Fundoscopy Made Easy 3ed

July 23, 2017 | Author: nanaelseed | Category: Retina, Human Eye, Cornea, Peripheral Neuropathy, Eye
Share Embed Donate


Short Description

Download Fundoscopy Made Easy 3ed...

Description

Fundoscopy Made Easy   

 

2010 

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15                                                   

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Fundoscopy Made Easy  WONG YEE MING  Medical Student, 5th Year, 2010/2011  National University of Malaysia.  © 2010 by medicalpblukm.blogspot.com  1st edition,  June 2009  2nd edition, July 2009  3rd edition, April 2010                         

This is an open project meant to be shared in any form of publication,  regardless of being reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in  any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or  otherwise from the author at [email protected] Credits should be  given to medicalpblukm.blogspot.com.  The author welcomes and appreciates feedbacks and reviews of this project in the effort to  improve this book in the spirit of information sharing, as well as notifications of usage of this  project in any form. Feel free to e‐mail the author at [email protected]       3 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

Acknowledgements  The 3rd edition of this Fundoscopy Made Easy reflects a continued  improvement on the previous editions. The changes that have been made are  largely from comments and suggestions by students, as well as review by a  senior lecturer and ophthalmologist Dr. Then Kong Yong who have taken time  to tell us what they like about the book and how it can be further improved.  We understand that this book is far from being perfect, and the flaws are  corrected as time goes by, which is why we try to incorporate the comments,  suggestions and feedback into this improvised edition.  Specifically, we owe our thanks to the following reviewers: doctors, students  and faculty who spent considerable time to provide us with correction,  suggestions, improvements and to make this possible. They were gladly the  source of inspiration in the continuation of this project to its 3rd edition:        

Dr. Then Kong Yong  Senior Lecturer  Ophtalmology Consulting Specialist (Cornea)   University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

   

Jeffrey Lee Soon Yit, MS  University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

                   

Lee Cun Coon, MS  University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia  Boey Ching Yeen, MS  University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Table of Contents  Preface ................................................................................. 6  The Tool – Direct Ophthalmoscope ....................................... 7  Note from the Author .......................................................... 9  The Fundus Mapping ........................................................... 10  Fundoscopy Steps ............................................................... 12  1. Optic Disc Abnormalities ................................................. 14  2.  Macular abnormalities .................................................... 21  3. Retinal Vessels  Abnormalities ........................................ 26  4. Retinal findings .............................................................. 28  Credits: ............................................................................... 36  EXTRAS: Systematic Ophthalmic Examination ................... 37                   

5 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

Preface  This open project book is intended for medical students who are newly  exposed to the use of the direct ophthalmoscope. Over the years, basics in  fundoscopy has form an essential part of the medical field. However, little has  been written specifically to teach the younger generation on how to appreciate  through the eyes of the fundoscope. For what the mind does not know, the  eyes could not see.  And yet, the eyes hold the 8th wonder of the world, being  the only place in our bodies where we can look in awe at the living pulses of the  blood vessels in our bodies. But first, we as students would need to be exposed  and taught of the ways of the fundoscope, and what we can see and expect.  We need to be guided in our pursue of perfection, and to tell us that, there is  more than meets the eye.     Being one of the many medical students who had struggled from such  experience, this book is written with medical students in mind, to help them to  master the fundamentals. That is, before they could proceed to appreciate the  abnormalities and pathology in the eyes which would never fail to mesmerize  those who could see it. We are incredibly grateful to everyone who made this  book a reality.   Wong Yee Ming  Kuala Lumpur, 2010                         

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

The Tool – Direct Ophthalmoscope                                                     

7 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

Apertures and Filters  There are various apertures and filters in the indirect  ophthalmoscope, but beginners may require only a certain few.  However, here is a general breakdown of the use of each aperture  and filter:    Small Aperture: For easy view of fundus through the undilated  pupil. Always start with this while looking at the fundus.   

Large Aperture: Standard aperture for dilated pupil and general  examination of the eye, particularly the red reflex.   

