RECORD STORES Barnes & Noble, 1960 Broadway, at 67th St, 212-595-6859 Colony Music Center, 1619 Broadway. 212-265-2050, www.colonymusic.com Downtown Music Gallery, 13 Monroe St, New York, NY 10002, (212) 473-0043, www.downtownmusicgallery.com J&R Music World, 13 Monroe Street, 212-238-9000, www,jr.com Jazz Record Center, 236 W. 26th St., Room 804, 212-675-4480, www.jazzrecordcenter.com Norman’s Sound & Vision, 555 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, New York 11211 Princeton Record Exchange, 20 South Tulane Street, Princeton, NJ 08542, 609-921-0881, www.prex.com Rainbow Music 2002 Ltd., 130 1st Ave (between 7th & St. Marks Pl.), 212-505-1774 Scotti’s Records, 351 Springfield Ave, Summit, NJ, 07901, 908-277-3893, www.scotticd.com MUSIC STORES Manny’s Music, 156 W. 48th St. (betw. 6th and 7th Ave), 212-819-0576, Fax: 212-391-9250, www.mannysmusic.com

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Drummers World, Inc., 151 W. 46th St., NY, NY 10036, 212840-3057, 212-391-1185, www.drummersworld.com Roberto’s Woodwind & Brass, 149 West 46th St. NY, NY 10036, 646-366-0240, Repair Shop: 212-391-1315; 212-840-7224, www.robertoswoodwind.com Rod Baltimore Intl Woodwind & Brass, 168 W. 48 St. New York, NY 10036, 212-302-5893 Sam Ash, 160 West 48th St, 212-719-2299, www.samash.com Sadowsky Guitars Ltd, 2107 41st Avenue 4th Floor, Long Island City, NY 11101, 718-433-1990. www.sadowsky.com Steve Maxwell Vintage Drums, 723 7th Ave, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10019, 212-730-8138, www.maxwelldrums.com SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, CONSERVATORIES 92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10128 212.415.5500; www.92ndsty.org Brooklyn-Queens Conservatory of Music, 42-76 Main St., Flushing, NY, Tel: 718-461-8910, Fax: 718-886-2450 Brooklyn Conservatory of Music, 58 Seventh Ave., Brooklyn, NY, 718-622-3300, www.brooklynconservatory.com City College of NY-Jazz Program, 212-650-5411, Columbia University, 2960 Broadway, 10027 Drummers Collective, 541 6th Ave, New York, NY 10011, 212-741-0091, www.thecoll.com Five Towns College, 305 N. Service Rd., 516-424-7000, ext.163, Dix Hills, NY Greenwich House Music School, 46 Barrow St., Tel: 212-2424770, Fax: 212-366-9621, www.greenwichhouse.org Juilliard School of Music, 60 Lincoln Ctr, 212-799-5000 LaGuardia Community College/CUNI, 31-10 Thomson Ave., Long Island City, 718-482-5151 Lincoln Center — Jazz At Lincoln Center, 140 W. 65th St., 10023, 212-258-9816, 212-258-9900 Long Island University — Brooklyn Campus, Dept. of Music, University Plaza, Brooklyn, 718-488-1051, 718-488-1372 Manhattan School of Music, 120 Claremont Ave., 10027, 212-749-2805, 2802, 212-749-3025 New Jersey City University, 2039 Kennedy Blvd., Jersey City, NJ 07305, 888-441-6528 New School, 55 W. 13th St., 212-229-5896, 212-229-8936 New York University-Jazz/Contemporary Music Studies, 35 West 4th St. Room#777, 212-998-5446, 212-995-4043 New York Jazz Academy, (718) 426-0633, www.NYJazzAcademy.com Princeton University-Dept. of Music, Woolworth Center Musical Studies, Princeton, NJ, 609-258-4241, 609-258-6793 Queens College — Copland School of Music, City University of NY, Flushing, 718-997-3800 Rutgers Univ. at New Brunswick, Jazz Studies, Douglass Campus, PO Box 270, New Brunswick, NJ, 908-932-9302 Rutgers University Institute of Jazz Studies, 185 University Avenue, Newark NJ 07102, 973-353-5595 newarkwww.rutgers.edu/IJS/index1.html SUNY Purchase, 735 Anderson Hill Rd., Purchase, NY 914-251-6300, 914-251-6314 William Paterson University Jazz Studies Program, 300 Pompton Rd, Wayne, NJ, 973-720-2320

RADIO WBGO 88.3 FM, 54 Park Pl, Newark, NJ 07102, Tel: 973-6248880, Fax: 973-824-8888, www.wbgo.org WCWP, LIU/C.W. Post Campus WFDU, http://alpha.fdu.edu/wfdu/wfdufm/index2.html WKCR 89.9, Columbia University, 2920 Broadway Mailcode 2612, New York, NY 10027, Listener Line: (212) 8549920, www.columbia.edu/cu/wkcr, [email protected] One Great Song, Hosted by Jay Harris, www.wmnr.org (at 6 on Saturdays, and at www.tribecaradio.net at 11AM Sundays and again on Monday and Thursday nights at 11PM.) Lenore Raphael’s JazzSpot, www.purejazzradio.com.

PERFORMING GROUPS Westchester Jazz Orchestra, Emily Tabin, Director, PO Box 506, Chappaqua, NY 10514, 914-861-9100, www.westjazzorch.org

ADDITIONAL JAZZ RESOURCES Big Apple Jazz, www.bigapplejazz.com, 718-606-8442, [email protected] Louis Armstrong House, 34-56 107th St, Corona, NY 11368, 718-997-3670, www.satchmo.net Institute of Jazz Studies, John Cotton Dana Library, RutgersUniv, 185 University Av, Newark, NJ, 07102, 973-353-5595 Jazzmobile, Inc., 154 W. 126th St., 10027, 212-866-4900, www.jazzmobile.org Jazz Museum in Harlem, 104 E. 126th St., 212-348-8300, www.jazzmuseuminharlem.org Jazz Foundation of America, 322 W. 48th St. 10036, 212-245-3999, www.jazzfoundation.org New Jersey Jazz Society, 1-800-303-NJJS, www.njjs.org New York Blues & Jazz Society, www.NYBluesandJazz.org Rubin Museum, 150 W. 17th St, New York, NY, 212-620-5000 ex 344, www.rmanyc.org.   

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

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Duane Eubanks (Continued from page 12) to make that phone call. But as far as being motivated, that’s easy for me. I saw my brother go from working at a bakery to being watched on TVs all over the world. How is that for motivation? JI: Recently, I saw a post you made online about not having a gig for New Year’s Eve for the first time - and you pointed up the positive side of being able to stay home with family instead. DE: When I was younger, I believed the stereotype that all musicians worked on New Years Eve. It was said to set the trend for you the following year. If you had a gig - good sign. If you didn’t - bad sign. I also heard Tommy Flanagan say that musicians get paid to get to the gig, and we play for free. Getting to the gig is more work than sight reading someone’s book these days. I thought about the headache of getting around New York on New Years Eve. I then thought about avoiding the police. Then I thought about all of the incredibly inebriated crowds I would be up against. Now that I’m older, that wild party atmosphere is, for the most part, out of my system. I felt relieved when the gig I had was cancelled. I mean what a relief to know that I can sit in civil surroundings with my beautiful family and bring in the New Year with them. Though the gig might have paid a little more, it’s okay to ask yourself, “Is it worth it?” And it’s okay to say, “No!” I now refuse to allow one night of music become a measuring tool for my success for an entire year. JI: Could you talk about what if any are the broader changes in the music business and performance opportunities for you that this might reflect? DE: Things are always changing. The biggest change I see is that musicians now have to take more control of their careers and the direction in which they are headed - which, if you really think about it, shouldn’t be a second thought. Nowadays, as a musician, you have to be your own personal record label. Many of us are now seeing exactly how much needs to be done to ensure certain things. Also realizing how much or little record labels do or did for them. Artists’ must now take a more openly creative look at themselves, their musical intent, and how to reach their audience. JI: What are your opinions about the benefits or shortcomings of the academic route versus performance and apprenticeship in the real world, which had been the pathway to a performance career in the past? DE: Academic vs. street knowledge - Hmmm!! I think it’s possible to get the best of both worlds. I think being on a college campus grants you the opportunity to put in that daily three to four hours you really need to develop as a serious To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

