AD2000 Series Products - User Manual - Version 3

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telemetry + control solutions

A Miri Technologies Help Manual

AD2000 Series Wireless RTU/PLC/Data-Logger User Manual Miri Technologies 30 Buckingham Drive, Wangara Western Australia, 6065 PO Box 1116, Wangara, 6947 phone • (61-8) 9409 8998 fax • (61-8) 9409 9229 email • [email protected] website • www.miri.com.au

Part Number - UserManV300 Revision B September 2007

© 2007 Miri Technologies All rights reserved.

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AD2000 User Manual - Version 3.00 This document replaces all previous publications and is for use in conjunction with the latest MiriMap2000+ software application and the associated firmware which will be installed into any AD2000 Series device using MiriMap2000+ Version 3.00 and later. If previous versions of MiriMap2000+ or AD2000 devices are being used and there is no intention to upgrade them to Version 3.00, please refer to that documentation as not all items in this document will be relevant. This version of software and firmware was released in May 2007.

Copyright & Trademark © Miri Technologies. All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be transmitted or reproduced in any form or by any means without the written permission of Miri Technologies. Printed in Australia. Ethernet is a trademark of Xerox Corporation. Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows NT, Windows XP and Vista are trademarks of Microsoft Corporations.

Contacts Miri Technologies 30 Buckingham Drive, Wangara Western Australia, 6065 PO Box 1116, Wangara, 6947 Phone: (61-8) 9409 8998 Fax: (61-8) 9409 9229 Email: [email protected] Website: www.miri.com.au Technical Support Online: www.miri.com.au/support.htm Email: [email protected]

© 2007 Miri Technologies All rights reserved.

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Revisions Date

Part No.

Rev.

Comments

July 2007

UserManV300RevA

A

Initial Document

September 2007

UserManV300RevB

B

Dialup, GSM and GPRS added.

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Table of Contents CHAPTER 1 - USING THIS MANUAL.........................................................................1-1 Purpose and Audience................................................................................................................................ 1-1 Chapter Summary ....................................................................................................................................... 1-1 Additional Documentation and Information................................................................................................. 1-3 Manual Errors and Request Form............................................................................................................... 1-4

CHAPTER 2 - INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................2-1 What are AD2000 Series Devices? ............................................................................................................ 2-1 Applications using the AD2000 Series Device............................................................................................ 2-3 Basic System Components ....................................................................................................... 2-3 The Common Wireless Solutions Available Today ................................................................... 2-4 Radio Modem Based Wireless Systems ................................................................................... 2-5 Public Wireless Based Systems.............................................................................................. 2-12 Satellite Wireless solutions...................................................................................................... 2-17 Data Gathering Techniques .................................................................................................... 2-18 Remote Connectivity ................................................................................................................................. 2-19 PLC Control Functions.............................................................................................................................. 2-20 Data-logging Monitoring Functions ........................................................................................................... 2-21 Protocol Connectivity to Other Devices .................................................................................................... 2-22 I/O Expansion Modules to Expand AD2000 Series Devices .................................................................... 2-23 Wired Connectivity Options....................................................................................................................... 2-23 AD2000 Series Devices Technical Specifications .................................................................................... 2-26 AD2000 Series Product Comparison Table.............................................................................................. 2-31

CHAPTER 3 - GETTING STARTED ............................................................................3-1 Hardware and Software requirements ........................................................................................................ 3-1 Default Programming ports ....................................................................................................... 3-2 Which Port is Which? ................................................................................................................ 3-2 Mode Switch .............................................................................................................................. 3-3 System Design Concepts............................................................................................................................ 3-4 What is the intended application? ............................................................................................. 3-4 How are the AD2000 Series devices to be arranged? .............................................................. 3-4 How many AD2000 Series devices are to be used in the eventual system?............................ 3-4 What devices are the AD2000 Series devices being connected to? ........................................ 3-4 Upgrading from earlier versions.................................................................................................................. 3-4 Downgrading to previous versions.............................................................................................................. 3-5 Part Numbers .............................................................................................................................................. 3-5

CHAPTER 4 - MIRIMAP2000+ SOFTWARE...............................................................4-1 What is MiriMap2000+ ................................................................................................................................ 4-1 Installation ................................................................................................................................................... 4-2 Running the Software ................................................................................................................................. 4-9 Main Menu-Options................................................................................................................................... 4-10 File ........................................................................................................................................... 4-10 Edit .......................................................................................................................................... 4-12 Project ..................................................................................................................................... 4-16 Display..................................................................................................................................... 4-22 PLC.......................................................................................................................................... 4-26 Watcher ................................................................................................................................... 4-31 Help ......................................................................................................................................... 4-36 Toolbars................................................................................................................................... 4-38 The Project List window .......................................................................................................... 4-39 The Network Map window ....................................................................................................... 4-40 © 2007 Miri Technologies All rights reserved.

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The Status bar ......................................................................................................................... 4-41 Building a System Network “Map”............................................................................................................. 4-42 Project Map Elements ............................................................................................................. 4-42 Step by Step Guide to Creating a New Project......................................................................................... 4-44 Opening a New Project File ...................................................................................................................... 4-44 Setting the Station Properties.................................................................................................. 4-46 Saving the Project Map File .................................................................................................... 4-47 Assigning Variables ................................................................................................................. 4-48 Configuring the Ports............................................................................................................... 4-51 Configuring Parcels ................................................................................................................. 4-53 Creating the Links between Stations....................................................................................... 4-56 Inserting Ladder Logic............................................................................................................. 4-57 Copying Stations ..................................................................................................................... 4-64 Station Properties - AD2000 Series Type devices.................................................................................... 4-69 General.................................................................................................................................... 4-69 Ports ........................................................................................................................................ 4-83 Parcels..................................................................................................................................... 4-88 Compile ................................................................................................................................... 4-96 Station Properties - I/O Expansion Type devices ................................................................................... 4-104 General.................................................................................................................................. 4-105 Setup Expansion ................................................................................................................... 4-106 IO Expansion Hardware DIP Switch Settings ....................................................................... 4-108 IO Expansion Wiring Details.................................................................................................. 4-109 IO Expansion Module Terminal Details and Specifications .................................................. 4-110 Station Properties - Other Protocol Type devices................................................................................... 4-114 General.................................................................................................................................. 4-114 Station Properties - SMS Type devices .................................................................................................. 4-116 General.................................................................................................................................. 4-116 AD2006 - Ethernet Port Set-up ............................................................................................................... 4-119 Device Installer Configuration Utility...................................................................................... 4-119 AD2006 XPort Ethernet Firmware Update.............................................................................................. 4-126 AD2000 - Ethernet Port Set-up ............................................................................................................... 4-131 Dialup System Set-up ............................................................................................................................. 4-132 Dialup System Configuration Arrangements ......................................................................... 4-132 AD2000 Series Device Dialup Port Configuration................................................................. 4-134 MiriMap2000+ Dialup Configuration...................................................................................... 4-136 HMI/SCADA Dialup Configuration......................................................................................... 4-136 GSM and SMS System Set-up ............................................................................................................... 4-137 Important Ladder Logic requirements for GSM Internal Modems......................................... 4-137 Typical GSM/SMS System Configurations............................................................................ 4-138 AD2000 Series GSM Port Configuration ............................................................................... 4-140 MiriMap2000+ GSM Configuration........................................................................................ 4-143 HMI/SCADA GSM Configuration........................................................................................... 4-143 Using SMS messages on GSM enabled AD2000 Series devices ........................................ 4-143 SMS Message Syntax ........................................................................................................... 4-145 GSM CMEE Errors ................................................................................................................ 4-153 GPRS System Set-up ............................................................................................................................. 4-155 Important requirements for GPRS Internal Modems............................................................. 4-155 Typical GPRS System Configurations................................................................................... 4-155 AD2000 Series GPRS Port Configuration ............................................................................. 4-157 MiriMap2000+ GPRS Configuration...................................................................................... 4-162 HMI/SCADA GPRS Configuration......................................................................................... 4-162 GPRS Diagnostics................................................................................................................. 4-162 GPRS CMEE Errors .............................................................................................................. 4-164

CHAPTER 5 - LADDER LOGIC FUNCTIONS.............................................................5-1 The PLC functions of the AD2000 Series Devices ..................................................................................... 5-1 The internal operations of the AD2000 Series PLC functions .................................................................... 5-1 I/O - (Inputs/Outputs)................................................................................................................. 5-2

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Internal memory points.............................................................................................................. 5-2 Counters .................................................................................................................................... 5-2 Timers........................................................................................................................................ 5-2 Data storage .............................................................................................................................. 5-2 PLC operation............................................................................................................................ 5-2 Editing Ladder Logic programs ................................................................................................................... 5-3 Selecting Edit mode................................................................................................................... 5-4 Inserting logic items on a rung .................................................................................................. 5-4 How to edit the element of choice ............................................................................................. 5-6 Inserting logic elements............................................................................................................. 5-6 Deleting logic elements ............................................................................................................. 5-7 Deleting logic rungs ................................................................................................................... 5-7 Inserting logic connect lines ...................................................................................................... 5-8 Deleting logic connect lines....................................................................................................... 5-9 Copying and pasting rungs and logic sections.......................................................................... 5-9 Undo facility for copying and pasting rungs and logic sections............................................... 5-10 Finding a specific variable ....................................................................................................... 5-10 Find & replace a specific variable............................................................................................ 5-11 Go To a specific rung number or label .................................................................................... 5-11 Adding Example Ladder Logic Rungs ..................................................................................... 5-11 Boolean Logic ........................................................................................................................................... 5-13 Normally Open Contact ........................................................................................................... 5-13 Normally Closed Contact......................................................................................................... 5-13 Positive Transition Contact...................................................................................................... 5-13 Negative Transition Contact .................................................................................................... 5-14 Any Transition Contact ............................................................................................................ 5-14 Output Coil............................................................................................................................... 5-14 Not Output Coil ........................................................................................................................ 5-14 Set Output Coil ........................................................................................................................ 5-14 Reset Output Coil .................................................................................................................... 5-14 Timers and Counters Function Block Descriptions................................................................................... 5-15 Counter Up (CTU) ................................................................................................................... 5-15 Counter Down (CTD)............................................................................................................... 5-16 Counter Up Down (CTUD) ...................................................................................................... 5-18 Timer Pulse (TP) ..................................................................................................................... 5-20 Timer On-Delay (TON) ............................................................................................................ 5-22 Timer Off-Delay (TOFF) .......................................................................................................... 5-23 Timer Accumulating (TACC) ................................................................................................... 5-25 Data Manipulation Function Block Descriptions ....................................................................................... 5-27 Absolute................................................................................................................................... 5-27 Greater Than (GT)................................................................................................................... 5-28 Less Than (LT) ........................................................................................................................ 5-30 Equal To (EQ).......................................................................................................................... 5-31 Maximum ................................................................................................................................. 5-33 Minimum .................................................................................................................................. 5-34 Modulus ................................................................................................................................... 5-35 Bit Shift Left (SHL)................................................................................................................... 5-37 Bit Shift Right (SHR)................................................................................................................ 5-39 Rotate Left (ROTL) .................................................................................................................. 5-41 Rotate Right (ROTR) ............................................................................................................... 5-43 Decrement ............................................................................................................................... 5-45 Increment................................................................................................................................. 5-47 Move........................................................................................................................................ 5-48 Move Not ................................................................................................................................. 5-50 Convert .................................................................................................................................... 5-52 AND Word ............................................................................................................................... 5-55 OR Word.................................................................................................................................. 5-57 XOR Word ............................................................................................................................... 5-59 Arithmetic & Mathematic Function Block Descriptions ............................................................................. 5-61 Add (ADD) ............................................................................................................................... 5-61

