Arvind ltd, santej unit

August 2, 2017 | Author: Divya Krishna | Category: Spinning (Textiles), Textiles, Cotton, Yarn, Organic Farming
Share Embed Donate


Short Description

textile internship report...

Description

OBJECTIVES OF INTERNSHIP The main objectives of the project/internship were: 1. Understanding basic principles of production of textiles. 2. In depth study and understanding of all process involved in textile production and the machinery and equipment used. 3. Knowledge about the company. 4. Understanding the company’s process flow in production 5. Study the work environment and practices followed for textile production.

The project is based on two weeks (i.e., May 25, 2015 to June 6, 2015) internship in Arvind Mills- Shirting Division, Santej (Gandhinagar) unit. It covers the information and learning experiences related to manufacturing shirting fabrics and the the processes involved are:     

Spinning Dyeing Weaving Finishing Testing Industry Mentor- MR. SUBHANISH MALHOTARA (Chief Manager HR)

OVERVIEW OF INDIAN TEXTILE INDUSTRY

1

The   textile   industry   has   been   gradually   re­located   from   the   developed   to   the   developing countries,   over   the   last   few   decades.   This   phenomenon   has   increased   the   opportunity   for developing countries to boost manufacturing and trade in textiles. It is highly competitive and its prospects are continuously increasing.  The   Indian   textile   industry   has   a   significant   presence   in   the   economy   as   well   as   in   the international textile economy. Its contribution to the Indian economy is manifested in terms of its contribution to the industrial production, employment generation and foreign exchange earnings. It contributes 20 percent of industrial production, 9 percent of excise collections, 18 percent of employment in the industrial sector, nearly 20 percent to the country’s total export earning and 4 percent to the Gross Domestic Product.  A strong raw material production base, a vast pool of skilled and unskilled personnel, cheap labour, good export potential and low import content are some of the salient features  of the Indian textile industry. This is a traditional, robust, well­ established industry, enjoying considerable demand in the domestic as well as global markets. 

India’s presence in the international market is significant in the  areas of fabrics and yarn as: 

India is the largest exporter of yarn in the international market and has a share of 25% in world cotton yarn exports.



India accounts for 12% of the world’s production of textile fibres and yarn.



In terms of spindleage, the Indian textile industry is ranked second, after China, and accounts for 23% of the world’s spindle capacity.



Around 6% of global rotor capacity is in India.



The country has the highest loom capacity, including handlooms, with a share of 61% in world loomage.

India has the potential to increase its textile and apparel share in the world trade from the current level of 4.5% to 8% and reach US $ 80 by 2020.

2

ABOUT THE COMPANY­ ARVIND LIMITED The Arvind Limited is one of the largest textile conglomerates in Asia. Its headquarters is in Ahmedabad (Gujarat). It manufactures a range of Shirting, Denims, Knits and Bottomweights (Khakis) fabrics. The company has a turnover of approximately $ 500 million and is a part of over 100 years old Lalbhai Group. Arvind ranks in top three largest Denim producers worldwide with an annual production of over 90 million meters of Denim Fabric and Exports to over 70 countries. It is also one of the largest producers in Asia of high value cotton shirting fabrics. It has a capacity of around 34 MMPA (million   meters   per   annum)   of   yard   dyed   shirting   and   piece   dyed   shirting   fabric   including specialty Fine count Indigo yarn dyed and solid Shirting fabric. It produces approximately 20 MMPA of Piece Dyed Khaki's fabrics and around 16 TPD (tones per day) of Knits Fabrics which is vertically integrated into Knits Garments. Arvind started with a share capital of ₹ 2,525,000 ($55,000) in the year 1931. With the aim of manufacturing   the   high­end   superfine   fabrics   Arvind   Limited   invested   in   very   sophisticated technology. With 52,560 ring spindles, 2552 doubling spindles and 1122 looms it was one of the few companies in those days to start along with spinning and weaving facilities in addition to full­fledged facilities  for dyeing, bleaching,  finishing and mercerizing.  The sales  in the year 1934, three years after establishment were ₹ 45.76 lakh and profits were ₹ 2.82 lakh.  In the mid 1980’s the textile industry faced another major crisis. With the power loom churning out vast quantities of inexpensive fabric, many large composite mills lost their markets, and were on the verge of closure. Yet that period saw Arvind at its highest level of profitability. At this point of time Arvind’s management coined a new word for it new strategy – Reno Vision. It simply meant a new way of looking at issues, of seeing more than the obvious and that became the corporate philosophy.

3

The   national   focus   paved   way   for   international   focus   and   Arvind’s   markets   shifted   from domestic to global, a market that expected and accepted only quality goods. Cottons were the largest growing segments. But where conventional wisdom pointed to popular priced segments, Reno vision pointed to high quality premium niches. Thus in 1987­88 Arvind entered the export market for two sections: Denim for leisure & fashion wear and high quality fabric for cotton shirting and trousers. By 1991 Arvind reached 1600 million meters of Denim per year and it was the third largest producer of Denim in the world. In 1997 Arvind set up a state­of­the­art shirting, gabardine and knits facility, the largest of its kind in India, at Santej, Gandhinagar (Gujarat). With Arvind’s concern for environment a most modern effluent treatment facility with zero effluent discharge capability was also established. Arvind entered into exports of garments setting up Shirt factories in Bangalore in 2001. This modest beginning has quickly grown to a capacity of around 4.50 Million Shirts per annum and the list of customers includes Gap, Dockers, Next, Esprit, FCUK, Osh Kosh and many others. Arvind's entry into Jeans/ Pants was delayed due to the tight quota situation in India. It entered into Jeans Garment exports with its first Jeans factory “The Arvind Overseas (Mauritius) Ltd., Mauritius, to offer full Garment package to its customers in USA and Europe. This factory which started in March 2002 was a good stepping stone/ pilot plant and did programs with customers which included Express, Next, M&S, Lee Cooper, Rocawear and others. With the world moving into a new Quota Free world, Arvind decided to move the Garment factory to Bangalore, India in September 2004, to offer its customers more flexibility and better cost effectiveness. Company's current Jeans capacity is around 10 Million Pieces per annum. Year 2005 was a watershed year for textiles. With the muliti­fiber agreement getting phased out and the disbanding of quotas, international textile trade was poised for a quantum leap. In the domestic market too, the rationalizing of the cenvat chain and the growth of the organized retail industry was likely to make textiles and apparel see an explosive growth.

4

Arvind has carved out an aggressive strategy to verticalize its current operations by setting up world­scale  garmenting  facilities  and offering a one­stop shop services, by offering garment packages to its international and domestic customers. With Lee, Wrangler, Arrow and Tommy Hilfiger and its own domestic brands of Flying Machine, Newport, Excalibur and Ruf & Tuf, Arvind is setting its vision of becoming the largest apparel brands company in India. Arvind also runs a value retail chain, Megamart, which stocks company brands. Arvind feature is that its enterprises are equipped with highly advanced equipment of a full cycle­ from painting the fiber to the finished product.  With   the   best   of   technology   and   business   acumen,   Arvind   has   become   a   true   Indian multinational, having chosen to invest strategically, where demand has been high and quality requirement is being superlative. Arvind has set the pace for changing global customer demands of textiles and has focused its attention on selected core products. Such a focus has enabled the company to play a dominant role in the global textile arena. Today, The Arvind Limited is the flagship company of  ₹ 30 billion Lalbhai Group. 

Current Chairman and Managing Director – MR. SANJAY S. LALBHAI

Figure 1: journey of Arvind Limited

5

In 1930, the world suffered a traumatic depression. Companies across the globe began closing down. In UK and in India, the textile industry in particular, was in trouble. At about this time, Mahatma Gandhi championed the Swadeshi Movement and at his call, people from all India began boycotting fine and superfine fabrics, which had so far been imported from England. In the midst of this depression one family saw opportunity. The Lalbhais reasoned that the demand for fine and superfine fabrics still existed. And any Indian company that met this demand would surely prosper. The three brothers, Kasturbhai, Narottambhai and Chimanbhai decided to put up a mill to produce this superfine fabric  and  the Arvind Mills (Arvind Limited) was born. The best technology of that time was acquired at a most attractive price.

TIMELINE  1931

Arvind   Limited   is   set   up   by   three   brothers   Kasturbhai,   Narottambhai   and Chimanbhai Lalbhai with a share capital of ₹2,525,000 (US$55,000) backed by state­of­the­art technology of England, with the aim to produce high­end superfine fabric.  Products manufactured are dhoties, sarees, mulls, dorias, crepes, shirtings, bra, panties, coatings, printed lawns & voiles cambrics, twills gaberdine etc. 

6

1934

With   sales   reaching  ₹45.76   Lakhs,   and   a   profit   of   almost  ₹3   Lakhs,   Arvind

1980

Limited establishes itself amongst the foremost textile units in the country. Arvind Limited records highest levels of profitability. The new strategy – ‘Reno vision’, points at changing the business focus from local to global, towards a high­

1986

quality premium niche market.  An   uninterrupted   record   of   not   missing   out   on   paying   dividend   to   its shareholders.

1987­88



First company to bring globally accepted fabrics Denim, yarn dyed shirting



fabrics and wrinkle free gabardines to India. Arvind enters the export market for Denims with a dual focus ­ Denim for leisure and Denim for fashion wear.

1991

 An established leader in fine and superfine cotton fabrics in Indian markets. Arvind reached 100 million meters of denim per year. Arvind emerges as the third

1992

largest manufacturer of denim in the world. The Company increased the production of denim cloth by 23,000 tonnes per day

1993

by modernising the plant located at Khatraj of Ankur Textiles.  The Company proposed to expand the denim manufacturing capacity by 85,00,000 metres per annum. 

The Company also proposed to set up a new composite mill for producing annually 120 lakh meters of high quality shirting fabrics to be marketed in

1993­94



the domestic as well as international markets. First Company to bring International Shirt brand ‘Arrow’  to India.

1995

 

First company to start retail outlets for Arrow brand. The performance of textile division was significantly affected due to an unprecedented rise in cost of cotton.

1997



Garment division launched ready to stitch jeans pack under the brand ‘Ruf



& Tuf’. India’s largest state­of­the­art facility for shirting, gabardine and knits is set up at Santej, Gandhinagar (Gujarat).



The largest zero discharge green effluent treatment plant in India.



The   marketing   and   distribution   network   of   ‘Newport’   brand   was strengthened   and  the   relaunched  ‘Flying  Machine’  and  ‘Ruggers’  brand

7

were strengthened. 

The   Company   reported   a   fire   in   the   goods godown &   folding   packing department in Naroda Road unit of the company.



Arvind sets up the anti­piracy cell for the first time in India to curb large scale   counterfeiting   of   their   highly   successful   brands   Ruf   &   Tuf   and Newport jeans.



Arvind   Limited   adopts   the   franchisee   system   for   the   manufacture   and distribution of Ruf and Tuf jeans.



Arvind Fashions, doubles its capacity in the state­of­the­art manufacturing facility in Bangalore to produce Lee jeans.



First Indian company to verticalize the cotton textile business from cotton fields to apparel retailing.

1998



1997 was also the year when Arvind Limited started facing serious troubles



financially. First   company   to   introduce   ERP   SAP   business   solutions   in   their   new manufacturing unit in April 1998.

1999 2000 2001

 

Largest Denim and Shirting in South Asia. Arvind sets a two­month deadline for hiving off its garments division into a



separate company and sale of its real estate in Delhi. CRISIL downgrades   the debenture issues   of   Arvind   Limited,   indicating



that the instruments were in default. Arvind   entered   into   exports   of   garments   setting   up   Shirt   factories   in Bangalore in 2001.



Arvind defaults on a $125 million floating rate note issue and puts forward a debt restructuring proposal that could significantly reduce its debt burden and sharply improve its financial health.

2002



Arvind   Limited   posts   a   net   loss   of  ₹44.59   crore   for   the   quarter   ended



September 30, 2001. Arvind entered into Jeans Garment exports in March 2002 with its first Jeans factory ‘The Arvind Overseas (Mauritius) Ltd.’, Mauritius, to offer

8

2003

2004



full Garment package to its customers in USA and Europe.  For the fourth quarter, Arvind witnesses 280% growth in the net profit.



Arvind Limited is assigned a `P1+` rating by CRISIL, which indicates a



very strong rating for their commercial paper. Company turns itself around showing remarkable improvement in financial performance.

2005



Arvind decided to move the Denim Garment factory to Bangalore, India in



September 2004. Arvind creates a unique one­stop shop service on a global scale, offering garment packages to reputed national and international customers.



For the fourth quarter in a row, Arvind has managed to post a profit growth in excess of 80 per cent.

2007 2008



Arvind   Limited   decides   to   buy   entire   stake   in   Arvind   Brands



from ICICI Ventures Arvind   expands   its   presence   in   the   brands   and   retail   segment   by



establishing MegaMart – One of India’s largest value retail chains. Largest portfolio of International brands: Lee, Wrangler, Nautica, Jansport, Kipling,   Tommy,   Arrow,   US   Polo,   Izod,   Pierre   Cardin,   Palm   Beach,

2010



Cherokee etc. Arvind   Limited   launches   ‘The   Arvind   Store’,   a   concept   putting   the company’s best fabrics, brands and bespoke styling and tailoring solutions under one roof. 