musician. I am extremely impressed with the technical facility that I hear from younger musicians. But there always appears to be something missing. After two or three tunes, I’m tired from hearing so many notes on rapid fire at the same volume. There is no school like being on stage with Jackie McLean, Art Farmer, Art Taylor, Clifford Jordan, the list goes on. At a point in time these bad MFs all had working bands, in which, young musicians could learn the real sh*t. The true authenticity of playing music from real deal cats that got it from the geniuses that helped them ... Back to the college technicians … Though it is impressive to get around your instrument, if you are not moving people emotionally, I don’t see the point! I used to go to Bradley’s because I knew that musicians, that were continuing the legacy of the music that I love to perform, would be there doing exactly what I wished to be doing one day. I’d go and study their every move: how they reacted to each other, how they talked to each other, who drank. Sometimes I’d check out what they drank, what tunes they called, in which order did they call them, solo orders. I was “in school” and there was no University that could have topped that experience. With the amount of information going around and the energy from all of those seasoned scholars, you couldn’t help but to be inspired. I think that academia allows you to overlook very important things that you can only get by checking out the scene - little things, like how to call a set, how to blend with another horn player, how to run a bandstand. These things you get together through experience. Now, the scene is not in place and that’s hurting cats and the quality of music, in my opinion. I think the emphasis that the industry put on younger performers - and overlooking the guys that were holding down the principles and the tradition of what the music was built from - hurt or crippled things. I look at guys like Eddie Henderson, Gary Bartz, James Spaulding, George Cables, Sonny Fortune, Harold Mabern, Victor Lewis, Billy Hart, and Buster Williams, off the top of my head. These guys should be headlining the festivals. These are some of the names that musicians should be practicing their butts for a chance to share the stage. The industry took the leadership role out of the hands of the elder statesmen. Replacing grown men with kids only works for video games. There are so many others that come to mind as well. But I think the cats on that musical level are the key to instill the degree of respect that is lacking. Students should be practicing in hopes of sharing the stage and learning from them. The industry gave the nod to younger musicians, who have less experience, less knowledge, and much less to say as individuals no real story to tell! I think that changed things. It changed the flow of information. It takes a lot more than technique to make a genuine statement playing this music. If the scene is shaky then academia becomes the new scene. JI: Benny Golson, Jimmy Heath, James Moody, Donald Byrd are among the influential jazz artists with whom you’ve played. Talk about some of the key understandings about performance, and or music business and or leadership that you might have gleaned from those experiences and

associations. DE: Those guys are a major reason that there is a vocabulary for us to try to master. The one thing I got from those guys is that they all have love for the music. They embrace the opportunity to play it and they are still working on their art. I hear Benny Golson and he still sounds modern. I also get the sense that they have fun while performing. That love transcends to the audience. I love to hear the many stories they all tell - its a comedic history lesson. They were all very encouraging to me and I hope to uphold that characteristic. Lastly, the need for me to practice was always ringing in my head. I always left inspired by those guys. That’s the sign of real dudes. That’s not as easy to as it may seem. I think that’s why they all remain on such a high level for so many years. We owe so much to those guys and they are still sharing their gift, knowledge, and experience. I hope to measure up one day. JI: What do you say to fans who are curious about improvisation and what the process is about? DE: The art of improvisation is a struggle to trust yourself to be able to make good musical decisions while logically reacting to what others are doing around you doth the intent to enlighten the listener. JI: What are your goals? DE: My goals are to continue to work hard on my craft and to do what I can to uphold and share what little I know to whoever needs it. I’m looking to record again sometime soon. I feel really good about the group of guys I’m using these days. I’ve been trying to keep a couple of gigs in the books for us, I think it’s time to take things to the next level, We have a lot of great music ready to be documented. JI: Is there anything you’d like to promote or discuss that I haven’t prompted you about? DE: My band will perform at Small’s on May 16 and Smoke as part of their Miles Davis Festival on June 19. I’m working hard at keeping us playing until the opportunity to record arises. Keep an eye and ear out for us. I just received a CD from a band that I love to perform with: Jeff Williams Quartet. Its called The Listener. It should be available for purchase early June. In listening, it is by far, the best documentation of my ability as an improvising trumpeter. All of my performance dates can be found at DuaneEubanks.com  “It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character.”

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That paradigm has been re-shaped and re-formed into one that is still evolving, and has not solidified yet—but is taking shape.

Robin Eubanks (Continued from page 14) come up through the ranks and start playing with other people. Now people are starting out by presenting already-formed groups of your peers. So there is a certain passing down of information that is skipped. I was fortunate enough to play with Elvin Jones, and while I was still living in Philadelphia, with Philly Joe Jones, and Sun Ra, and Jimmy McGriff. I got a chance to hang out with Dexter Gordon and Woody Shaw and Johnny Griffin. Just being in their midst on their gigs and watching them play, and the whole scene at Bradley’s—it was an opportunity to check out the people that have already done what you want to do. They would pull you aside. Slide Hampton mentored me. He took me under his wing and taught me all kinds of stuff. The whole community was different—the elders, the musicians. It’s not really there down—because the recording industry and the business has changed so much. JI: Did those experiences contribute to your development of a healthy modicum of humility? RE: No doubt about it. If the elders saw that you were very serious and a dedicated person and a person of integrity, they would also share their pitfalls with you—so you could avoid those things, and be steered in the right direction. My brother Kevin and I did some of our first gigs in New York with Ronnie Mathews. Ronnie was playing with Johnny Griffin. He lived near us in Brooklyn and began to hire us for gigs. The whole scene at Bradley’s was never replicated once it was gone. You had all the generations of musicians meeting in one place every night. It was great! Out of naivete, you think that that is going to go on forever — like “here I am in New York … out every night, playing every night.” Then the whole scene just changed so much. It was a rude awakening. It evolved like everything else does. So you adjust and adapt to the new realities. JI: That reminds me of one of the maxims I read by the philosopher, writer Eric Hoffer. “In times of change, the learners shall inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves ideally equipped to succeed in a world that no longer exists.” RE: A lot of the change stems from the recording industry. When the labels were controlling the music, they dictated and steered people in the directions they wanted things to go. Anything that was outside of the box was discouraged, or not promoted in the same way that they promoted the things that they already knew how to promote. So if you presented something that was outside of their comfort zone, they really didn’t know how to deal with it. Now you have a lot more latitude with what you can present. In some ways they held the music back. The festivals would hire the same people every year, and the clubs would hire the same people every year. 30

JI: What did you experience to be some of the differences in working with or for Art Blakey and Elvin Jones, for example? RE: I was younger when I worked with Art. I came to New York. My brother Kevin called me and told me that Art was putting a big band together. I just graduated. Kevin told me that Art was auditioning people up at this club Mikell’s in New York, on the Upper West Side. The night I auditioned for the band was the first time that I ever saw Art Blakey play. There were like 20 horn players lined up against the wall. Every one took a chorus or two. Eventually, I got the gig. He put the big band together. He had a sextet at the time and added me, my brother Kevin, Wynton and Branford Marsalis. So, it was a ten piece band—not quite a big band. He took us to Europe. Actually the first time I went to Europe was with Sam Rivers. We went to Europe constantly with Art—six or seven times a year. We gigged constantly. It was like an incubator— working with Art. You felt like you were on your way to becoming a quote unquote, jazz musician. Art was a good teacher in some ways, and maybe not in other ways. [laughs] But, you were learning both what to do and what not to do. By the time I played with Elvin Jones, it was a whole different situation. I was a little older. Elvin was my favorite drummer of all time. The way that I got the gig with Elvin was that Eddie Henderson was playing in the band at the time. Eddie couldn’t make a gig, and Sonny Fortune called me and asked if I could sub with the band up in Boston at the Regatta Bar. That was the first time I met Elvin. I told him that I was a huge fan, and that I would go and hear him at the Vanguard, and have tapes of him at the Vanguard. So we got to play together that night. He said that he loved the trombone—and the first time he went to Europe was with [trombonist] J.J Johnson. He had a band with Tommy Flanagan. So we connected right away when we started playing. I told him that I like to approach the trombone as a percussion instrument — very rhythmic. He said, “Yeah, I hear that.” He hired me in the band that night. Playing with Elvin was on a whole other level. I joined his band in February of 1998. JI: What kinds of discussions do you remember with Elvin. RE: He would talk to me about when he used to play with Coltrane, the vibe that they had, the friendship that they had. John Coltrane loved Elvin. One time he lent one of his cars to Elvin, and he got into a wreck with it. He didn;t care about the car. He just wanted to make sure that Elvin was fine. One of the things I asked him about — because his time and his phrasing and his swing and solos is so unique — was “How did you develop the style that you play?” I said, “I never heard anyone else play like that.” It was just something that he was feeling. One of the things that did help me was when we played vamps. If you didn’t count you’d come in

wrong—because of the way his phrasing was. He’d play over the beat, under the beat, behind the beat. He told me that he always kept the form by singing the bass line and the melody in his head while he was playing. That’s something that really stuck with me. If we’re playing in odd meters, and I need to re-orient myself … by singing the bass line and melody I keep myself oriented. That’s just one thing. But hanging out with him, talking with him … he was an incredible cat. I was so fortunate to spend some time on stage with him. That was a crazy period. I was playing with Holland’s band and I joined Elvin’s band, and I started teaching at Oberlin [College]. There was a two-year period where the longest I was in New York for any stretch was two weeks. I eventually had to leave Elvin’s band, because Dave started getting busier. But every time Elvin would play in New York, he would call me and tell me to come down and sit in. JI: In addition to your jazz experiences, you’ve played with various pop groups like the Rolling Stones. RE: I did some recordings with the Stones, Talking Heads, Bob Dylan. When I subbed on Saturday Night Live, I did that. Lenny Pickett was in charge of the horn section, and he would hire me to do a lot of recording sessions. Mick Jagger was in the studio when we recorded with the Stones, and David Byrne when we did the Talking Heads. It was a completely different type of experience—and they work very differently than their stage personas. They were calm and relaxed and knew what they wanted. It was business. It was just work. [laughs] Lenny did the horn arrangements. We took care of business—and we had a good time. It was nice to hear their music, and interact with them, and how they wanted to use the horn section. I also did recordings for some of the first hip-hop records—Sugar Hill. I did some of the early rap records in the early 80s. I also started to get hired to do work down in Philly—at Sigma Sound. I was on recordings for Teddy Pendergrass, Patti LaBelle, the O’Jays. There’s a wide range of stuff I like to play—and music that I try to be able to function in. I try not to limit myself to jazz. I just try to make a living playing the trombone. So when can get paid and have my horn in my face—it’s a good thing. So I try to keep myself open.   You’ll be able to read more of this interview with Robin in an upcoming issue. Visit Robin online at www.RobinEubanks.com