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Subtract (SUB) ........................................................................................................................ 5-62 Multiply (MUL) ......................................................................................................................... 5-64 Divide (DIV) ............................................................................................................................. 5-65 Cosine (COS) .......................................................................................................................... 5-67 Sine (SIN) ................................................................................................................................ 5-68 Tangent (TAN)......................................................................................................................... 5-69 ArcCosine (ARCCOS) ............................................................................................................. 5-71 ArcSine (ARCSIN) ................................................................................................................... 5-72 ArcTangent (ARCTAN)............................................................................................................ 5-74 Log Natural (LOG_LN) ............................................................................................................ 5-75 Exponential (EXPONENTIAL) ................................................................................................. 5-76 Log Base10 (LOG_10).............................................................................................................. 5-78 Square Root (SQRT) ............................................................................................................... 5-79 Power (POWER) ..................................................................................................................... 5-80 Degree To Radian (DEGCON)................................................................................................ 5-82 Radian To Degree (RADCON) ................................................................................................ 5-83 Special Function Block Descriptions......................................................................................................... 5-85 Change Detect (CHD) ............................................................................................................. 5-85 High Speed Counter for DIN1 and DIN2 ................................................................................. 5-87 High Speed Rate Calculation for DIN1 and DIN2 ................................................................... 5-89 Log Data Variable (LOG)......................................................................................................... 5-91 Moving Average (MAVG) ........................................................................................................ 5-93 Parcel ...................................................................................................................................... 5-94 RTC Time ................................................................................................................................ 5-97 RTC Date................................................................................................................................. 5-99 Rate Calculation (RATE) ....................................................................................................... 5-101 Scale...................................................................................................................................... 5-103 Shaft Encoder Interface (SHAFT) ......................................................................................... 5-105 Sub-Routine........................................................................................................................... 5-107 Printing Ladder Logics ............................................................................................................................ 5-108 Ladder Logic Cross-Reference List ........................................................................................................ 5-108

CHAPTER 6 - DATA-LOGGING FUNCTIONS............................................................6-1 The Data Logger functions of the AD2000 products................................................................................... 6-1 The difference between “data-log” and “real-time” variables .................................................... 6-1 Setting up the Data Logger Interface ........................................................................................ 6-3 Displaying the data-log data...................................................................................................... 6-5

CHAPTER 7 - PROTOCOLS .......................................................................................7-1 DF1 ............................................................................................................................................................. 7-2 Modes Supported ...................................................................................................................... 7-2 Memory Data Types Supported ................................................................................................ 7-2 Master Mode Configuration ....................................................................................................... 7-2 Slave Mode Configuration ......................................................................................................... 7-9 PLC Programming Software set up......................................................................................... 7-11 HMI Setup................................................................................................................................ 7-11 Modbus ..................................................................................................................................................... 7-12 Modes Supported .................................................................................................................... 7-12 Memory Data Types Supported .............................................................................................. 7-12 Master Mode Configuration ..................................................................................................... 7-13 Slave Mode Configuration ....................................................................................................... 7-19 Modbus TCP/IP ....................................................................................................................... 7-21 PLC Programming Software set up......................................................................................... 7-23 Citect HMI Setup ..................................................................................................................... 7-23

CHAPTER 8 - DIAGNOSTIC VARIABLES..................................................................8-1

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Radio Diagnostic Data ................................................................................................................................ 8-1 RD - 1 Temperature (%MW65160) .......................................................................................... 8-1 RD - 2 RSSI i.e. Radio Received Signal Strength (%MW65161) ............................................. 8-1 RD - 3 Tx Power i.e. Transmit Power (%MW65162)................................................................. 8-1 PLC Diagnostic Data................................................................................................................................... 8-3 PLC System Coils...................................................................................................................... 8-3 Time........................................................................................................................................... 8-5 General Diagnostics .................................................................................................................. 8-5 Data-log Diagnostics ................................................................................................................. 8-6 Port Diagnostic Data ................................................................................................................................... 8-6 Protocol error number per port .................................................................................................. 8-6 Modem Status per port.............................................................................................................. 8-6 Bad Packets per port................................................................................................................. 8-7 Current station ID polled per port .............................................................................................. 8-7 Received station ID polled per port ........................................................................................... 8-7 Retry count per port................................................................................................................... 8-8 Link Fail count per port.............................................................................................................. 8-8 Message Received count per port............................................................................................. 8-8 PCMCIA Diagnostics (PCMCIA port only) ................................................................................ 8-8 Broadcast Diagnostics............................................................................................................... 8-9 Miri2000 Error Codes ................................................................................................................................ 8-10 Code 1000 - Invalid Message.................................................................................................. 8-10 Code 1001 - Bad Command.................................................................................................... 8-10 Modbus Error Codes ................................................................................................................................. 8-10 Code 01 - Illegal Function ....................................................................................................... 8-10 Code 02 - Illegal Data Address ............................................................................................... 8-10 Code 03 - Illegal Data Value ................................................................................................... 8-10 Code 04 - Slave Device Failure............................................................................................... 8-10 Code 05 - Acknowledge .......................................................................................................... 8-10 Code 06 - Slave Device Busy.................................................................................................. 8-10 Code 07 - Negative Acknowledge ........................................................................................... 8-10 Code 08 - Memory Parity Error ............................................................................................... 8-10 Code 1000 - Invalid Message.................................................................................................. 8-10 Code 1001 - Bad Command.................................................................................................... 8-11 Allen Bradley DF1 Error Codes................................................................................................................. 8-11 Code 00h - OK......................................................................................................................... 8-11 Code 01h - Out of buffer space ............................................................................................... 8-11 Code 02h - Delivery problem................................................................................................... 8-11 Code 03h - Duplicate token..................................................................................................... 8-11 Code 04h - Local port is disconnected .................................................................................... 8-11 Code 05h - Application layer timed out ................................................................................... 8-11 Code 06h - Duplicate node...................................................................................................... 8-11 Code 07h - Station is offline .................................................................................................... 8-11 Code 08h - Hardware fault ...................................................................................................... 8-11 Code 10h - Illegal command or format .................................................................................... 8-11 Code 20h - Host has a problem and will not communicate..................................................... 8-12 Code 30h - Remote node host is missing, disconnected, or shut down ................................. 8-12 Code 40h - Host could not complete function due to hardware fault ...................................... 8-12 Code 50h - Addressing problem or memory protect rungs ..................................................... 8-12 Code 60h - Function not allowed due to command protection selection ................................ 8-12 Code 70h - Processor is in Program mode ............................................................................. 8-12 Code 80h - Compatibility mode file missing or communication zone problem........................ 8-12 Code 90h - Remote node cannot buffer command ................................................................. 8-12 Code A0h - Wait ACK (1775_KA buffer full) ........................................................................... 8-12 Code B0h - Remote node problem due to download .............................................................. 8-12 Code C0h - Wait ACK (1775_KA buffer full) ........................................................................... 8-12 Code D0h - Not used............................................................................................................... 8-12 Code E0h - Not used............................................................................................................... 8-12 Code F0h - Error code in the EXT STS byte........................................................................... 8-12 Code 100h - Invalid File .......................................................................................................... 8-12

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Code 101h - Invalid Function .................................................................................................. 8-13 Code 1000 - Invalid Message.................................................................................................. 8-13 Code 1001 - Bad Command.................................................................................................... 8-13

CHAPTER 9 - CABLES, CONNECTIONS AND PIN-OUTS........................................9-1 RS232 Standard Pin Connections .............................................................................................................. 9-1 25 Pin Assignments................................................................................................................... 9-1 9 Pin Assignments..................................................................................................................... 9-2 AD2000 RJ45 Pin Assignments ................................................................................................ 9-2 RS232 Converter Pin Connections ............................................................................................................. 9-3 RS232 25 Pin to 9 Pin converter Pin Assignments ................................................................... 9-3 9 Pin to AD2000 RS232 Converter - Pin Details....................................................................... 9-3 25 Pin to AD2000 RS232 Converter - Pin Details..................................................................... 9-4 Device Cable Details................................................................................................................................... 9-5 AD2000 to PC for Programming software and HMI/DCS cable - RS232.................................. 9-5 AD2000 to AD2000 Extension cable - RS232........................................................................... 9-5 AD2000 to GE Fanuc 90 Series CMM Module - RS232 ........................................................... 9-6 AD2000 to ADAM 4520 RS485/422 Converter ......................................................................... 9-6 AD2000 to Allen Bradley SLC500 PLC RS232 Port ................................................................. 9-7 AD2000 to UDS-10, 100 or 1100 Ethernet to Serial Converter ................................................ 9-7 AD2000 to Greenspan Smart Sensor RS232 ........................................................................... 9-8 Ethernet 10BaseT cables .......................................................................................................... 9-8