Sm Micro Spot Aperture: Allows easy entry into very small,  undilated pupils.  Slit Aperture: Helpful in determining various elevations of  lesions, particularly tumors and edematous discs.  Fixation Aperture: The pattern of an open center and thin lines  permits easy observation of eccentric fixation without masking  the macula.               

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Note from the Author  Before you conduct a direct fundoscopy, be realistic in your aims and  know that practice makes perfect. Nothing beats experience in  fundoscopy, even if you are a genius. But of course, do know your  fundoscopy steps prior to the examination. You might not want to  blind your volunteering patient with your initially wobbly techniques!  Now, I’m sure most of you medical students would have been too  enthuasistic on looking at the fundus, having seen many pictures in  the books. Do note that fundoscopy pictures in the books are taken  with indirect ophthalmoscope which have a wider  view. Therefore,  tracing is required in direct fundoscopy before you get a full picture  of the fundus.                    

                                            

                                                        

A view of indirect fundoscopy of a normal fundus (on the left) with a highlighted   area of focus of direct fundoscopy in the box(on the right).  

With this in mind, do not panic if you do not find the optic disc on  your first try. All you need is a clear and calm mind, and this book is  here to guide you for an enjoyable experience in your use of  fundoscopy. 

9 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

The Fundus Mapping                               

The major landmarks of the fundus:  1. Optic disc   •  the point where the optic nerve enters the retina. This is the  blindspot area of your eyes. In the optic disc is a cup which is  usually present.   • normal vertical cup disc ratio : 0.1‐0.3   o (pathological changes are suspected if > 0.6)    • the cup is usually at/ near the central of the optic disc, while  the crowding of vessels are always on the nasal side of the  optic disc.  • this knowledge is useful to identify which side is the eye(left or  right).In most pictures from indirect fundoscope, the optic disc  is shown on the nasal aspect, making it easier to identify them.   

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

2. Macula  • the pigmented area of the retina which is rich in cone  photoreceptors and is responsible for clear detailed  vision.  3. Fovea  • a small rodless area of the macula that provides acute  vision.  • the foveal light reflex should be seen particularly in a  young healthy adult as a rim of light around the fovea.  4. Vessel branches  • There are 4 main branches of vessels from the optic disc.  Each branches off into different directions, mainly  superonasally, superotemporally, inferonasally, and  inferotemporally.   • In the normal variation, the macula is devoid of retinal  vessels, thus it is supplied from the branches of  superotemporal and inferotemporal vessels.  • One should remember the embryonic development of  retinal vessels which arise from the optic disc, towards  the nasal aspect at 8 months of gestation and temporally  at 10 months (approximately 1 month neonatally). This is  important to understand the concept of retinopathy of  prematurity!                 

11 | P a g e    

Apr. 15 

Fundoscopy Made Easy Fundoscopy Steps  Fundoscopy should be done optimally in a dark or dimmed room.  Such preference is essential to keep the pupil as dilated as possible.  Alternatively, topical drops can be given to dilate the eyes if there is  no contraindications.  1. Fundoscopy should be done on the same side for the patient  and you, as the examiner. This being said, the examiner should  hold the fundoscope with his right hand, while his right eye  should be examining the patient’s right eye. This would avoid  both of you rubbing noses! Do remember to rest your other  (free) hand on the patient’s forehead, also to prevent you two  from knocking heads!  2. Start about an arm’s length away with the illuminated lens disc  at +4.00 ‐ +10.00 d (usually green positive) lens using the large  aperture. However, this may also depends on whether you are  wearing your glasses, so do experiment to get used to it.  3. Illuminate both of the patient’s eyes to enable you to observe  the red reflex of the patient and to examine for any media  opacities (cataract, corneal scars, large floaters).  4. Select “0” on the illuminated lens disc and start with the small  aperture as you approach the patient while fixing the “red  reflex” pupil as your target. Remember to ask the patient to  look straight at a distance to maintain pupil dilation.  5. Tilting slightly at 15‐25o lateral to the patient, move forward as  you direct the light beam into the pupil. The optic disc should  be within view as you are about 1‐2 inches from the patient’s  eye. remember that the optic disc is slightly towards the nasal  aspect of the fundus.  6. Do not panic if you do not see the optic disc initially. Look for a  nearby retinal blood vessels. You’ll most likely find the optic  disc by tracing at either one “end” or the other of the vessel.  This is due to the developmental fact that retinal vessels branch  from the optic disc to the peripheral retina. 