Arvind becomes one of India’s largest producers of fire protection fabrics.

COMPANY’S VISION

9

They Believe In people and their unlimited potential; in content and in focus on problem solving; in teams for  effective performance, in the power of the intellect.

They Endeavour To select, train and coach people to obtain higher responsibilities; to nurture talent, and to build  leaders for the corporations of tomorrow; to reward, celebrate and activate all intellectual  business contributions.

They Dream Of excellence in all endeavors; of mutual benefit and prosperity; of making the world a better  place to live in.

EXECUTIVE LEADERS

10

Corporate

Lifestyle Fabrics

Jayesh Shah Director & CFO

Aamir Akhtar CEO, Lifestyle Fabrics - Denim

Anang Lalbhai MD - Arvind Products

Susheel Kaul CEO, Knits & Woven Fabrics PD Chavda President, Voiles

Lifestyle Apparel Ashish Kumar CEO, Lifestyle Apparel - Jeans & Shirts

Brands & Retail J.Suresh Managing Director - Brands & Retail (Source: Company official website www.arvindmills.com)

DIVISIONS  Woven Fabrics

SHIRTING AND BOTTOM WEIGHTS Arvind’s expertise in new age shirting fabric and bottom weights is unparalleled. Their shirting fabrics have consistently fetched a premium in the local and international markets. Prominent products within shirting category include fabrics with non­iron properties, mechanical finishes, printed fabrics apart from the cotton and cotton blends in Linen, Lycra, Polyester, Modal, Silk etc. with varieties in yarn dyes and solids. The state of the art facility is capable of producing a total of 65 million meters per annum of Shirting   (35   million   meters)   and   bottom   weight   fabrics   (30   million   meters).   It   ensures   that

11

stringent  quality  standards  are met  and products  remain eco­friendly.  This  capacity  is  set to increase reaching a total of 84 million meters by the next financial year. Further, Arvind has a unique plant for manufacturing very light weight indigo dyed fabrics in yarn   dyed   and   solids   for   top   weights.   Arvind   Shirting   has   a   liquid   ammonia   based   fabric processing plant and a state­of­the­art print house – a first for India and one of the few in Asia.  They   have   a   dedicated   in­house   design   team   constantly   working   on  product   innovation   and fashion   forecasts   for   the   domestic   and   international   markets.   They   also   boast   of   the   largest yardage and sampling mill in India. Their spinning setup can produce a variety of counts for yarn types like compacts, slubs, signed yarn etc. The weaving capabilities  include high­speed Airjet looms  and Rapier looms. Their finishing capabilities include continuous bleaching and dying ranges, caustic mercerization, and machinery for various chemical and mechanical finishes. A sophisticated and supremely flexible package dying facility complete with vessels ranging from 1 Kg to 750 Kilograms and state of the art printing facilities are also in place.  In addition to cotton they now work with a variety of fibers including Modal, Tencel, Excel, Viscose, Bemberg, Lycra, Silk, Linen, Polyester and Nylon.  They are host to India’s first Ammonia Mercerization Plant.  They use patented technology to impart structural stability and superior hand­feel for the difficult­to­handle fibers like Modal, Tencel, Excel and Viscose.  Over the years, their in house R&D department has successfully developed and perfected a number of finishes adding value to our products and uniqueness to our range. 

 

Other   Chemical   Finishes:   Wrinkle   free,   Prepress,   Everfresh,   Easy   to   Iron,  Stain

Repellant, Nano Care, Anti­Bacterial, Permawhite etc.  Mechanical Finishes: Aero, Peach, Brush, Diamond Emery and Carbonium.  

12

Their product range is certified by Oekotex, processes are certified by GOTS for producing Organic products. They are certified producers of Lycra and Teflon based varieties, while their laboratory is accredited by Marks and Spencers, Next, Gap Inc., Levi's, DuPont and INVISTA.

DENIMS The late 1980’s saw Arvind pioneer the manufacture of denim in India. Today with an installed capacity of over 110 million meters per annum, Arvind is a leading producer of denim in the world.   It   has   an   export   network   of   70   countries   worldwide.   Design,   Innovations   and Sustainability have been their core competency and have played a key role in the success. The use of sophisticated ultramodern technology under the guidance of world­renowned designers has enabled Arvind to deliver many firsts in the international markets. All their products are designed and modeled on the basis of expert design inputs coming from our designers based out of India, Japan, Italy and the United States. All Arvind Denim products come with the hallmark of distinctiveness and quality. Some Examples: 

Shuttle looms for Selvedge denim



 Name selvedge and Stretch selvedge



Unique Fibers like Excel, Jute, Silk, Linen



 Natural Indigo and Vegetable dyes



Unique concept products like Indigo voiles & Handspun denim



Organic, BCI & Sustainable denim

  The denim facility at Arvind is accredited with ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OEKOTEX 100, GOTS, and Organic exchange standard. Our labs are certified by NABL (ISO 17025 certification) and customers  like Levi’s, Lee, and Wrangler etc. As one of the largest denim producers in the

13

world, Arvind caters to quality markets of Europe, US, West Asia, the Far East and the Asia Pacific.  

KHAKI   The many virtues of Arvind Khaki merit undivided attention: An annual capacity of 21 million meters which facilitates the launch of two new collections annually; and the distinction of being the only khakis division in South East Asia to do so. The division provides the finest fabrics in the variants of 100% Cotton, Cotton Rich Polyester Blend, Cotton  Lycra, Cotton Tencel,  Cotton Linen,  etc to name a few. The division has  an integrated plant with weaving and processing facilities. The most prominent products in this range include Chinos, Canvas, Ribstop, HBT, Tussore, Cavalry, Structures and Dobbies. 

VOILES Arvind   has   been   well   poised   as   a   leading   manufacturer   of   super   fine   fabrics   in   India.   An uncontested market­leader in the manufacture of voiles, Arvind still continues to manufacture the traditional fabric for both domestic and international markets. The legacy of Arvind transcends from the olden days into a golden future with a production capacity of 36 million meters per annum. Arvind’s voiles are primarily used as blouse material and are sold in the domestic market through   an   impressive   network   of   around   150   dealers,   reaching   over   5000   retail   outlets throughout India. High quality Swiss voiles are exported to Switzerland, Sri Lanka and countries in the Middle East.

14

Customers of Woven Fabrics: Banana Republic, Brooks Brothers, Ann Taylor, Hugo Boss, Calvin Klein, Polo Ralph,  Eddie Bauer, Express, J Crew, Louis Phillip, Van Heusen, Arrow, Color Plus, Esprit, Paul Smith, Park Avenue

KNITS FABRICS Arvind’s knits department has an annual knitting capacity of 5,000 tons. The knits vertical has a fabric dyeing capacity of 5000 tons per annum and yarn dyeing capacity of 1800 tons per annum. It has the ability to process both tubular and open­width fabrics and offers specialty finishes like mercerization, singeing and various forms of brushing and peaching. The department also boasts of a state­of­ the art print shop equipped with fully automatic placement printing capabilities Basic knits: 

Jersey, Pique, Rib, and Interlock



Specialty knits: Yarn­dyed, Auto stripers, Jacquards, and Stretch fabric



Fibers: Cotton, Excel, Viscose, Modal, Polyester



Finishes: Mercerization, Brushing, Peaching, Aero­finish.

    Customers: Marks & Spencer – Eddie Bauer – Zara – Josepha Bank

ADVANCED MATERIALS Arvind's   Advanced   Materials   is   a   certified   ISO   9001:   2008   manufacturing   facility producing   high   performance   industrial   fabrics   with   world   class   technology   and knowhow   based   on   a   strong   foundation   of   knowledge,   research   and   market   needs. They are committed to offer textile solutions for rapidly growing sectors like General Industrial manufacturing and processing, infrastructure, transport, energy and personal protection.

15

OTHER DIVISIONS GARMENT EXPORTS A world without boundaries is a promise of a global marketplace. At Arvind, the range of fabrics is   universal   in   appeal.   They   aim   to   inspire   a   diverse   mix   of   customers   enriching   lifestyles globally.  

Bottoms: 7.2 million pieces of jeans per annum\



 Formal & Casual tops: 6 million pieces per annum



Knit tops: 3.6 million pieces per annum



Their specialized capabilities for adding value to our products include;

             •   Automated Placement Printing Machinery              •   India’s largest washing facility with Tonello machines for wet processes              •   Bohemian machines and Laser tech for unique and automated dry processes              •   Skilled artisans for hand processes BRANDS OWN BRANDS: Mainstream, Excalibur Gant, Flying Machine LICENSED BRANDS: Bridge to Luxury, USA 1949, Energie PREMIUM BRANDS: Arrow, USPA, Izod, Lee, Wrangler, Ruf & Tuf, Cherokee, Mossimo, New Port University

ENVIRONMENTAL INITIATIVES Arvind Limited commits itself to continually improve our environmental management. It strives to go beyond the requirements of the applicable environmental laws & other regulations through: 

Optimizing usage of cotton, energy, chemicals & water. 



  Adopting   preventive   strategies   to   reduce   the   generation   of   effluents,   waste   &   air emissions. 

16

1)



Maximizing the recycling of inevitable wastes. 



Encouraging suppliers & buyers to become environmentally responsible 



Maintaining a safe working environment. 



 Increasing the green cover. 



 Training employees on environmental issues.  Effluent Treatment Facilities: 

All the production / processing units are provided with adequate wastewater / water treatment facilities, to meet the requirements of regulating authorities as well as our reputed customers like Levis, Nike etc.  Arvind Limited at Santej has one of the largest effluent recycle plants in Asia with recycling capacity 10,500 m3/day. The latest & best of the technologies available in water / wastewater treatments can be seen in operation in this plant. The Arvind International (division) has Effluent recycling facilities comprising Chemical, Biological & tertiary treatment and it is of 800­m3/day capacity. The plant also has ISO 9000 & ISO 14000 certification.  Arvind Limited at the main site at Naroda also possess chemical, biological treatment facilities to treat   10000   m3/day   of   effluents   to   meet   the   pollution   control   board   norms.   Ankur   Mills (division)   has   Effluent  treatment  plant  of  1600­m3/day  capacity   with  chemical  &  biological treatment   facility   to   achieve   the   pollution   board   norms.   Arvind   Limited   (Garment   exports division)   is   setting   up   a   new   garment   unit   at   Mysore   road,   Bangalore,   along   with   Effluent treatment  plant  of  1450  m3   /day  capacity.   This  plant  also  possesses  chemical,  biological  & tertiary treatment facilities to achieve the State Pollution Control Board norms. The uniqueness of this plant is – all it’s process water requirements will be attained through recycled sewage water of Bangalore City.  2)       Air pollution Control: 

17

Arvind   Limited   has   switched   from   liquid   fuel   to   Natural   gas   for   all   their   heating   &   steam requirements in order to avoid the air pollution. 

3)       Solid waste Management:  All the units  believe in waste minimization measures. All the ETP plants  are provided with adequate   sludge   Dewatering   facilities.   Units   at   Santej,   Naroda,   Arvind   International   &   the upcoming Bangalore unit are provided with Decanter Centrifuges for sludge de­watering. De­ watered   sludge   is   dried   in   solar   evaporation   pans   for   further   volume   reduction.   Waste   oil generated in all the units is recycled. Polythene liners, Discarded containers are disposed off to the respective buyers. 4)

Afforestation & Rain water Harvesting:

Units at Khatrej & Santej have very good afforestation & green belts. The Santej unit has more than 1 lakh trees & other shrubbery. Plants like Jetropha (seeds used for Biodiesel generation) are grown extensively. ETP treated water is used for this plantation so as to minimize raw water consumption. Beautiful lawns with Fountains are part of the landscape.  At the Santej unit ground water recharging facility is also developed where in yearly about 40 MLD rain water is recharged in to ground water table. Two recharge ponds with a capacity of about   4000   m3   are   made   &   Rainwater   during   the   monsoon   is   collected   in   theseponds   & recharged in to Ground water table.

ORGANIC COTTON PROJECT   Objectives:

18



To develop and promote a business model that is environmentally sustainable



To improve farm productivity and farmer incomes



To enhance biodiversity of the rural landscape



To develop a lasting social infrastructure and support system in the region

Organic Cotton Project was born from a need to create value through innovation across the supply chain particularly in the area of raw material – cotton. Arvind is a leading cotton textile manufacturer based in India with a significant global presence. With its dominance across the textile value chain, the company endeavors to be a one­stop shop for leading apparel brands. In order to complete the supply chain, Arvind has forayed into organic cotton production through contract farming model in order to source organic cotton that is of high quality; and a socio­ environmental   need   –   to   sustain   cotton   farming   production   in   a   socially   fair   manner   that promotes the rural economy and creates a healthy ecosystem.   Arvind is working closely with the farmers of the Vidarbha region in Akola to grow organic cotton.   This   initiative   has   helped   to   improve   the   livelihood   of   the   farmers   by   dramatically increasing   their   per­acre   income. All   the   organic   cotton   produced   at   these   organic   farms   is certified by the Control Union Certification, Netherlands. With a focus on securing more and more sustainable cotton sources, they have closely involved their   selves   with   the   Better   Cotton   Initiative   (BCI),   a   Swiss   association   working   to   reduce environmental and social impacts of cotton growing. The concept is to grow cotton with very carefully   controlled   application   of   water,   chemical   fertilizers   and   pesticides,   dramatically reducing the environmental footprint of cotton farming. These techniques work well in fertile and irrigated regions where organic farming is not economically viable. The project covers over 10,000 acres of farmlands and involves working closely with nearly 1200 farmers. 