CHAPTER 10 - GLOSSARY......................................................................................10-1 Bits, Bytes and Words, Long, Real ........................................................................................................... 10-1 Data acquisition......................................................................................................................................... 10-2 HMIs/MMIs/DCSs & PLCs ........................................................................................................................ 10-2 I/O.............................................................................................................................................................. 10-2 Ladder Logic ............................................................................................................................................. 10-2 Leased Lines & Landlines......................................................................................................................... 10-2 Master ....................................................................................................................................................... 10-3 Master/Slave (Polled) Systems................................................................................................................. 10-3 Narrow-Band Wireless .............................................................................................................................. 10-3 OPC .......................................................................................................................................................... 10-4 Point to Point Systems .............................................................................................................................. 10-5 Point to Multi Point Systems ..................................................................................................................... 10-5 Point Mapping ........................................................................................................................................... 10-5 Protocols ................................................................................................................................................... 10-5 PSTN Modems.......................................................................................................................................... 10-5 Report By Exception (RBE) ...................................................................................................................... 10-5 RS232/422 & 485...................................................................................................................................... 10-6 RTU........................................................................................................................................................... 10-7 SCADA...................................................................................................................................................... 10-7 Spread Spectrum Wireless ....................................................................................................................... 10-7 Store & Forward ........................................................................................................................................ 10-8 Telemetry .................................................................................................................................................. 10-8

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Figures Figure 1 - Typical Arrangement of AD2000 Series Devices............................................ 2-2 Figure 2 - Typical System Layout...................................................................................... 2-4 Figure 3 - How Far Will Radio Go? .................................................................................... 2-5 Figure 4 - Master/Slave Point to Point System Arrangement......................................... 2-7 Figure 5 - Example of External Radio Connectivity......................................................... 2-7 Figure 6 - Master/Slave Point to Multi-Point System Arrangement ............................... 2-8 Figure 7 - Store and Forward System Arrangement ....................................................... 2-8 Figure 8 - Multi-hop Store and Forward System Arrangement ..................................... 2-9 Figure 9 - Repeater Based Radio System Arrangement ............................................... 2-10 Figure 10 - Sub-Master Based System Arrangement .................................................... 2-11 Figure 11 - GSM Based System - Typical Layout .......................................................... 2-13 Figure 12 - GPRS Based System - Typical Layout - No Carrier Hub ........................... 2-15 Figure 13 - GPRS Based System - Typical Layout - Via Carrier Hub........................... 2-15 Figure 14 - Satellite Based System - Typical Layout using Iridium Network.............. 2-17 Figure 15 - Data-log Scheduler System Arrangement .................................................. 2-19 Figure 16 - Remote Connectivity Example Diagram...................................................... 2-20 Figure 17 - Example Ladder Logic screen from MiriMap2000+.................................... 2-21 Figure 18 - Example of Data-logging Screen in MiriMap2000+ Software .................... 2-22 Figure 19 - Example of I/O Expansion Modules............................................................. 2-23 Figure 20 - Wired Connection Options ........................................................................... 2-23 Figure 21 - Ethernet Networked AD2006s Using Modbus/TCP .................................... 2-24 Figure 22 - Ethernet Networked AD2006s Using Miri2000 and UDP PTMP System... 2-25 Figure 23 - Example of USB2.0 Type A to B Cable Connectors..................................... 3-1 Figure 24 - Programming Ports ......................................................................................... 3-2 Figure 25 - AD2000 Port Numbering ................................................................................. 3-2 Figure 26 - AD2006 Port Numbering ................................................................................. 3-2 Figure 27 - Run/Program Mode Switch............................................................................. 3-3 Figure 28 - AD2000 Series Part Numbers ......................................................................... 3-5 Figure 29 - Full screen view of MiriMap2000+................................................................ 4-10 Figure 30 - Example of Floating Toolbar ........................................................................ 4-38 Figure 31 - Example of Docked Toolbar ......................................................................... 4-39 Figure 32 - AD2000 Series Variable Memory Map.......................................................... 4-71 Figure 33 - IO Expansion Hardware DIP Switch Settings ........................................... 4-108 Figure 34 - IO Expansion Wiring Details....................................................................... 4-109 Figure 35 - M16-LN 16 Point Low Voltage Digital Input Module - General Arrangement .......................................................................................................................................... 4-110 Figure 36 - M16-LN 16 Point Low Voltage Digital Input Module - Wiring Schematic4-110 Figure 37 - M16-HN 16 Point High Voltage Digital Input Module - General Arrangement .......................................................................................................................................... 4-111 Figure 38 - M16-HN 16 Point High Voltage Digital Input Module - Wiring Schematic .... 4111 Figure 39 - M16-TR 16 Point Relay Output Module - General Arrangement ............. 4-112 Figure 40 - M16-TR 16 Point Relay Output Module - Wiring Schematic .................... 4-112 Figure 41 - M8-AD 8 Channel Analogue Input Module - General Arrangement........ 4-113 Figure 42 - M8-AD 8 Channel Analogue Input Module - Wiring Schematic .............. 4-113 Figure 43 - Dialup System Arrangement - AD2000 Series Device to Device ............ 4-132 Figure 44 - Dialup System Arrangement - MiriMap2000+ to AD2000 Series Device 4-133 Figure 45 - Dialup System Arrangement - HMI to AD2000 Series Device ................. 4-133 Figure 46 - GSM System Arrangement - AD2000 Series Device to Device ............... 4-138 Figure 47 - GSM System Arrangement - MiriMap2000+ to AD2000 Series Device... 4-139 Figure 48 - GSM System Arrangement - HMI to AD2000 Series Device .................... 4-139 Figure 49 - Typical SMS System Arrangement ............................................................ 4-144 Figure 50 - GPRS System Arrangement - AD2000 Series Device to Device ............. 4-156 Figure 51 - GPRS System Arrangement - MiriMap2000+ to AD2000 Series Device. 4-156 Figure 52 - GPRS System Arrangement - HMI to AD2000 Series Device .................. 4-157 Figure 53 - Real-time data collection example................................................................. 6-1 Figure 54 - External time stamp data collection example............................................... 6-2

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Tables Table 1 - Errors and Request Form - September 07 ........................................................ 1-4 Table 2 - Logic Functions................................................................................................. 2-26 Table 3 - Physical Dimensions ........................................................................................ 2-26 Table 4 - Environmental Specifications.......................................................................... 2-26 Table 5 - Power Interface Specifications ........................................................................ 2-26 Table 6 - Supported Protocols......................................................................................... 2-26 Table 7 - AD2000 Communications Port Specifications ............................................... 2-27 Table 8 - AD2006 Communications Port Specifications ............................................... 2-27 Table 9 - I/O Specifications .............................................................................................. 2-27 Table 10 - Memory Specifications ................................................................................... 2-27 Table 11 - AD2000 Series Temperature Specifications................................................. 2-28 Table 12 - AD200xS Spread Spectrum Wireless Module Specifications..................... 2-28 Table 13 - AD200xR Narrow Band VHF Radio Module Specifications......................... 2-29 Table 14 - AD200xR Narrow Band UHF Radio Module Specifications ........................ 2-30 Table 15 - AD200xG GSM/GPRS Modem Module Specifications ................................. 2-30 Table 16 - Product Comparison Table ............................................................................ 2-31 Table 17 - Link Healthy and Poll Select Block Numbers............................................... 4-34 Table 18 - AD2000 Series Device Physical I/O Memory Allocations............................ 4-71 Table 19 - AD2000 Series Device I/O Expansion Memory Allocations ........................ 4-71 Table 20 - AD2000 Series Device Diagnostic Variables Memory Allocations............. 4-73 Table 21 - Radio Power Settings ................................................................................... 4-103 Table 22 - M16-LN 16 Point Low Voltage Digital Input Module - Specifications....... 4-110 Table 23 - M16-HN High Voltage Digital Input Module - Specifications..................... 4-111 Table 24 - M16-TR 16 Point Relay Output Module - Specifications ........................... 4-112 Table 25 - M8-AD 8 Channel Analogue Input Module - Specifications ...................... 4-113 Table 26 - Number Format Ranges ................................................................................. 10-1

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Chapter 1 - Using This Manual

Chapter 1 - Using This Manual This chapter provides basic document details so the reader can access the required details.

Purpose and Audience This manual provides the information needed to configure, use and update the AD2000 Series products. It is those responsible for evaluating, designing, installing and maintaining systems using the AD2000 Series products.

Chapter Summary The remaining chapters in this manual include: Chapter 2 - Introduction

Provides an overview of the main features of the AD2000 Series products.

Chapter 3 - Getting Started

Provides some pointers to system design and configuration to ensure the correct AD2000 Series product and system arrangement is used.

Chapter 4 - MiriMap2000+ Software

Provides detailed information on the MiriM2000+ software application package which must be used to enable the various features of the AD2000 Series hardware.

Chapter 5 - Ladder Logic Functions

Provides detailed information of the various function blocks available for use within the Ladder Logic utility which is included in every AD2000 Series device.

Chapter 6 - Data-logging Functions

Provides detailed information of the various datalogging functions available for use within the DataLogger capability which is included in every AD2000 Series device.

Chapter 7 - Protocols

Provides detailed information about the associated protocols used to connect devices to the AD2000 Series devices.

Chapter 8 - Diagnostic Variables

Provides detailed information about the associated diagnostic variables used with the protocols to connect devices to the AD2000 Series devices.

Chapter 9 - Cables, connections and pin-outs

Provides useful details on associated cables used to inter-connect the most common devices to the AD2000 Series devices.

Chapter 10 - Glossary

A glossary of useful terms used in the manual.

Although every effort has been made to ensure informational accuracy, the contents of this publication are presented for informational purposes only. They are not to be construed as warranties or guarantees, expressed or implied, regarding the products or services described herein or their use or applicability. The manufacturer reserves the right to modify, improve or delete the designs or specifications of these products at any time without notice.

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Chapter 1 - Using This Manual This document was last printed on Wednesday, 26 September 2007 and there are a total of 398 pages in the document.

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Chapter 1 - Using This Manual

Additional Documentation and Information The following information is available for use: AD2000 Series Training Courses

A range of training courses, manuals and guides are available to enhance the information contained in this user manual - consult [email protected] for further details and course details.

AD2000 Product Datasheet

The AD2000 Series product brochure is available for download at the Miri website at AD2000 Series Datasheet.