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

7. The optic disc may not be focused as you see it, as  hypermetropic patients require more “plus” (green numbers)  lenses for clear focus of the fundus while myopia patients  require more “minus” (red numbers).  8. Examine the optic disc for (the 4C’s):  • color (pink, pale, hyperemia, etc)  • contour (margin, shape, elevation, etc)  • cup‐disc ratio (compare the vertical diameters)  • caliber of vessels (normal AV ratio around 2:3)  ‐ the AV ratio mentioned is measured from the width of  the vessels before the 3rd bifurcation from the origin on  the optic disc..   9. Follow each vessel as far to the periphery as you can and look  for any abnormalities such as venous dilatation, AV nipping,  etc.  10. To examine the periphery, ask the patient to:  • Look up for examination of the superior retina  • Look down for inferior retina  • Look temporally for temporal retina  • Look nasally for nasal retina.  11. Lastly, locate the macula which is approximately 2 disc  diameters temporally from the optic disc, between the  superotemporal and inferotemporal vessels. Or you can ask  the patient to look at the light of the ophthalmoscope, which  would put the macula in good view. Look for abnormalities.  Red filter facilitates the view of macula.   12. For the examination of the left eye, the same procedure can  be repeated, but with left hand and left eye on the left side.        13 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

1. Optic Disc Abnormalities 

   

Disc Swelling  i.

Disc swelling is a sign, not a diagnosis. 

ii.

It is essential to test the optic nerve function in all cases of  disc swelling. 

iii.

Tests for optic nerve function includes:  1. Visual acuity  2. Pupil response  ‐ direct reflex  ‐consensual reflex  ‐ relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD)  3. Visual field  4. Color vision (Red desaturation) 

iv.

Important causes of optic disc swelling(Disc edema) may  include:  • Optic Neuritis  • Papilloedema  • CRVO  • AION 

*The term ‘papilloedema’ is usually reserved for bilateral disc  swelling (as it is a result of increased intracranial pressure). Thus,  check the other eye for optic disc swelling before coming to a  conclusion of papilloedema!   *Cases of unilateral papilloedema are very rare. 

Fundoscopy Made Easy v.

2010 

Papilloedema vs Optic Neuritis 

  Definition 

Unilateral/  Bilateral  Pain on eye  movement 

Papilloedema  Passive swelling of  the optic disc  secondary to  increased intracranial  pressure.  Eg. Space Occupying  lesion, meningitis,  beingn intracranial  hypertension (BIH)  Usually Bilateral 

Optic Neuritis  Inflammation of the optic  nerve.  2 ypes of optic neuritis:  a. Papillitis  Optic disc is swollen  b. Retrobulbar neuritis  Normal appearance  of disc  Usually Unilateral 

No 

Yes  (Rectus contraction pulls  on optic nerve sheath)  Transient obscuration  Reduced  Visual  Acuity  – mostly normal until  late stage  Normal, no RAPD  Pupil  Positive RAPD in unilateral  reaction  cases  Visual field  Enlarged blind spot  Central or paracentral  scotoma  Color vision  Usually normal  Red desaturation            15 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

Quick Reference: Causes of disc swelling:  Unilateral  Vascular: eg. AION, CRVO or  diabetic papillopathy  Inflammatory: “papillitis”, eg.  uveitis, sarcoidosis, viral, SLE    Demyelination: MS‐ may become  bilateral  Hereditary: Leber’s Hereditary  Optic Neuropathy  Infiltrative: tumors such as  retinoblastoma, lymphoma  Infective: Toxoplasmosis, herpes,  Lyme’s disease                         