19

CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIETY

Arvind prides its participation in works that contribute to the betterment of society. Arvind’s CSR philosophy is based on the notion that society and the corporation are inextricably linked, and that a company can improve its own functioning by influencing the environment in which it operates. It is this philosophy that transcends through all of Arvind’s CSR initiatives.

Education Through SHARDA Trust, the company’s CSR vehicle, Arvind is committed to upgrading the standards of municipal schools in Ahmedabad and work towards building a pool of bright and employable youth. Today, over 900 students each year from five municipal schools benefit from the supplemental English, Mathematics and Computer education provided at their three learning centers that are equipped with state of the art facilities. It co­pioneered the world renowned Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (IIMA), and helped   set   up   the   Ahmedabad   Textile   Industry   Research   Association   (ATIRA),   and   The Kasturbhai Lalbhai Textile Training Center to develop and enhance the skills of textile workers. The NarottambhaiLalbhai Rural Development Fund and The Lalbhai Group Rural Development Fund where founded to undertake special programs for the economically deprived. 

Urban infrastructure Development of C G road – Ahmedabad’s most popular street – in a manner offers the urban dweller and visitor a clean, organized and enjoyable recreational experience. Upgrading slums Arvind   in   a   partnership   with   the   Ahmedabad   Municipal   Corporation   developed   a   model   to upgrade the slums of Ahmedabad. These slums house about 30% of the cities population that live in the most disadvantaged circumstances. In a highly documented and successful initiative a

20

dwelling of over 181 hutments, housing 1200 people, was provided with improved surroundings and access to clean drinking water and proper sanitation facilities in individual houses.

Vocational Training We initiated vocational training programmes to enhance and develop the skill of unemployed youth   and   help   them   take   up   Garment   Operative   jobs   within   Arvind   and   other garmentmanufacturing   firms   in   Ahmedabad.   In   another   initiative,   Arvind   has   organized Programmes in English and Computer Application equip students with relevant knowledge and skills   and   find   suitable   job   openings   for   them.   This   enables   the   students   to   seek   better employment and function effectively in their respective organizational roles.

ORGANIZATION CHART OF ARVIND MILLS­SHIRTING DIVISION

21

Chairman & Managing Director (Mr. Sanjay S. Lalbhai)

Chief Executive Officer- Knits and Woven Fabrics (Mr. Susheel Kaul)

Production Spinning HR Department Weaving Material Stores Processing & Finishing Administration & Accounts Quality Control Exports and Domestic Testing Packaging

Engineering

Production Planning and Control

22

PROCESSES / DEPARTMENTS OF ARVIND MILLS, SANTEJ

PRODUCTION PROCESS FLOW CHART

23

SPINNING

WEAVING PREPARATION

WEAVING

WET PROCESSING

DYEING/ PRINTING

FINISHING

24

SPINNING PROCESS

LAYOUT OF SPINNING DEPARTMENT

SLEEVE ROOM BLENDOMET MACHINE

COTTON GODOWN

FILTER ROOM

CARDING DEPARTMENT DRAWFRAMES

AUTOCORO DEPARTMENT

AUTOCORO STORAGE

OFFICE

25

 The cotton fibre grows in the seedpod or boll, of the cotton plant. Each fiber is a single elongated cell that is flat, twisted, and ribbon like with a wide inner hollow (lumen).It is composed of about 90 percent cellulose  and about 6 percent moisture; the remainder consists of natural impurities. The outer surface of the fibre is covered with a protective wax like coating which gives the fiber a somewhat adhesive quality.  Bale of about 165­170 kg comes into spinning mill

Types of cotton Arvind Mills use:

1. Pima(American): It is a very strong and extra long cotton fibre. The average size of this variety of fiber is 36mm. 2. Pima(Australian): It is considered as one of the best variety of cotton by Arvind mill. It has a very low percentage of waste it in, mainly consisting of dust, seed and metal. It average size is 32mm. 3. Pakistan Cotton 4. J34  SG:  It  is  a  selection   from  non descriptive  hirustum  mixtures.   Re­selection   from Bikaneri Narma. It is sown in the months of April/May and the crop is ready for picking by October/December..J34RG and SG are grown in the states of Punjab, Haryana and Rajasthan and total production per annum is around 2.6 million bales of each of 170 Kg.) 5. Shankar­6 Gujarat cotton: It is sown in the month of June­July and is ready for picking in November and may extend upto February. It is cultivated in an area of 4.4 million Acres in the state of Gujarat. 6. Organic cotton a. (Organic   cotton   is   being   produced   in­house   by   arvind   mills,   and   also   being procured   from   fully   organic   certified   farms,   as   some   environment   conscious customers prefer to use it.

26

b. Arvind’s organic cotton contract farming project is located in the cotton growing belt district of Maharashtra; Akola. )      5.  Egyptian Cotton: Sea­island cotton having silky, strong fibers, grown chiefly in          N  Africa. BLOW ROOM Blow room is the first step in the spinning process. The basic function of this process is to open the fiber first and then clean and mix and even it. In the blow room process, the machine used is filled with the fibers. The drum containing the fibers thus moves in a rotator motion creating a helical effect in the fiber and along with it the suction part in the machine keep on removing the dust. The material is thus clean in this way and then it is transferred by the delivery hopper into the transportation conduit. OBJECTIVES OF BLOWROOM: 1. To open the compressed bales of fibers 2. Remove dirt and dust, broken leaf, seed particles or any other foreign impurities from the fibers 3. To transfer the opened and cleaned fibers into a sheet form of definite width uniform weight per unit length which is called lap. 4. To roll the lap of predetermined length into a cylindrical shape around a lap pin. 5. To transfer the lap from the lap pin to a lap rod to a suitable and feed it to the subsequent m/c (carding).

27

PROCESS FLOW OF BLOW ROOM 1. OPENING

2. CLEANING

3. DUST REMOVAL

 4. BLENDING/MIXING



Opening



Opening is the first operation within the blow room in the fibers are opened and separated from each other.  This operation mainly focuses on every single fiber to attain the highest degree of  openness as to separate in small tufts.  As there is opening of fibers, cleaning also simultaneously takes place.  The fibers are handled gently so minimum loss of fibers  takes place

  

28

                               Machine: GBR cotton opener­ opens about 400 kg/hr



Cleaning 

Cleaning is the second step in the blow room.



While carrying out this process it should always be kept in mind that impurities can be removed from surface of tufts only. So after a short while, new surfaces are made to clean the fibers properly. 



Cotton   contains   up   to   18%   trash   in   most   cases.   To   clean   the   material   it   is unavoidable to remove as much fiber as much waste.



The fiber quality (short fibers, neps) as well as fiber loss is always negatively affected by maximum trash removal. 



Therefore it is necessary to measure the amount of the waste removed and its composition. As it is of high importance also called cleaning efficiency.

Machine used in Arvind Mills: Machine manufacturer:                Trutzschler (Germany)

29

Model:                                             052­2502 Pressure:                                         50­75 bar   Major parts:                          Two metallic perforated cylinders and waste collector         

3.Dust removal To extract the contamination in the cotton such as leaf, stone, iron particles, jute, poly propylene, colored fibers, feather and other foreign material from cotton by opening and beating. o An often underestimated task of the blow room line is the removal of dust. However, it is as important as the removal of impurities. o Dedusting   in   the   blow   room   happens   by   air   suctioning   only,   either between the machines, e.g. by dust cages, dust extractors, etc., or within the machine by normal air separation. o Every   blow   room  machine   must  be  capable   of  extracting  dust,  so  that special dedusting machines should be needed. o The efficiency depends not only on the devices but also on the size of the flocks. The smaller the flocks, the higher is the efficiency.

Machine: 

Trutzschler (Germany)

Model:

CVT­4 1600

No. of machines: 

2

Cleaning efficiency:

64%

30



Blending\Mixing

Mixing: It is generally meant as the intermingling of different classes of fibers of the same grade e.g. USA Pima grade2, CIS Machine for Mixing in Arvind Mills: Machine:  Model:  Motor speed:  Opening rolls speed: Number of chambers:  Output:  Pressure:  Major parts: 

Trutzschler  10236 1750 rpm  800­850 m/min 10            30­36%            350 bar            This machine consists of material feed, reserve    

                                                       tank, reserve tank flaps, optical sensor delivery,                                                         rollers, and material suction funnel. 

Blending: It is meant as the intermingling of different kinds of fibers or different grade of same fibers e.g. polyester & cotton, Viscose & cotton. o Blending of fiber material is an essential preliminary in the production of a yarn. o Fibers can be blended at various stages of the process. These possibilities should always be fully exploited, for example, by transverse doubling. o However,   the   starting   process   is   one   of   the   most   important   stages   for blending,   since   the   components   are   still   separate   and   therefore   can be metered exactly and without dependence upon random effects.

31

o A   well­assembled   bale   layout   and   even   (and   as   far   as   possible, simultaneous) extraction of fibers from all bales is therefore of paramount importance. Objectives of mixing or blending 

Economy



Processing performance



Functional properties

Machine for blending: Machine: Blendomat machine by Truetzschler

Model no. :

 

BDT 019/2300

Bale layout:

 

Both sides (2 rows)

Number of bales: 

 

50­60

Weight of bales: 

 

110­167 kg

Mode of bale laying:  

Manual

Material in process:  

Cotton with seeds and impurities

22

Even feed of material to card To uniform feeding to the next stage such as carding machine.

22

Recycling the waste material

32

CARDING

  OBJECTIVES OF CARDING: •   To open the tuft of fibers •   To make the fiber parallel & straight •   To remove remaining trash particles •   To remove short fibers •   To remove naps •   To produce a rove like fiber called sliver, which is uniform in per unit length. o Carding is a mechanical process that breaks up locks and unorganised clumps of fibre and then aligns the individual fibres so that they are more or less parallel with each other. Carding can also be used to create blends of different fibres or different colours.  o Carding is the process of removing impurities from fibers and producing a carded sliver of parallelized and straightened fibers.

33

o Before the raw stock can be made into yarn, the remaining impurities must be removed, the fibers must be disentangles, and they must be straightened. o The straightening process puts the fibers into somewhat parallel Carding.  o The work is done by carding machine.  o The   lap   is   passed   through   a   beater   section   and   drawn   on   rapidly   revolving   cylinder covered with very fine hooks or wire brushes slowly moves concentrically above this cylinder. o As the cylinder rotates, the cotton is pulled by the cylinder through the small gap under the brushes; the teasing action removes the remaining trashes, disentangles the fibers , and arranges them in a relatively parallel manner in form of a thin web.  o This web is drawn through a funnel shaped device that molds it into a round rope like mass called card sliver.  o Card sliver produces carded yarns or carded cottons that are serviceable to produce denim fabrics. MACHINES IN ARVIND MILLS: Number of machines: 

 14

Make:

Trutzschler (Germany)

Model:

 DK 803

Humidity:

 56.5%

Temperature:

             33.3 degree Celsius

Production:

80 kg/hr.

Card cleaning efficiency:

62­67%

CV%:

1.2­1.7

Front Delivery speed:

210­240 meters per minute

Pressure:

325 pas

MAIN ACTIONS OF CARDING MACHINE

34

•   Action between fee roller & taker in •   Action between taker in and cylinder •   Action between cylinder and flat •   Action between cylinder and doffer.

DRAWING

Drawing is the process where the fibres are blended, straightened and the number of fibers in the sliver   increased   in   order   to   achieve   the   desired   linear   density   in   the   spinning   process.   The drawing process also improves the uniformity or evenness of the sliver. The number of drawing passages utilised depends on the spinning system used and the end products. Carded Slivers are fed into the Draw­Frame and are stretched/ Straightened and made in to a single sliver. Also fibre blending can be done at this stage. The cans that contain the sliver are placed along the draw­frame feeder rack, usually including eight pairs of cylinders (each pair is above the space occupied by a can),the lower cylinder is commanded positively, while the upper one rests on the lower one in order to ensure movement of the relative sliver that runs between the two. Tasks of Draw frame: •   Drafting •   Equalizing •   Parallelizing •   Blending •   Dust removal.   Drafting:  The reduction of weight / yard of sliver and increase in length is called drafting. Or Attenuation of sliver without breaking is called draft.

35

Break draft: Draft b/w the 2nd and 3rd rollers is called break draft. Main draft: Draft b/w the 2nd and front rollers is called main draft.  In Arvind, sliver is drawn through the draw frame twice.  Drawframe used: Padmatex , No. of Drawframes: 12

36

COMBING Combing is an operation in which dirt and short fibers are removed from sliver lap by following ways. 

In a specially designed jaws, a narrow lap of fiber is firmly gripped across its width



Closely spaced needles are passed through the fiber projecting from jaws.