Website

The Miri Technologies website at www.miri.com.au is kept up to date with current documentation and product information.

Technical Support

Technical support information is available at www.miri.com.au or via email at [email protected]

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Chapter 1 - Using This Manual

Manual Errors and Request Form Should there be any errors or omissions noticed during the use of this manual or sections that require further enhancement or explanation, please complete the table below and fax to Miri Technologies on 61-(0)-89-409-9229 or email details to Technical support on [email protected] Table 1 - Errors and Request Form - September 07 Chapter Number

Page Number

Describe The Error or Content Change/Addition Required

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Chapter 2 - Introduction

Chapter 2 - Introduction The AD2000 Series products are devices that allow you to enable wireless and wired connections for remote monitoring and control applications. This introduction allows the user to understand some of the features of the AD2000 Series products and how they can be used. It is only an introduction, useful for new-comers to the product and systems. Details on how to use these features are contained in the following chapters. As a minimum requirement read this chapter to understand the basics of systems using the AD2000 Series devices then go to the section which gives a step by step guide to configuring an AD2000 Series based system. This will enable a quick start and leave reference to the details for further study.

What are AD2000 Series Devices? The AD2000 Series are integrated wireless RTU/PLC/Data-Logger devices used for remote monitoring and control and thus suitable for use in Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. The module options that are available are designed to suit low to medium I/O applications where secure, efficient and affordable wireless communication links are required to get data back to central monitoring locations. The AD2000 Series device options offer: ‰

In-built RTU functions for data transfer by polled, event or timed methods.

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In-built PLC software functions for local control and monitoring of the remote process.

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In-built data-logging of numerical data or text.

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In-built analogue and digital I/O

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Extension analogue and digital I/O modules for local or remote I/O additions.

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Wireless communications modules for:

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1-5W UHF internal radio (and up to 25W external).

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1-2W VHF internal radios (and up to 25W external).

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2.4GHz and 900MHz licence free, Spread Spectrum internal radios, 9600-115kbps.

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Internal GSM modems.

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Internal GPRS modems.

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External Iridium enabled Satellite systems.

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External 19200/9600bps, 395-520MHz data radios with diagnostics.

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External PSTN/Leased line modems.

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Additional Serial Communications modules, including in-built PCMCIA PC Type II card (AD2000) or on-board Ethernet module (AD2006) for Ethernet connectivity.

The AD2000 Series hardware is configured using the MiriMap2000+ configuration software package. The AD2000 Series devices have multiple protocol options for interface to popular HMI/DCS and PLC based systems, e.g. Modbus, DF1, OPC. These options allow the integration of the AD2000 Series devices into existing systems and to a variety of software platforms available worldwide. To illustrate the typical general arrangement of the AD2000 Series devices see the diagram in the following diagram:

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Figure 1 - Typical Arrangement of AD2000 Series Devices

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Applications using the AD2000 Series Device The AD2000 Series products are designed for use in remote monitoring and control systems. Such systems can involve distances of a few hundred metres in a factory area, industrial plant or building to several hundred kilometers across a wide area. The applications are extensive and some that the devices used have been applied to are listed below: ‰

Utility water supply systems (e.g. river, dams, pipelines, pressure, flow and level monitoring, pump control).

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Underground water bore systems (e.g. pump start/stop control, fault monitoring, flow, pressure and level measurement, diesel generator monitoring and control).

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Pipeline leak detection systems.

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Electricity pole top circuit breaker and re-closer monitoring and control.

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Mobile plant equipment monitoring and control (e.g. ore stacker/re-claimers, cranes, grain silo trippers).

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Environmental monitoring (e.g. river flow and level, water quality measurement)

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Flood warning/control systems.

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Weather monitoring systems.

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Oil-field on-shore well level measurement.

Basic System Components There are several basic system layouts that can be formed with the AD2000 Series devices with many possible variations varying according to the wireless network interface that is chosen. Some illustrations of typical system layouts are illustrated in this manual, however, these are to be considered only as basic component configurations and several variations on these are possible. Comprehensive analysis of any proposed system design requirements are available from Miri Technologies. The basic system components are: ‰

Field I/O Interface - Typically, the data is gathered from field instruments (e.g. level, pressure, flow, position) via transducers and input into the I/O channels on the AD2000 Series unit. These signals can be digital (on/off, open/close etc.) or via analogue transducers (e.g. 4-20mA, 1-5V). See the technical specifications section for exact details of the I/O channels supported.

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Local Process Control and Monitoring - This is also possible in all the system arrangements discussed as the features are available in all AD2000 series devices. Digital commands (e.g. open/close, start/stop etc.), conditional logic, timer and counters and numerous mathematical functions for analogue control (e.g. valve position, motor speed etc.) can be processed. This is processed locally via local logic (termed PLC Logic), using the Ladder logic language format.

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Data-logging - In many SCADA systems there is a requirement to store the exact time an event condition occurred or to periodically store timer, counter and other variable values (e.g. flow totals, run times). The in-built data-logging allows this with extensive scheduled data retrieval utilities available to access the data. A combination of both PLC logic and datalogging is also possible.

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Data sharing with other devices - Connections to serial devices (e.g. PLCs, power monitoring instruments and other intelligent electronic devices, IEDs) are also supported where the AD2000 Series devices share a common hardware interface standard (e.g. RS232, RS285 and Ethernet) and a common communications protocol (e.g. Modbus, DF1).

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Data Transfer - The data is transferred via a suitable wireless or wired link to transport it to another location, typically several kilometres away. The distinguishing factor that stands the AD2000 Series devices apart from stand-alone PLC systems is that they are designed to transport data efficiently and quickly via several wireless means, with no additional product required.

Figure 2 - Typical System Layout This total solution is available with a combination of the AD2000 Series hardware and the MiriMap2000+ software with full support from the one source.

The Common Wireless Solutions Available Today There are several “wireless” solutions available today and no doubt many more will appear in the coming years with the growing momentum towards “3G” wireless solutions. This document concentrates on the products and systems available today, since there is much “hype” in the media and many wireless systems we read about do not exist yet. The availability of various wireless systems also varies across countries depending on the level of telecommunications infrastructure available. For example, a wireless solution aimed at the Japan and Singapore markets may not be suited to a solution in Vietnam, Thailand or India. The type of wireless solution to use is also subject to the distance required to transmit data across and the number of times that this data is to be sent (or read). Any wireless based product is also subject to local telecommunication authority regulation and approvals and thus using solutions that have current approval in the country of use must be considered. The AD2000 Series of products provide wireless solutions to those systems most commonly available today, these being: ‰

VHF “Narrow Band” Radio 132-174MHz (typical transmission distances up to 60km)

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UHF “Narrow Band” Radio 400Mhz-943Mhz (typical transmission distances up to 30km)

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Spread spectrum 900MHz (restricted nations allow this) and 2.4GHz (low power international ISM band coverage used best used for transmission distances up to 1km)

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GSM including SMS transmission (global where network is supported)

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GPRS (TCP/IP based with mostly national coverage where network is supported)

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Satellite using the Iridium Short Burst Data system (global)

How Far Will Wireless Go? This is an often asked question and one that can only be described with accuracy when the actual geographical conditions are considered. © 2007 Miri Technologies All rights reserved.

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Figure 3 - How Far Will Radio Go? If you use the rule of “line of sight”, meaning if there are no obstructions between the two locations then the graphic below illustrates the difference between the different types of wireless solution. The typical maximum range for VHF narrow-band radios without repeaters is 60km, for UHF 30km and for the two variants of spread spectrum, 1-4km (longer distances can be achieved with spread spectrum with ideal topographical conditions and with high gain antennae and high masts). As described already the GSM/GPRS wireless solutions are country wide depending on the coverage of the respective networks in the country of installation. Satellite is the only truly global (with the exceptions of North Korea, Poland and Sri Lanka) coverage system that uses the same network. Note should be taken to understand that in the spread spectrum area, 900MHz systems will have longer transmit distances (up to tens of kilometres) possible compared to 2.4GHz systems (only a few kilometres) and that this difference due to frequency band must be considered when comparing systems. The choice of antennae also has significant influence on the transmit distance but some country authorities restrict the use of high gain antenna at these “open” frequencies.

Radio Modem Based Wireless Systems The most common wireless system using the AD2000 Series devices use internal or external radio modems. These can be UHF or VHF radios (termed “Narrow Band”) and there are also 900MHz or 2.4Ghz spread spectrum (termed “Broad Band”) options available. The physical interface is either FFSK (internal to the AD2000 Series device on Port 1), or RS232. VHF or UHF Radio - Narrow Band ‰

The AD2000 Series units can have an internal narrow band UHF or VHF radio module installed. Specifications are found at Table 13 - AD200xR Narrow Band VHF Radio Module Specifications and Table 14 - AD200xR Narrow Band UHF Radio Module Specifications. The part numbers for such options are of the format AD200xR-xx-xx.

Advantages of “Narrow Band” Wireless solutions ‰

Offers communications to remote locations (i.e. where there is little or no GSM/GPRS/CDMA or landline telephone based communications coverage).

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Offers greater range with up to 30km for UHF and 60km for VHF with greater range when repeaters are used (hundreds of kilometres have been achieved in some applications).

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Offers a “protected” frequency band that the user is legally entitled to use and is protected from interference (essential for control based systems or critical monitoring systems). The protection is being offered by the granting of a license from the appropriate country government telecommunications regulatory authority.

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Offers an equivalent GSM/GPRS//CDMA (as well as land-line) alternative and is cheaper in terms of annual operating costs and hardware (i.e. no call connect costs or charges per megabyte for data). Essentially, once installed this narrow band wireless solution is “free” to run.

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Can be connected more quickly than GSM/GPRS/CDMA, requiring in most cases minimal installation (i.e. you do not have to wait for telecommunications carrier action or contracts to be enabled).

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Offers greater portability and mobility where the user can move terminals around his plant.

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Radio capital cost is equivalent to or cheaper than GSM/GPRS/CDMA in hardware capital costs.

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The user owns the data transport equipment and pays only for radio licensing.

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The user is in control of the communications medium and its availability (i.e. you do not have to rely on the telecom company which is important for control based systems). System shutdowns are in the user’s control not the carrier’s and thus can be planned into maintenance schedules.