Bilateral  Raised intracranial pressure:  SOL, hydrocephalus, Benign  Intracranial Hypertension (BIH)  Malignant hypertension    Diabetic papillopathy  Infiltrative papilloedema:  lymphoma  Toxic: ethambutol,  chloramphenicol uremia   

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Optic Atrophy (Figure 1.1)  Optic atrophy is the final common morphologic endpoint of any  disease process that causes a loss of optic nerve fibers at the optic  nerve head.   Optic atrophy is actually a misnomer; in the strict histologic  definition, atrophy refers to involution of a structure resulting from  prolonged disuse.  • Clinical Findings:  a. Poor visual acuity   (Severity depending on degree of optic atrophy)  b. Reduced Color Vision  c. Visual field defect (depending on cause)  d. Positive RAPD (unilateral cases)  e. Pale optic disc                    Figure 1.1 Optic Atrophy  17 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

  Common Causes of Optic Atrophy  a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h.                          

  Pressure/ Traction: Glaucoma, Papilloedema  Hereditary: Autosomal dominant optic atrophy, autosomal  recessive optic atrophy, Leber’s hereditary Optic Atrophy  Vascular: Central Retinal Artery Occlusion, Antrior ischemic  optic atrophy (acute phase)  Retinal dystrophy: Cone dystrophy, Retinitis Pigmentosa  Nuttritional/Toxic: Vitamin B deficiency  Inflammatory: Sarcoidosis, polyarteritis nodosa  Demyelination: Multiple Sclerosis  Compresive: Optic nerve glioma or meningioma 

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Glaucomatous optic neuropathy (Figure 1.2)  Findings:  a. Increased Cup/Disc ratio  (Normal: 0.1‐0.3)  (Abnormal > 0.6)  b. Nasalization/Bayonetting of vessels in the optic disc  Bayoneting – double angulation of vessels as it “climbs” from the the cup of the optic  disc  Nasalization‐displacement of the vessels from center to the nasal aspect of the cup  in the optic disc. 

c. Lamellar dots (multiple gray dots scattered on cup of optic disc)  ‐caused by exposure of lamina cribosa due to loss of neuroretinal tissue (seen in  advanced glaucomatous stage) 

d. Very deep cup  *not all enlarged cup means glaucoma 

Figure 1.2 Glaucoma  19 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

  Optic Disc Neovascularization (Figure 1.3)  • Disorganized arcades of vessels seen on optic disc  • Can be shaped as fronds, with thin and fragile vessels  • Neovascularization may involve just the peripheral as well, and  may assume the shape of a “seafan”  • Common causes of disc neovascularization:  1. Advanced Diabetic Retinopathy  2. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion  3. Ocular Ischemic Syndrome                        Figure 1.3 New vessels formation on optic disc  Notice the disorganized tiny vessels on the nasal side of the optic disc, forming a massive  frond‐like stuctures. 

 

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

2.  Macular abnormalities  Macular edema  • Result of increased fluid and protein deposits within the  neuroretina in the macula.  • Swelling may distort the central vision, as the macula is near  the center of retina.   • May be differentiated into cystoid and  non‐cystoid.  *It is hard to differentiate between cystoid and non‐cystoid with a direct  ophthalmoscope, hence hard exudate seen around the macular region is usually used as  an indicator of macular edema. 

  Figure 2.1 ‐ Left: Hard exudate formation around the macula (Non‐cystoid)           Right: Thickening of fovea associated with microcyst (Cystoid)        21 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

• Causes of macular edema may include:  i. Retinal vascular disease (Background diabetic  retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion)  ii. neovascularization  iii. retinitis pigmentosa  iv. age‐related macular degenration (ARMD)  v. hypertensive choroidopathy, malignant arterial  hypertension  vi. iatrogenic (eye surgery, eg: retinal detachment surgery,  retinal cryotherapy)                           

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Stellate Maculopathy (Figure 2.3)  • Retinal hard exudates forming a macular star  • Frequently associated with optic disc swelling  • Causes:  o Hypertension – bilateral  o Papilloedema – bilateral (may be assymetrical)  o Neuroretinitis (usually unilateral)  o Capillary angioma, may be on the optic disc or at the  periphery, is associated with macullar star. 

