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10 Celebrating Diversity through World Literature English Teacher’s Guide

This book was collaboratively developed and reviewed by educators from public and private schools, colleges, and/or universities. We encourage teachers and other education stakeholders to email their feedback, comments, and recommendations to the Department of Education at [email protected] We value your feedback and recommendations.

Department of Education Republic of the Philippines i

Celebrating Diversity through World Literature – Grade 10 English - Teacher’s Guide First Edition 2015

Republic Act 8293, section 176 states that: No copyright shall subsist in any work of the Government of the Philippines. However, prior approval of the government agency or office wherein the work is created shall be necessary for exploitation of such work for profit. Such agency or office may, among other things, impose as a condition the payment of royalties. Borrowed materials (i.e., songs, stories, poems, pictures, photos, brand names, trade-marks, etc.) included in this book are owned by their respective copyright holders. DepEd is represented by the Filipinas Copyright Licensing Society (FILCOLS), Inc. in seeking permission to use these materials from their respective copyright owners. All means have been exhausted in seeking permission to use these materials. The publisher and authors do not represent nor claim ownership over them. Only institutions and companies which have entered an agreement with FILCOLS and only within the agreed framework may copy from this Teacher’s Guide. Those who have not entered in an agreement with FILCOLS must, if they wish to copy, contact the publishers and authors directly. Authors and publishers may email or contact FILCOLS at [email protected] or (02) 439-2204, respectively. Published by the Department of Education Secretary: Br. Armin A. Luistro FSC Undersecretary: Dina S. Ocampo, PhD Development Team of the Teacher’s Guide Consultants: Dr. Edizon A. Fermin and Prof. Marla C. Papango Authors: Liza Almonte, Lerma Flandez, Angelou Hermosa, Nedia Lagustan, Liberty Mangaluz, Elenita R. Miranda, Paul Anthony Mendoza, Lito Palomar, Grace Annette Barradas-Soriano, and Karen Villanueva Reviewers: Ruth Alido, Mara Angelie Banares, Jonalyn T. De la Cruz, Benjamin Hanson S. Juan, Jennifer E. Lopez, Carlo Erba Manalo – Pacinos, Dr. Sterling Plata, Jeanette M. Romblon, Leilani T. Señires, and Dr. Roderick Tadeo Language Editor: Dr. Ma. Antoinette Montealegre Production Team: Dir. Jocelyn DR. Andaya, Dr. Melinda P. Rivera, Mr. Ricardo G. Ador Dionisio, and Ms. Anna Marie B. San Diego Illustrators: Angielyn G. Bariñan, Eric S. De Guia, and Jayson M. Gaduena Layout Artists: Camille Francesca Mondejar, Matthew Leysa, and Jerby S. Mariano Printed in the Philippines by REX Book Store, Inc. Department of Education-Instructional Materials Council Secretariat (DepEd-IMCS) Office Address: 5th Floor Mabini Bldg., DepEd Complex Meralco Avenue, Pasig City Philippines 1600 Telefax: (02) 634-1054 or 634-1072 E-mail Address: [email protected]

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INTRODUCTION This Teacher’s Guide is specially designed to provide you the roads to cooperative, collaborative, and independent learning of the target themes, concepts, and competencies that will develop your 21st century real life-based skills. This module provides you with meaningful tasks to develop your skills for academic success and the world of work. It is anchored on the general principles, goals, and objectives of the K to 12 Basic Education program for Grade 10 that will enable you to become selfactualizing, productive and effective participant of the society and the world at large. This learner’s material provides a variety of texts particularly world literary pieces that are both relevant and meaningful to your life. It offers opportunities for you to be engaged in varied, interesting, motivating, challenging, meaningful and worthwhile tasks to further develop and improve your listening, speaking, viewing, vocabulary, literary, grammar and reading skills. These tasks are generated as communicative and real life-based activities anchored on the integration of literature and language skills. Positively, this material will help deepen your understanding on how you can enrich, enhance and lead a meaningful life. There are four modules in this learning material. Each module builds around a particular text for you to explore meaningfully through a variety of integrated, challenging, and interesting tasks. Module 1 : Overcoming Challenges Module 2 : Establishing Solidarity Module 3 : Reconciling with Nature Module 4 : Rebuilding Our Societies

Each module consists of six lessons wherein each lesson is developed through the following phases. 1. Your Journey - provides an overview of what you should understand in the lesson. This includes clear directions and purpose of the lesson. 2. Your Objectives –states the expectations in line with what you should know, understand, and be able to do, produce, or perform to show there is transfer of learning. 3. Your Initial Tasks – activates your prior knowledge and prepares you for higher level tasks.

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4. Your Text -presents the main reading or literary text and the activities/ tasks that leads you to acquire knowledge, make sense of, and construct meaning out of the information and experiences contained therein. 5. Your Discovery Tasks –includes activities that will expand, enrich, enhance, and broaden your understanding of the target concepts and skills. 6. Your Final Task –presents the real life- based product or performance task as final output for the lesson that serves as evidence of understanding of the target concepts and skills. This is an enabling task for the main real lifebased product or performance task covering the entire module. 7. My Treasure – enables you to express your insights, learning, and realization on the lesson. This part contains prompts and other organizers that will help you sum up and synthesize what you have learned.

This learner’s material includes formal pre and post assessments in both written response and multiple-choice formats. We hope that through this material, you will be provided with meaningful learning experiences and relevant competencies necessary for you to successfully meet the demands of the 21st century.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS MODULE 1: Overcoming Individual Challenges Lesson 1: Discovering Personal Challenges Lesson 2: Building Up Defenses Lesson 3: Capitalizing on Strengths and Weaknesses Lesson 4: Dealing with Personal Challenges Lesson 5: Winning Over Individual Challenges Lesson 6: Turning Challenges to Opportunities

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3 20 35 52 69 84

vi December 2013

(Grade 10)

ENGLISH

K to 12 Curriculum Guide

Republic of the Philippines Department of Education DepEd Complex, Meralco Avenue Pasig City

vii

THE FRAMEWORK

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

viii

Language is the foundation of all human relationships. All human relationships are established on the ability of people to communicate effectively with each other. Our thoughts, values and understandings are developed and expressed through language. This process allows students to understand better the world in which they live and contributes to the development of their personal perspectives of the global community. People use language to make sense of and bring order to their world. Therefore, proficiency in the language enables people to access, process and keep abreast of information, to engage with the wider and more diverse communities, and to learn about the role of language in their own lives, and in their own and other cultures.

Language is the basis of all communication and the primary instrument of thought. Thinking, learning, and language are interrelated. Language is governed by rules and systems (language conventions) which are used to explore and communicate meaning. It defines culture which is essential in understanding oneself (personal identity), forming interpersonal relationships (socialization), extending experiences, reflecting on thought and action, and contributing to a better society. Language, therefore, is central to the peoples’ intellectual, social and emotional development and has an essential role in all key learning areas1.

PHILOSOPHY AND RATIONALE

2

1998. English Curriculum Framework. Australia Cummins, J. 1991. The Acquisition of English as a Second Language in Spangenberg-Urbschat. K and Pritchard, R. (eds.) Reading Instruction for ESL Students Delaware: International Reading Association

1

Language acquisition and learning is an active process that begins at birth and continues throughout life. It is continuous and recursive throughout students’ lives. Students enhance their language abilities by using what they know in new and more complex contexts and with increasing sophistication (spiral progression). They reflect on and use prior knowledge to extend and enhance their language and understanding. By learning and incorporating new language structures into their repertoire and using them in a variety of contexts, students develop language fluency and proficiency. Positive learning experiences in language-rich environments enable students to leave school with a desire to continue to extend their knowledge, skills and interests.

The K-12 Language Arts and Multiliteracies Curriculum is anchored on the following language acquisition, learning, teaching and assessing principles. All languages are interrelated and interdependent. Facility in the first language (L1) strengthens and supports the learning of other languages (L 2). Acquisition of sets of skills and implicit metalinguistic knowledge in one language (common underlying proficiency or CUP) provides the base for the development of both the first language (L1) and the second language (L2) 2. It follows that any expansion of CUP that takes place in one language will have a beneficial effect on the other language(s). This principle serves to explain why it becomes easier and easier to learn additional languages.

II. GUIDING PRINCIPLES

I.

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

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K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

4

Malone, Susan. 2006. Manual on MTB-MLE (Community-Based Program). UNESCO Anderson and Anderson. 2003. Text Types in English 1. Malaysia: MacMillan 5 Malone, Susan. 2006. Manual on MTB-MLE (Community-Based Program). UNESCO 6 2011.Guiding Principles for English Language Arts and Literacy Programs in Massachusetts 7 2004. Second Language Studies. Standard Course of Study and Grade Level Competencies. Public Schools of Carolina. State Board of Education. Department of Instruction.

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develops thinking and language through interactive learning; develops communicative competence and critical literacy; draws on literature in order to develop students’ understanding of their literary heritage; draws on informational texts and multimedia in order to build academic vocabulary and strong content knowledge; develops students’ oral language and literacy through appropriately challenging learning; emphasizes writing arguments, explanatory/informative texts and narratives; provides explicit skill instruction in reading and writing; builds on the language, experiences, knowledge and interests that students bring to school; nurtures students’ sense of their common ground in using language/s for communication as present or future global citizens to prepare them to participate in school and in civic life, and; 10. assesses and reflects the students’ ability to interpret and/or communicate in the target language 7.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

An effective language arts and multiliteracies curriculum satisfies the following principles 6.