Disadvantages of “Narrow Band” Wireless solutions ‰

The user must fund the infrastructure costs of putting up masts and installing antennae.

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Requires technical competence in radio based systems to ensure correct design.

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Lower over the air data rates compared to some spread spectrum systems.

Spread Spectrum Radio - Broad Band ‰

The AD2000 Series units can have an internal 900MHz or 2.4GHz Spread Spectrum module installed. Specifications are found at Table 12 - AD200xS Spread Spectrum Wireless Module Specifications. The part numbers for such options are of the format AD200xS-xx-xx.

Advantages of “Broad Band Spread Spectrum” Wireless solutions ‰

License free so low cost to install and quick to install.

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Higher over the air data rates (up to 19200 bps) compared to the narrow band systems.

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“Worldwide” acceptance as wireless solution so can be installed in most countries.

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Offers communications to remote locations (i.e. where there is little or no GSM/GPRS/CDMA or landline telephone based communications coverage).

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Offers an equivalent GSM/GPRS/CDMA (as well as land-line) alternative and is cheaper in terms of annual operating costs and hardware (i.e. no call connect costs or charges per megabyte for data). Essentially, once installed this spread spectrum wireless solution is “free” to run.

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Can be connected more quickly than GSM/GPRS/CDMA, requiring in most cases minimal installation (i.e. you do not have to wait for telecommunications carrier action or contracts to be enabled).

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Offers greater portability and mobility where the user can move terminals around his plant.

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Radio capital cost is equivalent to or cheaper than GSM/GPRS/CDMA in hardware capital costs.

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The user owns the data transport equipment.

Disadvantages of “Broad Band Spread Spectrum” Wireless solutions ‰

In high noise areas (e.g. cities and suburban/commercial areas) interference/sharing the same broad frequency band can mean that the data throughput is severely limited or even stopped.

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Transmission distances are only short (typically less than 1km unless “line of sight” is available in non-urban environments).

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The user must fund the infrastructure costs of putting up masts and installing antennae.

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Requires technical competence in radio based systems to ensure correct design.

Typical radio modem based system layouts are described in the following sections. Point to Point System layout This is the basic system layout as illustrated below:

Figure 4 - Master/Slave Point to Point System Arrangement Two remote sites are connected by internal or external radios and the data is transmitted across one data link. Data can be transmitted continuously or periodically with events.

Figure 5 - Example of External Radio Connectivity Point to Multi-Point System layout A more complicated system layout is illustrated below:

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Figure 6 - Master/Slave Point to Multi-Point System Arrangement Several remote sites are connected by internal or external radios and the data is transmitted across the data link to one central location. That central location can be a PLC or DCS control system or an HMI or SCADA software package. Data can be transmitted continuously or periodically with events. Store and Forward System layout In radio based systems in some cases there cannot be direct links between all remote sites. This may be due to a building or hill interrupting the radio path to such an extent that the signal received is too weak for reliable operation. In many cases alternate paths do have good signal strength and these can be used to route the data signals via other remotes in the system. This is known as “store and Forward”. This is illustrated below:

Figure 7 - Store and Forward System Arrangement This technique can also be used in situations where the distance between remotes is long, as in pipelines. This system layout is available for VHF/UHF radio and Spread Spectrum configured AD2000 Series devices. It is not required for GSM/GPRS systems.

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Chapter 2 - Introduction This technique is useful when multiple links are required, one after the other in the same direction, e.g. a pipeline. It does not suit arrangements where the data update times are critical as there is a delay induced at each intermediate station as it re-transmits the data. This delay must be accounted for at the transmitting end by lengthening the reply timeout to account for the longer response from the remotes due to the re-transmitting. The store and forward process is carried out at the radio level, no data variable values are written to the memory of the intermediate AD2000 Series devices. Polling of the intermediate data variables is still possible and can be identified in the MiriMap2000+ software by turning on the display of parcels in the Display - Links main menu option. The following diagram illustrates a Multi-hop Store and Forward system arrangement.

Figure 8 - Multi-hop Store and Forward System Arrangement Whilst, in theory, this technique can result in a system with many linked hops, if the layout becomes too complex, a more suitable system would be to include a repeater in the system if the topography suits. It should also be noted that Store and Forward systems suit simplex frequencies (same transmit and receive frequency). If duplex frequencies are used (different transmit and receive frequency), each hop must have an opposite transmit and receive frequency to the preceding and subsequent device along the line. Repeater Based System In many radio based systems, wide area coverage is required to all remotes. The store and forward layout illustrated in the previous section will suit situations where a few remotes sites are out of range. In the case where all sites require coverage aa repeater based system can be a better proposal. The use of local terrain or infra-structure can be used to locate radio based repeaters at a high point in the area (e.g. hill top, high building, water tower). Such repeaters will allow all remotes to send the data via them and the maximum power output to be used for maximum range. Using repeaters forces all units to communicate via the repeater and often this requires redundancy or standby hardware to ensure the system is operational in the event of component failure. It is essential that duplex frequencies are used for repeaters and that all remotes have the same transmit and receive pairing of these two frequencies. Often the repeater has the transmit frequency keyed up constantly. This ensures faster system polling and stable receive signal strength measurement at the remotes. This is illustrated in the following diagram:

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Figure 9 - Repeater Based Radio System Arrangement This system layout is available for VHF/UHF radio and Spread Spectrum configured AD2000 Series devices. It is not required for GSM/GPRS systems. Sub Master Systems Where a large number of remotes are to be part of a system across a wide geographical area, they can be sub-divided into smaller systems. Each sub-system can use the more moderately priced data radios with a lower bandwidth and data rate to gather from remote sites back to a sub-master AD2000 Series device. Typically these units only have to process smaller packets of data (10-30 words) and can be configured in numbers to promote a rapid system update to a sub-master unit This in turn could form a slave mode connection to a master AD2000 Series device on higher data radio backbone. Here the amount of data transferred is larger in packet size and thus benefit from the higher data rate and can be justified in the higher costs. An example of this is illustrated in the following diagram:

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Figure 10 - Sub-Master Based System Arrangement

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Public Wireless Based Systems The major development of wide area wireless networks available through public networks installed by telecommunications companies allows connectivity for some SCADA based systems. Initial developments use the GSM network and the extended TCP based data capabilities of GPRS. GSM or GPRS Modem The AD2000 Series units can have an internal GSM/GPRS modem module installed. Specifications are found at ‰

Table 15 - AD200xG GSM/GPRS Modem Module Specifications. The part numbers for such options are of the format AD200xG-xx-xx.

GSM Wireless solutions This is by far the most common mobile phone standard and is a “world-wide” wireless network. It is a “common carrier” wireless service and compliments or replaces the traditional “wired” landline based telephone services we are all familiar with. It is “global” and can be used to send/receive data across and between countries where the GSM network has been installed. To access the network the user pays a contract to use the infrastructure that has been installed by a telecommunications company. It is a connection based system where the user has to dial a number, make a connection then send or receive data and thus it is relatively slow and can only be used for historical data updates not real-time. The user is charged based on the length of time connected. The network must be “data services enabled” for the types of applications the AD2000 products are used on and some telecom carriers charge extra for this service compared to a basic voice GSM contract. The network data rate is limited to 9600 bps. The GSM network is an “easy” network to interface to and there are several products in the marketplace that offer data transfer solutions. The one added “feature” is the Short Messaging Service (SMS) that the system offers. Here short text messages can be sent to any hand-phone on the network with, for example, alarm data. This provides a “quick and easy” alarm system without the need for elaborate SCADA or HMI systems to be installed. The only issue with SMS is that it is not a guaranteed delivery service and thus cannot be 100% reliable. Using GSM services with the AD2000 Series devices allows units to be connected together in Point to Point and Point to Multi-Point network arrangements. Normal device to device parcel based data transactions are possible using data enabled SIMs, much like a dialup modem connection. Here one device initiates the connection periodically or on event, connects to the remote device and reads or writes the data required then disconnects. It I also possible to send device to device read and write commands via SMS text messages. This varies from the traditional parcel based data transactions described throughout this manual, however does offer a simplified system where only basic GM services are available. In all GSM systems, SMS text messages can be sent to or read from mobile phone hand sets to enable human interrogation and control of the AD2000 Series devices and any equipment connected to the I/O terminals and serial ports.

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Figure 11 - GSM Based System - Typical Layout Advantages of “GSM” Wireless solutions ‰

Offers communications to country-wide locations (i.e. across larger distances in the region of hundreds of kilometres that narrow band and spread spectrum solutions cannot transmit across).

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Offers greater portability and mobility where the user can move terminals around his plant or plants.

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The user does not have to fund the infrastructure costs of putting up significant masts and installing antennae.

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“Quick” and “easy” to implement if the GSM service exists in the area of installation.

Disadvantages of “GSM” Wireless solutions ‰

Monthly contract costs are required.

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Connection time costs are incurred and these can be significant with increased activity which can be difficult to predict and control.

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Slow data updates and not practical for real time monitoring other than using SMS for alarm indication.

GSM Service Requirements for use with AD2000 Series Devices To connect an AD2000 Series device to a GSM network a Data Enabled SIM is required if AD2000 Series to AD2000 Series connections are required. In some telecom carrier systems this is a separate number compared to the voice number. If SMS only messaging is required then a normal voice only SIM card can be used. GPRS Based Systems General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) is a mobile data service available to users of GSM mobile phones. It is often described as "2.5G", that is, a technology between the second (2G) and third (3G) generations of mobile telephony. It provides moderate speed data transfer, by using unused TDMA channels in the GSM network.

