ISPS Code - Security Procedures

February 18, 2020 | Author: Anonymous | Category: Navigator, Ships, Port, Audit, Navigation
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Lloyd’s Register

Marine Management Systems

International Ship and Port Facility Security Code Ship Security Procedures

International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code: A practical approach to ship security

Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

IDS International

Lloyd’s Register and IDS International

Sample Ship Security Procedures

Using the Practical Pack and these Security Procedures The procedures form part of the Practical Pack and are provided as examples of how a company can ensure sufficient controls are in place to ensure that the security measures in the ship security plan are effectively implemented. This “practical pack” is intended to help company security officers meet the challenges posed by the introduction of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. By adopting a practical approach, this pack provides a methodology for conducting ship security assessments, performing on scene security surveys, developing ship security plans and writing the necessary security procedures to aid onboard implementation. Company security officers, ship security officers and managers involved in maritime security will benefit from this Practical Pack through a greater understanding of the processes involved in complying with the ISPS Code. When working through the Practical Pack reference should be made to The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code (including SOLAS amendments) and USCG Navigation and Inspection Circular NVIC 10-02 to better understand the principles upon which the Practical Pack is based.

Lloyd’s Register of Shipping, its affiliates and subsidiaries and their respective officers, employees or agents are, individually and collectively, referred to in this clause as the ‘Lloyd's Register Group’. The Lloyd's Register Group assumes no responsibility and shall not be liable to any person for any loss, damage or expense caused by reliance on the information or advice in this document or howsoever provided, unless that person has signed a contract with the relevant Lloyd's Register Group entity for the provision of this information or advice and in that case any responsibility or liability is exclusively on the terms and conditions set out in that contract.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Security Procedures Manual XYZ Shipping LTD

This “procedures manual” will form part of the Ship Security Plan. It should contain sufficient procedures to demonstrate how the security measures identified from the Ship Security Assessment will be implemented onboard. The examples given here are not intended to provide a definitive list of all the required procedures. All requirements of ISPS A/7 and 9.4 (including the relevant guidance in Part B) should be covered either in these procedures or in the ship security plan. The number and scope of procedures required to demonstrate compliance will vary from company to company. Procedures should be written in such a way as to reflect the operational requirements of the company and in a style and format consistent with existing procedural documentation, such as the safety management documentation required by the ISM Code. Where procedures are duplicated from other manuals (examples may include “Internal Audit”, “Review”, etc), it is recommended that these procedures are reproduced in full. This is because the Ship Security Plan is subject to formal approval by the Administration and a simple cross reference to part of another management system manual would make that part of the manual also subject to the formal approval process of the Ship Security Plan. Administrations will require certain amendments to the Ship Security Plan to be approved before implementation. The scope of these amendments will vary from Administration to Administration. All persons involved in amending, reviewing and updating Ship Security Plans should be aware of these requirements for the appropriate Administrations.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Amendment Record Sec.

Rev

All

0

Revision History Page 4 of 34

Description Initial Issue

Approval

Approval

Y/N?

(date)

Yes

01/01/04

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Date Implemented

01/01/04

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Index Section 0

Rev 0

Title Compilation, Issue and amendment of Documents related to security 1 0 Introduction and overview 2 0 Company Security Organisation the Master and the Ship Security Officer 3 0 Security Levels onboard 4 0 Access to the ship 5 0 Access within the ship and Restricted Areas 6 0 Interfacing with port facilities and ships in compliance with SOLAS XI-2 7 0 Interfacing with port facilities and ships NOT in compliance with SOLAS XI-2 8 0 Security considerations for cargo (Dry Bulk Carriers) 9 0 Security considerations for ships stores and bunkering 10 0 Security monitoring onboard ship 11 0 Communications relating to ship security 12* 0 The Ship Security Alert System 13 0 Security Equipment 14 0 Security Training (including Drills and Exercises) 15 0 Internal Safety and Security Audits 16 0 Management Reviews 17 Responding to security threats and breaches of security *This procedure is retained in a secure location separate from this manual Note:

These procedures shall be followed in addition to those Rules, Regulations, Codes and Guidelines which are applicable to this ship.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Compilation, Issue and amendment of documents related to security 1.0

Scope

1.1 This procedure describes how the Security Procedures and all other company documents relevant to the management of onboard security activities are compiled, issued and amended. All procedures are controlled documents.