April 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

Integrity “The measure of a person’s character is what they would do if they knew no one would find out”

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“If the elders saw that you were very serious and a dedicated person and a person of integrity, they would also share their pitfalls with you— so you could avoid those things, and be steered in the right direction.” - Robin Eubanks

Interview Scott Ballin Jazz Pianist, Composer, Educator at Five Towns College By Joe Patitucci

Photo, courtesy Five Towns College

Jazz Inside: Could you discuss the curriculum and private lessons for which your are responsible at Five Towns College?

fits or shortcomings of the academic route versus performance and apprenticeship in the real world that had been the pathway to a performance career in the past?

SB: Like anything else there are advantages and disadvantages to both ways of developing. Previous generations of musicians often went by the “sink or swim” method of starting on the band stand with little, or in some instances minimal training. This was often effective but, I believe limiting in the long run. The students who are involved in the academic route are exposed to a greater variety of styles and playing situations, which hopefully leads to a better, more JI: Talk about one or more of the pianists versatile, musician. and other jazz performers and what specifically was compelling about their artistry JI: Could you talk about how your array of that attracted you to them and influenced experiences as a performer and educator you to assimilate their ideas into your play- have expanded your understanding of the business side of music? ing and composing.

JI: Are there some words of wisdom or advice you’ve picked up from one or more of the influential jazz artists with whom you have worked - that you might share?

SB: As a performer and educator, all I can say is do what you do best. If one has the mind for business great, if not find someone who does. I see some people thinking too much about the business of music, and not enough about creating and performing of music.

SB: I think people should listen to a wide variety of styles, starting with Louis Armstrong then go through the eras. As far as the process I say leave that to the musicians, and enjoy the sounds and the way various music makes you feel.

Scott Ballin: The private lesson curriculum at Five Towns College is unique, as in addition to jazz related material, it requires students to demonstrate abilities in the classical repertoire as well as the standard technical studies. The lessons are 45 minutes per week with a professor, for eight semesters. No T.A.’s for the first two years as takes place at other institutions.

SB: Like many pianists I was first introduced to jazz through Bill Evans. I loved the way he interpreted standards, jazz classics, and of course his innovative originals. Bill brought to the piano the classical touch and beauty as well as a hard-driving swinging style. One of the first jazz recordings I heard was, Bill Evans Trio With Symphony Orchestra, arranged by Claus Ogerman. It has become a classic and it stills knock me out today! Later on I was introduced to the music of Miles Davis. Of course, I was drawn to the pianists in his groups. Red Garland, Evans, Wynton Kelly, Herbie Hancock, virtually wrote the book on modern jazz piano.

SB: You must be true to your art, as it is difficult enough without being involved with anything, especially jazz, half-hearted. And you never know whose listening. Meaning no matter what the situation you must always play as if it’s your last solo, and the opportunities will come if you stay dedicated. JI: What do you say to fans who are curious about improvisation and what the process is about?

JI: Is there anything you’d like to discuss JI: How has your work as an educator chal- for which I haven’t prompted you? lenged, supported or influenced your artSB: I encourage students of all levels to istry and creative pursuits? improvise, it doesn’t have to be complicated SB: I believe being an educator has sub- to be real. stantially enhanced my performing and    creative endeavors. In education you must explain the same concepts to individuals of various backgrounds and musical experiJI: Talk about the importance of develop- ence, in different ways, therefore you can’t ing solid rhythmic foundation to bolster help but gain greater insight to the material. “The welfare development in the pursuit of musical masof the people in tery and in the development of the skill of JI: Understanding that we are all in process particular has always and discovering our voices and paths as we improvisation. been the alibi of tyrants, go along, what were the inspiring underSB: Of course a solid rhythmic foundation standings and visions that you share with and it provides the further is important, especially in jazz, as rhythm is your students to motivate them? advantage of giving the driving factor in making improvisation the servants of tyranny a work. Sometimes on piano, and in the study SB: I tell students of various groups and good conscience” of jazz in general harmony and melody are situations I was fortunate to be part of. But emphasized, so special focus must be di- at the end of the day everyone must have their own dream, their own moment of rected towards rhythm. hearing a recording or live performance and - Albert Camus JI: What are your opinions about the bene- saying “That’s what I want to do!” 32

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Tuesday, April 02, 2013 06:34 Magenta Yellow Black Cyan

AROUND TOWN International Jazz Day April 30 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) DirectorGeneral Irina Bokova, UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador for Intercultural Dialogue Herbie Hancock, Turkey’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Ahmet Davutoglu and its Minister of Culture and Tourism, Ömer Çelik, announce the second annual International Jazz Day will be hosted by Turkey in the city of Istanbul. Held every year on April 30, International Jazz Day brings together communities, schools and groups from across the world to celebrate jazz, learn about its roots and highlight its important role as a form of communication that transcends differences. This year, the main concert for International Jazz Day will be held in Istanbul, Turkey, in partnership with the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz. “International Jazz Day is a means to highlight, support, and leverage the unifying attributes of music through worldwide celebratory events and activities on April 30 each year,” said Herbie Hancock. “On International Jazz Day, jazz is celebrated, studied, and performed around the world for 24 hours straight. Collaborations abound among jazz icons, scholars, composers, musicians, dancers, writers, and thinkers who embrace the beauty, spirit, and principles of jazz, freely sharing experiences and performances in our big cities and in our small towns, all across our seven continents.” The evening concert at Istanbul’s famed Hagia Irene will feature performances by John Beasley, George Duke, Robert Glasper, Herbie Hancock, Abdullah Ibrahim, Keiko Matsui, Eddie Palmieri, Al Jarreau, Milton Nascimento, Dianne Reeves, Marcus Miller, John McLaughlin, Lee Ritenour, Jimmy Heath, Wayne Shorter and many others. The concert will be streamed live on the internet via the UNESCO, U.S. State Department and Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz websites, and will be taped for future broadcast on public television stations around the world. For more information about International Jazz Day: www.unesco.org/days/jazzday www.jazzday.com

Jazz Appreciation Month At New School for Jazz Concerts and Clinics Featuring Jane Ira Bloom, Fred Hersch, Reggie Workman The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music celebrates Jazz Appreciation Month with a month-long series of concerts, master classes, and panel discussions. Jazz Appreciation Month is led by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History to to raise awareness of jazz music, history, and culture. “The most important thing that musicians bring to our world is our special ability to join others in a shared imaginative life,” said Martin Mueller, Executive Director of The New School for To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

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Jazz and Contemporary Music. The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music kicks off Jazz April with The Art of the Duo with Jane Ira Bloom and Fred Hersch (April 12th at 2:00 p.m.). Presented by the International Retired Professionals, the event marks the organization’s 50 years at The New School with a conversation between the two famed musicians. The event takes place at the Theresa Lang Community and Student Center at Arnhold Hall (55 W. 13th Street). The presentation is free, but seating is limited. RSVP by emailing [email protected] Eli Yamin & Evan Christopher Throughout the month, The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music will continue its Eyes of the Masters se- mer LaFrae Sci (Junior Mack Blues Band, Black ries with classes led by Cecil Taylor (April 5, Rock Coalition). The CD rel;ease event is on rescheduled from March 22), Fred Hersch (April Tuesday, April 9 with sets at 7:30pm and 12) and Kong Nay (Aril 19). Queens-born Tay- 9:30pm, at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, Jazz at lor carries on the grand tradition of New York Lincoln Center, 60th and Broadway, New York jazz pianists, while pianist and composer Hersch City, NY USA. http://jalc.org/dizzys is widely recognized for his creativity as a con- 212-258-9595. ceptualist, incorporating fresh ideas into timetested classics. Nay is a survivor of the 1970s Celebrating Duke Ellington Khmer Rouge purge in Cambodia. Now retired April 24-25, 2013 and living in Phnom Penh, he plays Chapei Dang Jazz At Lincoln Center Weng, a long neck two-stringed guitar. Both classes will be held in the Jazz Performance Since 1988, when Wynton Marsalis coaSpace on the fifth floor of Arnhold Hall (55 W. lesced his septet with Duke Ellington alumni 13th Street) from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.; admission is Jimmy Hamilton, Willie Cook, Jimmy Woode, free and seating is first-come, first-served. Norris Turney, Britt Woodman, and Joe TemperHighlighting New School student work, ley (still an active member of the Jazz At LinReggie Workman’s Jazz Improvisation Ensemcoln Center orchestra) to form the first edition of ble Showcase will play on-air on WBGO Jazz the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, Ellington’s 88.3 FM from 2:00-3:00 p.m. on April 17. Stuoeuvre has been fundamental to JALC’s mission dents from The New School for Jazz and Conand conception. Continuing in this vein, the Jazz temporary Music will also perform in several of at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marconcerts as part of the school’s Ensemble & salis will draw from its deep well of Ellingtonia, Recital series. For a detailed list of the performrendering the maestro’s essence and his centralances, visit the jazz events page. ity to American music with a forceful, idiomatic Visit the New School events calendar for clarity that reflects the JLCO’s abiding immerthe most up-to-date information at sion in his language. www.newschool.edu/events. Free pre-concert festival, April 25 at 6:30 PM. Free pre-concert discussion nightly at 7 PM. Eli Yamin Quartet Featuring For more information on the series of CelebratEvan Christopher: Louie’s Dream ing Duke Ellington event, visit: http://jalc.org/events/    CD Release Celebration Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, April 9th 2013 Pianist, jazz and blues ambassador, composer of jazz musicals, along with Evan Christopher, New Orleans clarinet sensation team up to salute their jazz heroes Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Sidney Bechet, Mary Lou Williams and more. Eli and Evan recorded Louie’s Dream as a duo. At Dizzy’s Club they will be joined by bassist Nicki Parrott (Les Paul Trio) and drum-