Short fiber which we remove is called comber noil. The comber noil can be recycled in the production of carded yarn. Yarn which is get from comber sliver is called comber yarn. Carded sliver are combine into comber lap in a single continuous process stage. Flat sheet of fiber which is get from comber lap is fed into the comber in an intermediate. Objectives of Combing:  1. To remove  

Necessity of Combing: The following quality of fibers can only be obtained by combing 

Clean finer fiber



Uniformity in length of fiber



Absence of nap



More parallel arrangement of fibers



Straight fibers

37

The sequence of operation in a comber is as follows: 1. Feeding of the lap by feed roller 2. The fed lap is gripped by the nipper 3. The gripped lap is combed by circular comb 4. The detaching roller grips the combed lap and moves forward 5. While the detaching roller delivers the material, top comb comes into action to further clean the lap. The short fibres are removed. 6. While going back, nipper opens and receives a new bit of lap. Thus, nipper holds the material while the comb moves to and fro. It pulls the material. There are brushes that clean the circular comb. Fibres must be presented to the comber so that leading hooks predominate in the feedstock. This influences not only the opening out of the hooks themselves, but also the cleanliness of the web. If the sheet is fed to the comber in the wrong direction, the number of neps rises markedly.

Machine: Lakshmi LK 54 Comber No. of Machines: 10 Input: Ribbon lap/ Super lap Output: Combed Sliver

38

ROVING

 In preparation for ring spinning, the sliver needs to be condensed into a finer strand known as a roving before it can be spun into a yarn. The roving frame draws out the sliver to a thickness of a few millimetres and inserts a small amount of twist to keep the fibres   together.   The   drafted   twisted   strand   is   wound   onto   a   bobbin   which   is   then transported to the ring frame and used as the feed package for spinning yarn.   It   is   an intermediate process   in   which   fibers   are   converted   into   low   twist   lea   called roving. The sliver which is taken from draw frame is thicker so it is not suitable for manufacturing of yarn. Its purpose is to prepare input package for next process. This package is to prepare on a small compact package called bobbins. Roving machine is complicated, liable to fault, causes defect adds to the production costs and deliver the product. In this winding operation that makes us roving frame complex.   There are two main basic reasons for using roving frame 

The roving sliver is thick and untwisted. Because of it hairiness and fly is created. So draft is needed to reduce the linear density of sliver. The ring drafting arrangement is not capable that it may process the roving sliver to make the yarn.



Draw frame can represent the worst conceivable mode of transport and presentation of feed material to the ring spinning frame.

 The main objective of roving frame are given below:­ 

Attenuation­ Drafting the draw frame sliver into roving.



Twisting­To insert the twist into the roving.



Winding­Winding the twisting roving on bobbin.



package building.

SPINNING 

39

The first step in the manufacturing of all kinds of fabric i.e. spinning of bales of raw cotton into yarns of various kinds suited for producing varieties of fabric. Trivia about Arvind Mills:  ‘Voile’ fabric is mainly used for knitting purposes and for making saris too, but is mostly exported to the middle east.  In addition to collaborations with multinational apparel giants, Arvind Mills runs its own brands of clothing e.g. Excalibur Gant, Flying Machine, Mainstream etc.  Cotton is procured from a host of countries including far­flung ones like Egypt, America and Germany.  Recently, Arvind Mills has come up with its unique product, Ready To Stitch (RTS) kits.  Cost of fabric accounts for ~65% of the cost of raw material.  4500 tonnes of yarn is spun every month, an exercise that contributes 450 crores towards costing. There are primarily two kinds of technologies that are in popular usage vis­a­vis spinning of yarn namely open end technology, also called rotor spinning owing to its being the key component in the machines involved, and ring spinning technology. At Santej unit of Arvind, ring technology is used, which generally results in production of 70 tonnes of yarn a day.   Rest of the yarn is required for fabric production. In Arvind, the cotton spinning is done using these technologies: 1. Ring spinning 2. Open end spinning  Open End Spinning:    In this type of spinning, twist is introduced into the yarn without the need for package rotation. Allowing for higher twisting speeds with a relatively low power cost. In rotor spinning a continuous  supply of fibres is delivered from delivery rollers  off a drafting system or from an opening unit. The   fibres   are   sucked   down   a   delivery   tube   and   deposited in   the   groove of   the   rotor   as   a continuous ring of fibre. The fibre layer is stripped off the rotor groove and the resultant yarn

40

wound onto a package. The twist in the yarn being determined by the ratio of the rotational speed of the rotor and the linear speed of the yarn. Sliver is fed into the machine and combed and individualized by the opening roller. The fibres are then deposited into the rotor where air current and centrifugal force deposits them along the groove of the rotor where they are evenly distributed. The fibres are twisted together by the spinning action of the rotor, and the yarn is continuously drawn from the centre of the rotor. The resultant yarn is cleared of any defects and wound onto packages.

Ring Spinning:  

Roving bobbins are creeled in appopriate holders



Guide rods leave the roving into the drafting arrangements



Drafting arrangements attenuate the roving to the final count



The drafting arangenments is inclined at an angle of 45 degrees to 60 degrees.



Upon leaving the front rollers the fibre strand is twisted to impart strength



Each rotation of th e spindle imparts one twist to the strand



The twist is generated by the spindle which is rotating at high speed



The directions of the twist is either "S" or "Z"



This completes the spinning of the yarn

41



The amount of twist inserted in the yarn is controlled by the front roll or the delivery speed and traveler rational speed



In   practice,   spindle   speed(n   spindle)   is   used   instead   of   traveler   speed   in   the   above equation, the spindle speed is slightly higher than traveler speed



Yarn Winding is performed simulatenously with Twisting



The difference in the speed beween traveler and spindle causes the yarn to wind on the package



The size of the yarn pckage is limited by the ring diameter, which has to be small to increase the spindle rotation at the same traveler speed.

42

WEAVING PROCESS The weaving department has 203 weaving machines en Toto, of the make ZAX and 209i, the latter being an older version. The machines  are of the company TSUDAKOMA, a Japanese concern as opposed to the spinning department where the machines were of German companies. The ZAX machines work at 750 rpm whereas 209i model machines work at 650 rpm. Together they churn out a lac m2 of cloth a day. In total the department has 159 ZAX machines and 44 209i. There happen to be 261 labourers working in 4 shifts in the department with 20 staff members i.e. 5 in each shift, out of whom there is one supervisor for each shift. A beam card keeps all the records of what is being put on the machine and under whom it is supervised. Inputs used for the weaving departments can vary from: 1. OE­ open end 2. ER­ even ring 3. UR­ uneven ring Lycra is used to increase the elasticity of the fiber. Filament is used in the fiber which is exported to countries where the level of sweating is lower as compared to Indian condition where majorly cotton is used for the same reason.  The weaving department has the distinction of being the largest at Arvind Mills and exports close to 95% of its manufactured fabric. Discussing the denim fabric, the core competence of AM, original denim is composed of 100% cotton but with a view to bring in variations to the material in consonance with the emerging trends in the market, various natural fibers like linen and  synthetic  fibers  like  filament,  lycra,  polyester are  added to  cotton.  While  weaving such mixed fabric, the core is made of the addend and original cotton is wound around it. Yarn woven vertically is called warp while that woven laterally is termed as weft. For weaving purposes a cotton count ranging from 5 to 20 is generally used.

43

WEAVING Weaving is interlacement of warp with weft thread.

44

Figure 2 : The flow chart shows various stages in manufacturing of woven fabric:

45

WEAVING PREPARATION RING FRAME Yarn is the basic building in weaving. Therefore, after yarn manufacturing, the next successive WINDING step should be to weave the yarn into a fabric. However, in practice,  the  condition of yarn produced on the spinning machine is not always good enough to be used directly for fabric formation. Package Size, yarn surface characteristics, and other factors make it necessary for WARP WEFT both filling yarn and warp yarn to be further processed for efficient fabric formation. These preparatory processes are called weaving preparation. DYEING Warp and filling yarns are subjected to different conditions and requirements during weaving. Therefore, the preparation of warp and weft yarns is different. Warp yarn is subjected to higher stress which require extra preparation. Depending upon the weaving methods, the filling yarns REWINDING may not be prepared at all, but, rather taken straight off the spinning process and transported to the weaving process. However, the ring­ spun yarns have to go through a winding process for several reasons. 

WARPING  The processes used to prepare yarns for weaving depend on yarn type as well. SECTIONAL WARPING  The   warp   yarn   preparation   is   more   demanding   and   complicated   than   the   weft   yarn preparation. Each spot in the warp yarn must undergo several thousand cycles of various SIZING stresses   applied   by   the   weaving   machine.   Weaving   stresses   include   dynamic tension/contraction, rotation (twist/untwist) and clinging of hairs. Additionally, there are metal­  to yarn and yarn­to yarn flexing and metal­to­ yarn and yarn­to­yarn abrasion DRAWING IN stresses.

WEAVING The output of the spinning machinery is spindles of short­length yarns. These spindles cannot be used in the next production process because they are very small lengths, because there is not enough yarn on the spindle and because its size is not suitable for weaving processes. Winding produces a yarn package that is suitable for further processing.

46

 

47

Figure 3:The flowchart shows the major preparation processes for filling the warp yarns

48

Weft Yarn Preparation

Warp Yarn Preparation

Winding

Winding

Warping

Slashing

Drawing-in or tying-in

Weaving

YARN DYEING SOFT WINDING

BATCHING

REWINDING

DRYER

YARN DYEING

HYDROEXTRACTOR

Figure 4 : process flow chart of yarn dyeing

SOFT   WINDING:    Yarns   are   transferred   from   paper   cones   to   plastic   tubes   or   steel   tubes (package dyeing) or beams (beam dyeing).

49

BATCHING: Yar000000e batched according to their count, lot, yarn type and others. A batch card is formed which contained the essential information of that batch. DYEING: The yarn for spinning room is in form of spinning bobbins. For dyeing purposes, it has to be packed in 

Spring tubes  (which can be compressed) or plastic  tubes. These packages  are named packages, which are then sent for dyeing



Beams are prepared which are then sent for yarn beam dyeing.

Soft Packages The requirements that a yarn dye package has to meet can be split into 2 major aspects -

Demands from dyeing.

-

Demands from downstream processes and quality control.

Dyeing related requirements: These include the basic physical issues relating  to the fundamental requirement of each and every fiber in the dye package to be exposed to an equal amount of dye liquor over an equal length of time, and, thus, we require: 

Uniform liquor flow within a package



Uniform liquor between packages (within batch)



Uniform liquor flow between packages (batch­to­batch)

In other words, each and every yarn dye package has to conform to a prescribed density and this density has to be uniform  from inside to outside and from tip  to toe  of package.  Similarly, packages of identical density and uniformity have to be produced on any spindle of a winding machine at any given time, meaning total reproducibility. The density of spun yarn dye packages recommend by leading dyeing vessel manufacturers is: 

For Cotton: 420 g/l



For Cotton/ Polyester blend: 460 g/l

50

Since such packages, as compared with those intended for use in warping creels or knitting creels, feel spongier, they are universally referred to as “soft packages”. Apart from yarn dyeing these packages must also conform to certain post­dyeing requirements, thus,  

Optimum unwinding properties



Resistance of package to handling, are equally important aspects of soft package winding.

After dyeing, the yarn will be used in either weaving or knitting, and, thus has to be unwound for further processing. Therefore, no tension variation or disturbed yarn layers must be present, as these defects are the major source of yarn hairiness or breakages. In Arvind Mills Machine SSM 51

Specifications 85% efficiency 60 spindles Speed: 1000­1100 m/min.



Machine Used: 4 machines



Types of cones: ­ Paper Plastic Tube(PPT), use and throw(135­140 g)

                                ­ Spring tube­ stainless steel­reusable(165 g) 

Package Size: 1.2 kg.



These soft packages are used for dyeing checks and stripes.

Beams for Beam dyeing Besides the yarn being wound in the form of soft packages, it is also wound on beams for beam dyeing purpose. Beam dyeing is mainly carried out if we want one color in the warp direction of the fabric. Spinning bobbins are placed on creels, and the yarn from each bobbin is then collected and sent to the machine, where it is wound on cylinders.

51

In Arvind Mills Machine Beam Dyeing Route

Specifications 85% efficiency 400­500 m/hr. speed 30 kg/ beam­ max. capacity (1160 m.) Faller wire stop motion device



Per shift­ 24 beams



The packages were mounted on a creel. Each creel has about 700­ grey packages. One and a half hours are required to change the creel.



A creel has 700 cones. Yarn from each cone passes through a spring before passing through the drop wires. These springs are set to a particular tension which determines the speed and tension at which he cheese will unwind.



Faller wire stop motion mechanism is as follows: Creel has drop wires (hook shaped), which drop as a yarn passing through it breaks. A sensor attached   to the Dyeing Beam stops the machine as soon as it senses a wire drop.



An indicator attached to the side of the rod (to which drop wires are attached), is lighted, thereby indicating the point where yarn breakage occurs.

HYDROEXTRACTOR AND DRYER: Excess water of the dyed yarn is removed.