2.0

Introduction

2.1 Appendix A to this procedure describes the objectives of the documented security management system and gives guidelines for the contents of associated documents. 2.2 Appendix B to this procedure lists the personnel to be involved with the development of procedures and work instructions.

3.0

Responsibilities

3.1 The appropriate Managers in Appendix B shall be responsible for the identification, compilation and amendment of procedures plans and other company documents in accordance with the requirements of this procedure and its appendices. The CSO is responsible for the controlled issue of procedures and work instructions.

3.2

3.3 The designated holders of any document file are responsible for updating their own copy on receipt of new or amended procedures and keeping confidential both current and superseded copies.

4.0

Detail

4.1

Format:

4.1.1

Procedures shall be drafted on white paper in the following format:

a • • • • • • • •

The first or second page shall indicate. Procedure number. Issue date. Page number. Authorisation. Title. Scope. Responsibilities. Detailed instructions.

b The second and subsequent pages shall indicate: • Procedure number. • Page number. Note: If pages are loose leaf the issue date shall be listed on all pages.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures c If required, an introduction to the procedure may be given after the scope to give further explanation of the activities addressed or clarification of terms or abbreviations used within the procedure. 4.1.2 a • • • • •

Ship Security Plans shall also be drafted on white paper in the following format:

The first page shall indicate: Ship’s Name and IMO Number. Flag State and Port of Registry. Issue date. Page number. Authorisation.

b The second or subsequent pages shall indicate: • Ships Name and IMO Number. • Page number. Note: If pages are loose leaf the issue date shall be listed on all pages. 4.2

Compilation and Issue:

4.2.1 In order to ensure that operating procedures and associated instructions accurately reflect current Company practice, the contents of draft procedures shall be based on the following: a The guidelines in appendix A to this procedure. b Previous existing documentation. c Precise notes prepared by senior staff or appointed representative describing various routines or activities. d Notes arising from discussions with staff. 4.2.2 All procedures and instructions shall clearly define the relevant task and assign it to qualified personnel. 4.2.3 On completion of the written draft, the author shall forward it to the appropriate Manager for approval prior to typing. The Master copy shall be signed by the relevant personnel to indicate their agreement to the written procedure. 4.2.4 The CSO shall arrange for typing on red paper1 and shall authorise the issue of the typed procedure by signing and dating the first page in the block provided. All drafts shall then be destroyed. 4.2.5 A new procedure shall be issued together with an updated File Revision List and a transmittal memorandum. Procedures will be issued on a "need to know" basis and the number of copies in each area shall be such that each person shall have ready access to a copy as required. Access to security procedures and all other company documentation relating to security shall be strictly controlled. Photocopying of any such documents is strictly prohibited. No “locally controlled” or uncontrolled copies are to be produced. 4.2.6

The master copy of each procedure are retained in a Master File retained by the CSO

4.2.7 The CSO shall be responsible for maintaining the distribution list of procedures and the ship security plan. 4.2.8 All Security Procedures and the Ship Security Plan shall be treated as strictly confidential and their contents shall not be disclosed to any outside party. Masters shall be aware of restrictions on disclosure of

1 Security documentation is to be printed on red paper to make such documentation easily identifiable and to avoid confusion with “non confidential” items. In addition, the use of red paper makes photocopying of documents considerably more difficult, thus discouraging “working copies”.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures these procedures and the ship security plan. Except as required by Flag Administrations, there shall be no externally distributed copies of security procedures and the ship security plan.