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CD Reviews

Aaron Diehl THE BESPOKE MAN’S NARRATIVE— Mack Avenue Records MAC 1066. Prologue; Generation Y; Blue Nude; Moonlight in Vermont; Single Petal of a Rose; The Cylinder; Stop and Go; Le Tombeau de Couperin (III. Forlane); Bess You is My Woman Now; Epilogue. PERSONNEL: Aaron Diehl, piano; David Wong, bass; Rodney Green, drums; Warren Wolf, vibraphone. By Eric Harabadian Although pianist Aaron Diehl is only 26 he’s already got the chops and sophistication of those twice his age. He brings a wisdom and grace to his Klaveirhaus Fazioli grand piano that is elegant and exploratory, yet still rooted in a rich tradition of what came before. The word “bespoke” in the album’s title is an adjective, used in the fashion world that refers to custom made clothing signifying the person who designs or constructs them. Well, that description would certainly apply to Diehl and his quartet. This disc is a mix of original compositions and classic standards that were arranged specifically to suit this particular group. Diehl’s debut works as, not only an unveiling to the public of his immense wealth of talent, but a sort of coming out affair for his ensemble as well. Opening tunes “Prologue” and “Generation Y” are Diehl compositions and reflect a classic flavor right from the get-go. The pianist’s

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Ahmad Jamal-like block chords and intricate melodies envelope the listener in a warm and inviting manner. Vibist Warren Wolf is Diehl’s perfect foil. Their seamless blend of harmonic and unison lines seems effortless and adds much depth to the overall group sound. “Blue Nude” is another Diehl piece that is an exercise in taste and restraint. This features lovely Errol Garner/ Ellington-like expression, with exceptional drum interplay by Rodney Green. Speaking of the “Duke,” Ellington’s “Single Petal of a Rose” is a sweet lullaby and delivered with tender loving care by the leader in a solo spot. Milt Jackson’s “The Cylinder” is a prime example of what this group is all about. There is a very precise and mechanized way in which each band member interacts with the next. They integrate their respective parts in a funky call and response manner that really works. Another Diehl gem; “Stop and Go” burns in the form of a playful and spirited romp. Rapid fire chord progressions alternate with mid-tempo swing for a dynamic and exciting effect. Gershwin’s “Bess, You is My Woman Now” is really special for Diehl’s delicate and sensitive arrangement. The combination of David Wong’s bowed bass matched with Green’s superb brush technique and the leader’s virtuoso playing is a showstopper. Aaron Diehl and his quartet of young lions provide a wonderful and satisfying debut for jazz fans of every distinction. Not only is this “Bespoke Man’s Narrative” custom fit for the artists that created it but it was designed for you—lovers of art and all things real—as well.

Vince Ector ORGANATOMY – American Showplace Music www.vincentector.com. In A Sentimental Mood; Up & Down; Karen’s Dance; Aries; Con Alma; I Don’t Know; Jinrikisha; Organatomy; So Danço Samba.

PERSONNEL: Vince Ector, drums; Kyle Koehler, organ; Bruce Williams, saxophone; Yotam Silberstein, guitar; Claudio Roditi, trumpet; Café, percussion. By Mark Keresman

Drummer and educator Vince Ector is yet another of those musicians you’ve likely heard and not been aware of it. Ector has plied his trade with Freddie Hubbard, Gloria Lynne, Charles Earland, Bobby Watson, Grover Washington Jr., Dr Lonnie Smith, George Cables, Melvin Sparks, Johnny Coles, and Shirley Scott, and he’s played on recordings by Jimmy Bruno, Onaje Allan Gumbs and Charles Earland. He’s even appeared on ABC television’s One Life to Live daytime soap as – are you ready? – a musician. Organatomy is Ector’s third CD as a leader and it’s a veritable tribute to a different kind of Philly soul sound, the city’s rich organ jazz tradition. Best of all, it doesn’t yell “tribute” from the rooftops—it simply is what it is, another slice of hearty jazz du Philly. Philadelphia has a massive tradition of jazz organists—Charles Earland, Jimmy McGriff, Joey De Francesco and his father Papa John, Shirley Scott, and Trudy Pitts make up a who’swho of that beefy/velvety-sounding axe. Whether or not Ector choose a fine an organist as Kyle Koehler as a way of connecting to a historical continuum is anyone’s guess, but it sure hasn’t hurt. Koehler’s keyboard has a so dense of a texture that one can practically walk upon it—it has the nimble flow of the younger De Francesco and the BBQ sauce-funky sumptuousness of McGriff and Earland and a thickness that is truly unique. The set kicks off with a swaggering take on “In A Sentimental Mood,” with Bruce Williams’ tart, lithe soprano darting and dancing over Koehler’s classiness and Yotam Silberstein’s tangy, Kenny Burrell-esque chords. They follow it up with an original midtempo bop swinger “Up & Down,” wherein Silberstein seeks and finds the little bit of Grant Green that lurks in nearly every jazz guitarist, while Williams wails with a touch of Joe Henderson’s 1960s-era knottiness. Claudio Roditi adds his trumpet for the cooker that is “Karen’s Dance,” another Ector original, contributing a nice Dizzy-ish muted solo. Throughout this piece, Ector has some the polyrhythmic approach of Art Blakey but with subtleness that amiably buoys the tune without drawing attention to itself. (In fact, Ector takes a rather selfeffacing approach on the entire album.) The majestic “Aries” is by an organist that adopted Philly as his home, the late Don Paterson, and could well be a hit on some wise jazz-playing

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radio station. Joe Henderson’s “Jinrikisha” is another mid-tempo cooker with some rippling, chunky, hard-swinging work from Silberstein and some fleet, slightly dramatic Koehler, Ector crackling like an autumn bonfire before making with some short, sweet, punchy solos. The title track has a loping, vaguely funky, sardonic, somewhat Steely Dan-like groove, with Ector’s drums evoking a most happy fellow skipping down the street. Williams’ sound, especially in unison with Silbersteen, is big enough for a whole sax section. The closer makes a mad cooker from an Antonio Carlos Jobim melody, the whole band swinging until the proverbial cows come home to roost. At the risk of sounding the press agent, the rollicking, immediate Organatomy— whether a tribute to Philly’s organ “school” or not—is an album that could (and ought to) catapult Vince Ector to bigger and better things.