WINDING

Yarn packages come from the dyeing unit in the form of packages winded in spring or PP tube. They   can’t   be   directly   used   for   warping   or   for   weft   yarn   on   the   looms.   So   the   weaving department is equipped with winding machines and autoconers. These machines are also used to recycle the left over cone packages. Packages that have been used for warping or as weft on the looms, (and are left with some yarn on them) are collected and converted to bigger packages so they can be used again.

52

Winding is basically transferring a yarn from one type of package to another. It is an important and necessary process that performs the following functions especially for ring spun yarns. 

Winding produces a yarn package that is suitable for further processing. Ring spinning produces small packages of yarn (called spinner’s package) or bobbins) which would be depleted relatively during filling insertion or warping. Therefore, the amount of yarn on several small packages is combined by splicing or knotting onto a single package.



The winding process provides an opportunity to clear yarn defects. Thin and hick places, slubs, neps or loose fibers on the yarn are cleared during winding, and, thus, the overall quality of yarn is improved. Staple yarns require this clearing operation most because they have these kinds of faults most often.

OBJECTIVES OF WINDING: •    Scanning   and   faults   removing: Electric   Scanners   (uster)   are   used   for checking and elimination of yarn faults during winding process. This process is called Usterization of yarn. Such faults are called scan­cuts. •    Splicing of broken or cut yarn: Auto splicing is done for broken yarn pieces to eliminate yarn knots and bad piecing. •    Bigger and quality package: Conversion of yarn from small ring bobbins to bigger yarn cones of different international standard or as per requirement of customer. During achieving above objectives or making of winding cones some faults are created during the process. These faults need to be controlled through monitoring and continuous study. Most of the winding faults are   very   dangerous   for the   next subsequent   process   which   can   be   warping   or   knitting   or doubling. We can face complains from customer of breakage of yarn during unwinding process.

53

In   order   to  avoid   any complaints from   customers   of  Arvind   Mills,  faulty   winding   cones   are separated during inspection by inspectors. Following three decisions are taken at this stage. 

Use as it is: When the fault is of some minor category, and there is no risk of next process   failure   during   unwinding.   Decision   is   only   taken   by   some   senior   person   of quality.



Rewind: Some   faults   can   be  removed   after   rewinding.   But   rewinding   itself   is   costly affair and quality of cones also detritus after reprocessing.



Degraded as B grade: If fault is of such nature that rewinding can’t remove that fault and there is doubt for customers to complains then such cones are downgraded to lower grade. Degrading cones in to lower grade is again financial loss to the company.

How quality is maintained in Arvind Mills? Following point are considered from quality point of view 

Winding speed should be 1200 meter per minute for getting good quality.



For getting good quality, yarn fault clearers device setting should be as close as possible in order to eliminate the disturbing yarn faults.



In order to get good quality of yarn count channel setting should be less than 7%.



Cone which we prepare for weaving purpose should have minimum fault for getting good quality, especially in the long thin places and long thick places.



For   getting   good   quality   yarn,   splice   strength   must   be   75%   more   than   of   the   yarn strength.



Splice appearance should be good. Splice device should be checked twice in a week.



To get better efficiency, cone weight should be 1.8 to 2.4.



Yarn  winding  tension  must not  be  high  during  winding.  If we will   keep it  high then tensile properties will be affected such as elongation and tenacity.



If waxing attachment is below the clearers, the clearers should be clean at least once in a day.



Wax roller should rotate properly

54

Properly formed packages of defect­free spun­ yarn are an even more critical factor. Package consideration include condition of the passage core, the proper provision of yarn transfer tails; properly formed splices or knots; elimination of internal defects such as slubs, sloughs, tangles, wild   yarn,   scuffs,   etc.;   and   elimination   of   external   defects   such   as   cobwebs,   abrasion,   poor package shape or build, proper density (hardness) and unwind stability. PRECISION WINDING: By precision winding successive coils of yarn are laid close together in a parallel or near parallel manner. By this process it is possible to produce very dense package with maximum amount of yarn stored in a given volume.  Features: •   Package are wound with a reciprocating traverse •   Patterning and rubbing causes damage of packages •   Package contains more yarn •   Package is less stable •   The package is hard and compact •   The package is dense •   Rate of unwinding of package is low and the process of unwinding is hard •   The unwound coil is arranged in a parallel or near parallel manner. Non   Precision   Winding: By   this   type   of   winding   the   package   is   formed   by   a single thread which is laid on the package at appreciable helix angle so that the layers cross one another and give stability to the package. The packages formed by this type of winding are less dense but is more stable. Features: 

Only one coil is used to make this packages



Cross winding technique is used



The package density is low

55



Minimum number of yarn is wound



The package formed is soft and less compact



The stability is high



Flanges are not required



The rate of unwinding is high and the process is easy



The packages formed have low density

FOR WINDING MACHINE Smew

NO. OF M/C 3

Muratec (Mach Coner) Muratec (Mach

FEATURES Hand Knotting

OUTPUT 50 Cones­ 50

Splicing

packages 50 Cones­ 50

Fisher Knot

packages 50 Cones­ 50

10 2

Coner)

packages

REWINDING OF LEFT OVERS MACHINE Muratec (mach mini)

NO. OF M/C 2

FEATURE 15 cones from 1 package and 15 packages can be made in 11/2 hrs.

WARPING  Warping is  transferring  many yarns  from  creel  of single­end  package forming parallel sheet of yarn wound on to be a beam or section beam. Warping machines can process all type

56

of materials  including coarse and fine filament and staple yarns, monofilament, textured and smooth yarns, silk and other synthetic yarn such as glass. A warp beam that is installed on weaving machine is known as weaver beam. A weaver beam contain thousand of ends, but in denim production a beam obtain from warping is known as section   beam   because   denim   is   made   from   dyed   yarn   that’s   why   first   section   beam   can   be obtained and then these section beam are combined on the stage dyeing and sizing to get required number of ends for weaving process. In denim production initially the yarns are first dyed and then weaving process is carried out .  WARPING MACHINES IN SHIRTING DIVISION OF ARVIND

BENNINGER’S WARPING MACHINE MODEL

AGCH 9240

57

Maximum creel capacity

640 (V­Creel used)

Minimum creel capacity

334

Speed

20/ min. to 1200/ min.

Tensioner Type

Electronic

Pressure

200 daN to 600 daN

Manufacturing Country

Germany

Number of Machines

8

58

VAMATEX WARPING MACHINE Maximum creel capacity

600 (V­Creel used)

Minimum creel capacity

250

Speed

20/ min. to 800/ min.

Tensioner Type

Semi Automatic

Pressure

200 daN to 600 daN

Manufacturing Country

India

Number of Machines

5

UKIL’S WARPING MACHINE Maximum creel capacity

700 (V­Creel used)

Minimum creel capacity

350

Speed

15/ min. to 1400/ min.

59

Tensioner Type

Electronic

Pressure

200 daN to 600 daN

Manufacturing Country

Japan

Number of Machines

4

SIZING Sizing is a complementary operation which is carried out on warps formed by spun yarns with  insufficient tenacity or by continuous filament yarns with zero twist. In general, when sizing is  necessary, the yarn is beam warped, therefore all beams corresponding to the beams are fed, as  soon as warping is completed, to the sizing machine where they are assembled. Sizing consists of impregnating the yarn with particular substances which form on the yarn surface a film with the  aim of improving yarn smoothness and tenacity during the subsequent weaving stage. It  improves yarn tenacity and elasticity, so that the yarn can stand without problems the tensions  and the rubbing caused by weaving. In the sizing process, a coating of a starch­based adhesive is applied to the sheet of yarn to improve its weavability. It increases yarn strength; it also reduces hairiness, which minimizes the abrasion   that   occurs   between   the   warp   threads   and   the   various   parts   of   loom,   and   between threads that are adjacent to each other.  Arvind   generally   source   sizing   chemicals   (Seycofilm,   Seycobond   etc.)   from   Refnol Resins & Chemicals, Ahmedabad (Gujarat). The four main parts of Sizing machines are: 

CREEL­ This houses the warper’s beams and should ensure that there is a uniformity of tension   throughout   the   ends   on   the   weaver’s   beam   by   strict   controlling   the   tension applied to the sheet of yarn from each back beam.



THE SIZE BOX­ The sheet of yarn from the back beams is guided into the size liquor where   an   immersion   roller   ensures   that   there   is   adequate   facility   for   the   yarn   to   be thoroughly saturated. Squeeze roller ensures that there is adequate penetration and excess is removed.

60



DRYING­ Cylinders are preferred because they are more efficient when use in multiples, although   when   compared   with   hot­air   systems,   they   do   tend   to   flatten   the   yarn   and require more softener in the size mix in order to ensure an acceptable level of pliability.



HEADSTOCK­ The headstock comprises a number of different parts that, in sequence, can   be   used   for   waxing,   moisture   regain   measurement,   sheet   splittin,   measuring   and marking, beam drives and stretch control.

MACHINE Hacoba’s sucker muller

NO. OF M/C 4

TIME 1 beam­1 1/2 hrs.

61

MACHINE Benninger Germany 1996

NO. OF M/C 3

TIME 1 beam­50 minutes

DRAWING­IN (REEDING)

The one­by­one threading of the warp yarns through the spaces between the dents of the  reed is an operation which is referred to as “ drawing­in” or “reeding”. The process of  passing warp threads through heald eyes and reed dents according to the desired design is  called drawing or denting.

PROCEDURE: 

Beam released from warping is brought in this section.



Warp ends are drawn through heald eyes of frames as instructed in the draft by  Design department.



Ends are simultaneously drawn through reed dents also.



Ends are taken over serrated bars and drop pins are put on each individual end.



The yarns ends are tied together to avid entangling and removal from healed eyes.



The whole assembly (of beam, serrated bars with drop pins, heald frames and reed)  is put on a trolley and taken to looms by beam getters for gaiting by jobbers.

62

In Arvind drawng in is done in two ways:

 Manual drawing in   Automatic drawing in

MACHINE Staubli delta 200 Manual drawin in

NO. OF M/C 2 7

TIME 1 ½ hrs.­ 1 beam 12 hrs.­1 beam

63

WEAVING MECHANISM

PRIMARY MOTION There are three primary motions of loom in a weaving cycle.  Shedding­ It involves rising and (or) descending of warp yarns to create a space amongst  the warp yarns for weft direction.  Picking­ Picking refers to weft insertion. It is means by which the weft is projected  through the shed.  Beating­ It is pushing of newly inserted pick to fell of cloth. TYPE OF LOOM AIRJET

RAPIER

SHEDDING  Positive electronic 

PICKING  High speed 

BEATING Straight reed mounted

STAUBLI dobby 

compressed air.

on sley.

type. Positive electronic 

Double rapier system.

Straight reed mounted

STAUBLI dobby type

on sley.

SHEDDING­POSITIVE ELECTRONIC DOBBY  Dobby systems normally control a maximum of 6 to 32 heald shaft.  It uses computers into which desired lifting plan is fed.  This is then entered onto a disc that is subsequently fed to the dobby, where the pattern is  read and memorized by an electronic system.  This system eliminates the possibility of miss­lifts resulting from broken pegs and torn  pattern sheets.  As a disc can be removed from the dobby after the pattern has been memorized, it can be  used for a number of looms so removing the need to make duplicate patterns. PICKING­AIR­JET INSERTION

64

 High speed compressed air is used.  It could run at higher speeds of around 400 picks per minute.  No width restrictions.  Weft insertion rates of 1500+ meters per minute.  Includes weft patterning as well as dobby and jacquard shedding. PICKING­ DOUBLE RAPIER SYSTEM  Working width of 3000 nm.  Speed – 800 meters per minute.  Weft patterning is achieved ,more easily.  Popular for fancy weaving, especially when pattern changes are frequent.  Two rapiers are used.  One carries the weft to the centre of the loom where it meets the other and transfers the  grip­hold on the tip of the yarn.  The second rapier then completes the pick insertion as the rapiers are withdrawn. BEATING­ UP  The reciprocating red is responsible for pushing the pick into theb fell of the cloth for  beat­up.

SECONDARY MOTION There are three secondary motions in weaving.  Let­off: The sheet of the warp yarn is controlled by keeping it under tension.  Take­up: The cloth take­up motion withdraws cloth from the fell and then stores it at the  front of the loom.  Weft Selection: A weft selection or patterning mechanism is only necessary when it is  desired to vary the weft being inserted. LET­OFF

65

 The amount of tension applied to the warp affects the end breakage rate, the warp and  weft crimp ratios and thereby the width and length of the fabric, the general appearance  of the fabric and selvedge.  Mechanisms to emnsure that the warp is under the correct tension wll restrict the rotation  of the beam either by (i) applying a braking force (negative let­off) or (ii) by driving the  beam through a mechanism (automatic let­off) TAKE­UP There are three aspects of controlling the cloth once it leaves the fell;  The temple (a cloth control guide, one at either side of the loom) is essential in holding  the cloth correctly just in front of the fell.  The pick density is determined by the speed of rotation of the take up roller.   The cloth must then be stored at the loom until the desired length as been woven. WEFT SELECTION OR PATTERNING  In rapier weaving, the weft is picked up bu a guidre which moves the yarn across the path of the rapier head just outside the selvedge on the supply side of the loom.   In air­jet weaving, upto four jet pointing are used at the entry point of the shed. Selection determines which of the jets will operate and so which weft will be inserted on each pick.