Amendment:

4.3

4.3.1 When subject to review and approval by the Flag Administration, changes are required to a procedure or the ship security plan then this should be co-ordinated through the CSO. All staff involved in the review and amendment process shall be aware of the relevant Flag State requirements for amendments that require APPROVAL BEFORE IMPLIMENTATION ONBOARD. The CSO holds details of all such amendments applicable to ships currently being operated. 4.3.2 When a procedure or work instruction is amended its revision date shall be changed and a completely new issue shall be authorised for release by the CSO. 4.3.3 The master copy shall be removed from the file, marked superseded and filed in the appropriate procedure or work instructions amendment file. 4.3.4 In order to ensure that the nature of the change can be readily identified, the revised parts or wording shall be highlighted in the text of the procedure by a single line adjacent to the amendment. The highlighting shall only be applied to the most recent changes. 4.3.5 Brief details of the amendments, together with the procedure and work instructions number and revision date shall be recorded in the appropriate Procedure File Revision List. 4.3.6 Copies of the following are produced and distributed to all holders of a document file: a Procedure File Revisions List. b Procedure Transmittal Memorandum. c The amended Procedure. Receipt:

4.4

4.4.1 On receipt of a new or amended procedure or work instruction and the associated documentation the recipient shall: a remove from the document file any superseded pages, File Revisions List and destroy them. b insert the new and amended pages and replacement File Revision List. c sign and return the Amendment Transmittal memorandum. 4.5 Should an individual recognise a need for a new procedure/instruction, he shall communicate that need in writing to the relevant Manager or through the company or ship's safety and security meetings.

5.0 • • • • •

Records/References

Amendment File. Transmittal Memorandum. File Revision List. Distribution List. Master Copy File.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Appendix A: System Documentation 1.0

Objectives:

1.1 The objectives for the company's Documented System are: a To have the documented management system of onboard security activities documented in a hierarchical structure. b For the hierarchical System documents to be titled and numbered in one style. c That each document in the company which affects or could affect the safety/pollution prevention of the company's operations may be included in this documentation either directly or by crossreference. All documents affecting the security of operations shall be included here.

2.0

Documentation Structure

2.1

The hierarchical structure of the System documentation is shown below:

Security Procedures Defines the company's policies for the management of security activities, and details what the company does to satisfy the requirements of the ISPS Code. Define the responsibilities of personnel and the controls to be applied to either a single or collated set of activities, applicable to for onboard operations on any trading pattern. Some procedures will only be applicable to a single ship type while others apply across the company’s fleet. These procedures are attached to and form part of the individual ship security plan.

Ship Security Plan This document is ship specific and details the measures to be employed onboard each ship. The ship security plan is developed from the ship security assessment (including on scene security survey). Company security policy statements and organisational structure are also included in the ship security document.

3.0

Document Contents

3.1

General

3.1.1

Documents within the documented system shall be written as part of the structured system.

3.1.2 All documents shall, where necessary, cross reference other external documents, rules, codes and instructions in use. Documents directly controlling the management of security activities shall be included in either the Security Procedures or the Ship Security Plan. 3.1.3 All procedures and work instructions shall be written in the future tense using the words 'shall' and 'must'. 3.1.4 Numbering of the documented system shall be as follows: (The company will need to devise the numbering system that best suits them). 3.2

The Ship Security Plan.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures 3.2.1 The Manual shall state the organisation's security policy, the overall organisation and responsibilities. Other parts of the Ship Security Plan are ship specific and detail the measures to be employed on each of the company’s ship to meet the requirements of the ISPS Code and the company Security Procedures. 3.3

Security procedures

3.3.1 Procedures shall describe: • What has to be done. • When it has to be done. • What has to be achieved. • Who shall do it. • How it shall be done. • How it shall be known that it has been done correctly. • What records will be kept.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Appendix B: 1.0 List of personnel responsible for identification and development of procedures and work instructions (including amendments) • Managing Director • Company Security Officer (CSO) • Technical Director • Operations Manager • Fleet Manager • Ship Masters • Ship Security Officers (SSO) • Others with specific roles related to security through either the SSO or CSO, as appropriate. .