Successful language learning involves viewing, listening, speaking, reading and writing activities 5. Language learning should include a plethora of strategies and activities that helps students focus on both MEANING and ACCURACY. Language learning involves recognizing, accepting, valuing and building on students’ existing language competence, including the use of non-standard forms of the language, and extending the range of language available to students. Through language learning, learners develop functional and critical literacy skills. They learn to control and understand the conventions of the target language that are valued and rewarded by society and to reflect on and critically analyze their own use of language and the language of others.

Learners learn about language and how to use it effectively through their engagement with and study of texts. The term ‘text’ refers to any form of written (reading and writing), oral (listening and speaking) and visual communication involving language4. The texts through which students learn about language are wide-ranging and varied, from brief conversations to lengthy and complex forms of writing. The study of specific texts is the means by which learners achieve the desired outcomes of language, rather than an end in itself. Learners learn to create texts of their own and to engage with texts produced by other people.

Learning requires meaning . We learn when we use what we know to understand what is new. Start with what the students know; use that to introduce new concepts. They use language to examine new experiences and knowledge in relation to their prior knowledge, experiences, and beliefs. They make connections, anticipate possibilities, reflect upon ideas, and determine courses of action.

3

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NEEDS OF THE LEARNERS : THE CONTEXT

Gen Z kids will grow up with a highly sophisticated media and computer environment and will be more Internet savvy and expert than their Gen Y forerunners.

While we don’t know much about Gen Z yet... we know a lot about the environment they are growing up in. This highly diverse environment will make the grade schools of the next generation the most diverse ever. Higher levels of technology will make significant inroads in academics allowing for customized instruction, data mining of student histories to enable diagnostics and remediation or accelerated achievement opportunities.

Members of Generation Z are adept at multi-tasking. They can text, read, watch, talk and even eat simultaneously. However, this has also led to reduced attention span leading to what psychologists call acquired attention deficit disorder. This generation is unable to analyze complex data and information as they cannot focus for very long.

For them, social media platforms are a way to communicate with the outside world. They are not bothered about privacy and are willing to share intimate details about themselves with complete strangers. They have virtual friends and for them hanging out with friends means talking to them over the cell phones, emails and text messages. However, at the same time, this generation is considered to be creative and collaborative and will have a significant impact on the way companies work when they join the workforce.

The generation born after the year 1994 until 2004 is referred to as Generation Z. This is the first generation to be born with complete technology. They were born with PCs, mobile phones, gaming devices, MP3 players and the ubiquitous Internet. They do not know life without technology. Hence, they are often termed as digital natives and are extremely comfortable with technology. They can email, text and use computers without any problems. In addition, members of Generation Z can understand and master advancement in technology. Unfortunately, this reliance on technology and gadgets has had a negative effect on the members. They rather stay indoors and use their electronics than play outdoors and be active. They are leading a sedentary life that can result in health problems later on.

III.

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8

OUTCOMES

Communicative Competence

Multiliteracies

Canale, M. and M. Swain. 1980. Theoretical bases of communicative approaches to second language teaching and testing. Applied Linguistics

Multiliteracies (multiliteracy practices) recognize that there are many kinds of literacy at work within our society. These include traditional literacy practices using texts as well as new literacy practices using texts of popular culture such as films. Social literacy encompasses how we communicate and exchange meaning in our society while professional literacy links with the notion of literacy for school or the workplace.

2.

4. Strategic Competence is to DO with the knowledge of verbal and non-verbal strategies to compensate for breakdown such as self-correction and at the same time to enhance the effectiveness of communication such as recognizing discourse structure, activating background knowledge, contextual guessing, and tolerating ambiguity.

3. Discourse Competence is the knowledge of rules regarding the cohesion (grammatical links) and coherence (appropriate combination of communicative actions) of various types of discourse (oral and written). Sociolinguistic rules of use and rules of discourse are crucial in interpreting utterances for social meaning, particularly when the literal meaning of an utterance does not lead to the speaker’s intention easily.

2. Sociolinguistic Competence refers to the learning of pragmatic aspect of various speech acts, namely, the cultural values, norms, and other sociocultural conventions in social contexts. They are the context and topic of discourse, the participant’s social status, sex, age, and other factors which influence styles and registers of speech. Since different situations call for different types of expressions as well as different beliefs, views, values, and attitudes, the development of sociolinguistic competence is essential for communicative social action.

1. Grammatical/Linguistic Competence means the acquisition of phonological rules, morphological words, syntactic rules, semantic rules, and lexical items.

Communicative competence is classified into the following competencies.

Communicative Competence is a synthesis of knowledge of basic grammatical principles, knowledge of how language is used in social settings to perform communicative functions, and how knowledge of utterances and communicative functions can be combined according to the principles of discourse.8

1.

The ultimate goal of the Language Arts and Multiliteracies Curriculum is to produce graduates who apply the language conventions, principles, strategies and skills in (1) interacting with others, (2) understanding and learning other content areas, and (3) fending for themselves in whatever field of endeavour they may engage in.

IV.

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

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CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Component 4 explains the holistic assessment of the Language Arts and Literacy Curriculum which serves as feedback of its effectiveness to students, teachers, school administrators, and curriculum developers.

Component 3 shows the interdependence and interrelationships of the macro-skills of the language (listening, speaking and viewing; reading, viewing and responding; writing and representing) and the development of thinking skills (critical thinking, creative thinking, and metacognition) allowing students to make meaning through language.

Component 2 describes knowledge and skill areas which are essential to effective language use (understanding of cultures, understanding language, processes and strategies) which will be developed through language arts (macro-skills).

Component 1 illustrates learning processes that will effect acquisition and learning of the language. It explains the HOW of language learning and therefore serves as guiding principles for language teaching.

The curriculum has five (5) components. Each component is essential to the learners’ ability to communicate effectively in a language leading them to achieve communicative competence and multiliteracies in the Mother Tongue, Filipino and English. The diagram on page 2 shows that the heart and core of LAMC is making meaning through language and aims to develop graduates who are communicatively competent and multiliterates.

The Language Arts and Multiliteracies Curriculum (LAMC) addresses these needs. This is the rationale why Mother Tongue, Filipino, and English follow a unified framework which allows easy transition from acquiring and learning one language to another.

The world is now in the “Knowledge age” where the challenge of education is to prepare learners to deal with the challenges of the changing world. Students in this age must be prepared to compete in a global economy, understand and operate complex communication and information systems, and apply higher level thinking skills to make decisions and solve problems.

IV.

The curriculum aims to help learners acquire highly-developed literacy skills that enable them to understand that English language is the most widely used medium of communication in Trade and the Arts, Sciences, Mathematics, and in world economy. Furthermore, the curriculum aims to help learners understand that English language is a dynamic social process which responds to and reflects changing social conditions, and that English is inextricably involved with values, beliefs, and ways of thinking about ourselves and the world we dwell in. Through multiliteracy skills, learners will be able to appreciate and be sensitive to sociocultural diversity and understand that the meaning of any form of communication depends on context, purpose, and audience.

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

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6. Construction Making meaning is the heart of language learning and use. Learning tasks and activities will be designed for learners in such a way that they will have time to reflect on and respond to ideas and information. Learners will be provided with sufficient scaffolding so that they will be able to reach their full cognitive, affective, and psychomotor potentials and become independent learners who are good consumers and constructors of meaning.

5. Contextualization Learning tasks and activities will be designed for learners to acquire the language in authentic and meaningful contexts of use. For example, lessons will be planned around learning outcomes, a theme, or a type of text to help learners use related language skills, grammatical items/structures and vocabulary appropriately in spoken and written language to suit the purpose, audience, context, and culture. Learning points will be reinforced through explicit instruction and related follow-up practice.

4. Learner-Centeredness Learners are at the center of the teaching-learning process. Teaching will be differentiated according to students’ needs, abilities and interests. Effective pedagogies will be used to engage them and to strengthen their language development.

3. Integration The areas of language learning – the receptive skills, the productive skills, and grammar and vocabulary will be taught in an integrated way, together with the use of relevant print and non-print resources, to provide multiple perspectives and meaningful connections. Integration may come in different types either implicitly or explicitly (skills, content, theme, topic, and values integration).

2. Interaction Language learning will be situated in the context of communication (oral and written). Activities that simulate real-life situations of varying language demands (purposes, topics, and audiences) will be employed to help students interact with others thereby improve their socialization skills.

1. Spiral Progression Skills, grammatical items, structures and various types of texts will be taught, revised and revisited at increasing levels of difficulty and sophistication. This will allow students to progress from the foundational level to higher levels of language use.

For effective language acquisition and learning to take place, language teachers must be guided by the six (6) language teaching principles. These principles explain the natural process of language development.

COMPONENT 1: Language Learning Process

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3. PROCESS AND STRATEGIES. Learners select from a repertoire of processes and strategies by reflecting on their understanding of the way language works for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts. They deliberate on how they use language and apply different language strategies, depending on their purpose, context and audience. They use language as a way of coming to grips with new ideas, resolving difficulties or solving problems. They use strategies such as brainstorming and discussion as a way of developing ideas. They experiment, take risks and make approximations with language as a way of developing their language skills. They clarify what they need to know when seeking information for particular purposes. They use key-word searches and their understanding of the conventions of informational texts

2. UNDERSTANDING LANGUAGE. Learners apply their knowledge of the system of the language to assist them to make meaning and to create meaning. They come to recognize the patterns and rules of the language which emerge as they interact with a plethora of texts (literary and informational) to make meaning. They apply this knowledge and understanding to create their own spoken, written, and visual texts. Differences in language systems are expressed in a variety of ways: for example, in grammatical differentiations, variations in word order, word selection, or general stylistic variations in texts. By comparing the system of the language with the systems of other languages, students understand that each language is different, but has identifiable patterns within its own system.