ANCILLARY MOTION The ancillary motion includes:  Warp Stop Motion: It halt the loom when a drop wire falls as the result of an end break.  Weft Stop Motion: It halt the loom in the event of a break in the weft yarn.  In Arvind, piezo element is used. It creates vibration which generates a pulse in an  electronic unit. If this unit fails to receive a signal when the weft is being inserted, it will  act thorough the electronic unit to stop the loom before beat­up can occur.

66

MACHINE PICANOL Air jet 

NO. OF M/C

YEAR OF 

FEATURES

98

CONSTRUCTION 1999

Working width  3400 

weaving loom type 

mm, 6 colours, 

OMNI­6­R­340

positive electronic  STAUBLI  dobby  type 2861, upto 16  shafts, 380 V­ 50Hz, 1

PICANOL Rapier 

72

2004

reed Working width  3600 

looms type Gam Max­

mm, 4 colours, 

4­R­360

positive electronic  STAUBLI  dobby  type 2861 with pre­ equipped for batching  motion but without  the batcher

67

PROCESSING

Singeing : The direct, very intensive flame, the short contact time between flame and fabric, the ignition flame temperature necessary for the vaporization of polyester and the various singeing positions represent the decisive advantages of the osthoff­senge singeing system. 

Singeing positions 

ONTO FREE GUIDED FABRIC Flame meets right­angle onto dense woven fabric freely guided between 2 rollers, recommended for natural fibres and blends weighing more than 125g/m²

ONTO WATER COOLED ROLLER Flame meets right­angle onto the fabric bended over a water cooled roller. Recommended for fabrics of temperature sensitive fibres, those of open­weave, blended ones weighing less than 125g/m

68

TANGENTIAL SINGEING Flame passes tangentially over the fabric bended over a water cooled roller recommendable for fabrics which cannot tolerate direct exposure to flame and for repair of filamentation

FLAME SHEARING Flame passes tangentially over the fabric bended over a singeing sword, with minimized contact time, singeing effect on fibre tip only

69

Company name: 

 osthoff­senge

No. of machines: 

2

Fabric speed                                            125m/min Working width:                        340cm Rubber belt section face width         2170mm   Water cooling rollers                        2

Desizing Desizing is done in order to remove the size from the warp yarns of the woven fabrics. Warp yarns are coated with sizing agents prior to weaving in order to reduce their frictional properties, decrease   yarn  breakages   on  the   loom   and   improve   weaving   productivity   by  increasing   weft insertion speeds.  The sizing material present on the warp yarns can act as a resist towards dyes and chemicals in textile wet processing. It must, therefore, be removed before any subsequent wet processing of the fabric.  If   the   fabric   is   woven   from   sized yarn, desizing is essential before subjecting it to other treatments.   For   this,   the   fabric   must   be   soaked   in   0.5%   aqueous   solution   of   amylase  enzyme  for 8  hours  ensuring  that  it  is  completely immersed  in  the  solution.  After  the  size has been removed, the fabric is subjected to a hot and cold water wash.

70

The factors, on which the efficiency of size removal depends, are as follows: Type and amount of size applied Viscosity of the size in solution Ease of dissolution of the size film on the yarn Nature and the amount of the plasticizers Fabric construction Method of desizing, and Different methods of Desizing: Enzymatic desizing Oxidative desizing Acid steeping Rot steeping Desizing with hot caustic soda treatment, and Hot washing with detergents  The most commonly used methods for cotton are enzymatic desizing and oxidative desizing.  Acid steeping is a risky process and may result in the degradation of cotton cellulose while rot  steeping, hot caustic soda treatment and hot washing with detergents are less efficient for the  removal of the starch sizes. 1.Enzymatic desizing  Enzymatic desizing consists of three main steps: application of the enzyme, digestion of the  starch and removal of the digestion products. The common components of an enzymatic desizing bath are as follows:    Amylase enzyme  pH stabilizer  Chelating agent Salt Surfactant, and  Optical brightener                 Advantages Of Enzymatic desizing No damage to the fibre No usage of aggressive chemicals Wide variety of application processes, and High biodegradability                Disadvantages: Lower additional cleaning effect towards other impurities, no effect on certain starches (e.g.  tapioca starch) and possible loss of effectiveness through enzyme poisons.

71

2.Oxidative desizing   Oxidative desizing can be effectede  by hydrogen peroxide, chlorites, hypochlorites, bromites,  perborates or persulphates. Two important oxidative desizing processes are:  the cold pad­batch  process based on hydrogen peroxide with or without the addition of persulphate; and the  oxidative pad­steam alkaline cracking process with hydrogen peroxide or persulphate.                   The advantages offered by oxidative desizing are Supplementary cleaning effect Effectiveness for tapioca starches No loss in effectiveness due to enzyme poisons. Some disadvantages of oxidative desizing include possibility of fibre attack, use of aggressive  chemicals and less variety of application methods.

SCOURING

The   term   ‘scouring’   applies   to   the   removal   of   impurities   such   as   oils,   was,   gums,   soluble impurities and sold dirt commonly found in textile material and produce a hydrophilic and clean cloth.   Objectives of Scouring: 1. To remove natural as well as added impurities of essentially hydrophobic character as completely as possible 2. To increase absorbency of textile material 3. To leave the fabric in a highly hydrophilic condition without undergoing chemical or physical damage significantly. Scouring process depends on: 1. The type of cotton 2. The color of cotton 3. The cleanliness of cotton 4. The twist and count of the yarn

72

5. The construction of the fabric.

Description

 

and

 

Working

 

Principle

 

of

 

Scouring

 

Process: 

Kier boiler is a long mild steel or cast iron cylindrical vessel provided with two perforated tube sheets (disc with a number of holes). One is placed at the bottom and another is top. These discs are connected by a number of tunes which carry the liquor from the bottom compartment to the upper one. In the middle compartment steam is passed. Thus the tubes carrying the liquor are surrounded

 

by

 

steam

 

which

 

heats

 

them. 

The hot liquor from the multitublar heater is sprayed over the cloth, packed in the kier, through a hollow perforated ring. The liquid passes slowly over the packed cloth, collects below the false bottom, from where it is pumped into the auxiliary heater by a centrifugal pump and the cycle repeats.   Precaution: 1. Kier boiler should be cleaned. 2. Material should be packed evenly. 3. Complete immersion of the fabric need. 4. After boiling the liquor should be removed in absence of water. 5. Before starting all the joining parts should be checked. 6. Fabric should always keep under scouring solution.

BLEACHING

73

Bleaching is chemical treatment employed for the removal of natural coloring matter from the  substrate. The source of natural color is  organic compounds  with conjugated double bonds , by  doing chemical bleaching  the discoloration takes place by the breaking the chromophore , most  likely destroying the one or more double bonds with in this conjugated system. The material  appears whiter after the bleaching

DYEING AND PRINTING

BENNINGER PAD DRY CONTINUOUS DYEING MACHINE Brand Benninger Width 180 cm. Year 2002 Model SIMATIC OP 27 Speed 30­60 meters/ min.

74

    BASTIAN COLD PAD BATCH DYEING MACHINE Mangle Pressure (L M R): 1.5, 1.3, 1.45 Cold Pad Batch: 20-24 hrs. Threading Length: 10 m

Dye absorption:  When fibre is immersed in dye liquor, an electrolyte is added to assist the exhaustion of dye. Here NaCl is used as the electrolyte. This electrolyte neutralize absorption. So when the textile material is introduces to dye liquor the dye is exhausted on to the fibre.  Fixation:  Fixation of dye means the reaction of reactive group of dye with terminal –OH or­NH2 group of fibre and thus forming strong covalent bond with the fibre and thus forming strong covalent bond with the fibre. This is an important phase, which is controlled by maintaining proper pH by adding alkali. The alkali used for this create proper pH in dye bath and do as the dye­fixing agent. The reaction takes place in this stage is shown below: ­ 1. D­SO2­CH2­CH2­OSO3Na + OH­Cell   =  D­SO2­CH2­CH2­O­Cell + NaHSO3 2. D­SO2­CH2­CH2­OSO3Na + OH­Wool   =   D­SO2­CH2­CH2­O­Wool + NaHSO3 3. Wash­off:  As the dyeing is completed, a good wash must be applied to the material to remove extra and unfixed dyes from material surface. This is necessary for level dyeing and good wash­fastness. It

75

is   done   by   a   series   of   hot   wash,   cold   wash   and   soap   solution   wash.  Application method:  These are 3 application procedures available:  1. Discontinuous method­  ­Conventional method  ­Exhaust or constant temperature method  ­High temperature method  ­Hot critical method.  2. Cotinuous method­  ­Pad­steam method  ­Pad dry method  ­ Pad thermofix method  3. Semi continuous method­ 

­ Pad roll method  ­ Pad jig method 

76

PRINTING

ZIMMER AUSTRALIA ROLLER PRINTING MACHINE NUMBER OF ROLLERS 12 CAPACITY 10000 meters SPEED 40 meters/ min. TYPE TR­Compact HC YEAR OF CONSTRUCTION 2013

ICHINOSE ROLLER SCREEN PRINTING MACHINE



Manufacturer : Japan



No. of Rollers: 12



No. of Machines: 3



Year of Construction: 2006

77

LAXMI SCREEN PRINTING MACHINE 

Manufacturer: India



Speed: 30-35 m./min.



Length: 18 meters



No. of heads: 12



No. of Machines: 2

DYE WASHING MACHINE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR YAMUNA WASHING MACHINE Reactive 

Speed  30 m./

Tank 1 Cold

Tank 2 Temp.:

Tank 3 Temp.:

Tank 4 Temp.:

Tank 5 Temp.:

Tank 6A  Cold

Tank 6B Cold

Drying Temp.

Washing

min.

Wash

­85°C Overflow

­95°C Overflow

­95°C Deskol

­85°C Overflow

Wash

Wash

up to

Acetic

Overflow

dry

Overflow

Discharge

30

Cold

Temp:

Temp.:­

Washing

m./min.

Wash

­60°C

80­ 85°C

Overflow

Peroxide:2­

Overflow

5 g/l.

dosing:

Acid

3 to 5

Dosing

G/L Temp.:­ 80­ 85°C Deskol

fabric

Temp.:­

Cold

Cold

Temp.  up to  dry  fabric

80­ 85°C

Wash

Wash

Overflow

Overflow

Overflow

Temp.:

Cold

Cold

Temp.

­90 °C

Wash

Wash

up to

Dosing: 0.1 to 1

Disperse

25

Cold 

Temp.:

Temp.:­

G/L Temp.:­

Washing 

m./min.

Wash

­80°C 

­70 to

­70 to

80°C Caustic:

80°C Caustic:

3g/l

3g/l

Acid

Hydro: 3g/l

Hydro:

Dosing

Overflow

Overflow

dry Overflow

Acetic

Overflow

fabric

3g/l

78

FINISHING PROCESS The department churns out 300000 meters of finished denim cloth a day. What happens to the fabric that has come off loom is called surface finishing that entails softening of fabric, thus making it fit to wear. Further, de sizing is done in order to reduce tension in the knit yarn, to ensure that it doesn’t break out of undue tension.to accomplish the process, there are three basic mechanisms involved namely desized finishing, desized mercerized finishing and desized mercerized tint finishing. In yesteryears, there existed a demand for long lasting colors in denim apparel, which is no longer present. Consumers are becoming more inclined towards denim that loses color in a few washes. For such emerging needs and choices, double dyeing concept has been adopted that renders denim fabric various effects after subsequent washes. The process is as follows  Singeing is done and the hairiness of the fabric is burned by flames.  Desizing removes the sizer put on by the suker muller in the dyeing department to increase the strength of the fabric (a mixture of desizing agent, alcozyme and acetic acid is used for the same).  Mercerizing is the process of caustic wash and the unit studies is gpl (gram per liter).  Stenter is used to settle the width shrinkage and to adjust the elasticity by killing the elastic properties of lycra in the fabric which is to the tune of 30 to 40% earlier and can be dropped down to 3 to 8% as per customer requirement. Finishing techniques used in arvind mills are:  Glaze finishing  Padding  Curing  Montfort finishing  Foam finishing In addition there is an intervening singeing and washing process that brings in more softness in the fabric. The product is washed off water soluble chemical remnants, steam dried and then causted that lead to swelling of the material. Earlier foam technology was used for this purpose, which has now been replaced by wet technology that gives more softness and binding to fabric. 

79

This is the followed by moving the fabric through centering machines that kill extra percentage of inbuilt lycra to peg elasticity at the desired level as demanded by the customers. Temporizing is the next process to be carried out with the help of rubber and leads to permanent shrinkage of the fabric.

Softening finish : This machine produces soft & smooth/ silky feel to the fabric. Machine name :biancalani's airo® 24 Number of machine ­1

  Company name:  Model: No. of machines: 



 biancalani                        airo® 24 1

Airo 24, from the masters of the air power, the new revolution in the fabric finishing sector after Airo, air flow drying softening and finishing machine for fabric in continuous and open width form. 