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

XYZ Shipping LTD Introduction and overview 1.0

Scope

This procedure describes how the company manages security risks onboard ships.

2.0

Responsibilities

3.0

Detail

4

Records/References

This section should give any background information that the company feels appropriate. This section should also contain a copy of the Security Management Policy Statement.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Company security organisation, the master and the ship security officer

1.0

Scope

2.0

Responsibilities

3.0

Detail

4.0

Records

This procedure shall detail the company’s security organisation, both ashore and onboard. All specific security duties of the master and SSO should be documented if not included in other procedures.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Security Levels onboard company ships 1.0

Scope

This procedure describes the three security levels that company ships shall observe.

2.0

Responsibilities

2.1

The Administration is responsible for setting security levels onboard ships flying their flag.

2.2 The Designated Authority may increase the security level on ships visiting port facilities in their territory to match the security level of those port facilities. 2.3 Masters and ship security officers are responsible for ensuring ships act on security levels set by Administrations and Designated Authorities.

3.0

Detail

3.1

Three security levels shall be observed onboard company ships. 3.1.1 Security Level 1: Is the level for which minimum appropriate protective security measures shall be maintained at all times. Companies may wish to extend this definition from ISPS Code Part A Section2.1.9 in line with company operations to illustrate that this is the normal condition. 3.1.2 Security Level 2: Is the level for which appropriate additional protective security measures shall be maintained for a period of time as a result of heightened risk of a security incident. Companies may wish to extend this definition from ISPS Code Part A Section2.1.10 in line with company operations to illustrate that this is a heightened state of readiness which may have to be maintained for a period of time. 3.1.3 Security Level 3: Is the level for which specific protective security measures shall be maintained for a limited period of time when a security incident is probable or imminent, although it may not be possible to identify the specific target. Companies may wish to extend this definition from ISPS Code Part A Section2.1.11 in line with company operations to illustrate that this security level is only maintained when there is specific indications that a security incident is imminent and that this security level is only maintained for the duration of the specific threat, or the duration of a security incident. At security level 3, Administrations and Designated Authorities will issue instructions relating to security that ships shall follow. At security level 3, the ship security officer shall be relieved of all other onboard duties and shall be dedicated to overseeing the security of the ship and supporting the master.

3.2 The ship security plan details the specific measures that shall be maintained in each area of ship operation at each security level. These procedures detail how these measures are to be applied, maintained and controlled at each security level. 3.3 The master, in consultation with the company and ship security officers, may increase the security measures onboard from the minimum measures stipulated in the ship security plan. Such actions could result from the ship transiting a high security risk area or entering a port where security problems have been encountered previously. Under no circumstances shall the master apply security measures less than those stated in the ship security plan for the current security level. Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

3.4 When operating with increased security measures, as described in 3.3, above, the ship security level remains as that set by the Administration or the Designated Authority (for the current port facility). Masters, company security officers or ship security officers can not set or change the security level onboard the ship. 3.5 Whenever increased security measures are applied as described in 3.3 above, details of the increased security measures and their duration of implementation shall be recorded in the security logbook. 3.6 Communications related to security levels, including when the ship has difficulty complying with security levels set be Administrations or Designated Authorities, are included in section XX (Communications relating to security) of these procedures.

4.0

Records/References

Official Logbook / security logbook. Records of communications relating to security.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Access to the ship 1.0

Scope

This procedure describes how access to the ship is controlled in various operational situations at the three security levels.

2.0

Responsibilities

2.1 This section should detail who has responsibilities relating to controlling access to the ship. It should contain responsibilities of the ship security officer, watch keeping officers and crew. Outside security contractors may be included. If so, responsibilities for controlling these contractors should be included.

3.0

Detail

3.1 This section will detail who does what and when. Reference should be made to the ship security plan where the individual security measures are contained. Cross reference to the section on contingency planning should be made to cover attempts (whether successful or unsuccessful) to gain unauthorised access to the ship. Consideration should be given to discharging security duties in conjunction with “normal” duties relating to ship operation, safety, etc.