Sociocultural understanding refers to knowing about the language speaking communities. It means taking into account the non-linguistic features in the life of a society. Learners broaden their frame of reference beyond their own social and cultural experiences. They gain insights into different values and belief systems and acknowledge the cultural contexts which underpin them. They make sense of the social fabric of the target language community. They understand that the natural and physical environments – as well as the social, economic, historical, and political environments – influence the language speaking groups and their cultural traditions.

1. UNDERSTANDING CULTURES. Learning language through text types and literary appreciation exposes learners to different cultures of the world, including one’s culture. Learners develop sociolinguistic and sociocultural understandings and apply them to their use of the language (Mother Tongue, Filipino, and English). Sociolinguistic understanding refers to appropriate language use. It is defined in this document as taking into account the social significance of linguistic forms and the linguistic implications of social facts. Language is a complex social practice that reflects and reinforces shared understandings about appropriate actions, values, beliefs and attitudes within a community. These shared understandings determine not only what is communicated and when and how it is communicated, but also who does the communicating. These collectively constitute the sociolinguistic features of language.

There are three major applications of the macro-skills of the language (Understanding of Cultures; Understanding Language; and Processes and Strategies). They are described as the knowledge and skill areas which are essential to effective language use demonstrated through the language macro-skills.

COMPONENT 2: Effective Language Use

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The revised curriculum re-organizes the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum according to the content standards that must be met by all students at the end of basic education. This is not inconsistent with the proposed 5 sub-strands of the Language Arts and Multiliteracies Curriculum (LAMC) but fleshes out the areas that children need to learn and that teachers need to teach in greater detail. Below is the matrix that presents the spread and alignment of the language and literacy domains with the 5 sub-strands.

The Language Arts and Multiliteracies Curriculum (LAMC) is composed of five (5) intricately intertwined and integrated sub-strands (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and viewing) that serve as building blocks for understanding and creation of meaning and for effective communication across curricula (Matrix 1).

The skills, grammatical items, structures and various types of texts will be taught, and revisited at increasing levels of difficulty and sophistication. This design allows students to progress from the foundational level to higher levels of language use.

Language is the major instrument in communication (oral and written) and the heart of which is the exchange of meaning. Language learning should focus on guiding students make meaning through language for different purposes on a range of topics and with a variety of audiences. Students must be able to adapt to various situations where communication demands greatly vary.

COMPONENT 3: Making Meaning through Language

Learners reflect on ethical considerations in the use of ideas and information. They recognize the importance of attributing sources of ideas and information, and of presenting or representing ideas and information in ways which are not misleading. They use quotation and sourcing conventions appropriately. They take into account the possible effects of and responses to the presentation of ideas and information.

such as tables of contents, headings, indexes, forewords, and glossaries as aids in locating information. They assess the usefulness of information for particular purposes. They treat information and ideas critically and evaluate information in terms of its reliability and currency. They make notes and graphic representations of information and combine information from different sources into a coherent whole by summarizing, comparing and synthesizing.

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

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Phonological Awareness

Book and Print Knowledge

Alphabet Knowledge

Phonics and Word Recognition

Fluency

Spelling

Writing and Composition

Grammar Awareness & Structure

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

√ √

√ √

13. Attitudes towards language, literacy and literature

14. Study Strategies



























√ √

SPEAKING

LISTENING

12. Listening Comprehension

11. Reading Comprehension 11.1 schema & prior knowledge 11.2 strategies 11.3 narrative text 11.4 informational text

10. Vocabulary Development

Oral Language

1.

Integrated Language Arts Domains























READING

Alignment of the Language and Literacy Domains with the 5 sub-strands

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM



















WRITING











VIEWING

xvii

Viewing

Study strategies

literature

Attitude towards language, literacy and

Listening comprehension

Reading comprehension

Vocabulary development

Grammar awareness and structure

Writing and composition

Spelling

Fluency

Phonics and word recognition

Alphabet knowledge

Book and Print knowledge

Phonological awareness

Oral language

Domains

K-3

4-6

7-10

Funnelling of Domains Across the K-12 Basic Education Integrated Language Arts Curriculum

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

11-12

xviii

Assessment procedures are based on the notion that the interrelationships among the various aspects of language, such as phonology, grammar, and vocabulary, among others cannot be ignored. Also the four skills of language-listening, speaking, reading, and writing-are seen to be parts of a structurally integrated whole. Assessment approaches should be used for communication and self-expression. Assessment also takes into account the whole learner and his or her social, academic, and physical context.

2. A holistic view of language

Assessment procedures should be based on activities that have authentic communicative function rather than ones with little or no intrinsic communicative value. These activities are based on actual performance in authentic situations which the learner is likely to encounter in his or her daily life.

1. Proximity to actual language use and performance

Characteristics of Assessment

Assessment is an important aspect of learning and teaching. It should be effectively used to support the holistic development of our pupils. Our assessment practices should go beyond summative evaluation and move towards a more holistic approach. Holistic assessment refers to the ongoing gathering of information on different facets of a child from various sources, with the aim of providing qualitative and quantitative feedback to support and guide the child's development. Holistic assessment informs our teachers of their teaching practices and guides them in the design and delivery of student learning. It will also enable parents to support their children's development and growth.

COMPONENT 4: Holistic Assessment

3. Content includes print and electronic texts that are age, context and culture appropriate.

2. Competencies are spiraled across the curriculum and year levels. Upper level courses will focus on writing, comprehension and study strategies.

goals.

1. The K-12 languages curriculum ensures that processes and products of learning actively foster and contribute to the achievement of the basic education program

Coherence with the Basic Education Program Goals

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For students, assessment should allow them to see their own accomplishments in terms that they understand and, consequently, allows them to assume responsibility for their learning. Assessment should allow parents to share in the educational process, and offers them a clear insight into what their children are doing in school. For teachers, the primary advantage of assessment is that it provides data on their students and their classroom for educational decision-making. In addition, it reports the success of the curriculum and provides teachers with a framework for organizing student’s works.

Assessment entails obtaining information about the learner from numerous sources and through various means.

5. Multiple referencing

Assessment procedures set expectations that are appropriate within the cognitive, social, and academic development of the learner. This characteristic of assessment makes it particularly valuable for second language learners who come from culturally diverse backgrounds and who may have atypical educational experiences.

4. Developmental appropriateness

Assessment attempts to capture the learner’s total array of skills and abilities. It measures language proficiency in the context of specific subject matter. Assessment procedures are based on the idea that various aspects of a learner’s life, both academic and personal, are integral to the development of language proficiency and cannot be ignored. These dimensions include not only processes such as acquiring and integrating knowledge, extending and refining knowledge, and using knowledge meaningfully, but also issues such as varying student attitudes towards learning.

3. An integrative view of learning

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Be able to demonstrate phonological awareness at the levels of the syllable and the phoneme Demonstrate and use concepts of print, such as directionality, spacing, punctuation and configuration Recognize, name and sound out all the upper and lower case letters of the alphabet. Use sight word recognition or phonic analysis to read and understand words in English that contain complex letter combinations, affixes and contractions Read aloud grade level texts effortlessly and accurately, without hesitation and with proper expression Spell words with two or more syllables using phonic, semantic, and morphemic knowledge Express their ideas effectively in formal and informal compositions to fulfill their own purposes for writing Write legibly in manuscript or cursive writing

Phonological Skills

Book and Print Knowledge

Alphabet knowledge

Phonic and Word Recognition

Fluency

Spelling

Writing /Composition

Handwriting

Acquire, study, and use English vocabulary words appropriately in relevant contexts

Vocabulary

Activate prior knowledge conceptually related to text and establish a purpose for reading Be self-aware as they discuss and analyze text to create new meanings and modify old knowledge Respond to literary text through the appreciation of literary devices and an understanding of story grammar Locate information from expository texts and use this information for discussion or written production Demonstrate a love for reading stories and confidence in performing literacy-related activities/task Demonstrate critical understanding and interpretation of visual media Organize, process and use information effectively

Use of Content and Prior Knowledge

Comprehension Strategies

Comprehending Literary Text

Comprehending Informational Text

Attitude

Viewing

Study Strategies

Reading Comprehension and Study Strategies

 

Grammar Awareness and Structure

Demonstrate grammatical awareness by being able to read, speak and write correctly Communicate effectively, in oral and written forms, using the correct grammatical structure of English

Have sufficient facility in English to understand spoken discourse and to talk and interact with others about personal experiences and text listened to or read

Performance Standards at the end of Grade 3

Oral Languages in English

Content Standards

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K to 12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

xxi GRADE 3 - Students should be able to demonstrate eagerness to explore and experience oral and written texts and to communicate meanings and feelings effectively.

GRADE 6 - Student should be able to construct meanings and communicate them using creative, appropriate and grammatically correct oral and written language.

GRADE 10 - Students should be able to interpret, evaluate and represent information within and between learning area texts and discourses.

GRADE 12 - Students should be able to integrate communication and language skills for creating meaning using oral and written texts, various genres, and discursive contexts for personal and professional purposes.

KEY STAGE STANDARD

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

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2

1

EN10LC-Ia-11.1: Get information that can be used in everyday life from news reports, speeches, informative talks, panel discussions, etc. EN10LC-Ib-4: Determine the implicit and explicit signals, verbal, as well as non-verbal, used by the speaker to highlight significant points

EN10RC-Ia-2.15.2: Determine the effect of textual aids like advance organizers, titles, non-linear illustrations, etc. on the understanding of a text

EN10RC-Ib-2.15.2: Determine the effect of textual aids like advance organizers, titles, non-linear illustrations, etc. on the understanding of a text

EN10VC-Ib1.4/2.4: Determine how connected events contribute to the totality of a material viewed

EN10VC-Ia1.4/2.4: Determine how connected events contribute to the totality of a material viewed

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10V-Ib-13.9: Differentiate formal from informal definitions of words

EN10V-Ia-13.9: Differentiate formal from informal definitions of words

V Vocabulary Development

EN10LT-Ib-2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection EN10LT-Ib2.2.1: Express appreciation for sensory images used

EN10LT-Ia14.2: Explain how the elements specific to a selection build its theme

LT Literature

EN10WC-Ib12.1: Identify features of persuasive texts

EN10WC-Ia12.1: Identify features of persuasive texts

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-Ib-3.15: Describe and interpret the ethics of public speaking

EN10OL-Ia-3.14: Identify the factors of public speaking

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-Ib-27: Use reflexive and intensive pronouns

EN10G-Ia-27: Use reflexive and intensive pronouns

G Grammar Awareness

The learner composes a short but powerful persuasive text using a variety of persuasive techniques and devices.