Figure 2.2 Macular Star  Diabetic Maculopathy  • Poor near vision, not corrected by Plus lenses  • Usually assymetrical  • The commonest cause for poor vision in diabetes patients is  macular edema especially in NIDDM.    23 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

Cherry Red Spot (Figure 2.4)  • An obvious red round spot of the fovea surrounded by a  concentric area of pale retinal background.  • Causes: Central retinal artery occlusion (acute phase), and GM2  gangliosidoses particularly Tay‐Sachs disease.   

Figure 2.4: Cherry Red Spot in  central retinal artery occlusion(left) and Tay‐Sachs disease(right) 

Note the much paler background of the retinal in CRAO    *In CRAO, giant cell arteritis (GCA) should be considered in patients  older than 65 years, but do not ignore in younger patients.           

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

*Central Serous Retinopathy (Of interest) – Figure 2.5  • Localized detachment of sensory retina at the macula  secondary to focal RPE defects.  • Self‐limiting, usually affecting young/middle‐aged men with  Type A personality.  • Sub‐retinal fluid around macula (elevation as indicated by the  “climb” by vessels on macula.                    Figure 2.5 Central Serous Retinopathy            25 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

 3. Retinal Vessels  Abnormalities  Normal Artery to Venous (A‐V) ratio is 2:3    Reduced in:   • Aging  • Hypertension  • Old CRAO (due to attenuated arterioles)  Retinal Vasculitis (Figure 3.1)  • Vasculits may affect veins (periphlebitis) or arteries  (periarteritis)  • Active vasculitis is characterized by fluffy white haziness  (cuffing) of the vessels column.                      Figure 3.1 Examples of retinal vasculitis 

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Common Causes of Major Changes in Vascular Caliber  Arterial attenuation  Venous dilatation and/or  tortuosity  • Systemic hypertension  • Retinal vein occlusion  • Retinal artery occlusion  • Non‐proliferative diabetic  • Diffuse retinal disease  retinopathy  (Retinitis pigmentosa)  • Hyperviscosity syndrome  Combined venous and arterial  dilatation and tortuosity  • Ocular ischemic syndrome  • Retinopathy of prematurity  • Inherited venous beading  • Retinal capillary  hemangioma  • Retinal racemose  hemangioma               

Figure 3.3  

Figure 3.2 

Arterial attenuation in advanced retinitis  pigmentosa 

   

Venous beading and dilatation along with new  vessels formation on disc (Proliferative Diabetic  Retinopathy) 

Figure 3.4  Arterial and venous tortuosity in racemose  hemangioma 

27 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

4. Retinal findings   Retinal hemorrhages  i. Superficial  Flame shaped hemorrhages (Figure 4.1)  • bleeding near the surface of retina in nerve fiber  layer  • follows nerve fiber, giving flame‐shaped appearance  • located usually in relation to optic nerve head or  posterior pole, seldom in peripheral retina where  nerve fiber layer is thin.  • causes: retinal vein occlusion, diabetic retinopathy,  optic nerve disease (acute papilloedema, anterior  ischemic optic neuropathy), retinal periphlebitis  Figure 4.1 Flame‐shaped hemorrhage 

Notice the unidirectional smudge‐smear like of the hemorrhage, forming the characteristic  flame appearance. 

 

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

ii. Deep           Dot and blot hemorrhages (Figure 4.2)  • bleed from deep retinal capillaries  •  dot hemorrhages are small round and with uniform      density  •  blot hemorrhages are larger, with irregular shape and  density, forming an irregular patch of bleeding, and  darker in color  •  dots and blots are mostly found in the peripheral retina  where retinal nerve fiber is usually thinner  •  causes: retinal vein occlusion, non‐proliferative diabetic  retinopathy, ocular ischemic syndrome                              Figure 4.2 A clear  cut dots and blots hemorrhage appearance    29 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