4.0

Records/References

• Records of security activities relating to access control.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Access within the ship and Restricted Areas 1.0

Scope

This procedure describes how access within the ship is controlled in various operational situations at the three security levels. Within the ship there are a number of Restricted Areas; this procedure details has access to such areas is monitored and controlled.

2.0

Responsibilities

2.1 This section should detail who has responsibilities relating to controlling access within the ship. It should include the responsibilities of the ship security officer, watch keeping officers and crew. Responsibilities should reflect that deck, engine and catering departments will all have Restricted Areas within their normal jurisdiction.

3.0

Detail

3.1 This section will detail who does what and when. Reference should be made to the ship security plan where the individual security measures are contained. Cross reference to the section on contingency planning should be made to cover attempts (whether successful or unsuccessful) to gain unauthorised access to a Restricted Area. If the Company has a policy concerning controlling access to Restricted Areas it should be included here and reflected in the measures in the ship security plan. Consideration should be given to discharging security duties in conjunction with “normal” duties relating to ship operation, safety, etc.

4.0

Records/References

• Records of security activities relating to access control.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Interfacing with port facilities and ships in compliance with SOLAS XI-2 1.0

Scope

2.0

Responsibilities

3.0

Detail

4.0

Records/References

This procedure will detail the normal security activities involved with ship/port and ship/ship interfaces when the other ship or port facility is also subject to, and in compliance with, SOLAS XI-2. This section will cover pre arrival activities, entering port and actions in port. Guidance / instruction should be given as to the circumstances when the ship should request the issue of a Declaration of Security. Records to maintained of ship/port interfaces should also be specified.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Interfacing with port facilities and ships NOT in compliance with SOLAS XI-2 1.0

Scope

2.0

Responsibilities

3.0

Detail

4.0

Records/References

There will be occasions when the ship will have to interface with other ships or port facilities that are not in compliance with SOLAS XI-2. In such circumstances additional security measures should be implemented and records of these additional measures maintained.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Security considerations for cargo 1.0

Scope

2.0

Responsibilities

3.0

Detail

4.0

Records/References

This procedure shall detail security considerations relating to loading and discharging cargo.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Security considerations for ship stores and bunkering 1.0

Scope

2.0

Responsibilities

3.0

Detail

4.0

Records/References

This procedure could also cover control of baggage and persons seeking access to the ship

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Security monitoring onboard ship 1.0

Scope

This procedure defines the activities and controls necessary to monitor the deck and areas surrounding the ship. In addition it defines how the ship security officer ensures that the appropriate security measures are implemented and maintained at all times.

2.0

Responsibilities

2.1

The Master is ultimately responsible for the security of the ship

2.2 The ship security officer is responsible for ensuring that appropriate security measures are implemented and maintained at all times. He is also responsible for directing others in the measures required to monitor the deck areas and areas surrounding the ship dependent on the ships location and the current security level. 2.3 Officers are responsible for implementing security measures relating to monitoring the deck and areas surrounding the ship, as directed by the ship security officer through their head of department. 2.4

The crew are responsible for carrying out security duties as directed by officers.

2.5 The navigation officer is responsible for annotating passage plans in accordance with this procedure.

3.0 Ensuring appropriate security measures are implemented and maintained. 3.1 The ship security officer shall maintain an ongoing record of all security measures being implemented onboard in the security logbook. 3.2 At least once per day, the ship security officer will tour all areas of the ship that are currently implementing security measures to confirm the measures are in place and remain effective. At security level 3 these tours shall be conducted at least once every six hours. 3.3 Any perceived weaknesses in security shall be discussed with the master and any corrective action or additional security measures shall be agreed. 3.4 Security tours and their findings shall be recorded in the security logbook, which shall be countersigned by the master on a weekly basis.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures 4.0