Kevin Eubanks THE MESSENGER – Mack Avenue 1065. Mack Avenue Records, 18530 Mack Avenue #299, Grosse Pointe Farms, MI 48236. ; www.mackavenue.com www.kevineubanks.com . The Messenger; Sister Veil; Resolution; JB; 420; Led Boots; M.I.N.D.; Queen of Hearts; The Gloaming; Loved Ones; Ghost Dog Blues. PERSONNEL: Kevin Eubanks, acoustic and electric guitars; Billy Pierce, soprano and tenor saxophones; Rene Camacho, bass; Marvin “Smitty” Smith, drums; Robin Eubanks, trombone; Duane Eubanks, trumpet; Alvin Chea, vocals; Joey DeLeon Jr. congas and percussion. The important thing is not the ingredients, but the way they’re cooked. The cover sticker uses unlikely phrases (“rock-infused, blues-dipped”) to avoid calling this fusion. No need; there’s nothing offensive about this or in the music Kevin Eubanks culls from its vocabulary. A taut bass snaps hard on “Resolution”, handing off to Smitty Smith’s laid-back beat. Kevin glides his way in, first with buzzy chords, then with soft-focus notes, bouncing some quiet funk. Come Billy Pierce’s slippery tenor and you scratch your head: this is Coltrane’s “Resolution”, the second part of A Love Supreme, played as if it collided with James Brown’s “Soul Power”. Following this theme and a sweetly funky vamp, Pierce goes to work: a nervous hum, moving at right angles besides Eubanks’ tart chords. Kevin’s

own solo goes for slippery slides, pools of echo, and a rock vibe that hints both Trane and late-’Sixties Larry Coryell. A Stax-like horn section forms the backdrop for “JB”, whose bassline invokes Mr. Superbad. As brother Robin works a burly trombone, the guitar enters outer space: we hear spiraling echoes, odd wiggly noises, Peter Frampton talk-box effects – all linked to the movements of the horn. On trumpet, Duane Eubanks takes a simpler path, floating short phrases in weary tone. Behind him, Kevin mixes it up, switching between glowing chords and flashes of wah-wah. As mood and song fade, a stronger one enters “420”: as raw-toned strings mesh in a raga-like drone, Billy’s soprano swoops, darting with swift speed and sad sound. Then the theme erupts: lots of horns, twisting Zappalike lines, and guitars at full boil. Duane’s muted strut works great in this bitches brew; like its predecessor, it exits fast before it wears out its welcome. “Led Boots” buries great snapping leads in an annoying wordless rap, while “The Messenger” gives you funk in smooth clothing. The strings keep rippling, drums and conga percolate swiftly … and Pierce at his sweetest, most confident tone. This could work on mainstream radio – and it fits your stereo as well. “M.I.N.D.” begins with a Morse-code first, framed by straight-line horns – a pleasant theme in a cold environment. In time the mood remains as the details shift: Kevin draws slow arcs in the mode of Bill Frisell, as Billy’s tenor acquires some grit. His bitteredged solo takes little steps at quickening pace; nothing much happens but he sounds great doing it. On his turn Kevin tries harder, with mixed results: it’s a bit long and the rock noodlings are too much for my taste, but there’s some nice twang and the end-licks are tasty. The ballad “Queen of Hearts” is a good deal: a slow swaying reed, with acoustic figures that sound like a kalimba … or a music box. The theme is so simple it’s barely there, but there’s a mood, a warmth with touches of sadness … and it’s a nice place to be. Stick around for Robin’s buttery solo, a sound big as an elephant and nearly as strong. Slower and better is “The Glowing”, where Kevin’s folkish strum meets Billy’s dark-end-of-thestreet moan. In time Pierce’s tone becomes warmer, the pace slower, and the lonely mood becomes romantic. As this transpires Kevin holds his notes longer, and a thick harmonic blanket covers Pierce and the listener. And you’ll want to snuggle. As good as the album’s first half is, I’d likely have changed the programming; putting all the soft tunes together makes them seem alike. “Loved One” has much the same vibe of the last two selections, only this guitar is electric and Kevin plays alone. High notes drift atop an up-and-down counterpoint; curlicue phrases end in big chords and bigger echoes. This is like a country path or the first time you held someone’s hand: the feeling is familiar even if the tune is not. And our finale is exactly what you want: a big rough-hewn

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slab of late-night blues. Billy is back. Kevin delivers strong sliding fingers, and two tons of bad attitude - goes down smooth, no aftertaste, and reminds you of the music’s past without any copying. As Mr. McDuff might put it: a real good’un.

Nilson Matta BLACK ORPHEUS—Motema Music MTM103. Overture; Repinique Interlude; Samba De Orfeu; A Felicidade; Cuica Interlude; O Nosso Amor; Manha De Carnaval; Batucada I; Eli E O Meu Amor/Lamento No Morro; Frevo De Orfeu; Valsa De Euridice; Ascend, My Love; Um Nome De Mulher; Batucada II; Se Todos Fossen Iguais A Voce; Violao Interlude; Hugs and Kisses. PERSONNEL: Nilson Matta, bass; Leny Andrade, vocals; Kenny Barron, piano; Randy Brecker, trumpet; Alfredo Cardim, piano; Anat Cohen, clarinet; Anne Drummond, flute; Alex Kautz, drums; Laura Metcalf, cello; Guilherme Monteiro, guitar; Klaus Mueller, piano; Gretchen Parlato, vocals; Fernando Saci, percussion; Erivelton Silva, drums; Jorjao Silva, percussion; Reinaldo Silva, percussion.

By Eric Harabadian Brazilian bassist and producer Matta assembled an all-star cast to perform on a reimagining of music from the 1959 movie Black Orpheus, and the lesser known 1956 play Orfeu da Conceicao it is based on. Growing up in Brazil, Matta had heard the soundtrack of the film from his father’s record collection. The bassist had always connected with the music so the impetus to do such an ambitious work came very naturally to him. Matta does a masterful job of adapting the original material from bossa nova pioneers Antonio Carlos Jobim and Luiz Bonfa and giving them their just due. The film Black Orpheus is a retelling of the Greek myth Orpheus and Euridice and is set in Rio De Janeiro during Carnaval. That sense of drama, romance and intrigue infused with a celebratory spirit is captured wonderfully in this landmark release. Pianist Klaus Mueller serves as associate producer on this project and also does some of the arranging as well. Jobim’s “Overture” begins appropriately with a stunning overview of coming attractions, as it were. Mueller’s arrangement is superb and effective without being overbearing. That is followed by the first in a series of percussion interludes by the brothers Silva. The interludes are brief vignettes that provide respite and act as links and intros to various tunes. The music is, of course, classic and timeless. And for those familiar with the film and the bossa nova genre you will immediately fall in

love with the album’s intoxicating effect. But the performances and interpretations of these indelible gems make this disc extra special. Bonfa’s “Samba De Orfeu” is spry and graceful, with a dynamic interplay between Anat Cohen’s lyrical clarinet and Kenny Barron’s amusing piano lines. Vocalist Leny Andrade is relaxed and alluring on “A Felicidade.” Matta’s arrangement is light and beautiful as the melody caresses the listener like a lullaby. Another Jobim composition “O Nosso Amor” has great energy powered by Randy Brecker’s mighty trumpet and Mueller’s deft pianistics. This is a brisk samba that features exceptional and inspired solos. “Manha De Carnaval” is significant for Barron’s arrangement and small trio setting. Backed by Matta and drummer Alex Kautz, the pianist takes some tasteful solos that are meaty but spare. There is a nice cocktail lounge feel at work here. The other featured vocalist on the album is Gretchen Parlato. She does a marvelous job conveying lyricist Vinicius de Moraes’ thoughts and emotions on “Eu E O Meu Amor/Lamento No Morro.” Her smooth delivery puts one in a good place as the combination of Mueller’s arrangement with Anne Drummond’s flute work is transcendent. “Frevo De Orfeo” follows and delves into more of a bebop structure. There is an amusing major/ minor melody shift that occurs and is fueled by Cohen’s blazing reed work and intrepid guitar from Guilherme Monteiro. “Valsa De Euridice”does an about face mood-wise, with Parlato singing quiet and breathy words that draw you in with their erotic and seductive power. About half way through the band opens up and blossoms like a beautiful flower. It would be an oversight not to mention the sole original composition on the album. And that is by the leader himself. Matta’s “Hugs and Kisses” closes the festivities and is most apropos for its uplifting feel and sentiment. It is a highly energized samba that, in the bassist’s words, emphasizes his belief that “no matter what troubles we face, life must contain and be sustained by happiness.”

Chris Potter THE SIRENS – ECM Records. Wine Dark Sea; Wayfinder; Dawn (With Her Rosy Fingers); The Sirens; Penelope; Kalypso; Nausikaa; Stranger at the Gate; The Shades. PERSONNEL: Chris Potter, tenor & soprano saxophones, bass clarinet; Craig Taborn, piano; David Virelles, keyboards, harmonium; Larry Grenadier, bass; Eric Harland, drums. By Mark Keresman Saxophonist and composer Chris Porter is one of the best players on the American jazz scene. Like Dave Douglas—with whom he’s 36