PERFORMANCE STANDARD LC Listening Comprehension

The learner demonstrates understanding of how world literature and other text types serve as ways of expressing and resolving personal conflicts, also how to use strategies in linking textual information, repairing, enhancing communication public speaking, emphasis markers in persuasive texts, different forms of modals, reflexive and intensive pronouns.

CONTENT STANDARD

RC Reading Comprehension

The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/ her understanding of literature and other text types for a deeper appreciation of World Literature, including Philippine Literature.

GRADE LEVEL STANDARD

Week

The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/ her understanding of literature and other texts types for a deeper appreciation of Philippine Culture and those of other countries.

PROGRAM STANDARD

FIRST QUARTER

GRADE 10

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

xxiii

5

4

3

Week

EN10LC-Ie-14.1: Point out the effectiveness of the devices used by the speaker to attract and hold the attention of the listener

EN10LC-Id-4.1: Single out direct and indirect signals used by a speaker

EN10RC-Id-2.15.2: Determine the effect of textual aids like advance organizers, titles, non-linear illustrations, etc. on the understanding of a text

EN10RC-Ie-2.15.2: Determine the effect of textual aids like advance organizers, titles, non-linear illustrations, etc. on the understanding of a text

EN10LC-Ic-4: Determine the implicit and explicit signals, verbal, as well as non-verbal, used by the speaker to highlight significant points

LC Listening Comprehension

EN10RC-Ic-2.15.2: Determine the effect of textual aids like advance organizers, titles, non-linear illustrations, etc. on the understanding of a text

RC Reading Comprehension

EN10VC-Ie-25: Express insights based on the ideas presented in the material viewed

EN10VC-Id-25: Express insights based on the ideas presented in the material viewed

EN10VC-Ic1.4/2.4: Determine how connected events contribute to the totality of a material viewed

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10V-Ie-13.9: Differentiate formal from informal definitions of words

EN10V-Id-13.9: Differentiate formal from informal definitions of words

EN10V-Ic-13.9: Differentiate formal from informal definitions of words

V Vocabulary Development

EN10LT-Ie2.2.3: Determine tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author

EN10LT-Id2.2.2: Explain the literary devices used EN10LT-Ie-2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection

EN10LT-Ic2.2.2: Explain the literary devices used EN10LT-Id-2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection

EN10LT-Ic-2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection

LT Literature

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

EN10WC-Ie12.2: Formulate a statement of opinion or assertion EN10WC-Ie12.3: Compose a persuasive text of three paragraphs expressing one’s stand on an issue

EN10WC-Id12.2: Formulate a statement of opinion or assertion

EN10WC-Ic12.2: Formulate a statement of opinion or assertion

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-Ie3.16.1: Employ the techniques in public speaking in a sample public speaking situation

EN10OL-Id3.16.1: Employ the techniques in public speaking in a sample public speaking situation

EN10OL-Ic-3.16: Describe the techniques in effective public speaking

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-Ie-26: Using words and expressions that emphasize a point

EN10G-Id-26: Using words and expressions that emphasize a point

EN10G-Ic-26: Using words and expressions that emphasize a point

G Grammar Awareness

xxiv

10

9

8

7

6

Week

EN10LC-Ih-14.3: Show appreciation for songs, poems, and other listening texts

EN10LC-Ii-14: Examine how spoken communication may be repaired or enhanced

EN10RC-Ii-21: Compare new insights with previous learnings

EN10LC-Ig-8.7: Make generalizations

EN10RC-Ig-21: Compare new insights with previous learnings

EN10RC-Ih-21: Compare new insights with previous learnings

EN10LC-If-14.2: Determine the roles of discourse markers (e.g. conjunctions, gambits, adverbs) in signaling the functions of statements made

LC Listening Comprehension

EN10RC-If-21: Compare new insights with previous learnings

RC Reading Comprehension

EN10VC-Ii1.5/2.5: Draw generalizations and conclusions based on the materials viewed

EN10VC-Ih1.5/2.5: Draw generalizations and conclusions based on the materials viewed

EN10VC-Ig1.5/2.5: Draw generalizations and conclusions based on the materials viewed

EN10VC-If-25: Express insights based on the ideas presented in the material viewed

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10LT-Ii-18: Evaluate literature as a way of expressing and resolving one’s personal conflicts

EN10LT-Ih-2.3: Draw similarities and differences of the featured selections in relation to the theme

EN10LT-If2.2.3: Determine tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author EN10LT-Ig-3: Explain how a selection may be influenced by culture, history, environment, or other factors

EN10LT-If-2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection.

LT Literature

Culminating Activity

EN10V-Ii-13.9: Differentiate formal from informal definitions of words

EN10V-Ih-13.9: Differentiate formal from informal definitions of words

EN10V-Ig-13.9: Differentiate formal from informal definitions of words

EN10V-If-13.9: Differentiate formal from informal definitions of words

V Vocabulary Development

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

EN10WC-Ii-12: Compose short persuasive texts using a variety ofpersuasive techniques and devices

EN10WC-Ih12.3: Compose a persuasive text of three paragraphs expressing one’s stand on an issue

EN10WC-Ig12.3: Compose a persuasive text of three paragraphs expressing one’s stand on an issue

EN10WC-If-12.3: Compose a persuasive text of three paragraphs expressing one’s stand on an issue

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-Ii3.16.1: Employ the techniques in public speaking in a sample public speaking situation

EN10OL-Ih3.16.1: Employ the techniques in public speaking in a sample public speaking situation

EN10OL-Ig3.16.1: Employ the techniques in public speaking in a sample public speaking situation

EN10OL-If3.16.1: Employ the techniques in public speaking in a sample public speaking situation

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-Ii-3.6: Use modals

EN10G-Ih-3.6: Use modals

EN10G-Ig-3.6: Use modals

EN10G-If-3.6: Use modals

G Grammar Awareness

xxv

3

2

1

EN10LC-IIa-11: Switch from one listening strategy to another to extract meaning from the listening text EN10LC-IIb-15.1: Assess the effectiveness of a material listened to taking into account the speaker’s purpose EN10LC-IIc-15.2: Assess whether the speaker’s purpose is achieved or not

EN10RC-IIa-11: Transcode information from linear to non-linear texts and vice-versa

EN10RC-IIb-11.2: Explain illustrations from linear to nonlinear texts and vice versa

EN10RC-IIc-5.4: Present information using tables, graphs, and maps

EN10VC-IIa-3.8: Assess the effectiveness of the ideas presented in the material viewed taking into account its purpose EN10VC-IIb-3.8: Assess the effectiveness of the ideas presented in the material viewed taking into account its purpose EN10VC-IIc-3.8: Assess the effectiveness of the ideas presented in the material viewed taking into account its purpose

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10V-IIc-13.9: Give technical and operational definitions

EN10V-IIb13.9: Give technical and operational definitions

EN10V-IIa13.9: Give technical and operational definitions

V Vocabulary Development

EN10LT-IIc2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection EN10LT-IIc2.2.1: Express appreciation for sensory images used

EN10LT-IIb14.2: Explain how the elements specific to a selection build its theme

EN10LT-IIa14.2: Explain how the elements specific to a selection build its theme

LT Literature

EN10WC-IIc13.3: Use patterns and techniques of developing an argumentative claim

EN10WC-IIb13.2: Formulate claims of fact, policy, and value

EN10WC-IIa13.1: Identify parts and features of argumentative essays

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-IIc3.11: Use the correct sound of English when delivering impromptu and extemporaneous speech

EN10OL-IIb5:Employ appropriate pitch, stress, juncture, intonation, etc.

EN10OL-IIa5: Employ appropriate pitch, stress, juncture, intonation, etc.

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-IIc-29: Observe correct grammar in making definitions

EN10G-IIb-29: Observe correct grammar in making definitions

EN10G-IIa-29: Observe correct grammar in making definitions

G Grammar Awareness

The learner proficiently delivers an argumentative speech emphasizing how to resolve conflicts among individuals or groups.

PERFORMANCE STANDARD LC Listening Comprehension

The learner demonstrates understanding of how world literatures and other text types serve as vehicles of expressing and resolving conflicts among individuals or groups; also how to use strategies in critical reading, listening, and viewing, and affirmation and negation markers to deliver impromptu and extemporaneous speeches.

CONTENT STANDARD

RC Reading Comprehension

The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/ her understanding of literature and other text types for a deeper appreciation of World Literature, including Philippine Literature.

GRADE LEVEL STANDARD

Week

The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/ her understanding of literature and other texts types for a deeper appreciation of Philippine Culture and those of other countries.