Monitoring of deck areas and areas surrounding the ship

While underway 4.1 At security level 1 while underway: The requirements for conducting a safe navigational watch shall be suitable for monitoring the deck areas and areas surrounding the ship. 4.2 At security level 2 while underway: The requirements for conducting a safe navigational watch shall be suitable for monitoring the deck areas and areas surrounding the ship, providing the ship is at least 100 nautical miles from the nearest land. 4.3 At security level 3 while underway: The requirements for conducting a safe navigational watch shall be suitable for monitoring the deck areas and areas surrounding the ship, providing the ship is at least 200 nautical miles from the nearest land and watch keepers have been instructed to maintain maximum vigilance. 4.4 The navigation officer shall annotate all passage plans and course lines on charts to indicate when the ship is within 200 nautical miles and 100 nautical miles of the nearest land. 4.5 Master’s standing orders shall include a requirement for the officer on watch to inform the master or the ship security officer when the ship comes within 200 and 100 nautical miles from the nearest land. These requirements should be reflected in the procedures controlling passage planning and bridge watch keeping in the Safety Management System. At anchor, in port and while underway in circumstances not covered in 4.1 to 4.3, above 4.6

Security measures employed shall be as described in the ship security plan.

4.7 At security level 1 security measures may be implemented by a single crew member in conjunction with their normal shipboard duties, provided such other duties do not hamper the effectiveness of the security measures. An example could be a crewmember maintaining a gangway watch while performing other duties in the vicinity of the gangway. 4.8 At security level 2 security duties shall be performed by crewmembers dedicated to that duty while it is being undertaken. Crewmembers undertaking security duties shall be in constant communication with the ship security officer or with the relevant officer on watch. An example could be a crewmember dedicated to undertaking the gangway watch and supplied with a handheld VHF radio. Another example could be if a deck tour is required at certain intervals. In this case it would be permissible to periodically take a crew member of other duties to conduct the tour and then return to their other duties once the tour was complete. It is not necessary to have crewmembers dedicated to security duties. 4.9 At security level 3 security duties shall be performed by a team of at least two crewmembers dedicated to performing security duties. Each team shall be in constant contact with either the master or the ship security officer. Given the nature of security level 3, it is not unreasonable to expect either the master or the ship security officer to be overseeing the security of the vessel at all times.

5.0

Records/References

The security logbook Passage Plans

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Communications relating to ship security 1.0

Scope

2.0

Responsibilities

3.0

Detail

4.0

Records/References

All communications relating to security should be controlled and recorded. This includes Ship – Company, Ship – Administration and Ship – Port State.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Ship Security Alert System This procedure is to be kept confidential onboard. Only the master, ship security officer, company security officer and representatives of the ship’s Administration have free access to this procedure. Access to others can only be granted with the express permission of the ship’s Administration. 1.0

Scope

This procedure defines the controls necessary to ensure correct operation and testing of the Ship Security Alert system.

2.0

Definitions

2.1 “Ship Security Alert”: The alert system required by SOLAS XI-2 Reg 6 and complying with the performance standards stated in IMO Resolution MSC.136(76). 2.2 “Competent Authority”: As designated by the Administration in accordance with SOLAS XI-2 Reg 6.2.1, which for this ship is the Company Security Officer.

3.0

Responsibilities

3.1 The master is responsible for the activation of the ship security alert system in the circumstances detailed in current “Instructions to masters” or in other circumstances deemed appropriate by the master. 3.2 The Ship Security Officer is responsible for ensuring that the ship security alert system is tested in accordance with this procedure. The ship security officer is also responsible for ensuring that others onboard know the location of the ship security alert activation points and the circumstances in which they are authorised to activate the ship security alert. 3.3 The Company Security Officer is responsible for acting as the Administration nominated “competent authority” and acting on security alerts received from the ship. The company security officer is also responsible for limiting “false alerts” in line with this procedure. For routine testing of the ship security alert, the company security officer may delegate his duties to a nominated deputy. 3.4 All officers and crew are responsible for activating the ship security alert system when ordered to do so by the master or the senior officer in the event that a security incident has removed effective command of the ship from the master.