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Chapter 2 - Introduction GPRS is different from the older GSM Circuit Switched Data (or CSD) connection discussed in this document. In CSD, a data connection establishes a circuit, and reserves the full bandwidth of that circuit during the lifetime of the connection. GPRS is packet-switched which means that multiple users share the same transmission channel, only transmitting when they have data to send. This means that the total available bandwidth can be immediately dedicated to those users who are actually sending at any given moment, providing higher utilisation where users only send or receive data intermittently. Web browsing, receiving e-mails as they arrive and instant messaging are examples of uses that require intermittent data transfers, which benefit from sharing the available bandwidth. Usually, GPRS data are billed per kilobytes of information transferred while circuit-switched data connections are billed per second. The latter is to reflect the fact that even during times when no data are being transferred, the bandwidth is unavailable to other potential users. Packet-switched data under GPRS is achieved by allocating unused cell bandwidth to transmit data. As dedicated voice (or data) channels are setup by phones, the bandwidth available for packet switched data shrinks. A consequence of this is that packet switched data has a poor bit rate in busy cells. The theoretical limit for packet switched data is approx. 160.0 kbit/s (using 8 time slots and CS-4). A realistic bit rate is 30–80 kbit/s, because it is possible to use max 4 time slots for downlink. A change to the radio part of GPRS called EDGE allows higher bit rates of between 160 and 236,8 kbit/s. The maximum data rates are achieved only by allocation of more than one time slot in the TDMA frame. Also, the higher the data rate, the lower the error correction capability. Generally, the connection speed drops logarithmically with distance from the base station. This is not an issue in heavily populated areas with high cell density, but may become an issue in sparsely populated/rural areas. Telephone operators have priced GPRS relatively cheaply (compared to older GSM data transfer, CSD and HSCSD) in many areas, such as Finland. Most mobile phone operators don't offer flat rate access to the Internet (with the notable exceptions of T-Mobile and Cingular in the United States), instead basing their tariffs on data transferred, usually rounded off per 100 kilobyte. Typical rates vary wildly, ranging from EUR €1 per megabyte to over €20 per megabyte. In the U.S., T-Mobile offers US$30 per month unlimited GPRS. In India, BPL Mobile (Bombay) offers unlimited GPRS for Rs.500 (USD 11) per month. Orange (UK) offers a 1 Gigabyte package for £88 a month. In Poland, Era GSM offers a 2 Gigabyte package of GPRS and UMTS transmission under Blueconnect brand for €30 a month and Plus GSM offers a 1 Gigabyte package for €15 a month. GPRS Data on pre-paid packages is usually expensive, and limited to WAP and MMS. Full internet access, allowing Web browsing, access to POP/IMAP mail, FTP and other mainstream Web applications is usually restricted to contract packages, and are made available at lower cost. The maximum speed of a GPRS connection (as offered in 2003) is the same as modem connection in an analogue wire telephone network, about 4-5 kB/s (depending on the phone used). Latency is very high; a round-trip ping being typically about 600-700 ms and often reaching one second round trip time. GPRS is typically prioritized lower than speech, and thus the quality of connection varies greatly. In order to set up a GPRS connection, a user needs to specify Access Point Name (APN), user name and password, and very often an IP address, all provided by the network operator. For the purposes of AD2000 Series usage on GPRS systems a static IP number must be assigned as this simplifies the networking to identify each device in the system. An example layout of the AD2000 Series devices attachment to GPRS based networks is shown in the following diagram:

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Figure 12 - GPRS Based System - Typical Layout - No Carrier Hub The GPRS network will allow TCP or UDP networking packets to be used to transfer the data between a central location and remote sites. The connection from the AD2000 Series devices is enabled by an internal GPRS modem located inside the AD2000 Series device casing. The part number for these is AD200xG-xx-xx. External GPRS modems can also be used as long as the modems used support the same GPRS AT command set (refer to [email protected] for further details). A direct TCP packet connection can also be achieved if the GPRS telecom provide can enable direct access to their network a illustrated in the following diagram:

Figure 13 - GPRS Based System - Typical Layout - Via Carrier Hub The essentials for GPRS connectivity are:

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Chapter 2 - Introduction Each device must have a Private Static IP enabled SIM service on an Access Point Name (APN) assigned network domain. APN is the name of an access point for GPRS. Please note the term used is “Private Static IP”. This term “Static IP” should not be confused with a static IP address on the public accessed internet. These can be expensive to obtain due to the lack of global IP number availability. In the case of the suggested GPRS networks for SCADA usage a “Private Static IP” number is only required and these are easier and cheaper to obtain from telecom providers. A Private network is a domain setup by the telecom carrier, accessible to only the telecom carrier and thus they can assign as many static IP numbers as they wish. No public access is available. This helps with security issues as well a most SCADA provider companies don’t want public access to their asset network? The data, once retrieved, can be made available on the public internet via appropriate web server software packages. Support for UDP or TCP packets exists. Using UDP will reduce the byte count per packet by approximately 20 bytes and thus save on data costs if they are charged on a kilobyte basis. The Scheduler functions within MiriMap2000+ can be used to read data-logged data periodically via GPRS systems, exporting the data to .CSV files for further use and development. A periodically polled system with events can be used to create more traditional remote AD2000 Series device to AD2000 Series device connections for point to point and point to multi-point systems. Advantages of “GPRS” Wireless solutions ‰

Offers communications to country-wide locations (i.e. across larger distances in the region of hundreds of kilometres that narrow band and spread spectrum solutions cannot transmit across).

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Offers greater portability and mobility where the user can move terminals around his plant or plants.

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The user does not have to fund the infrastructure costs of putting up significant masts and installing antennae.

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“Quick” and “easy” to implement if the GPRS service exists in the area of installation.

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Ideal for historical data-log data retrieval based systems where regardless of the actual connection reliability the data since last connection is always gathered on the next successful connection.

Disadvantages of “GPRS” Wireless solutions ‰

Monthly contract costs are required.

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Requires service providers to have static IP networks set up on their GSM system network.

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Data “used” costs are incurred and these can be significant with increased activity which can be difficult to predict and control (unless some other contract can be negotiated by the end user or fixed priced “unlimited” Mbyte contracts are available).

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GPRS is typically prioritised lower than speech, and thus the quality of connection varies greatly if voice traffic is high (e.g. holiday periods).

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When the location is far from the nearest GSM cell tower, the connection speed drops logarithmically with distance from the base station.

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Not suitable for “real-time” data faster than 5-10 minutes.

GPRS Service Requirements for use with AD2000 Series Devices To connect an AD2000 Series device to a GPRS network a Private Static IP enabled SIM is required if AD2000 Series to AD2000 Series connections are required. Dynamic SIM cards cannot be used.

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Satellite Wireless solutions Satellite has always been the dream “wireless” solution with global coverage being the main attraction. The reality is that most satellite services offer this through a mixture of land based systems and satellite. Many satellite services offer coverage in regions only and the “global” offering transfers data through the existing earth based telecommunications infra-structure. Iridium was a truly global Low Earth Orbiting Satellite (LEOS) system based on 66 orbiting satellites at an elevation of approximately 600 miles above the earth in polar orbits. The only places it doesn't work is North Korea , Poland and Sri Lanka. Iridium was initially a project headed by Motorola in the late 1990’s whereby they developed the system and attracted investors globally. Unfortunately, the project was doomed from it’s inception since management had no idea how to evaluate market demand as it related to price. The system at this juncture cost 5 Billion USD$ and could only attract less than 50,000 subscribers. In the year 2000, the system went into bankruptcy and was almost de-orbited until it was pulled from bankruptcy court in 2001 by a consortium of private investors for 25 Million USD$. The system exists today with handsets and service pricing at dramatically lower costs than initially developed at and has become a marketable success showing close to 100,000 subscribers. Since the US Defence Department had a stake in maintaining the system it’s future under the new owners is assured (it had a $200 million contract to participate in the project and also continues to use the service. It says it spent $140 million building its own gateway in Hawaii and paying Motorola to run it, and buying 3,000 satellite handsets). The Iridium system was a significant component to media and military communications in the recent war in Iraq. The Iridium Satellite System is the only provider of truly global, mobile satellite voice and data solutions with complete coverage of the Earth (including oceans, airways and Polar regions). The constellation is now managed by Boeing under an engineering contract and works through one down linking gateway located in Tempe, Arizona. USA. The service is ideally suited for a variety of rural and industrial applications, covering a wide range of vertical segments which includes: construction, media, government, defence/military, EMS, marine, mining, forestry, oil and gas, aviation and so on. Although predominantly voice based, the Iridium network also has some unique data service features when compared to other satellite services (such as Inmarsat etc.). Miri Technologies is working closely with Iridium service providers to utilise their Short Burst Data (SBD) system that allows large packets (1900 bytes) of data to be sent from remote locations to a central server via the Iridium network and then onto email recipients world-wide. This would allow remote users to retrieve periodic data information from sites throughout the world and have the data available at any corporate network headquarters.

Figure 14 - Satellite Based System - Typical Layout using Iridium Network Advantages of “Satellite” Wireless solutions ‰

Offers “global” communications.

‰

Offers greater portability and mobility where the user can move terminals around his plant or plants (country-wide).

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Chapter 2 - Introduction ‰

Can offer remote data links to equipment on almost any part of the earth’s surface, in areas where landline and other wireless services do not exist (e.g. ideal for trans-national pipelines and marine applications).

Disadvantages of “Satellite” Wireless solutions ‰

High running costs (although with Iridium they have matched GSM data-based service costs)

‰

High capital cost of modems and antennae (when compared to the narrow-band and GSM/GPR solutions).

‰

Restricted services and not a wide range of products available in the marketplace.

Data Gathering Techniques In many remote monitoring applications data is generally collected in real time. Typically there is a central monitoring site that gathers the remote location data. There could be tens of remote stations and one central location. The terminology typically used is that one AD2000 Series unit acts as the “master” and there can be one or several “slave” devices. These can be in the form of any of the layouts discussed in the section on typical system layouts. There are also many remote monitoring applications where data is generally collected locally to the remote device, stored with a time stamp on each record and that data is retrieved periodically via the data communications link. Here the critical factor is not knowing, at the central monitoring location what happened at the instant an event occurred but to know the sequence of events at a later date. This is ideal for water supply systems where changes over a period of time are accumulated locally to the remotes (e.g. flow totals, pressures, run-hours etc.). Using a combination of periodical scheduled data-log gathering with events for critical alarms a system which conserves bandwidth and limits air time costs can be design (especially useful on GSM/GPRS based systems). Several options are available in the AD2000 Series system software to get the data across the networks that are formed by the AD2000 Series devices: Continuously Polled The Master will “poll” the slave devices requesting the data. This data poll can be continuous or periodic. Continuously polled systems are best suited where the fastest possible update time is required. The restriction is that on larger systems (100+ slaves) the time to get event changes can be long, depending on how long the polling cycle takes. Periodically Polled (with events) The Master will “poll” the save devices at pre-determined times (e.g. every 10 minutes, every hour, every day) as set in the polling cycle of the Master AD2000. In between the poll there is no activity. This allows events at the slaves to get access to the master AD2000 in between polls to send event changes. The restriction here is that if events are sent during the time a Master is polling they may not get through. To avoid losing event data, event data packets should always be duplicated with polled data packets. This is a system feature suited to modem based systems (e.g. dial-up, GSM and GPRS). Broadcast Event Polling This is a unique feature to the AD2000 Series products that can be used only on radio systems where all slaves will be able to “hear” the Master polls. The polling sequence is the same as a regular poll where the Master will “poll” the slave devices requesting the data. In between polls a “Broadcast” for events request from the slave devices is sent. Any slave will send events queued to the Master. This will provide faster event updates from the slave AD2000s than in the normal periodically polled systems and ensures all events get through.