PROGRAM STANDARD

SECOND QUARTER

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

xxvi

6

5

4

Week

EN10LC-IIf-13.2: Employ analytical listening in problem solving

EN10LC-IIe-13.2: Employ analytical listening in problem solving

EN10RC-IIe-7.3: Read closely to get the author’s purpose

EN10RC-IIf-13.1: Read closely to get explicitly and implicitly stated information

EN10LC-IId3.15:Evaluate listening texts in terms of accuracy, validity, adequacy, and relevance

LC Listening Comprehension

EN10SS-IId-1.5.2: Scan for needed information

RC Reading Comprehension

EN10VC-IIf-26: Detect bias and prejudice in the material viewed

EN10VC-IIe-26: Detect bias and prejudice in the material viewed

EN10VC-IId26:Detect bias and prejudice in the material viewed

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10V-IIf-13.9: Give technical and operational definitions

EN10V-IIe13.9: Give technical and operational definitions

EN10V-IId13.9: Give technical and operational definitions

V Vocabulary Development

EN10LT-IIf2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection EN10LT-IIf2.2.3: Determine tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author

EN10LT-IIe2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection EN10LT-IIe2.2.3: Determine tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author

EN10LT-IId2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection EN10LT-IId2.2.2: Explain the literary devices used

LT Literature

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

EN10SS-IIf1.6.6: Use quotation marks or hanging indentations for direct quotes

EN10SS-IIe1.6.4: Use writing conventions to indicate acknowledgement of resources

EN10SS-IId1.6.3: Acknowledge citations by preparing a bibliography

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-IIf-3.8: Observe the correct stance and proper stage behavior as deemed necessary EN10OL-IIf2.6.2: Establish eye contact

EN10OL-IIe-3.8: Observe the correct stance and proper stage behavior as deemed necessary EN10OL-IIe2.6.2: Establish eye contact

EN10OL-IId3.11:Use the correct sound of English when delivering impromptu and extemporaneous speech

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-IIf-28: Use words and expressions that affirm or negate

EN10G-IIe-28: Use words and expressions that affirm or negate

EN10G-IId-29: Observe correct grammar in making definitions

G Grammar Awareness

xxvii

10

9

8

7

Week

EN10RC-IIi-2.22: Evaluate text content, elements, features, and properties using a set of criteria.

EN10RC-IIh-2.22: Evaluate text content, elements, features, and properties using a set of criteria

EN10RC-IIg-13.1: Read closely to get explicitly and implicitly stated information

RC Reading Comprehension

EN010LC-IIi-15.3: Determine unsupported generalizations and exaggerations

EN010LC-IIh-15.3: Determine unsupported generalizations and exaggerations

EN10LC-IIg-13.3: Detect biases and prejudices

LC Listening Comprehension

EN10VC-IIi-27: Use previous experiences as scaffold to the message conveyed by a material viewed

EN10VC-IIh-27: Use previous experiences as scaffold to the message conveyed by a material viewed

EN10VC-IIg-27: Use previous experiences as scaffold to the message conveyed by a material viewed

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10LT-IIi-19: Evaluate literature as a vehicle of expressing and resolving conflicts between and among individuals or groups

EN10LT-IIh-3: Explain how a selection may be influenced by culture, history, environment, or other factors

EN10LT-IIg2.3: Draw similarities and differences of the featured selections in relation to the theme

LT Literature

Culminating Activity

EN10V-IIi-13.9: Give technical and operational definitions

EN10V-IIh13.9: Give technical and operational definitions

EN10V-IIg13.9: Give technical and operational definitions

V Vocabulary Development

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

EN10WC-IIi-13: Compose an argumentative essay

EN10WC-IIh-13: Compose an argumentative essay

EN10SS-IIg1.6.5: Use in-text citations

WC Writing and Composition

EN10F-IIi-1.15: Make and deliver impromptu and extemporaneous speeches with ease and confidence

EN10F-IIh-3.7: Demonstrate confidence and ease of delivery

EN10F-IIg-3.7: Demonstrate confidence and ease of delivery

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-IIi-28:Use words and expressions that affirm or negate

EN10G-II-h-28: Use words and expressions that affirm or negate

EN10G-IIg-28: Use words and expressions that affirm or negate

G Grammar Awareness

xxviii

2

1

EN10LC-IIIa-16: Listen to simplify, reorganize, synthesize, and evaluate information to expand, review, or update knowledge

EN10LC-IIIb-16.1: Distinguish the important points from less important ones in a text listened to

EN10RC-IIIa-22.1: Overall artistic value of the structure and elements of the selection (structuralist/formalist)

EN10RC-IIIb-22.2: Treatment of underlying or overarching issue concerning human experience (moralist)

EN10VC-IIIb-23: Share viewpoints based on the ideas presented in the materials viewed

EN10VC-IIIa-12: Raise questions to clarify issues covered in the material viewed

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10V-IIIb13.9: Give expanded definitions of words

EN10V-IIIa13.9: Give expanded definitions of words

V Vocabulary Development

EN10LT-IIIa2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection EN10LT-IIIa2.2.1: Express appreciation for sensory images used EN10LT-IIIb2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection EN10LT-IIIb2.2.2: Explain the literary devices used

LT Literature

EN10WC-IIIb14.1.2: Use a variety of informative, persuasive, and argumentative writing techniques

EN10WC-IIIa14.1.1: Expand ideas using principles of cohesion and coherence

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-IIIb3.8: Use the correct stage stance and behavior when giving a roast and a toast and when paying tribute to someone in a eulogy

EN10OL-IIIa3.8: Use the correct stage stance and behavior when giving a roast and a toast and when paying tribute to someone in a eulogy

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-IIIb-31: Use pronouns effectively

EN10G-IIIa-31: Use pronouns effectively

G Grammar Awareness

The learner skilfully delivers a speech for a special occasion through utilizing effective verbal and non-verbal strategies and ICT resources.

PERFORMANCE STANDARD LC Listening Comprehension

The learner demonstrates understanding of how world literature and other text types serve as sources of wisdom in expressing and resolving conflicts among individuals, groups and nature; also how to use evaluative reading, listening and viewing strategies, special speeches for occasion, pronouns and structures of modification.

CONTENT STANDARD

RC Reading Comprehension

The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/ her understanding of literature and other text types for a deeper appreciation of World Literature, including Philippine Literature.

GRADE LEVEL STANDARD

Week

The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/ her understanding of literature and other texts types for a deeper appreciation of Philippine Culture and those of other countries.

PROGRAM STANDARD

THIRD QUARTER

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

xxix

6

5

4

3

Week

EN10LC-IIIf-3.13: React to the falsity or soundness of an argument

EN10LC-IIIe-2.9: React intelligently and creatively to the text listened to

EN10RC-IIIe-22.5: Relevance of the selection to the historical context during which it was produced (historical)

EN10RC-IIIf-2.18: Personal significance of the selection to the reader (readerresponse)

EN10LC-IIId-3.2: Raise questions and seek clarifications on issues discussed in the text listened to. EN10LC-IIId-3.18: Get different viewpoints on various local or global issues

EN10LC-IIIc-3.14: Summarize important points discussed in the text listened to

LC Listening Comprehension

EN10RC-IIId-22.4: Gender relationships of characters (feminist)

EN10RC-IIIc-22.3: Power struggles of characters (Marxist)

RC Reading Comprehension

EN10VC-IIIf-23: Share viewpoints based on the ideas presented in the materials viewed

EN10VC-IIIe-12: Raise questions to clarify issues covered in the material viewed

EN10VC-IIId-28: Disclose the personal significance of a material viewed

EN10VC-IIIc-10: Evaluate the information contained in the material viewed in terms of accuracy and effectiveness

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10V-IIIf13.9: Give expanded definitions of words

EN10V-IIIe13.9: Give expanded definitions of words

EN10V-IIId13.9: Give expanded definitions of words

EN10V-IIIc13.9: Give expanded definitions of words

V Vocabulary Development

EN10LT-IIIf-3: Explain how a selection may be influenced by culture, history, environment, or

EN10LT-IIIe-3: Explain how a selection may be influenced by culture, history, environment, or other factors

EN10LT-IIId14.2: Explain how the elements specific to a selection build its theme

EN10LT-IIIc2.2.3: Determine tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author

LT Literature

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

EN10SS-IIIc-1.6: Show respect for intellectual property rights by acknowledging citations made in the critique EN10SS-IIIc1.6.4: Use writing conventions to acknowledge sources EN10SS-IIId1.6: Show respect for intellectual property rights by acknowledging citations made in the critique EN10SS-IIId1.6.6: Use quotation marks or hanging indentations for direct quotes EN10SS-IIIe-1.6: Show respect for intellectual property rights by acknowledging citations made in the critique EN10SS-IIIe1.6.5: Use in-text citations EN10SS-IIIf1.6.3: Acknowledge sources by preparing a bibliography

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-IIIe3.9:Use the correct and appropriate language when giving a toast or a tribute to someone and when delivering welcome and closing remarks EN10OL-IIIf-3.9: Use the correct and appropriate language when giving a toast or a tribute to someone

EN10OL-IIId1.4:Use polite expressions when giving a roast

EN10OL-IIIc-5: Employ the appropriate prosodic features of speech

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-IIIf-30: Use structures of modification

EN10G-IIIe-30: Use structures of modification

EN10G-IIId-31:Use pronouns effectively

EN10G-IIIc-31: Use pronouns effectively

G Grammar Awareness

xxx

10

9

8

7

Week

EN10LC-IIIh-6.5: Describe the emotional appeal of a listening text

EN10LC-IIIi-2.9: React intelligently and creatively to the text listened to

EN10RC-IIIi-3.1.12: Examining biases

EN10LC-IIIg-14.3: Show appreciation for songs, poems, plays, etc.