Preretinal Hemorrhage (Figure 4.3)  Also known as: Subhyaloid hemorrhage  • Bleeding on the surface of retina, between the retina and  hyaloid membrane of vitreous   • Usually solitary and located at the posterior pole  • Well defined margin with vessels sometimes seen crossing  BELOW the hemorrhage area. (Not over the hemorrhage)  • Initally round but later settle with gravity, giving the “boat‐ like” apperance due to pooling of the blood.  • Causes: Proliferative retinopathy, retinal artery  macroaneurysm, wet ARMD, choroidal neovascularization,  trauma 

Figure 4.3 Preretinal hemorrhage  A round preretinal hemorrhage (left) with vessels seen crossing below it. The picture on the  right show a large preretinal hemorrhage which settled into a boat‐like appearance or  pooling of blood. 

     

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Subretinal Hemorrhage (Figure 4.4)  • Bleeding between the photoreceptors and retinal pigment  epithelium  • Usually large and bright red with indistinct margin  • Vessels are clearly seen ABOVE the hemorrhage (not below the  hemorrhage)  • Causes: choroidal neovascularization, retinal tear, Coat’s  disease, sickle cell anemia, blunt trauma 

Figure 4.4 Subretinal hemorrhage  Note that the vessels are crossing above the hemorrhage area. 

  Key Points  Retinal hemorrhage  Superficial: Flame‐shaped  Deep: Dots and blots  Preretinal hemorrhage  Blood vessels cross BELOW the hemorrhage area  Subretinal hemorrhage  Blood vessels cross ABOVE the hemorrhage area    31 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

Cotton Wool Spots ( Figure 4.5)  • Represents microinfarction of the nerve fiber layer of the retina  • Consist of axoplasmic debris  • small, white, superficial lesions with indistinct margin, giving it  a fluffy appearance of cotton wool .  • Causes: Retinal vein occlusion, non‐proliferative diabetic  retinopathy, vasculitides (SLE, scleroderma), hypertensive  retinopathy, AIDS microvasculopathy, microembolic retinal  artery occlusion 

Figure 4.5 Cotton Wool Spots       

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Hard Exudates ( Figure 4.6)  • Leakage of high protein and lipid due to break in blood retinal  barrier  • Yellowish glistening intraretinal lesion, usually with a well‐ defined margin.  • Commonly seen in any conditions that are associated with  chronic vascular leakage , such as::  1. Diabetic retinopathy  2. Hypertensive retinopathy  3. Choroidal neovascularization   

Figure 4.6 Hard Exudates  Notice the picture on the right where a circinate ring is being formed. 

*In fundus with massive hard exudates, check the patient’s lipid profile  for hypercholesteremia. It is essential to control the cholesterol level as  well!    33 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

Drusen (Figure 4.7)  • Drusens are yellowish deposits external to neuroretina and  retinal pigment epithelium.   • It may be well‐defined and small (hard) or ill‐defined (soft).   • Drusen may be discrete or confluent (coalesce with one  another) and usually are the hallmarks of age‐related change.  • Drusens can occur anywhere, in the peripheral retina or macula,  but those occuring at the macula are the ones with clinical  significance as they may be related to central visual loss..  • Association: Age‐related macular degeneration (ARMD),  autosomal dominant drusens (ADD                        Figure 4.7 Drusens on the macular area        

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Tigroid retina /fundus (Figure 4.8)  •  A normal fundus to which a deeply pigmented choroid gives  the appearance of dark polygonal areas between the choroidal  vessels, especially in the periphery. Causes: Highly myopic eyes  or racial variations.  • Sometimes, it refer to the lacking pigment so that underlying  choroid vessels are visible as irregular stripes. Causes: albinism  • The dark stripes at the background resemble the tiger stripes,  which therefore give rise to its name: Tigroid fundus                      Figure 4.8 Tigroid fundus      35 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

  With this, the book has come to an end of the basics of fundoscopy.  The author did not touch on certain aspects such as fibrosis in retinal  detachment but nevertheless important once you have grasp the  basics in this book. This book does not intend to replace any  textbook in fundoscopy teachings, thus readers are advised to read  up more from recommended Ophthalmology textbooks. Last but  not least, enjoy your fundoscopy experience!! 