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Chapter 2 - Introduction Scheduled Data-log Reading In any real-time system, when data is gathered it is presented to some form of SCADA or HMI software application. This software will add a time stamp for the day and the hour, minute and second for use in the local HMI/SCADA alarm database. In most cases there is a slight delay between the actual event taking place in the field and the time this software application applies that time stamp. Where the update time is fast or where the delay in this time-stamp is not an issue then most systems can tolerate the delay. Many systems are less concerned in having the data read in “real-time” but do require the actual time the event or the value was recorded to be used. The AD2000 Series devices have internal data-logging capabilities and can store tens of thousands of sampled events or values and text messages. Typical system applications that can use this feature are weather and environmental monitoring, water supply, waste-water and flood monitoring systems. The system arrangement used is to run a software scheduler product on a centrally located PC and use it to gather the data-log data from the remote network. The data is retrieved with the historical time stamp attached to each data value or text string recorded at the remote in the data-log memory of the AD2000 Series device. That data is then exported to a Comma Separate Variable (CSV) file format for onward use in analysis or via external programs such as HMI/SCADA software packages.

Figure 15 - Data-log Scheduler System Arrangement A combination of a periodically polled system with events and this scheduled data-log reading of records provides a suitable method of having urgent event data sent in “real-time” and historical data stored and sent occasionally. The advantage in this method is that non-essential data is still gathered, records of data values never lost, the time stamping is accurate and the system bandwidth does not have to accommodate the throughput demands of a continuously polled system. This is ideal for slow to respond, non-critical systems.

Remote Connectivity The AD2000 Series devices can be connected in system configurations that will allow remote “over the air” monitoring and programming. The following diagram illustrates the remote connection capability. Once all the AD2000 Series units in the project contain the same project configuration details from the same project file, each unit is aware of the physical links between them. This is determined by a routing table and thus any changes to the physical links in the configuration should be updated to the installed AD2000 Series units that these change effect.

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Chapter 2 - Introduction

Figure 16 - Remote Connectivity Example Diagram In the diagram, the radio network is the primary data connection. However, connecting a PC running MiriMap2000+ to one of the spare communications ports will allow remote connection to the other AD2000 Series units via the radio network. Typically this would be a PC connection to the RS232 port, however this is also possible via the Ethernet port. Remote connections from slave units to other devices is also possible as long as the master device leaves a time slot in communications to allow the remote to access the network. All stations must first be configured with the same MiriMap2000+ configuration file, have unique identifier numbers assigned and have working physical links available between the sites.

PLC Control Functions In many remote monitoring applications there are requirements to perform local control logic on the various field devices that are being monitored. Traditional approaches would be to install a small Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) at the site to do this and connect it to an external modem device. Connecting such devices to external modems (radio, GSM, GPRS etc.) often requires special modules, cables, software and knowledge to implement all of which can add to the engineering process in both time and cost. Since the AD2000 Series devices combine real-time, data-logging and programmable logic capabilities then they can be integrated into a variety of remote monitoring and control systems “out of the box”. The in-built PLC capability is inherent to the AD2000 device via the Ladder logic interface and thus no extra software or knowledge is necessary to implement a remote monitoring device with PLC control. A program in ladder logic, also called a Ladder Logic, is similar to a schematic for a set of relay circuits. Ladder logic is useful because a wide variety of engineers and technicians can understand and use it without much additional training because of the resemblance to familiar systems. Advantages of using the internal AD2000 PLC functions are: ‰

Integrated software package handling all AD2000 Series program and monitoring functions

‰

Integrated communications allowing local and remote “over the air” connections

‰

No other special cables or software

‰

A compact solution, useful when limited space is available

‰

In-built PLC software functions for local control and monitoring of the field devices connected to the AD2000 Series device via I/O or serial channels.

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Chapter 2 - Introduction ‰

Real-Time Clock coils and diagnostic memory points so that control and monitoring functions can be completed based on the time of day.

‰

On-line (local and remote) monitoring of logic and memory variables.

‰

Tabbed view sub-routine programming so logic code can be written in manageable sections.

‰

Special function blocks to perform integral data parcel event sending within ladder logic

‰

Special function blocks to perform integral data logging within ladder logic

‰

Special function blocks for Moving Average, Flow Rate calculations and others.

A full listing of the PLC/Ladder logic functions available for programming use can be seen in the technical specifications section. An example of the Ladder logic screen in the MiriMap2000+ software package is shown below and for details on configuration go to the chapter on Ladder Logic Functions.

Figure 17 - Example Ladder Logic screen from MiriMap2000+

Data-logging Monitoring Functions In many remote monitoring applications there are requirements to store or data-log certain events and memory variables that are being monitored. This could be digital status (e.g. alarms, fault conditions or a required device status change etc.) or counters and analogue values (e.g. rainfall, run hours, tank levels, flows). These values can then be read later, either locally or remotely for analysis or input into a SCADA software system. Traditional approaches would be to install a separate data-logger device at the site to do this and connect it to an external modem device. Connecting such devices to external modems (radio, GSM, GPRS etc.) often requires special modules, cables, software and knowledge to implement all of which can add to the engineering process in both time and cost.

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Chapter 2 - Introduction Since the AD2000 Series devices integrate wireless RTU/PLC/Data-Logger functions into one product remote monitoring and control is possible “out of the box”. The in-built data-logger capability is inherent to all the AD2000 devices and no extra software or knowledge is necessary to implement a remote monitoring device with data-logging capability. The AD2000 Series Data-logger functions offer: ‰

In-built data-logger interface to enable periodic and event based data logging.

‰

Descriptive text string logging with embedded memory variable values (e.g. DD:MM:YY HH:MM:SS Tank level=10.05m)

‰

Log counters, timers and any internal AD2000 memory variable in short and long integer and floating point format.

‰

Scheduler to remotely read any data-log data from any AD2000 in the network and export to Comma Separated Variable (CSV) file format for use with databases and spreadsheets.

An example screen from the data-logging utility in MiriMap2000+ is displayed below and for details on configuration go to Chapter 7 - Data-logging Functions.

Figure 18 - Example of Data-logging Screen in MiriMap2000+ Software

Protocol Connectivity to Other Devices In many SCADA systems the data gathered via the remote monitoring system will be viewed and processed via a SCADA software package or Human Machine Interface (HMI) package. Typically these are installed at the central monitoring station and will host several commonly used industrial protocol drivers to allow the data from the AD2000 Series device to be read from or written to via a suitable interface. The most popular protocols such as Modbus and Allen Bradley (Rockwell) DF1 are supported in the AD2000 Series devices. Other special protocols are also written for special applications and devices. The AD2000 Series devices use their own protocol to enable the routing techniques used for remote programming and store and forward repeating of data. There is an OPC Server available for this AD2000 protocol to allow interface to SCADA and HMI systems that support the OPC Client connectivity (see http://www.opcfoundation.org or further information).

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Chapter 2 - Introduction For a full detailed list of protocols supported see Chapter 8 - Protocols.

I/O Expansion Modules to Expand AD2000 Series Devices In many situations the on-board analogue and digital Input/Output (I/O) channels on the AD2000 Series modules will satisfy most applications. There are situations where additional I/O are required and the I/O Expansion modules are available for this scenario. These use the RS485 2 wire interface to connect the data link to the main AD2000 Series module. In the case of the AD2000 this requires an RS232/RS485 converter (available as a DIN rail mounted module from Miri Technologies, part number M232-485) between one of the AD2000 RS232 ports and the I/O Expansion module RS485 terminals. In the case of the AD2006 there is an on-board RS485 port designed to connect these modules to. Up to 32 I/O Expansion modules can be supported on one AD2000 Series Device port (subject to the use of correct RS485 cabling and termination). The arrangement is shown in the diagram below:

Figure 19 - Example of I/O Expansion Modules

Wired Connectivity Options Typically the AD2000 Series devices are used where wireless connectivity is required. However, they will be required to pass the data gathered via these networks to traditional wired devices such as HMI/SCADA PCs or DCS/PLC based systems. The wired options available on board the AD2000 Series hardware are: ‰

RS232, RS485, 2wire/4wire FFSK audio and Ethernet

Interfaced to fibre optic systems is also possible via common converters. Some typical connections are suggested in the following diagram:

Figure 20 - Wired Connection Options For further details on the interface options per AD2000 Series device see the Technical Specifications section. Ethernet LAN and WAN connections are also possible between the AD2006 units operating with the Miri2000 or Modbus/TCP protocols in master or slave modes, enabling point to point and point to multi-point configurations.

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Chapter 2 - Introduction A typical example using the Modbus/TCP protocol is shown in the following diagram:

Figure 21 - Ethernet Networked AD2006s Using Modbus/TCP The more traditional AD2000 Series device Master to Slave Point To Multi-Point (PTMP) system configuration is also possible on LAN and WAN networks. Typically this has a single master AD2000 Series device with multiple slave AD2000 Series devices. A continuous or periodically polled system can be built in the same manner as described I the manual section Building a System “Network” Map. Chossing the source and destination ports assigned to Ethernet (in the case of the AD2006 this is Port5), the parcels can be constructed between the AD2000 Series devices. The AD2006 devices should be used and the Ethernet ports set up to use UDP. Details on how to set up the AD2006 Ethernet port is available in the section AD2006 - Ethernet Port Set-up. It is important to note that in this arrangement the remote port settings are defined. From the slave devices they point to the Master IP address and for the Master the IP address is set to x.x.x.255 so as to accept all incoming packets and broadcast all outgoing packets. A typical example using the Miri2000 protocol with UDP is shown in the following diagram:

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Chapter 2 - Introduction

Figure 22 - Ethernet Networked AD2006s Using Miri2000 and UDP PTMP System

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Chapter 2 - Introduction

AD2000 Series Devices Technical Specifications The following technical specifications are listed for the various options available for the AD2000 Series devices:

Table 2 - Logic Functions Logic Functions

Subject to change as new features are added - Consult User Manual.