EN10RC-IIIg-2.18: Personal significance of the selection to the reader (readerresponse)

EN10RC-IIIh-23.1: Identifying textual details that affirm or refute a claim

LC Listening Comprehension

RC Reading Comprehension

EN10VC-IIIi-28: Disclose the personal significance of a material viewed

EN10VC-IIIh-28: Disclose the personal significance of a material viewed

EN10VC-IIIg-10: Evaluate the information contained in the material viewed in terms of accuracy and effectiveness

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10LT-IIIh2.3: Draw similarities and differences of the featured selections in relation to the theme EN10LT-IIIi20: Evaluate literature as a source of wisdom in expressing and resolving conflicts between individuals or groups and nature

EN10LT-IIIg20: Evaluate literature as a source of wisdom in expressing and resolving conflicts between individuals or groups and nature

other factors

LT Literature

Culminating Activity

EN10V-IIIi13.9: Give expanded definitions of words

EN10V-IIIh13.9: Give expanded definitions of words

EN10V-IIIg13.9: Give expanded definitions of words

V Vocabulary Development

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

EN10WC-IIIi-14: Compose an independent critique of a chosen selection

EN10WC-IIIh14: Compose an independent critique of a chosen selection

EN10WC-IIIg14: Compose an independent critique of a chosen selection

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-IIIi1.10: Deliver special speeches like toast and roast speeches, tributes, welcome and closing remarks, speeches to introduce guest speakers/resource persons etc. effectively in varied speech situations

and when delivering welcome and closing remarks EN10OL-IIIg1.10: Deliver special speeches like toast and roast speeches, tributes, welcome and closing remarks, speeches to introduce guest speakers/resource persons etc. effectively in varied speech situations EN10OL-IIIh3.11: Produce the sounds of English correctly and effectively

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-IIIi-30: Use structures of modification

EN10G-IIIh-30: Use structures of modification

EN10G-IIIg-30: Use structures of modification

G Grammar Awareness

xxxi

2

1

EN10LC-IVa-16: Listen to simplify, reorganize, synthesize and evaluate information to expand, review, or update knowledge

EN10LC-IVb-3.18: Get different viewpoints on various local or global issues EN10LC-IVb-16.1: Distinguish the important points from less important ones in any listening text

EN10SS-IVa-1.5: Use locational skills to gather information from primary and secondary sources of information

EN10SS-IVb-1.7: Get vital information from various websites on the internet

EN10VC-IVb-15: Compare and contrast the contents of the materials viewed with outside sources of information in terms of accessibility and effectiveness

EN10VC-IVa-15: Compare and contrast the contents of the materials viewed with outside sources of information in terms of accessibility and effectiveness

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10V-IVb-30: Get familiar with technical terms used in research

EN10V-IVa-30: Get familiar with technical terms used in research

V Vocabulary Development

EN10LT-IVa2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection EN10LT-IVa2.2.1: Express appreciation for sensory images used EN10LT-IVb2.2: Explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection EN10LT-IV-b2.2.2: Explain the literary devices used

LT Literature

EN10WC-IVb14.1.2: Use a variety of informative, persuasive, and argumentative writing techniques

EN10WC-IVa14.1.1: Expand ideas using principles of cohesion and coherence

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-IVb3.8.1: Show courtesy and politeness when delivering campaign speeches

EN10OL-IVa-3.9: Use appropriate language when delivering campaign speeches.

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-IVb-32: Observe the language of research, campaigns, and advocacies

EN10G-IVa-32: Observe the language of research, campaigns, and advocacies

G Grammar Awareness

The learner competently presents a research report on a relevant socio-cultural issue.

PERFORMANCE STANDARD LC Listening Comprehension

The learner demonstrates understanding of how world literature and other text types serve as instruments to resolve social conflicts, also how to use the language of research, campaigns and advocacies.

CONTENT STANDARD

RC Reading Comprehension

The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/ her understanding of Philippine Literature and other texts types for a deeper appreciation of Philippine Culture.

GRADE LEVEL STANDARD

Week

The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/ her understanding of literature and other texts types for a deeper appreciation of Philippine Culture and those of other countries.

PROGRAM STANDARD

FOURTH QUARTER

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

xxxii

6

5

4

3

Week

EN10LC-IVe-2.9: React intelligently and creatively to the text listened to

EN10LC-IVf-3.2: Raise questions and seek clarifications on issues discussed in the text listened to

EN10RC-IVf-2.12: Draw conclusions from the set of details

EN10LC-IVc-3.18: Get different viewpoints on various local or global issues EN10LC-IVc-16.1: Distinguish the important points from less important ones in any listening text EN10LC-IVd-3.14: Summarize important points discussed in the text listened to

LC Listening Comprehension

EN10RC-IVe-15.1: Evaluate the accuracy of given information

EN10RC-IVd-2.13: Distinguish facts from beliefs

EN10SS-IVc-1.8: Synthesize essential information about a chosen issue

RC Reading Comprehension

EN10VC-IVf-6.1: Evaluate how the elements that make up reality and fantasy affect viewing habit

EN10VC-IVd29:Appraise the unity of plot, setting and characterization in a material viewed to achieve the writer’s purpose EN10VC-IVe-30: Assess one’s viewing behavior

EN10VC-IVc29:Appraise the unity of plot, setting and characterization in a material viewed to achieve the writer’s purpose

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10V-IVf-30: Get familiar with technical terms used in research

EN10V-IVe-30: Get familiar with technical terms used in research

EN10V-IVd-30: Get familiarwith technical terms used in research

EN10V-IVc-30: Get familiarwith technical terms used in research

V Vocabulary Development

EN10-LT-IVd2.3: Draw similarities and differences of the featured selections in relation to the theme EN10LT-IVe21: Evaluate literature as an instrument to express and resolve conflicts within, between, and among societies EN10LT-IVf14.2: Explain how the elements specific to a selection build its theme

EN10LT-IVc2.2.3: Determine tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author

LT Literature

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

EN10WC-IVf14.1.2: Use a variety of informative, persuasive, and argumentative writing techniques

EN10WC-IVf14.1.1: Expand ideas using principles of cohesion and coherence

EN10SS-IVe-2.3: Compose a research report on a relevant social issue

EN10SS-IVd1.6.4: Use writing conventions to acknowledge sources

EN10SS-IVc1.6.3: Acknowledge sources by preparing a bibliography

WC Writing and Composition

EN10OL-IVf-5: Use the correct prosodic features of speech

EN10OL-IVe-5: Use the correct prosodic features of speech

EN10OL-IVd3.11: Produce the sounds of English correctly and effectively

EN10OL-IVc-3.8: Demonstrate the appropriate stage stance and behavior when persuading others in a campaign speech

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-IVf-32: Observe the language of research, campaigns, and advocacies

EN10G-IVe-32: Observe the language of research, campaigns, and advocacies

EN10G-IVd-32: Observe the language of research, campaigns, and advocacies

EN10G-IVc-32: Observe the language of research, campaigns, and advocacies

G Grammar Awareness

xxxiii

10

9

8

7

Week

EN10LC-IVh-14.3: Show appreciation for songs, poems, plays, etc. EN10LC-IVh-6.5: Describe the emotional appeal of a listening text EN10LC-IVi-3.14: Summarize important points discussed in the text listened to

EN10RC-IVi-10.2: Distinguish between general and specific statements

EN10LC-IVg-16.2: React to the falsity or soundness of an argument

LC Listening Comprehension

EN10SS-IVh-1.8.1: Point out relationships among statements

EN10RC-IVg-2.12: Draw conclusions from the set of details

RC Reading Comprehension

EN10VC-IVi-6.1: Evaluate how the elements that make up reality and fantasy affect viewing habit EN10VC-IVi30:Assess one’s viewing behavior

EN10VC-IVg-15: Compare and contrast the contents of the materials viewed with outside sources of information in terms of accessibility and effectiveness EN10VC-IVh-29: Appraise the unity of plot, setting and characterization in a material viewed to achieve the writer’s purpose

VC Viewing Comprehension

EN10LT-IVi-21: Evaluate literature as an instrument to express and resolve conflicts within, between, and among societies

EN10-LT-IVh2.3: Draw similarities and differences of the featured selections in relation to the theme

EN10LT-IVg-3: Explain how a selection may be influenced by culture, history, environment, or other factors

LT Literature

Culminating Activity

EN10V-IVi-30: Get familiar with technical terms used in research

EN10V-IVh-30: Get familiar with technical terms used in research

EN10V-IVg-30: Get familiar with technical terms used in research

V Vocabulary Development

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

EN10SS-IVi-2.3: Compose a research report on a relevant social issue

EN10SS-IVg1.6.3: Acknowledge sources by preparing a bibliography EN10SS-IVg1.6.4: Use writing conventions to acknowledge sources EN10SS-IVh-2.3: Compose a research report on a relevant social issue

WC Writing and Composition

EN10F-IVi-1.16: Deliver selfcomposed Campaign Speeches on Advocacies, Social Issues and Concerns

EN10F-IVh-1.16: Deliver selfcomposed Campaign Speeches on Advocacies, Social Issues and Concerns

EN10OL-IVg3.10: Use appropriate multimedia resources that accompany language

F Oral Language and Fluency

EN10G-IVi-32: Observe the language of research, campaigns, and advocacies

EN10G-IVh-32: Observe the language of research, campaigns, and advocacies

EN10G-IVg-32: Observe the language of research, campaigns, and advocacies

G Grammar Awareness

xxxiv

Arabic Number

*Put a hyphen (-) in between letters to indicate more than a specific week

Lowercase Letter/s

Roman Numeral

*Zero if no specific quarter

Uppercase Letter/s

First Entry

LEGEND

Competency

Week

Compose clear and coherent sentences using appropriate grammatical structures

Week six

First Quarter

Grammar

Domain/Content/ Component/ Topic

Quarter

Grade 4

English

Grade Level

Learning Area and Strand/ Subject or Specialization

SAMPLE

2.5

-

f

I

-

G

EN4

Sample: EN4G-If-2.5

CODE BOOK LEGEND

DOMAIN/ COMPONENT

OL

Oral Language

S SS VC V WC

Study Strategies Viewing Comprehension Vocabulary Development Writing and Composition

RC

Reading Comprehension Spelling

PA

Phonological Awareness

PWR

LC

Listening Comprehension

Phonics and Word Recognition

G

F

BPK

AK

CODE

Grammar

Fluency

Book and Print Knowledge

Alphabet Knowledge

K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM

Teacher’s Guide ENGLISH GRADE 10 Program Standard: The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/ her understanding of literature and other texts types for a deeper appreciation of Philippine Culture and those of other countries. Grade Level Standard: The learner demonstrates communicative competence through his/her understanding of literature and other text types for a deeper appreciation of World Literature, including Philippine Literature.