80

Microsanding finish 

The fabric moves under 2 or more rollers with fine emery paper on first roller to more abrasive paper in each successive roller.



Abrades the surface causing fibrils to split from the fibres.



Abrasion generate heat may cause harshness on synthetic fabric. 



Decrease the strength by 60%.  Company name: 

 laffer(Italy)

Model:

Water repellent finish  Water

 

repellency

depends   on   surface

                       laffer2

No. of machines: 

1

Machine type :                  Diomand emmerizing carbosent

tension   &   fabric

Fabric width                         1800mm

penetrability. 

Roller width                          2000mm

 It is different from the waterproof finishes, as those finishes are impermeable to air also  Fabric resist wetting but air/ moisture can penetrate.  It is achieved by combination of fabric structure & finish.  Commonly used chemicals are: paraffin wax, paraffin wax with Al or Cr salt, pyridinum salt, reactive silicon resins, fluoro carbon emulsion.  These chemicals fill the gaps b/w yarns in fabric. Company name:  Model: No. of machines: 

  brückner and pleva                 stenter frame 1(amd)

81



Highest   drying   performance   due   to   the   well­engineered   and   patented   split­flow® air circulation system



Up to 35% energy saving thanks to economical heat recovery and energy saving concepts



Absolutely homogeneous distribution of air flow and temperature due to the alternating air flow in the thermo zones (every 1.5 m)



The flexible  split­flow® air circulation system allows a process control which is fine­ tuned to the particular finishing requirements of all kinds of fabric



Optimum straightening results due to an innovative, integrated straightener with shortest possible fabric path to the pin­on point



Extremely robust and low­maintenance chains, chain rails as well as pin bar carriers and clips



Exactly   reproducible   finishing   results   thanks   to   full   automation   and   the   recipe administration of the line

Calendering finish  Compression of the fabric b/w 2 heavy rolls to give flattened, smooth appearance of the fabric by the action of heat & pressure.   Surface of the roller can be either smooth or engraved.   One roll is usually metal and the other is usually covered with paper or fabric.  Moisture in the form of water or steam may be used to achieve a desired luster.   Resins required to be used to make calendaring durable on cellulosic fabrics. Without the resin the effect lasts only one laundering

82

Company name:  Model:

 ramisch guarneri                           Nipco® i ­ calender

No. of machines: 

1

Fabric speed                                            70m/min Type :                  3 roll system with 2 cotton rolls and one steel roll Temperature                               70C Pressure                                      70N/mm

83



This machine is a typical example of an unusually flexible and efficient calender solution.its advantages lie in its diverse range of applications, particularly whenspecial effects are required, e.g. Smoothness, lustre, high glaze and air permeability.an innovative development with significant efficient benefits, the hydro pneumatic width adjustment, which can be reset in a flying change when operating pressure or fabric widths change. 



This reduces non­productive times, makes production even more flexible and increases efficiency.

Flame ­ Lamination finish  Flame­laminating­machines are used to join thermoplastic materials like foam made of polyester, polyether, polyethylen or various adhesive foils and textile, pvc­foils, artificial leather, non­wovens, papers or other materials.  Depending on the machine construction, single­ or sandwich­ laminations can be made. The materials are taken from bales or plates (flat­base­laminating­machine).  A line­gas burner which is installed across the whole working width, is melting the foam, resulting in an adhesive film. Inside the calander, the foam and the top fabric, resp. The backlining are permanently joined together when running through the laminating gap.

  Company name: 

  Schmitt

No. of machines: 

1

Fabric speed                                            60m/min Working width:                                     up to 2000 mm 

 

84

Shrinkage control  finish  It is pre­shrinking finishing   Impart shrinkage to the fabric and improve luster of the fabric.  Maximum shrinkage is first calculated.  Fabric dampened and passed through continuous thick rubber belt where preshrinking takes place which is further set by  woolen/ felt blanket.

Company name: 

 monforts monfortex sanforiser

No. of machines: 

3

Fabric speed                                            50m/min Working width:                        2000mm Rubber belt section face width         2170mm   Water cooling rollers                        2

85

 Chemical padding: The denim fabric is then padded to apply finish to the fabric. Here thefabric passes into a full immersion pad and finish is added at high wet pick up. The finish isnecessary to properly lubricate fabric for the subsequent skewing operation.

 Desizing (dhall): Continuous desizing ranges are suitable for eliminating the size material from denim fabricwith the help of rapid enzymes in the impregnator tank. It is then developed in the steamerfor suitable time. It is then subjected to intensive washing, and followed by cylinder drier.the inlet is into scray 

 Skewing: After chemical padding, the fabric is stretched by passing through two pullingdevices and then passes through a skewing unit, where it is skewed.now, skewing being an important issue shall be dealt with more details. Skewness in twill fabric :the skewness in denim fabric, particularly in twill weave creates a serious problem insubsequent garment manufacturing and its washing. Leg twist is a major problem in denimmanufacturing. Due to this problem the leg is rotated in the opposite direction of the twill of thefabric after laundering.  Leg twist is assumed to be happen due to the directional yarn stresses.these are inherent in regular twill weave fabrics and developed during weaving. During washing the yarn stresses is relaxed which change the regular position of interlacement between warp and filling yarns. Due to this reason the legs are twisted. Normally leg twist not shown on garment stage.  It only observed after laundering of the garment. Although leg twist appears after first laundering and it increases progressively with repeated launderings .ideally warp and weft should be at right angle to each other in normal fabric. Skew in the fabric occurs when the warp are displaced from their vertical position or when the weft are displacedfrom their horizontal position. Woven fabric skewness The degree of skew movement depends upon yarn characteristics, weaving tensions, and the fabric structures

 Pre­drying:

86

The fabric is then passes through drying cylinders for partial drying of the fabric. Here 75­85% moisture are removed. The steam cylinders drive moisture in to the core of the yarns and reducing it to the 15­17% which is required for optimal sanforizing.

 Compressive shrinking: Subsequently, the denim fabric passes through a compressive shrinking unit where the denim fabric is pre­shrunk according to the grey potential shrinkage of the fabric, so that the residual shrinkage should be under tolerance limit.100% cotton denim may require about 14% moisture for effective pre shrinkage. Moisture should be uniform thorough out the length, width, and depth of fabric for effective shrinking.the compressive shrinkage unit consists of a heated and polished stainless steel cylinder, tension roller, pressure roller and guide rollers. Both the tension roller and the pressure can be adjusted as per requirement. A rubber belt cooling device is fitted with a water spraying arrangement on both faces of the rubber belt. Rubber belt unit is equipped wit hbelt grinding roller and a suction device for dust removal from the belt grinding device. Palmer cylinder: After the compressive shrinkage unit, the fabric is passes through a palmer unit, where the fabric is dried and iron. The functions of the palmer cylinder is:to dry the denim fabric to a level of about 4% relative humidity and set shrinkage, adjust the shrinkage, to compare incoming and outgoing fabric tension and determine fabric shrinkage, It helps in precise adjustment of fabric shrinkage. It pulls the fabric and precisely contro ltensionon the fabric.it gives a pressing and calendaring effect on the preshrunk fabric

 Stain resistance  finish  Arvind mills is one of the very few mills in the world to have achieved such superior stain­ resistant finishes with high degree of post garment wash performance. Though the scotchgard tm range of chemicals have been in the market for over 40 years, very few companies have been able to achieve such outstanding stain­resistant properties on cotton fabrics.

 Cooling unit  At the exit of the palmer there is a cooling can. The unit consists of one, two or threestainless steel jacketed cylinders equipped with chilled water circulation to cool the hot fabric as it comes out of the palmer unit.

 Delivery unit 

87

The delivery unit consists of big batching arrangement and a plaiting device. A stainlesssteel scray can be equipped for continuous operation.

Technical advancements in finishing Arvind   Ltd   has   diversified   into   the   Advanced   Textiles   Business   and   has   envisioned   world leadership in the field of advanced materials offering high­tech textile solutions for critical and composite applications. 

To service this emerging market Arvind has set up a state­of­the art manufacturing facility at Santej for manufacturing  high­end Industrial Fabrics. This facility can make produce fabrics from high performance Multi­filaments, Mono­filaments and Spun Yarns. Typical application will   be   in   Solid­Liquid   Filtration,   Industrial   Belting,   Coating   Substrates,   Outdoor   and   other Industrial application. It has further diversified into manufacturing of Anti­Ballistic fabrics, for use in Bullet Proof Vests and Helmets. Arvind offers range of Nylon fabrics for the defence applications. 

Arvind's new facility (Joint Venture with PD Group, Germany) to manufacture Glass, Carbon and Aramid fabrics is under commissioning. These fabrics will be woven and Multi­axial as per customer specifications, which will be solutions to various industrial and advances composite applications like wind mill blades, automotive, aerospace, infrastructure etc.

About   PRO1  Pro1   range   of   branded   fabrics   and   composite   textiles   includes   solutions   for   growing industrial sectors like Personal Protection, Industrial Filtration, Wind Energy, Defense, Auto Components, Transportation, and Housing & Infrastructure.

 For the first time in India Arvind introduces Proban fabrics which come with reliability assurance from Rhodia, UK. Proban meets International Fire Safety Standards such as EN 533/ISO 14116:2008, EN 531/ISO 11612:2008, NFPA 70E, NFPA 2112. Proban has

88

proven performance for more than 50 years now. Arvind Limited is the only licensed manufacturer   of   this   product   for   sale   in   select   17   countries   in   Asia   Pacific,   North America, South America, Canada & South Africa. 

 In a short span of time, Arvind has established itself as the largest Fire Protection Fabric producer in India. Apart from PROBAN Arvind range of Fire Resistant Fabrics consists of PYROVATEX, Meta­Aramid (NOMEX from DuPont), Modacrylics, FR Viscose and its blends.

89

PRO1 Range Fire Protection Solution 

Chemically Treated Flame Retardant Fabrics

PROBAN® Arvind   has   been   licensed   by  Rhodia,   Novecare   to  manufacture   and  sell   PROBAN®   treated fabrics and garments in 17 countries of Asia pacific, North America, South America, Canada and South Africa. PROBAN gives cotton and cotton rich fabrics durable flame retardant properties that meet European fire safety regulations and offer protection for the lifetime of the articles. There is no chemical reaction within the fibre hence the fabric remains unaffected. Every lot of PROBAN   treated  fabric   of Arvind  is  tested   and certified   by Rhodia's  UKAS   &  ISO  17025 accredited facilities in the UK and meets the stringent requirement of the latest standards of ISO 11612.

PYROVATEX® PYROVATEX Treated Fabrics offers protection against flame. These fabrics are available in combination of cotton, cotton/Nylon blend. Arvind is expertise in treating cotton fabrics ensures that   PYROVATEX   Fabrics   maintain   their   original   softness   and   comfort   to   wearer. PYROVATEX Treated Fabrics assures long lasting FR properties. Arvind offers PYROVATEX Fabrics in combination with antistatic, water and oil repellent functionality permitting creation of multi functional fabrics.

90



Inherent Fire Resistant Fabrics

NOMEX® Arvind has been licensed to manufacture and market Nomex branded fire resistant fabrics and garments   by   E.I.Dupont   for   consumption   within   Indian   sub   continent.   These   fabrics   have excellent FR performance for the lifetime of the article with good color fastness. It has very good resistance to chemical and excellent thermal insulation properties. Nomex meets the stringent requirements of fire safety standards such as ISO 11612, ISO 14116, NFPA 70E and NFPA 2112.

PROTEX® Arvind uses inherently flame­retardant PROTEX Modacrylic Fiber from Kaneka Corporation, Japan. It exhibits a high LOI value and is designed to blend perfectly with natural or manmade fibres to produce high quality textiles with superb handle, drape and appearance. It does not melt or drip when ignited. Protex blended fabric will self­extinguish and char barrier will form that works as a shield to minimize fire damage. It is also available in hi­visibility colours certified as per EN471 standard.

91

PRO1 Range High­Tech Fabrics Filtration Fabric  Arvind specializes in manufacturing woven fabrics for solid­liquid separation. These are made of multi   filaments,   monofilaments,   spun   yarns   and   in   combinations.   Latest   generation manufacturing technology helps in monitoring the consistent permeability in the fabrics for these critical applications. Arvind's filtration fabrics have reputation of uniform distribution of pore size, dimensional stability better strength and durability.

Anti Ballistic Fabric Arvind's anti­ballistic fabrics are made from world famous TWARON® Para­aramid filaments supplied by Teijin Aramid, Netherlands. Arvind makes 1100 dtex and 3300 dtex plain­woven fabrics.   These   are   used   for   manufacturing   Bullet   Proof   Vests   and   Bullet   Proof   Helmets   for defence applications.

Nylon and Other Industrial Fabrics Arvind manufactures fabrics made of high tenacity Nylon 6/Nylon 6.6 filaments. These fabrics are sometimes coated or laminated as per specific requirements in defence, outerwear and high altitude clothing.

92

Arvind   also   offers   fabrics   for   other   industrial   applications   like   Belting,   Coating   Substrates, Outdoor etc.