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played and recorded—Potter refuses to stay still, steadfastly refusing to be limited to one scene/ bag/genre or another. He distinctively shines whether playing with Dave Holland, Paul Motian, Red Rodney, Patricia Barber, Pat Metheny, or Steely Dan, whether in contexts “straightahead” or simply nigh-on-category-resistant, such as his debut disc as a leader for ECM, The Sirens. The Sirens is inspired by Homer's The Odyssey—not exactly a barrel of laughs, but it’s nonetheless a fine basis for some haunting, keening jazz. With a tone as shiny, full-bodied, and clear as that of Sonny Rollins and Wayne Shorter, Potter “sings” the restless ballad “Wine Dark Sea”—the melody is both oblique and affecting, troubling (in a way that a Tennessee Williams play is) and oddly attractive (ditto). “Wayfinder” continues the restive vibe with lyrical flights by Craig Taborn (here heard on acoustic piano only, whereas some of his other work with Potter featured electric keys) and nervy crackle from bassist Larry Grenadier and drummer Eric Harland. This session is unusual—even for Potter—in that his band features two set of hands at the keys, Taborn (like Potter and Douglas, a great inside/outside player) and David Virelles playing prepared piano, celesta (or celeste), and harmonium, the latter judiciously adding layers of ambiance. “Penelope” features Potter’s elegiac soprano sax, wailing as a siren might, beaconing a traveler to lands fraught with possibility and wonder. “Kalypso” is almost like Rollins’ “St. Thomas” but in reverse—where Rollins embraced calypso Potter hints at it darkly, his tenor jousting and jabbing like the beginning of a storm that might imperil a journey. Harland’s drumming is especially compelling here, simulating the crashing of waves as surely as in any seagoing-based film, while hinting at rolling, vivacious calypso rhythms. Taborn and Virelles engage each other in “Nausikaa,” the piano and celeste (often heard on MisterRogers’ Neighborhood) tinkle and shimmer (slightly evoking the multiple keyboards of Bitches Brew) while Potter’s soprano sings of mysteries in an alluring manner while Harland thunders like a god of the earth’s tectonic plates. “Stranger at the Gate” features Potter surging proudly and assertively (though not with arrogance, which the gods don’t dig) on tenor, like he was scaling Mount Olympus, his band “spotting” him with great care. As you may’ve deduced, dear Reader, the overall mood of The Sirens is sober with a capital S and ruminative with a capital R—but here, “sober” and “ruminative” do not equal turgid and ostentatious. Potter and company play with not only great subtlety but with plenty of rippling vitality and poetic lyricism. While there aren’t any “swingers” per se there also aren’t any dirges or navel-gazing episodes either. So put on your cerebral travelling shoes and let Potter’s quintet take you on a mythic, engrossing odyssey.

Beast Within; Run; Portraits; Homecoming; Healing Hymn; Ascension; In This Quiet Place; Summer in Central Park; Inner Strength; Ruby Goes To School. PERSONNEL: Shamie Royston, piano; Ivan Taylor, bass; Rudy Royston, drums; Camille Thurman, vocals.

By Mark Keresman Pianist Shamie Royston is the wife of drummer Rudy Royston and her sister is saxophonist Tia Fuller, but that’s by way of biography (part of my gig as a “music critic”), not as any way of defining her. Ms. Royston is, regardless of familial connections, is simply an ace key-cracker whose style evokes Geri Allen, McCoy Tyner, and Ahmad Jamal, and her debut is a (to use an ancient expletive) crackerjack endeavor. The opener “The Beast Within” finds Ms. Royston using space and tempo and a graceful lyricism to establish a suitably (but not heavyhanded) ominous ambiance. Like Hitchcock, she gingerly piles on the detail, building the mood as surely as Janet Leigh just stepping into her room

at the Bates Motel. Royston uses subtle tempo changes to keep you off-balance, all the while maintaining an understated but certain lyrical flow, while bassist Ivan Taylor and drummer Rudy crackle and ebb and flow throughout. The mid-tempo “Portraits,” after a leisurely intro, promenades like Herbie Hancock and Dave Brubeck palavering about piano stuff on a sunny day in Central Park while Rudy Royston churns like a storm in the not-so-distance. Ivan Taylor sneaks in a probing, Charlie Haden-like solo. “In This Quiet Place” is a wistful ballad featuring the slightly little-girlish, wispy but supple singing of Camille Thurman, Ms. Royston placing the heavy notes sparsely and with great care. “Ruby Goes To School” is a nigh-onperfect example of how a master pianist can absorb influences without overtly “sounding like” them—this graceful swinger blends the cheery melodic sense of Brubeck with the witty economy of Monk. “Inner Strength” is a hardswinger with slight Latin overtones and she overtly displays her affection for McCoy Tyner (not that there’s anything wrong with that). “Healing Hymn” is a solo piece wherein Ms. Royston’s gingerly touch, along with the floating-in-the-evening-mist melody makes this into a romantic ballad for the ages. The closer “Ruby Goes To School” is a gem—the bass and drums team are cool-cat buoyant as all get-out and Ms. Royston teases the inner ear with such catchy melodic motifs you’ll reach for the “repeat” button—a pick-to-click for some savvy jazz radio programmer!

Shamie Royston PORTRAITS – www.shamieroyston.com . The To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

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Ms. Royston has a deceptively leisurely style. While hardly minimalist or frugal, she never plays flurries of notes nor does she play notes at a high rate of speed, preferring to let the spaces do the communicating. Stylistically one could file her under “post bop” but not for her are the dark dirges—while utterly modern she’s as convivial as Hank Jones or George Shearing, plus there’s a gospel influence too. She always has a solid sense of swing going on. The only drawback to this otherwise practically flawless set is that sometimes Mr. Royston, while a powerful swinging presence himself, can be a wee bit over-enthusiastic at times (though not showoff-y or overbearing). All in all, one of the more impressive debuts this writer has heard in a while.

Allen Vizzutti RITZVILLE—Village Place Music 061552. Vizzutti.com. Ritzville; Silhouette; Amara; Ticklish; Glide; Touch; One of a Kind; Papa Bear; Laura’s Blues; Azure Cool; I Don’t Know PERSONNEL: Allen Vizzutti, trumpeter, flu-

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gelhorn, piccolo trumpet, producer, arranger, liner notes; Chick Corea, acoustic piano; andothers By Alex Henderson Over the years, Allen Vizzutti (or Al Vizzutti) has not been an easy artist to pigeonhole stylistically. The veteran trumpeter/ flugelhornist, who turned 60 on September 13, 2012, has appeared on many straight-ahead postbop albums as a sideman, but he has also played an abundance of electric jazz-funk and poppish material. While Vizzutti has a long list of sideman credits (ranging from Woody Herman to Chick Corea to Stan Getz), he has only recorded sporadically as a leader—and although some of the albums he recorded in the past were uneven, Ritzville is among his more consistent efforts. This 2011 release doesn’t fit neatly into one particular area of jazz; parts of Ritzville are more straight-ahead, while other parts are funkier or more pop-influenced. The more straight-ahead tracks on Ritzville include the angular “Ticklish” (which boasts Stanley Clarke on acoustic bass) and “Amara,” a Brazilian-flavored tune that features Corea on acoustic piano. Vizzutti spent four years as a Corea sidemen in the late 1970s/early 1980s. Vizzutti gets into jazz-funk mode on “Papa Bear” and the Miles Davis-flavored title track. Of course, when one hears that a composition has a Miles Davis influence, the question becomes, “Which Miles Davis?” The trumpet icon

liked to keep forging ahead, and he wasn’t one to look back or indulge in nostalgia. Compositionally, the Davis who influences Vizzutti on the title track is the funky, fusion-oriented Davis of the 1970s and 1980s, not the acoustic Davis of the 1940s and 1950s. Davis has clearly influenced Vizzutti’s trumpet and flugelhorn playing as well as some of his composing, but then, one hears a variety of trumpeters in Vizzutti’s playing—not only cool-toned players like Davis and Chet Baker, but also, Freddie Hubbard, Dizzy Gillespie and Art Farmer. In terms of tone, Vizzutti occupies a middle ground on his instruments; he has a bigger tone than Davis and Baker, but not as big a tone as Hubbard, Lee Morgan or Clifford Brown. The late jazz critic Leonard Feather once metaphorically described saxman Hank Mobley as “the middleweight champion of the tenor,” meaning that Mobley had a tone that wasn’t too large and wasn’t too small—and similarly, Vizzutti has maintained a middleweight approach on his trumpet and flugelhorn. Ritzville was not recorded with jazz purists in mind. The disc has too much funk and pop influence to win over purists. Regardless, there is an improvisatory spirit throughout Ritzville; Vizzutti has plenty of room to stretch out and blow.

Alexander von Schlippenbach SCHLIPPENBACH PLAYS MONK – Intakt

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www.intaktrec.ch . Reverence; Work; Interlude I; Locomotive; Introspection I; Introspection II; Coming On the Hudson; Interlude 2; Epistrophy; Interlude 3; Reflections; Interlude 4; Interlude 5; Brilliant Corners; Interlude 6; Interlude 7; Pannonica; Interlude 8; Played Twice; Epilogue. PERSONNEL: Alexander von Schlippenbach, solo piano. By Mark Keresman An American icon up there with Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk (1917-1982) was one of the most pure jazz musicians America ever produced—and “pure” in this case is not about some inflated or exclusionary “purist” mentality. Unlike many American pianists (jazz and otherwise), the European classical music tradition seemingly had little impact upon Monk. He emerged directly from America’s blues, jazz, and gospel continuum—as a youth, he’d played for preachers’ revivalist shows. He brought his own inimitable idiosyncratic approach to the 88s, rich with droll humor and a unique sense of space—like classical avant-gardist John Cage, Monk made use of “silence” and “space(s)” the most musicians and composers use notes. Alexander von Schlippenbach (b. 1938) is Germany’s premier avant-garde jazz pianist—and he clearly emerged from the Euro-classical tradition. AvS has played with virtually every major figure of Europe’s free jazz sphere (Evan Parker and Peter Brötzmann , to name two) and he was the foun-

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der of the Globe Unity Orchestra. What happens when a sultan of free jazz fury takes on Monk? Some kind of wonderful, that’s what. He shines the light of some Monk chestnuts through his Central European prism, while adding a few brief originals-interludes of his own, for a set that celebrates one of jazz’s greatest-ever pianists. The opener “Reverence” is an original— musing, introspective, it shows how von Schlippenbach absorbed and internalized Monk’s approach into his playing, while the second track, Monk’s “Work” gleefully displays the influence of the stride style (i.e., Fats Waller, James P. Johnson) on Monk. Monk’s “Introspection II” features wry blues-tinged idylls shot through with playful dissonances. “Reflections” accents the rhapsodic side of Monk, von Schlippenbach caressing each note with tender reverie while sidestepping schmaltz. “Brilliant Corners” is (humorously) injected with bits of Germanic Romantic/dramatic bombast a la Beethoven. Von Schlippenbach’s own assorted interludes highlight the thornier aspects to his style while the shade of Monk shimmers in the ether. While Plays Monk doesn’t “swing” as the Monk did—who could, really—it is a thoroughly charming, intriguing, and stimulating listen. Cerebral without being arid, demonstrative without being slavish, it’s a cut above the many Soand-So Plays Such-and-Such “tribute” albums.