MODULE 1 Description: Module 1 with the theme, Overcoming Challenges, covers the period from the Beginnings in Oral Tradition (Myths and Legends) to Classical Tradition. This is especially designed to cater to learners’ special interests, talents, abilities, skills, needs, qualities, attitudes hopes, dreams, challenges and values. It also guides the students to compose a short but powerful persuasive text using a variety of techniques and devices. This offers a full-blown exploration of the interrelated key concepts described in six sub-themes that learners need to understand to pave way for the development of their English language communication skills. They are carefully distributed and organized in six lessons. Though the activities may be contextualized, bear in mind that the competencies that the students must meet are non-negotiable. Periods Covered: Beginnings of Oral Tradition (Myths & Legend) Classical Tradition

Theme: Overcoming Challenges

Content Standard: The learner demonstrates understanding on how world literature and other text types serve as ways of expressing and resolving personal conflicts and also how to use strategies in linking textual information, repairing, enhancing communication public speaking, emphasis markers in persuasive texts, different forms of modals, reflexive and intensive pronouns. 1

Performance Standard The learner composes a short but powerful persuasive text using a variety of techniques and devices.

Reminders to the Teacher: The strategies for executing the lessons are merely suggestive, not prescriptive. You are free to modify the procedures which are appropriate for your learners. Bear in mind that the learning competencies are non-negotiable.

Matrix of Essentials No. of Lesson

Sub Theme

Language/Grammar Focus

Enabling Activities

1

Discovering Personal Challenges

Using Reflexive Pronouns

Deliver a concise oral report

2

Building Up Defenses

Using Intensive Pronouns

Make a quality brochure on building defenses

3

Capitalizing on Strengths and Weaknesses

Modals Expressing Ability, Possibility, and Probability

Present a catchy ad campaign

4

Dealing with Personal Challenges

Special Expressions Emphasizing a Point

Create an impressive photo essay

Modals expressing obligation, necessity

Participate in a quick but meaningful panel discussion

5

6

Winning Over Individual Challenges

Turning Challenges to Opportunities

Modals expressing futurity, willingness

2

Compose a short but powerful, persuasive text (Culminating Activity)

Module 1 Lesson 1 Sub-theme: Discovering Personal Challenges Matrix of Essentials Reading/Literary Text

Language/Grammar Focus

Enabling Tasks (leading to Culminating Task)

Reflexive Pronoun

Oral Report about Cyber Bullying

ICARUS & DAEDALUS by Nick Pontikis

Instructional/Learning Plan Phase of the lesson Your Journey This part of the lesson is composed of two paragraphs. The first paragraph provides a short and vivid introduction of the lesson and the discussion of the sub theme which is “Discovering Personal Challenges”. The second paragraph provides an overview of the lesson and the enduring question that sums up the enduring understanding one should draw out of this lesson. Your Objectives This part of the module provides the competencies. Remember that the objectives: • are taken from the Curriculum Guide (CG)

Activities/Tasks

WIPS Provision

Invite the students to read the Introduction (Module 1 Lesson 1) for them to get an overview of where they are headed to and to be aware of the desired result; that is, for them to demonstrate understanding of how to deal with personal challenges.

Whole class

Allow the students to go over the following objectives for them to focus more on the target concepts, language communication and literary skills: • determine the effect of textual aids on the understanding of the text. • get information from various text types that can be used in everyday life.

Individual work

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address the enabling knowledge and skills to be developed to achieve the content and performance standard clarify expectations in terms of what the students should know, understand and be able to do

This part of the lesson also informs the learners of the enabling activity.

determine how connected events contribute to the totality of a material viewed. • • • •

differentiate formal from informal definitions of words. explain how the elements specific to a selection build its theme. identify features of persuasive texts. identify factors of public speaking use reflexive pronouns.

• Remind them that the expected output in this lesson is a quality Oral Report about Cyber Bullying and the criteria for assessment will be verbal skills, non-verbal skills and content of the presentation. Ask the students if they have questions and/or clarifications about the rubrics. Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment as learning.

Invite the students to work on the prerequisites to check their background knowledge, and to prepare them for In presenting this part of the development of their target skills the module, the teacher through the following tasks/activities: should be able to: Task 1. Blocks that block • diagnose and Explain to the students that each block activate prior represents a saying or well-known phrase. knowledge; • hook and engage Have them identify what is being asked learner’s interest; by each block. • ask questions; encourage Tell them to write their answers on their student questions; notebooks. welcome tentative responses as Process the activity using the following guide to further questions: exploration; and 1. What is your overall impression about the phrases above? Your Initial Tasks Pedagogy:

4

Small group discussion



clarify the learners’ expectations and how learning shall be assessed by presenting the enabling activity and the rubrics.

Assessment: •



All the activities in this phase are diagnostic in nature. Scores must be recorded to help the teacher plan the succeeding lessons and not to grade the students. All answers are tentative and must be written on their notebooks for reference.

2. How do they reflect realities in life? Task 2. You’ve Got a Friend Ask the students to remember the time when they were weak and low. Allow them to fill out the balloons with their experiences in life that have to do with their responses in Task 1.

Small group discussion

Let them share their work with their classmates. Process the activity using the following questions: 1. What can you say about the activity? 2. How did you feel when you have to recall all those experiences? 3. Did you have fear in sharing your experiences with the class? Why? Task 3. Watch and Learn! Allow the students to watch the video carefully and answer the following questions for processing: 1. Who is the main character in the story? 2. What is the story all about? 3. What are the personal challenges of the character are highlighted in the video? 4. How would you compare yourself to the character in the video? 5. What insights have you gained from the video? Task 4. “I think” Allow the students to use the table found in the LM to jot down their answers to the three questions. Process the activity. Ask them if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment as learning.

5

Small group discussion

Small group discussion

Task 5. Guide for Reading is Your Text subdivided into different tasks. In this part of the module, the teachers must be able Task 5.1 A Scheme for Schema Let the students answer the questions Whole class to help the students: in each balloons found in the LM. • make sense Ask them to take note of their answers of information, and be able to relate all of them to the develop, reflect, selection they are about to read. rethink, validate, Share inputs on the following: and revise understandings of Myth - a myth is an ancient story the lesson; created to explain natural events. Gods, • check for goddesses, and heroes are among understanding; the characters in myths. In addition to provide feedback; explaining events in nature, some myths check against also present a lesson on how to live, or content standard serve as a warning to follow society’s (content tocontent), rules. • assess student’s Daedalus and Icarus is a myth. It skills (checking discusses adventures and mistakes of learner’s learning heroes or characters. progress and Before asking the students to read the interest); text, inform them to specifically answer • ask questions the following questions: for them to • How does Icarus get himself into construct their own a difficult situation? meanings and • How did Icarus escape from • provide a variety of Crete? learning resources Process the activity using the following questions: Assessment: 1. What are some myths that you have read? • All the activities 2. Why are these stories called in this phase myths? are formative in Task 5.2 Anticipation-Reaction Guide nature. Scores Ask the students to accomplish the must be recorded Whole class Story Anticipation-Reaction Guide found for instructional in the LM using the following steps: decision not to 1. Before reading – read the grade the students. statements and check the column that corresponds to their answer of agreement or disagreement.

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Refer the students back to the tentative answers they have written on their notebooks for them to validate whether their tentative answers are correct or not.

2. After reading – review their answers and indicate in the last column whether they were right or wrong.

Task 6. Vocabulary Spinner Ask the students to play the vocabulary spinner by spinning the wheel and give the synonym, antonym, and function of each word use in a sentence or give the This process is important definition of the following words: • comfortable in validating, rethinking • overlapping and revising their • plunged understanding. • hurtled • vengeful Before reading the text, ask the students to answer the following guide question “How would personal challenges make you a better person?” Give students enough time to reflect on the question. Provide the students with copies of the text Daedalus and Icarus by Nick Pontikis Ask them to read the text. Let them deal with the breakers (the questions in the boxes) to enrich their reading experience. Task 7. Flight and Light Ask the students to answer the following comprehension questions on their notebooks. 1. Who hired Daedalus? 2. What did Daedalus design to hold the Minotaur? 3. What did Daedalus invent to help them escape from the Labyrinth? 4. What did he warn Icarus not to do? 5. What happened to Icarus?

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Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other. Task 8. What’s Going On? Ask the students to answer the following interpretation questions on their notebooks. 1. Why did Minos imprison Daedalus in the Labyrinth? 2. Why did Minos think that if Daedalus can’t find his way out, “so much the better”? 3. Minos tells Icarus the plan is dangerous. Why does he want them to take this risk? 4. Why did Daedalus leave his wings on the altar of Apollo? Why wouldn’t he want to fly anymore? Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other. Task 9. Digging Deeper Ask the students to answer the following evaluation questions on their notebooks: 1. In a short paragraph, describe how Daedalus planned to escape from the island prison of Crete. 2. Do you think Daedalus’s plan to escape will or will not work? Explain your answer. 3. Could the events of Daedalus’s and Icarus’s escape, from the island prison of Crete, happen in real life? 4. Which events of the myth could have happened in real-life? 5. If you had access to building resources and materials, how would you design a flying machine to help you escape from the island prison of Crete? Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other.