Arithmetic & Maths - Add, Subtract, Multiply, Divide, Cosine, Sine, Tangent, Arc Cosine, Arc Sine, Arc Tangent, Log Natural, Exponential, Log Base10, Square Root, Power, Degree To Radian, Radian To Degree Data Manipulation - Absolute, Greater Than, Less Than, Equal To, Maximum, Minimum, Modulus, Bit Shift Left, Bit Shift Right, Rotate Left ,Rotate Right, Decrement, Increment, Move, Move Not, Convert, AND Word, OR Word, XOR Word Boolean - Normally Open, Normally Closed, Positive Edge, Negative Edge, Any Edge, Output Coil, Not Output Coil, Set/Reset Output Coils Timer/Counter - Counter Up, Counter Down, Counter Up Down, Timer Pulse, Timer On-Delay, Timer Off-Delay, Timer Accumulating Special - Change Detect, High Speed Counter for DIN1 and DIN2, High Speed Rate Calculation for DIN1 and DIN2, Datalog Variable, Moving Average, Parcel, RTC Time, RTC Date, Rate Calculation, Scale, Shaft Encoder Interface, PID (option on application).

Table 3 - Physical Dimensions Dimensions (for AD2000 & AD2006) Length

202mm (7.95”)

Width

178mm (7.01")

Depth

60mm (2.36")

Weight (with internal radio or modem)

950g

Weight (with no internal radio or modem)

650g

Table 4 - Environmental Specifications Environmental Specifications Operating temperature range Operating humidity range

-10°C to +70°C < 90% RH

Storage temperature range

-40°C to +85°C

Table 5 - Power Interface Specifications *24VDC option available AD2000/2

Power Interface Specifications Main input voltage - range

+10.5 VDC to +15.0 VDC

Main input voltage - nominal

12.0 VDC

Peak input current (maximum)

200mA @ 12.0 VDC

Table 6 - Supported Protocols Protocols Miri2000 (&Oval2000) Modbus Allen Bradley DF1 Half Duplex Slave OPC TCP/IP Protocol stack, UDP, Telnet configuration Protocol development available on requested

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Chapter 2 - Introduction Table 7 - AD2000 Communications Port Specifications Port Specifications Internal module - number

AD2000 1 1 x FFSK modem or RS232

1

Either FFSK or RS232 not both. With any internal communications module fitted, e.g. GSM/GPRS module, this port is not available for external device connection. FFSK modem data rates selectable 1200/2400/4800 bps. RS232 date rates 300-38.4kbps.

Serial Ports - number 2

1 x RS232

2

1 x type II

3

All to 38.4kbps, RS232 via RJ45 connectors

PCMCIA/PC Card - number 3

Supports Ethernet (LAN & ADSL connectivity). RS232 and CF FLASH memory card capability. Specific cards only to be used with installed drivers. Not all PCMCIA/PC Cards are compatible. Contact AD2000 dealer for compatible products.

Table 8 - AD2006 Communications Port Specifications Port Specifications Internal module - number

AD2006 1 x FFSK modem or RS232

1

1

Either FFSK or RS232 not both. With any internal communications module fitted, e.g. GSM/GPRS module, this port is not available for external device connection. FFSK modem data rates selectable 1200/2400/4800 bps. RS232 date rates 300 to 115kbps.

Serial Ports - number 2

2 x RS232 + 1 x RS485

2

All to 115kbps, RS232 via RJ45 connectors, RS485 via screw terminals

Ethernet Option Interface Connector Layer 3 Protocols

1 Ethernet 10Base-T or 100Base-TX (Auto-Sensing) RJ45 TCP, UDP, IP, ARP, ICMP, SSH, SSL, XML, HTTP, PPP, PAP, CHAP, DNS, SMTP, RSS, DHCP, BOOTP, AutoIP, SNMP, FTP, TFTP, Telnet, CGI

USB 2.00 Programming port

1

Table 9 - I/O Specifications Input/Output Specifications

AD2000 (N.B. Optical isolation to

AD2006 (N.B. Optical isolation to 3kV)

3kV)

Digital Inputs - number

16

16

Digital Inputs - voltage

10-50VAC/DC or 70-110VAC/DC 1 High Speed to 5kHz (to 50VDC) 4 (2 form A and 2 form C) Relay or Transistors 100mA sinking 35VMax 8 (if 4 x Analogue O/Ps used 4 I/Ps

10-50VAC/DC or 70- 110VAC/DC 2 High Speed to 5kHz (to 50VDC) 4 (2 form A and 2 form C) Relay or Transistors 100mA sinking 35VMax 8 (if 4 x Analogue O/Ps used 4 I/Ps

Digital Inputs - pulse (All digital inputs count to 5Hz) Digital Outputs - number Digital Outputs - type Analogue Inputs - number Analogue Inputs - type Analogue Inputs - format Analogue Outputs - number

available)

available)

4-20mA/1-5V or 0-20mA or 0-10V 12 bits Accuracy 0.1% Linearity 0.1% 4 x 4-20mA (Optional)

4-20mA/1-5V or 0-20mA or 0-10V 12 bits Accuracy 0.1% Linearity 0.1% 4 x 4-20mA (Plug-In Module)

Table 10 - Memory Specifications Memory Specifications RAM Program storage FLASH Datalog FLASH (on-board)

AD2000

AD2006 256kbyte 512kbyte 512kbyte

512kbyte 512kbyte

1

1Mbyte

1

1

As an example 4 x 12bit resolution analogue channels are time stamped data-logged every 15 minutes to give approx 136 days of data logging before first data is over-written. (1Mbytes=1024*1024=1048576bytes, 10 bytes/logged channel)

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Chapter 2 - Introduction Table 11 - AD2000 Series Temperature Specifications AD2000 Series Temperature Specifications AD2000R (Specified without radio) AD2000E AD2000B 450SR Series Radio Standard Version 450SR Series Radio 1 Watt only 450M Series Radio 450E Series Radio 150SR Series Radio 900SS Radio Module 24SS Radio Module M16-LN Input Module M16-HN Input Module M16-TR Relay Module M8-AD Analogue Input Module

-30 to +70 Celcius -30 to +70 Celcius -30 to +70 Celcius -10 to +60 Celcius -10 to +70 Celcius -30 to +60 Celcius -30 to +60 Celcius -30 to +60 Celcius -30 to +70 Celcius -30 to +70 Celcius -30 to +70 Celcius -30 to +70 Celcius -30 to +70 Celcius -30 to +70 Celcius

Table 12 - AD200xS Spread Spectrum Wireless Module Specifications Specifications Frequency Option1 (where approved) Frequency Option2 (Global ISM Band) Spreading Spectrum Type

902-928MHz 2.4000-2.4385GHz Frequency Hop, direct FM

Network Topology

Point To Point, Point To Multi-Point, Store & Forward

Channel Capacity

7 hop sequences share 25 frequencies

Certifications

ETSI (2.4GHz model only), FCC Part 15.247 (Both)

Performance Indoor/Urban Range (900MHz) Indoor/Urban Range (2.4GHz) Outdoor LOS Range (900MHz)

457m 183m 11km (dipole) 32km (high gain antenna) 5km (dipole) 16km (high gain antenna) 9600/19.2kBPS

Outdoor LOS Range (2.4GHz) Serial Data throughput RF Baud rate

10,000/20,000BPS

Transmit Output Power (900MHz) Transmit Output Power (2.4GHz) Receiver Sensitivity (900MHz)

140mW (21.5dBm) 50mW (17dBm) [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Receiver Sensitivity (2.4GHz) Environmental Specifications Operating temperature range Operating humidity range Storage temperature range General RF Connector type

© 2007 Miri Technologies All rights reserved.

0°C to +70°C < 90% RH -40°C to +85°C SMA

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Chapter 2 - Introduction Table 13 - AD200xR Narrow Band VHF Radio Module Specifications AD200xR Narrow Band VHF Internal Radio Module Type 02 Frequency Range Frequency Control Emission Designator

132-174KHz Synthesised 12.5kHz –11KOF3E 25kHz –16KOF3E NP42422430-001 2984195377A

FCC Acceptance Type IC Acceptance Type Transmitter Tx Power

2W or 5W (Please specify) 50ohm 50% 7millisecs 2ppm -40dB at 12.5kHz -45dB at 25kHz Less than 3% [email protected]

RF Output Impedance Duty Cycle Attack Time Frequency Stability FM Hum and Noise Modulation Distortion Current Drain Receiver Sensitivity Frequency Stability Attack Time Carrier Detect Time Selectivity Inter-modulation Current Drain Conducted Spurious Audio Distortion General RF Connector type

© 2007 Miri Technologies All rights reserved.

-116dB for 12dB SINAD 2.5ppm 7millisecs 30millisecs -60dB at 12.5kHz -70dB at 25kHz -70dB 90mA -57dBm Less than 3% SMA

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Chapter 2 - Introduction Table 14 - AD200xR Narrow Band UHF Radio Module Specifications AD200xR Narrow Band UHF Internal Radio Module Frequency Range Sub-Frequency band options 10

370-520MHz (Tx) 848 to 858MHz (Rx) 920 to 934MHz (Tx) 920 to 934MHz (Rx) 848 to 858MHz 855 to 860MHz (Tx & Rx) (Tx) 925 to 943MHz (Rx) 906 to 924MHz (Tx) 904 to 922MHz (Rx) 925 to 943MHz 924 to 944MHz (Tx & Rx) 403 to 417MHz (Tx & Rx) 450 to 465MHz (Tx & Rx) 465 to 480MHz (Tx & Rx) 480 to 494MHz (Tx & Rx) 505 to 518MHz (Tx & Rx) 435 to 450MHz (Tx & Rx) 418 to 435MHz (Tx & Rx) 428 to 443MHz (Tx & Rx) o +/-1kHz(-10 to 60 C)
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