Eli Yamin

Evan Christopher LOUIE’S DREAM FOR OUR JAZZ HEROES—Yamin Music YM 37574-8. Louie’s Dream; The Mooche; You Gotta Treat it Gentle; It’s the Way That You Talk; Don’t Go Back On Your Raisin’; What’s Your Story Morning Glory; Azalea; My Jazz Hero; Baraka 75; Let His Love Take Me Higher; Impromptu; Dancers in Love; Louie’s Dream Reprise. PERSONNEL: Eli Yamin, piano; Evan Christopher, clarinet By Eric Harabadian This is an album dedicated to many of the jazz greats such as Louie Armstrong, John Coltrane, Duke Ellington and others that were influential to this duo’s creativity and vision. This love letter to the heroes of jazz is sincere and genuinely heartfelt, with a simpatico and understanding between these two artists that are welcome and inviting. And you, the listener, have a front row seat as Yamin and Christopher sound like they are right there in your living room. The clarity and dynamics of their performance is warm and vibrant. It is a very intimate experience where the interplay between the duo really draws you in. From the first few bars of Armstrong’s “Louie’s Dream” you know you are in the presence of two masters at work. Yamin demonstrates a natural and relaxed feel for stride styles and the bubbly filigree of Christopher’s reed

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facility is breathtaking. Duke Ellington’s “The Mooche” begins in a somewhat typical manner but then takes an interesting turn into darker corners and melodic peaks and valleys. The duo are also excellent composers and Christopher’s “You Gotta Treat it Gentle” is a fine example of that. The clarinetist’s dedication to Sidney Bechet is delicate and balanced and performed in the style of that early jazz period. Yamin adds Monk-ish nuances that set up a playful atmosphere. The pianist also shows his flair for composing with two back-to-back tunes from the socially-conscious jazz musical “Holding the Torch for Liberty.” Yamin also really shines on the bluesy Mary Lou Williams piece “What’s Your Story Morning Glory.” He is in his element as each solo chorus explodes with limitless possibilities. Perhaps, one of the disc’s strongest outings is the gospel-tinged tribute to Mahalia Jackson entitled “Let His Love Take Me Higher.” It is co-written by the duo and is beautiful for the flute-like registers that Christopher manipulates from his clarinet and Yamin’s elaborate command of the entire keyboard. The passion exuded from their exchange is truly inspiring. Yamin is also a poet and, perhaps, the centerpiece of this album is his spoken word text called “My Jazz Hero.” His words encapsulate the intent of this project: “My jazz hero is strong and gentle, kind and fierce. A great leader and self-starter, a great listener and supporter. My hero recognizes greatness when others pass her by. My hero does not give up and is never afraid to try.”

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Miho Hazama JOURNEY TO JOURNEY – Mr. O; Tokyo Confidential; Blue Forest; Journey to Journey; Paparazzi; Believing in Myself; Ballad; What Will You See When You Turn the Next Corner; Hidamari. PERSONNEL: Miho Hazama, composer, conductor, piano (4,6); Mark Feldman, Joyce Hammann, violin; James Shipp, Stefon Harris, vibes; Steve Wilson, alto sax (4); Sam Anning, bass; Jake Goldbas, drums; Chris Reza, conductor (4); Jim McNeely, director; and others. By Mark Keresman Born in Tokyo 1986 and now residing in New York, composer Miho Hazama has accomplished much for someone of her tender years. After studying with arranger/pianist Jim McNeely and having worked with Yosuke Yamashita, Vince Mendoza, and Ryuichi Sakamoto, she favors the Collective Us with her debut album. Stylistically, it’s not an easy mark— it’s not avant-garde but it’s certainly not conservative, either. To use a seldom-used-anymore term, this writer might use Third Stream, that somewhat maligned handle for when hep composers in the 1950s and ‘60s worked at a fusion of jazz and classical forms. Journey to Journey evokes the compositions and arrangements of Gil Evans, Jimmy Giuffre, John Lewis, Bill Russo, Teddy Charles, and George Russell without being derivative of any of them. There’s plenty of swing—note the driving baritone sax and vibes solos in “Tokyo Confi-

dential”—but also plenty of knotty, zigzagging, and slightly angular/askew arrangements that sometimes skirt dissonance without ever “embracing” it. Hazama’s compositions surge with a Stan Kenton-like verve, then artlessly and effortlessly segue into animated chamber music passages smacking of Brahms and Ives. “Blue Forest” is her version of a tender jazz ballad— “version” only because while Philip Dizack’s flugelhorn has the plaintive grace of Art Farmer but it’s set against a sparse modernist nearly Bartok-ian backdrop, imparting the feeling one might get reading about psychoanalysis during a beautiful sunrise. Hazama is a heck of an interpreter too—listen how she recasts Lady Gaga’s “Paparazzi” as a sly, regal, almost Ellington-ian blues-piece with touches of Maynard Ferguson’s brassy swagger. Elsewhere and throughout, Hazama mixes the essences of old-world drama of Schubert and Mahler, the old-meets-new world of Bartok, the coolly brooding intrigue of George Russell, the genteel sophistication of Ellington and Strayhorn, the brainy swing of Gil Evans, and minute sprays of the pointed humor of Mingus and Willem Breuker—yet no one aspect dominates. Whenever a composition seems like it’s going in one seemingly obvious direction, Hazama tosses you a curve—but never just to be clever or quirky for its own sake. She doesn’t pile on the ideas and concepts—she plays with and develops them with warmth and an unassuming nature. The soloists play with heart and economy throughout. Yes, it’s early in the year, but it’s likely Journey will be viewed as one of the best large-group jazz recordings of ’13.   

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Noteworthy Performance

Ralph Lalama

Ralph Lalama Small’s, April 19-20

Grammy winning tenor saxophonist Ralph Lalama will be hosting two special European musicians at Smalls Jazz: the gifted Helmut Kagerer from Germany on guitar and Austrian drummer extraordinaire Bernd Reiter. Having toured together in Europe in 2011, they decided to reunite in New York City for a weekend of gigs and a recording session for an upcoming CD. You can catch them both Friday and Saturday, April 19 & 20 at Smalls, two sets starting at 10:30 PM, and an extra bonus set on Sunday, April 21 at 7:00 pm at Somethin' Jazz Club, where they'll also add vocalist Nicole Pasternak to the mix. (Photo of Ralph Lalama by John Abbott)

Noteworthy Performance Jazz At Lincoln Center’s

Kings Of The Crescent City Rose Theatre, April 19-20, 8PM Victor Goines

Noteworthy Performance

The Bad Plus with Bill Frisell Jazz At Lincoln Center, Allen Room, April 12-13

Featuring the Music of Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet, Jelly Roll Morton, and King Oliver Jazz at Lincoln Center continues the 25th anniversary season with a celebration of the four founding fathers of jazz – Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet, Jelly Roll Morton, and King Oliver – in a special concert event entitled Kings of the Crescent City in Rose Theater at 8pm on April 1920. New Orleans-born Victor Goines, the superlative clarinetistsaxophonist with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra for the last two decades, leads an all-star ensemble including Marcus Printup and Kenny Rampton (trumpet), Chris Crenshaw (trombone), Don Vappie (banjo), Dan Nimmer (piano), Reginald Veal (bass), and Adonis Rose (drums), whose early immersion in the musical culture of the Crescent City directly informed their musical production throughout their brilliant careers. Free pre-concert discussion, nightly, 7pm. Goines says, “We will take the music of Armstrong, Bechet, Morton and Oliver and all these capable musicians and give the people a program that reflects the history of the New Orleans tradition–with the wisdom of our collective studies, learned over the course (Photo of Victor Goines by Frank Stewart) of our careers. 42

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The Bad Plus with Bill Frisell will collaborate for the first time in New York City at Jazz at Lincoln Center on April 12-13. The Bad Plus—Ethan Iverson, bassist Reid Anderson, and drummer Dave King — is best known for idea-packed deconstructions of post-60s pop and the post-Stravinsky Euro-canon. Joining the band is the infinitely resourceful guitarist Bill Frisell. “He’s a big influence on us,” Iverson says of Frisell. “He’s someone we studied when we were coming up. In high school we bought his records and we loved him. For me, I especially love the work with Paul Motian and Joe Lovano. It is easy playing with him because we always studied his music. He can play out, but so can we. That’s the avant-garde part.