4.0

Detail

The locations of the ship security alert activation points are included in the ship security plan. These locations shall not be disclosed to any “outside party” without the express permission of the ship’s Administration.

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Sample Ship Security Procedures Routine Testing 4.1 The ship security alert shall be tested once every calendar month on a day agreed in advance between the master, the ship security officer and the company security officer. 4.2 Throughout the testing, telephone contact will be maintained between the master and the company security officer 4.3 Once communication has been established between the master and the company security officer the purpose of the test shall be confirmed. 4.4 The ship security alert shall be activated from the first activation point. When the company security officer receives the alert, the information contained in the alert shall be verified for accuracy. The minimum information to be verified shall be the ship’s identity, the current position and that the information received is identified as a “ship security alert”. 4.5

The company security officer will then reset the ship security alert from shore.

4.6 All other activation points onboard shall then be tested in accordance with section 4.4 and 4.5 of this procedure. 4.7 When all security alert activation points have been tested and the ship security alert has been reset, it shall be agreed between the master and the company security officer that testing is complete and all future alerts are to be treated as “real”. 4.8 Prior to terminating the call, the company security officer will issue a confidential “code word” to the master that will be used to limit false alerts from the ship. Limiting “false alerts” 4.9 As the ship security alert gives no indication of being activated onboard, it is necessary to have controls in place to limit “false alerts” being generated. 4.10 When the company security officer receives a security alert from the ship the following steps shall be taken: 4.10.1 The company security officer shall immediately attempt to contact the ship using an agreed covert message which is identical in format to a routine ship / shore communication2. 4.10.2 If the ship security alert HAS NOT been activated as a result of a security incident: On receipt of the covert message, the master will reply with the current security “code word”. On receipt of the “code word” the company security officer will contact the ship and agree the security alert status with the master. Once the cause of the false alert has been identified and corrected, the company security officer shall reset the ship security alert from ashore. 4.10.3 If the ship security alert HAS been activated as a result of a security incident: On receipt of the covert message, the master may either ignore the message or reply with an incorrect code word, as appropriate to the circumstances. If there is no response to the “covert message” from the ship within [one hour] of sending, or an incorrect “code word” is received the company security officer shall proceed on the understanding that the ship security alert has been activated in connection with a security incident onboard.

2 The means of communication (telex, GMDSS, fax, etc) and the content of this message shall be agreed with the master before joining the vessel. No record as to the type and content of this message will be kept onboard.

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Lloyd’s Register and IDS International

Sample Ship Security Procedures Maintenance and survey of the ship security alert system 4.11 The ship security alert system and any associated equipment shall be included in the GMDSS equipment contract with [ABC Marine Electronics International]. No part of the system can be serviced or repaired by onboard staff. If a fault is detected in the ship security alert, the company security officer shall be immediately informed and a radio technician will be arranged for the earliest opportunity. 4.12 The operational status of the ship security alert system shall be surveyed as part of the Safety Radio Equipment Survey.

5.0 • • • •

Records

Records of routine testing Records of maintenance of all GMDSS equipment onboard Record of survey of Safety Radio Equipment List of current security “code words” and “covert messages” (held ashore with the company security officer)

Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

Ship Security Alert Page 27 of 34

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Security Equipment 1.0

Scope

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Responsibilities

3.0

Details

4.0

Records/References

This procedure will detail the additional controls by which the SSO ensures that inspection, testing and calibration of security equipment is carried out. The actual inspection, test and calibration can be carried out as part of the ship’s planned maintenance system.

Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

Security Equipment Page 28 of 34

Lloyd’s Register and IDS International

Sample Ship Security Procedures

Security Training (including Drills and Exercises) 1.0

Scope

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3.0

Detail

4.0

Records

If this procedure is combined with the corresponding section of the Safety Management System, the combined procedure should be reproduced in full in the security procedures. An example of a combined procedure is included in the “Management Review” procedure included here.

Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

Security Training Page 29 of 34

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Internal Safety and Security Audits 1.0

Scope

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3.0

Details

4.0

Records/References

This procedure may be combined with the corresponding section of the Safety Management System. If so, then the combined procedure should be included , in full, in these procedures.

Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

Internal Audit Page 30 of 34

Lloyd’s Register and IDS International

Sample Ship Security Procedures

Management Review 3 This procedure duplicates Safety Management System procedure number XXXX. If this procedure is required to be amended or revised, such amendments and revisions shall also apply to SMS procedure XXXX.

1.0

Scope

This procedure describes the activities required to carry out periodic reviews ashore of the Security and Safety Management Systems in conformity with the ISPS and ISM Codes.

2.0

Responsibilities

2.1 The Managing Director is responsible for arranging and co-ordinating Management Review meetings. 2.2 The Designated Person Ashore and Company Security Officer are responsible for ensuring that any actions concerning shore based activities, raised at Management Review meetings, are carried out as soon as is practicable thereafter. 2.3 Superintendents assigned to particular ships are responsible for ensuring that actions concerning those ships resulting from Management Review meetings, are carried out as soon as practicable thereafter.

3.0

Detail

3.1 A Management Review of the Security and Safety Management Systems shall be held at intervals not exceeding once each year. 3.2 Whilst it is appreciated that some superintendents may not be able to attend the meeting due to overseas commitments, a Management Review shall not take place unless at least 50% of the superintendent staff are present. The Managing Director, (M.D.) Designated Person Ashore (D.P.A.), Company Security Officer (CSO) and at least two Masters on voyage leave shall be present at every Management Review meeting. 3.3 The purpose of a Management Review meeting is to evaluate the efficiency of the Security and Safety Management Systems and to recommend any changes intended to enhance that efficiency. 3.4 Every Management Review meeting shall be minuted and shall indicate actions required, where appropriate. 3.5 Each year, in January, the M.D. shall prepare a list of attendees for the Management Review meeting.

The requirement for the CSO’s review of security is included in section 2 “Company Security Organisation, the master and the ship security officer”. 3

Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

Management Review Page 31 of 34

Lloyd’s Register and IDS International

Sample Ship Security Procedures 3.6 Suggested items for the agenda will be submitted to the D.P.A. and C.S.O. no later than the end of December in each year. The agenda and date for the meeting will be set by the D.P.A. and circulated to all attendees. 3.7 The agenda for the Management Review meeting shall include, but need not be limited to: • Minutes of the previous meeting. • Analysis of accidents, hazardous occurrences and non-conformities. • Reports of security incidents and breaches of security. • Port State Control inspection, including security related control and compliance measures. • Internal audit findings. • Organisational changes. • Third party audit results. • Effectiveness of training methods. • Changes in relevant legislation, conventions etc. • Identification of new plans, procedures, or instructions. • The efficiency of the Security and Safety Management Systems and any suggested changes. 3.8 Minutes of the Management Review meeting shall be approved by the MD and then circulated to all relevant personnel, including the Master and Ship Security Officer of each ship. Reviews of security activities shall be treated as confidential and shall not be disclosed to any outside agency without the express permission of the Administrations concerned. 3.9 Management Review meetings may be held more frequently than once a year, provided the meeting has been called by either: • The Managing Director. • The Designated Person Ashore. • The Company Security Officer.

4.0

Records/References

Minutes of Management Review.

Management Review Page 34 of 34

32 Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

Lloyd’s Register and IDS International

Sample Ship Security Procedures

Responding to security threats and breaches of security 1.0

Scope

2.0

Responsibilities

3.0

Details

5.0

Records/References

This procedure should detail the controls necessary to effectively implement the measures on contingency planning contained in the ship security plan.

Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

Contingency Planning Page 31 of 32

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Sample Ship Security Procedures

Coastal State Security Contact Details Insert a list of security contacts for Coastal States, as and when available from IMO

Management Review Page 34 of 34

34 Document Version 0.1 created on 2-Apr-03 © Lloyd’s Register 2003

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