Credits:  1.  Jack J.Kanski. Clinical Ophthalmology‐ A Systematic Approach.   6th edition 2007.  2. Jack K Kanski, Ken K Nischal. Ophthalmology – Clinical Signs and  Differential Diagnosis. 1999  3. Jane Oliver, Lorraine Cassidy. Opthalmology at a Glance. 2005.  4. E‐Medicine specialties: Ophthalmology,  http://emedicine.medscape.com  5. Digital Reference of Ophthalmology, Edward S. Harkness Eye  Institute. http://dro.hs.columbia.edu/index.htm   6. Prof. Dr Che Muhaya Hj Mohamad. Ophthalmology Checklist for  Undergraduates. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (National  University of Malaysia)  7. Dr Zaid Shalchi. Eyes Made Easy.http://eyesmadeeasy.net  8. Dr Faridah Hanom Annuar, our supervisor who had inspired us to  work hard and was always there to guide us in our lessons.         

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

EXTRAS: Systematic Ophthalmic Examination  In a systemic ophthalmic examination, there are 5 essential  components to perform, which includes:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Visual Acuity  External Eye Examination  Extraocular Movements  Visual Field Test  Fundoscopy 

Visual Acuity  There are 2 aspects of the visual acuity which should be tested for,  namely the distance and the near vision.  Distance vision should be formally done with a Snellen Chart or its  equivalent for pediatric cases, at 6 meter. If the acuity is too poor, let  the patient try reading at 5 meters instead. For worse cases, check  for counting fingers and hand movement.Then, try shining a  pentorch from the peripheral retina, to test for light perception. In  cataract, light perception is usually preserved.  Near vision can be tested with a Test Chart at 15 inches or 33cm away  from the eyes.    *Vision should be checked with and without glasses and pinhole  glasses.      37 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

External Eye Examination  From general inspection, look for any ptosis, symmetry of the face  particularly the eyelids or any obvious changes which have include  discoloration of the sclera or a serious red eye. This can be done as  soon as your patient steps into the clinic!    1. Lids  • The upper lid should cover around 1mm of the upper limbus.   • Lower lid should cover just at the lower limbus.   • Palpebral aperture should be normal and look at the lashes for  possible malalignment for trichiasis. A normal lash should be  pointing anteriorly and laterally.  • Look for the margins for lumps, bumps and any pigmentation.    2. Conjunctiva  • The conjunctiva consist of the palpebral, fornix and bulbar  conjunctiva. Inspect each side closely.  • Look for any papillae, follicles, dilatation of vasculature  (injection) or subconjunctiva hemorrhage.               

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Next would be the Anterior Segment which consist of cornea,  anterior chamber, pupil/iris and the lens.  3. Cornea  • Looks at the size(normal adult diameter 10‐13mm) and  shape of the cornea which should be round and equal size.   • Sharp and pointy cornea is suggestive of keratoconus.  • The cornea should be clear and avascular.  (A generalized cloudy cornea is suggestive of corneal  edema)  • Look out for any sutures or scar especially at the superior  cornea for signs of previous  cataract surgery.    4.Anterior chamber  • Inspect the content of the anterior chamber, whether if it is  clear, hypopyon or hyphaema.  • Shine a torch perpendicular to the limbus from the lateral  aspect and observe the shadow to gauge the depth of anterior  chamber. A deep anterior chamber should have no shadow at  the medial iris.    5. Pupils/Iris  • The pupils should be equal, round and central.   • The color of the iris should be same for both eyes, otherwise it  would be heterochromis iridis.  • Look out for any previous scars suggestive of peripheral  iridectomy or iridotomy!  • Pupillary reflex may be examined, the direct light reflex,  consensual light reflex and relative afferent pupillary defect.    39 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

6. Lens  • Check for the eye’s red reflex if possible. Shining a torch at the  lens may show a dislocated lens or sometimes an intraocular  lens in the anterior chamber.  • Shine a light at the cornea through the pupil. Pseudophakic  patients may reveal an obvious double light reflex, a second  glistening reflex.  • Also, check for the presence of cataract if the red reflex  is  absent. The cataract can be anterior subcapsular, posterior  subcapsular, nuclear sclerosis or cortical cataract.    Note: There are a total of 4 light reflexes from the eye media  when the light is shone thorugh the media (cornea and lens).  However, only 1 can be obviously seen as you manouver the light  source in a circular motion.     