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Noteworthy Performance

Noteworthy Performance

Hiromi

Wayne Escoffery

Blue Note: April 16-21

Jazz Standard, April 16-17 Interview by Eric Harabadian Photo by Eric Nemeyer

HU: I always wanted to play songs written by somebody else, and in order to do that I have to have a deep understanding and have to really like the songs. A lot of the songs on there I had been playing for more than ten years and I loved them so much I started to hear them in my own way; rearranging and orchestrating them. But for me these were all songs I loved so much. They all fit in the same category for me. JI: I really enjoyed was your solo piano studio album Place to Be. Can you talk about the concept behind it? HU: I was traveling so much that I started to wonder, where was my place to be? Sometimes I would wake up in the middle of the night and, for a second, had to think where I was. And then I’d think, “Oh, I’m in San Francisco or Tel Aviv.” But then when I came to the stage and see all the smiles it really made me realize this is the place to be. I realized how much I loved performing and that the people have been so welcoming. I feel very much at home with the audience and I wanted to thank the people for giving me that home. Sleeping on planes is not a very easy thing to do. But because I love making people smile and playing on stage for those two hours keeps pushing me. I always want to give 100% of what I have and am so grateful for the people to take time out of their busy day to come to the shows.

Interview & Photo by Eric Nemeyer WE: There are two big challenges we face and will continue to face as artists. The first, is trying to make a good living in a country that doesn’t support its artists. The other challenge is trying to establish yourself as a reputable artist and get your music heard, despite the almost hindering effect the majority of the industry’s media outlets and writers have on young artists. Too often, politics and money have too much to do with who gets covered and who is endorsed, and who is not. Art mimics society and unfortunately the politics of the music industry is mimicking the current politics of our government. I don’t know that I can make this situation work for me, but they say “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger” and I plan on getting stronger every day.

HU: She was a very unique teacher. I started piano when I was six years old studying musical scores, with all this musical jargon I didn’t understand. I was only six years old and trying to read dynamic marks like “pianissimo” and “mezzo forte” didn’t really click for me. She circled “fortissimo” with a red pencil and she circled the “pianissimo” sign with a blue pencil. I could see it visually and it touched my heart. It reached my heart easier. She colored all my scores with these pencils and I started to understand how she wanted me to play. She taught me you have to play music with emotions. I still see colors when I play.

On Jackie McLean: WE: When I first got to Hartt, I was into Sonny Stitt, Dexter Gordon. After Awhile, I was really into Trane—like every young tenor saxophone player. Jackie heard that I was trying to do that. One day I was going to teach at the Artists’ Collective, a school that Jackie founded. He was sitting in his car. He saw me and invited me in. We listened to some music he was playing—a live recording of him playing at the Village Vanguard with Cedar Walton. We were talking about it and he said, “You know Wayne, I hear that you really want to sound like Coltrane, and you’ve been checking out a lot of Coltrane.” He then said, “You know, Coltrane checked out a lot of Bud Powell. When I first heard Coltrane he was sounding like Sonny Stitt. Next time I heard Coltrane, he was sounding like Dexter Gordon. So if you want to sound like Coltrane, you’ve got to check out Bud Powell, Dexter Gordon, Sonny Stitt.” Another way that Jackie influenced me was that in the mid 1960s, when he was getting into his more avant-garde work, he began to really get vocal about Civil Rights. That inspired me. In that spirit, I feel that my music and what I do artistically is very much inspired by what happens in the world today. I think from the 1960s on, Jackie McLean made that a part of his life, and apart from his artistic creation. I’m trying to do the same thing. What’s happening politically and socially in the world is always on my mind when I’m making music. In short, I would be a completely different person if he [Jackie] would not have been in my life. Forget about music. I would have been a very different person.

  

  

www.BlueNote.net | www.HiromiMusic.com

www.JazzStandard.com | www.WayneEscofferyMusic.com

JI: Can you tell me about your experiences working with Stanley Clarke and Lenny White? You also did a duet album with Chick Corea too. HU: Stanley wanted to do an acoustic trio and he gave me a call. And that was a shock because I never really knew him or worked with him before. I met him at some festivals and stuff but I was very surprised. But he called me and I was so excited! We went in the studio and the touring followed. I also worked with Chick. Every minute there was so much learning going on. It’s like they have so many drawers in their music and it’s like going to a huge library. It was an amazing experience! JI: ... one of your early piano teachers ... encouraged you to tap into your intuitive side as well as your technical side. She suggested colors to describe sound. Can you talk about this?

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Noteworthy Performance

Noteworthy Performance

Christian Scott

Arturo Sandoval Blue Note: April 26-28

Jazz Standard: April 25-28

Interview by Eric Nemeyer

(Photo, courtesy of artist)

AS: For me the most important thing in life is health. If you’re healthy you’ve got a good part of it all. The second thing that is equally important is freedom. The third one – and it is no less important – is happiness. If you’ve got freedom and you feel healthy and you feel happy, you couldn’t ask for anything else from God. Success, for me, happiness doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to make a lot of money. JI: Well, there’s merit to what you say. There are plenty of people who are financially wealthy who are just miserable millionaires.

Interview & Photo by Eric Nemeyer CS: Sometimes it’s hard for people not to become egotistical. For instance, if you come from a situation or musical background where people were always telling you that you couldn’t play, just because you have a different sound or you interpret things differently. People have a propensity to say that you cannot play because you might not sound like the masters. But I think when they get into a situation where people tell them they sound great or that they sold so many records and people want to be around that, it makes them feel good so its hard for them to let go of that after they have been tormented. Because as you know, the process of learning how to play this music is hard, and if you have been tormented your whole life while trying to learn the music and someone tells you that you sound great, you hold on to that. JI: Either way, compliments, like perfume, are meant to be inhaled rather than swallowed.

AS: Absolutely. I know a few of them. They have no happiness and they don’t enjoy life, and they have a lot of money. On the other hand, when you’re making music and you’re connected with your spirit, then you can’t help but be happy, because you’re focusing in on what you’re drawn to naturally. Also when you have that gift from God to be enabled to share your emotions and your feelings with the audience, and get connected – that is a privilege, a big privilege, and a unique kind of experience. JI: What challenges did you experience in Cuba when you were trying to make music?

CS: Exactly, lots of people always tell me, “You can’t believe the press,” or “Don’t believe the hype.” When people say something bad don’t believe it and when people say something good don’t believe it either. You just have to know where you stand in your heart and everything else will fall where it may. You know people are going to talk – it is just the nature of this business and the nature of playing the music. People are entitled to their opinions and they can say whatever they want, but I think when you start to place a value on what other people think of you, you’re only setting yourself up for failure. I view this music as your personal way of emoting and I don’t think that anyone’s opinion is more or less valid, because it’s all based on the human condition and the things you go through in your life. Someone can tell me that I am great or someone can tell me that I am horrible, but I can’t internalize all of that because it can prove to be a very hurtful experience. And I came from a situation with a lot of great players. So I look at my uncle and I realize he has forgotten more music than I have had time to process. So it keeps me thinner, you know what I mean? I try not to let it enter my space because then it gets dark.

AS: That was a completely different story. We were there trying to survive. Our main concern, the whole day and the whole night, was what are we going to eat to survive? There was no chance to think about sophisticated things like what kind of chord you’re going to use to make that composition more beautiful. There was no room for that. As soon as I arrived here, my life had a big transformation. There’s a movie on HBO about that. It’s a complicated story and difficult for people who grew up under freedom and a democracy, and a respect for human rights. There are so many problems you face under the government in Cuba. The government wants to control everything – even in the way you think. Whatever you say, whatever you do has to be controlled by the government. You have to be extremely careful about what you say. They can do anything to you. They have no scruples. The law doesn’t exist. They invent the law according to what they want. There are no trials. They prosecute you and do whatever they want, and that’s it – put you in jail or whatever. But, if you’re lucky and you have a trial, the lawyer who defends you works for and represents the government. Sometimes he is worse for you than the prosecutor. Under those circumstances, life is miserable. There is no respect at all.

JI: What are some of the key understandings about human nature that you have gleaned from your travels on the road?

JI: After you go through, that you can’t help but appreciate freedom.

CS: One of the main things that I have seen more often than not is the need for people to be heard. The general consensus that I’ve drawn from it is that many of them are in situations where no one really values what they have to say. I think that is a big part of the human condition that needs to be changed, the concept of some people being valued and others not. That’s hard, but it’s something that I would like to change in my lifetime. No one is less important than anyone else.   

AS: Absolutely. No one appreciates this country more than I do….perhaps equally as much as I do, but not more than I do? Impossible. I’m very, very blessed by God to live in this country, and I’m very proud to be an American citizen. Sometimes I get mad that a lot of American people don’t support our country the way that they should. They take for granted so many things. They don’t understand, most of the time, what we have.   

www.JazzStandard.com | www.ChristianScott.tv

www.BlueNote.net | www.ArturoSandoval.com

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