Carbon, Glass & Aramid Fabrics Arvind's new facility (JV Company with PD Group Germany) offers woven and multi­axial fabric solutions made of Glass, Carbon and Aramid. This facility provides textile solutions to various   industrial   and   advanced   composite   applications   like   wind   mills   blades,   automotive, aerospace, infrastructure etc.

Coating substrates :  Arvind  manufacture fabrics upto 350cm using High Tenacity, Low Shrinkage and Super Low Shrinkage Polyester filaments.   

93

Glass wovenrovings : These are composed of direct Rovings woven into a   fabric.   The   input   Rovings   have   excellent   wet­out   and   laminate   properties.   A   variety   of constructions give bi­directional reinforcement and the strength of continuous filaments. Woven Rovings   from   Arvind   PD   Composites   is   ideal   for   hand   and   machine   production   of   boats, containers, automotive parts, sports equipment, corrosion resistant tanks, etc,. The range includes width upto 3.6m from a variety of Rovings of different tex.

Multiaxial   fabric:  Sometimes   known   as   Non­Crimp   Fabrics produced using a technology wherein production allows fabric construction with up to five layers of fibres oriented in different directions and stitched together by an interlocking system to form a single reinforcement. These can be a combination of non­woven fabrics, chopped strand mats or other fabrics giving an unlimited combination of various individual fibres. This product range allows distribution of strength depending on the orientation of fibres. This product is also finding big applications in automotive, aerospace, transportation, sports & leisure, construction, medical and marine industry.

94

Heat and cut resistant fabrics:  Heat & Cut protection fabrics are manufactured using Kevlar® para­ aramid staple fiber from DuPont. Arvind is the exclusive licensee for manufacturing Kevlar® fabrics for Heat & Cut protection applications like hand gloves, aprons, safety shoes, garment reinforcements etc. These fabrics are available in both Woven (330 gsm, 450 gsm, 600 gsm and 750 gsm) and Knits (210 gsm Rib, 270 gsm double knit with cotton) forms. These fabrics are tested as per EN 388 (Cut resistance) and EN 407 (contact heat) standards.

PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL DEPARTMENT The production Planning and Control department is the one that materializes the production flow and monitors it. The main objective of the production planning department is to execute mass production. The department plans each and every step of the production process, and it is its responsibility to deliver high quality products at the promised time.

95

Sometimes the buyer selects the designs that he wants to get mass produced from the fabric database of over 8000 design collection developed by the research and Development department of Arvind Mills. The specifications and procedures for such designs are already listed in the database and now the work of the PPC department is to efficiently carry out those procedures. Other times the customer sends samples and requires the mass production for it. In such cases, the Research and Development department develops the procedures involved for production of that sample by reverse engineering.  The   PPC   department   then   allots   the   machinery   and   time   required   for   fulfillment   of   each procedure accordingly. The lead time is also decided by PPC on the based of order size, machine availability, profits involved and the urgency as per the consumer. In case of orders of lower quantities, the PPC has to strategise the execution of the order and plan whether or not to accept it, since dyeing machines of slasher and rope dye have limitations as to the minimum amount of dyeing, for best results and avoidance of wastage.

96

The   PPC  department  also  plans   separately   for  orders   of  export  and   domestic   market  as   the demand vary from region to region. The bottle neck operation that determines the lead time for the production is the weaving procedure. The loom capacity depends on the following factors:   

Construction of fabric Loom Speed Efficiency

The production planning team needs to coherently work on deciding whether the capacity of the plant is enough to fulfill the order in the given lead time. Usually the lead time for any particular order is 50 to 55 days, including all quality checks inspection etc. The thumb rule for calculation of lead time:    

Pre­ spinning procedures: 3 days Spinning: 15­20 days Warping and dyeing­ 3 days For every weaving cycle­ 3 to 4 days(weaving cycles depend on the order quantity

 

and above mentioned factors) Usually for one order about 8 to 10 weaving cycles required Finishing processes­ 1 day for each process, if not covered in the integrated finish

 

processing machine Inspection 2 to 3 days Washing 2 to 3 days

COSTING       

Spinning :  Rs 1.10/kg/count    (avg. weight 650gram/mtr) Weaving :  Rs 0.21 / pick Dyeing :   Rs 4/mtr Finishing :  Rs 0.04/mtr Coating :   Rs 4/mtr Power :  Rs 2.25/unit Labor wage :  Rs 6000 to 8,500/month

97



Inspection:     Rs 0.65/mtr

RAW MATERIAL :   

Cotton 100 kilo cotton = 88 kilo of yarn(for combed yarn) (75% yarn realisation) Loss : 1 % sizing, 2.3 to 2.5 % weaving,1% warping (total 4 to 4.5%)

The production planning process for shirting in Arvind is done on excel. Though an attempt was made  previously  to employ  an ERP  system,  the project  failed  causing  major  loss  of capital because an ERP system does not work for such a huge company with such diversification in the process. Process control is not possible as each order has a different requirement and hence a different set of processes to be executed. Moreover, the lead time and cost calculations, that are supposed to be taken care of by the ERP system, cannot take into account of all the possible factors at a plant as huge as Arvind Shirting unit.

QUALITY ASSURANCE DEPARTMENT In the modern day quality assurance has a wider scope and it includes activities like process ownership   and   calibration   where   in   the   department   ownership   is   given   to   a   person   and   it becomes his/her duty to deal with it in the most efficient manner. Quality assurance at Arvind mills has the following labs. : 1. Cotton laboratory 2. Physical testing laboratory

98

3. 4. 5. 6.

Chemical testing laboratory Callibaration laboratory Colour quest laboratory Clearance department

COTTON LABORTARY: Cotton is held for the 70% cost of the fabric cost only and hence becomes a major factor which if controlled will add maximum contribution to the strength of Arvind mills. The coefficient of variance is calculated for the width, diameter and hairiness of the fibre. The machine used for this purpose is USTER TESTER 5.the fibre is passed at a speed of 400m/min   and   the   variance   is   hence   calculated.   The   variance   is   calculated   against international or the preset Arvind standards  The length, weight and the exact count of the fibre is also calculated and the CASCADE machine is used for this purpose which ensured the right thing at the right time as per customer demands. PHYSICAL TESTING LABORTARY This testing happens at the yarn manufacturing stage and the yarn is tested for its 1. Length 2. Elongation 3. Elasticity etc The yarn should be tested in a way so as to know whether the yarn can take all the loadings or not and if yes to what extent can it take. This helps in deciding what processes the yarn can face and what effects cab be deduced. Single yarn strength and its elongations is measured using the USTER TENSORPAID 3 machine which is the most trusted name in the field and comes from Switzerland. INSTRON 4465 is used to check the tensile strength of the fibre and the tear strength is also calculated in grams. For all the above written testing’s the standard lab conditions are made at a temperature of 60+/­ 2 f and the humidity level is maintained at 65%+/­2% Factors like stretchablilty skew and shrinkage are tested after marking is done followed by three washings of the fabric; the fabric is tonned to the environment after keeping it in the standard environment.

99

CHEMICAL TESTING LABORTARY: In the chemical laboratory they check all the fuels, dyes, and all the chemicals that are used in the production process. They even check the denim if it is washed with bleach how much it fades the colour. They try different process like how the denim would react in different conditions like in case of perspiration, salt water, normal water, in extreme temperature.  COLOUR QUEST LABORTARY: In the colour quest they try to find out the different shades and they see to it that after the washing and drying process does the shade match the requirement of the customer or not.  CALIBRATION LABORATORY: Definition: Calibration is a specialized measurement process where in one compares test and measuring instruments/equipments of unknown status to well defined standards of greater accuracy in order to detect /eliminate error by adjustments & report any variation in accuracy capability. CALIBRATION ACTIVITY Calibration through in –house facility Calibration throughout­side agencies                          

93% 7%

CALIBRATION FACILITY AT CALIBRATION LABORATORY PARAMETERS

INSTRUMENT & FUNCTIONS

Temperature

Mercury thermometer, temperature indicator & controllers, temperature switches, temperature gauges, temperature transmitters.

Pressure

Pressure gauge, vacuum gauge, pressure transmitter, pressure switch.

Mass

Analytical weighing balance

100

Electrical

AC/OC   voltage,   AC/DC   current,   single   phase   power,   frequency, resistance capacitance, conductance, logic pulses, logic levels. Digital   &   analogue   amateur,   multimeters,   panel   meters,   frequency meters.

Dimensional

Measure tape, steel scale, verniar capture, micro meter, dial gauge.

Gas lab instruments

Lab instruments used for quality conformance tests & physical testing lab & chemical testing lab.

CHECK POINTS IN GREY FABRIC INSPECTION (ARVIND SHIRTING):  Loom Stop Mark  More Pick  Double Pick  Tight Warp  Package Change  Slough Off  Broken Pick  Temperature Crack  Multi Break  Black/ Oil Stain

101

PROFORMA OF FABRIC INSPECTION REPORT ( ARVIND SHIRTING)

ARVIND LIMITED QUALITY ASSURANCE DEPT. ARVIND SHIRTING P.O. Khatraj, Tal. Kalol, Dist. Gandhinagar, Pincode­ 382721, Gujarat, India

FABRIC TEST RESULTS S.O. NO. I.B. NO. COUNT CUSTOMER

SHADE FINISH DESCRIPTION MTRS.

PHYSICAL TESTS Test

Method

Std.

Unit

Result

Notes

102

Warp

Threads/Inch

Weft Fabric Weight Overall Width Usable Width Tensile Strength

ASTM­D­5034

G/m² Cm. Cm. Kg. Warp

ASTM­D­1424

Weft g Warp

ASTM­D­434

Weft Kg Warp

Dimensional

AATCC­135

Weft % Warp

Stbility Martindale

ASTM­D­4996

Weft Revs.

Tear Strength Seam Slippage

ASTM­D­3776

Abrasion

COLOR FASTNESS TESTS Colour Fastness Washing @ 49 °C [email protected] 37 ° C Dry Rub Wet Rub Heat­Dry pressed Acid perspiration

AATCC­61­2A AATCC­107 AATCC­8 AATCC­8 AATCC­133 AATCC­15

4C, 3S 4C,3S 4S 3S 5C 4C, 3S

OTHER REQUIREMENTS Crease

AATCC­66

Recovery

Warp FF BB Weft FF BB

DP Rating Bow/ Skew

AATCC­124 %

Pass/Fail:                                                                               Tested By: HEAD OF DEPARTMENT                                                      Date:

103

MACHINES USED FOR QUALITY TESTING  

104

Specimens are tumbled in the test chamber by aluminum impellers rotating at a constant speed of approximately 1200 rpm for periods of up to 60 minutes. After each test period the specimen is removed, lightly cleaned and subjectively evaluated. Susceptible fabrics will develop lint pills typical of everyday wear. Users have also found high quantitative Correlation for surface appearance, changes in appearance, scuffing, fuzzing and loss of color.

SPECIFICATIONS  Four Chamber (PT-4) 

Dimensions: 47 cm x 68 cm x 39 cm (18.5” W x 26.8 H x 15.5” D)



Weight: 57 kg (125 lbs )



Electrical: 120 V/60 Hz, 10A 230 V/50 Hz, 5A

Accreditations



Air: 1.9 L/s @ 21 kPa

TEST CHAMBER

(4 cfm @ 3 psi)  Iso 9001:2000By bvqi  (india)  pvt. Ltd.,  mumbai­india,  for manufacture  andsupply  of denim fabrics.the  Iso 9000 Family   of   standards   is   related   to   quality   management   systems   anddesigned   to   help organizations ensure that they meet the needs of customers and other stakeholders While meeting statutory and regulatory requirements related To the product. Iso 9001:2000 version sought to make a radical change in thinking by actuallyplacing the concept   of   process   management   front   and   center   ("processmanagement"   was   the monitoring and optimisation of a company's tasks andactivities, instead of just inspection of the final product).  Is0 14000:

105

Provides   environment   management   standards   to   help   organisations   minimize theirnegative   impact   on   the   environment   environment   management   system   (ems) mandatorycertification carried out by third partyfocuses on process as in case of iso 9000  Oeko­tex standard 100 By shirley technologies ltd., uk, for black and indigodyed denim fabrics, black / indigo printed denim fabric Including stretch denims.the oeko­tex® standard 100 is a globally uniform testing and certification systemfor textile raw materials, intermediate and end products at all stages of production.thetests for harmful substancescomprise substances which are prohibited orregulated by law, chemicals which are known to be harmful to health, andparameters which are included as a precautionary measure to safeguard health.  By controlunion certifications, the netherlands, for processing of organic cotton.  “global   organic   textile   standards”,   control   union   certifications,   the   netherlands,For processing of fibres from certified organic agriculture.  National   accreditation   board   for   laboratories,   delhi,   india,for   chemical   &   mechanical disciplines of testing.Premier accreditation scheme by marks & spencer,  Test methods and conditions set forth, laboratory, shirting division business, the arvind mills ltd.  Liz claiborne int’l ltd., testing audit performance, laboratory, shirting businessDivision, the arvind mills ltd.  Labs certified by dupont

106

View more...

Comments

Copyright ©2017 KUPDF Inc.
SUPPORT KUPDF