Summary:     

External Eye Examination:  Lids + conjunctiva + Anterior Segment  = Lids + conjunctiva + (Cornea + Anterior Chamber + Pupils/Iris + Lens)   

Anterior Segment Examination:  Cornea + Anterior Chamber + Pupils/Iris + Lens   

         

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Principles of RAPD (Relative Afferent Pupillary Defect)   

RAPD                  41 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

Extraocular Movement  Extraocular movement is only done in certain patients most of the  time. It is not aroutine examination, thus you won’t see such  examination done in a patient on diabetic retinopathy follow up.  Indications for such a test include:  • • • •

Symptoms of double vision (diplopia)  Strabismus  Patients with also neurological problems  History of trauma to the orbit 

There are 2 methods to test for extraocular movement:  i.

Bisected H  The typical H shape drawn in the air with a target object  (pentop or finger). Be sure to not exceed the patient’s range of  vision, otherwise you may cause a physiological nystagmus!   

          Bisected H pathway for extraocular movement     

Fundoscopy Made Easy ii.

2010 

“Union Jack”  This is a test using a pentorch with the light directed at both  eyes. With this, the corneal light reflex can be observed while  doing the extraocular test, which can rule out pseudosquint if  present.   This method use a different pathway but applies the same  principles as the bisected H. 

          Pathway for the “Union Jack” extraocular movement test 

              The actions of the IIIrd, IVth and VIth nerves on the eye movements of the right  eye. III= Oculomotor, IV=trochlear, VI= abducent  43 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

*Note:  • Test for accomodation as well by bringing the target to around  20 cm from the patient’s eyes and observe the pupil  constriction and eye convergence.  • remember to gently pull up the eyelid as the patient looks  down to have a clear view of the eyeball positions.  • Observe for the smoothness(smooth pursuit) of the eye  movement as it follows the moving target. They can be smooth  or jerky.  • Always ask the patient if they see any double vision during the  extraocular movement test.  • If there is limitation of the eye movement, you may try  occluding the normal eye. That way, you may test if the defect  is vergence or version.  • Know the muscles involved in each eyeball movement and the  supplying cranial nerves.     

 

The eye muscle movements are:

 

   

   

Abduction‐adduction   

Elevation‐depression   

 

Intorsion – extorsion

 

 

       

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

Visual Field Test  • This can be done with a confrontation test (1 meter apart and  on the same level with the patient) with a white neuropin.  Peripheral vision utilizes rods which is predominant in  peripheral retina, thus it detects black and white, not color  vision.  • Make sure the patient could see in each eye before testing for  visual field.  • Remember to bring the neuropin all the way to the center from  the peripheral. You might miss a scotoma defect or a central  visual defect !  • Blind spot should also be tested with a red neuropin. This is due  to the fact that the blind spot is enlarged in disc edema. As the  macula is near to the optic disc (blind spot area in your eye),  color acuity is the best, thus red pin is used instead of white.  •  Move around the blind spot once you found it. Move up or  down to check if it is enlarged, and make sure that the reason  the patient can’t see the target is not because it is beyond his  visual field’s limit!       

 

Red pin is also used to test for optic nerve  function by checking for red desaturation in  all 4 quadrants of the visual field.  

 

  Fundoscopy  Fundoscopy is the last part of the examination, and it has been  described in the early section of the book. Thus, I am sure you would  have no difficulty in doing this.    45 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

                                             

Fundoscopy Made Easy

2010 

               

47 | P a g e    

Fundoscopy Made Easy

Apr. 15 

 

View more...

Comments

Copyright ©2017 KUPDF Inc.
SUPPORT KUPDF