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Task 10. Fact or Not Ask the students to tell whether the statement is a fact or not. Draw WINGS if the statement is a fact and SUN if otherwise 1. Daedalus was an inventor. 2. King Minos wanted to kill the Minotaur. 3. It would be easy to find your way out of the Labyrinth. 4. Icarus designed his own wings. 5. The wings were made of chicken feathers. Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other Task 11. Agree or Disagree Tell the students to state whether they agree or disagree and find evidence from the text as evidences to support their claim. Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other. Task 12. Image in my Mind Tell the students that as they read the story, there were mental images that they could have imagined. Group them into five and ask each group to illustrate the images formed in their minds while they were reading the story. Group 1: The Labyrinth Group 2: Icarian sea Group 3: Minos’ shell Group 4: Minotaur Group 5: Icarus’ wings Process the activity Task 13. Time line Ask the students to create a timeline of what happened in each of the following: 1. The palace of Minos 2. In prison

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3. Icarus in the sea 4. Sicily Process their answers. Task 14. Character Cycle Have the students extract actions, dialogues and thoughts of Athene from the text and create an impression about the character. Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other. Before doing Task 14, the teacher should provide inputs on reflexive pronouns. Task 15. Grammarian for a Day Allow the students to do the following activities: A. Scan the paragraphs below. Underline all the pronouns used by the author. He was then tried at the Areiopagus, which was the ancient Greek court, and banished from his home city of Athens. He fled to the island of Crete, where he began to work at the court of King Minos and Queen Pasiphae, in the magnificent palace of Knossos. It is said that Daedalus was the first to conceive masts and sails for ships for the navy of Minos, helping Crete become a naval power. The statues he carved were so exquisite, they looked as if they were alive. It is said that they would have escaped were it not for the chain that bound them to the palace wall. Daedelus also constructed a wooden cow for the queen to hide and to satisfy her amorous longings for a white bull sent by Poseidon, and by which she became pregnant with the Minotaur.

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When the dreadful Minotaur was born, Daedalus built the Labyrinth to contain the monstrous half-man, halfbull. For years Minos demanded a tribute of youths from Athens to feed the creature as punishment for the accidental killing of his son while he was visiting Athens. Eventually, the Athenian hero Theseus came to Crete to attempt to slay the Minotaur. Princess Ariadne, daughter of king Minos and queen Pasiphae, fell in love with Theseus and asked Daedalus to help him. Daedalus gave her a flaxen thread for Theseus to tie to the door of the Labyrinth as he entered, and by which he could find his way out after killing the monster, simply by following the thread back. Theseus succeeded, and escaped Crete with Ariadne. B. From the identified pronouns above, ask them to pick at least five (5) of them and paraphrase the statement by making the pronouns reflexive. C. Using the following pronouns, ask the students to construct their own sentences by converting the assigned pronouns into reflexive pronouns. Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment as learning. Your Discovery Tasks Pedagogy:

Task 16. Men Under Lens Ask the students to do the following:

Remember that the discovery tasks allow the students to enrich learning by contextualizing, localizing, and differentiating instruction.

A. Make a list of all the personal challenges Icarus and Daedalus needed to overcome in the text. B. Pick out the personal challenges of the two characters the students have also undergone in their lives. 11

Individual Work

Your main target in this Processing the activity using the phase is to provide them following questions: 1. What do the similarities of your the understanding of personal challenges in life and content as applied to a those of Daedalus and Icarus variety of context. tell? What new discoveries did Here is where the teacher you find? associates the theme 2. How do you compare the to the learners personal similarities of your personal experience and it should challenges in life and these of therefore, provide them Daedalus and Icarus? the opportunity to answer the essential questions raised at the beginning of Task 17. In your Own Words Remind the learners that Daedalus the lesson. tried to make Icarus pay attention to his instructions, but Icarus got excited and Assessment: didn’t obey the rules.

All the activities in this Then ask them to do the following in 1 phase are formative in whole sheet of paper. nature and must not be • Write an essay about a safety recorded but graded as rule that you think is important bases for instructional to people but often ignored by decision whether to them because it ruins their fun. proceed to the next activity • Try to convince your readers or facilitate another activity that they really should obey this depending on the needs of safety rule. your learners. Process the activity. Highlight the Refer the students back value of safety rules. Integrate risk to the tentative answers and disaster reduction management they have written on their concepts. notebooks to validate whether their tentative Task 18. Imprint in Print answers are correct Allow the students to look in today’s or not. This process is paper for a story about an engineering important in validating, solution to a problem. This could be rethinking and revising anything from coordinating traffic lights their understanding. to avoiding local flooding problems to At the end of this phase, just before doing the final task, the teacher may provide a summative test (pen-and-paper or authentic task) to sum up

developing a new type of space craft.

This is integrated in Science and Technology by asking the students to create a chart showing the problem, the solution and what basic tools and forces are involved.

12

Individual Work

Individual Work

Remember that the phase operate in the premise that performance standards are done only if the content standards are addressed and fully understood. This summative test is recorded and graded.

Process the activity. Emphasize the value of careful planning. Task 19. Design Remind the learners that Daedalus is an engineer and designed two very different inventions in this story.

Individual work

Ask the students to make a library/ internet research of careers in the field of engineering on the following aspects: 1. Types of engineering careers 2. How much each type earns 3. What qualifications each type would require. Share your answer with the class. This task could be given as an assignment and discussed the next day. Task 20. Dealing with Personal Challenges Introduce the personal challenges the class have discovered from Icarus and Daedalus. Ask them how would they deal with these challenges if they are to encounter them. 1. Abuse of power 2. Self Destruction 3. Foolishness 4. Lack of contentment 5. Aggressiveness 6. Hard headedness 7. Impetuousness 8. Hostility 9. Addiction 10. Boastfulness 11. Egocentricity 12. Procrastination 13. Compulsiveness 14. Envy Accept varied responses. Allow the students to interact with each other.

13

Individual work

Task 21. The Worry Sheet Tell the students that the things that worry us could be a great challenge. Ask them about what worries them at the moment and what they can do about it. Let them accomplish the chart found in the LM. Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other. Process the activity. Emphasize the value of positive thinking. Task 22. Stress Tabs Tell the students that stress is a personal challenge. It drags them from their studies and slows them down in accomplishing a lot of things. Use the chart found in the LM to identify what causes their stress and their effects to them. Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other. Process the activity. Emphasize the value of stress management. Task 23. Peer Pressure Tell the students that peer pressure is another personal challenge to overcome. Ask them about how they would respond to a friend who forces them to do things described in the LM. Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other. Process the activity. Emphasize the value of positive thinking Task 24. React to the Max, Explain to the students that their instant reactions tell something about them. Ask them how they would react in each of the situations described in the LM. Instruct them to copy the chart on their notebooks and place their answers in the balloon.

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Check their answers. Allow the students to interact with each other. Process the activity. Emphasize the value of positive thinking. Task 25. Matter of Judgement Relate to the students that weighing Small Group between two or more decisions could be a challenge. Ask them: “If you are a judge and is set to free one from the following prisoners, who would it be and why? “ Ask them to check the entries in the box of their choices and justify their answer on their notebooks. Task 26. The Great Eight The students will be grouped according to their intelligences/abilities. Ask each group to do any of the following: A. Across Thy Mind (ATM) [LogicalMathematical] • Make a survey within the group on how disciplined the members are using the following scale: Well Disciplined, Moderate Disciplined, Not Disciplined. • Make a tally of your data according to the scale • Construct a graph of the data. • Interpret your graph and make a conclusion. B. Youth Power [Verbal-Linguistic] • Imagine that you are SK officers and your task is to write a barangay ordinance that requires the youth to participate in community service activities. C. A Tree for a Day [Naturalistic] • Picture yourself as a tree and you would like to express how you feel about the residents of your

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D. Goal Setting [Intrapersonal] • Make a list of your strengths and weaknesses. • Set a plan of action that would transform your weaknesses into strengths and further improve your strengths. E. The Filipino Spirit is Water Proof! [Visual-Spatial] • Draw an interpretation of the line “The Filipino Spirit is Water Proof!” which showing how the Filipinos face calamities. F. Strong U [Bodily-Kinesthetic] • Make a dance interpretation of the song “Stronger” by Kelly Clarkson. G. Sing [Musical] • Sing a song with any of the following themes: • Nature • Discipline • Patriotism H. Ma’am, May I? [Interpersonal] • Interview your teacher about how difficult their job is and how personal discipline helps improve their work.

Accept varied responses. Allow the students to interact with each other. Process the activity. Emphasize the value of positive thinking. Task 27. My Purpose Ask the students to create their Personal Mission Statement for them to discover their purpose. In writing their mission statements, let them begin by completing the chart found in the LM. Considering the answers to those questions, ask the students to draft a personal mission statement.

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Individual work

Small group

Present Republic Act No. 10627 or the “Anti-Bullying Act of 2013″ found in the LM and let them accomplish the chart found in Module1. Process the activity. Task 28. Bull and Bully Ask the students about what they would do to stop or at least to minimize the case of bullying if they would be a… Group 1: A Senator for a Day? Group 2: A School Janitor for a Day? Group 3: A Teacher for a Day? Group 4: A Parent for a Day? Group 5: A Newscaster for a Day? Accept varied responses. Allow the students to interact with each other. Process the activity. Emphasize the value of empathy. Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment as learning. Provide a short summative test that sums up the content standard and must be recorded and graded as part of assessment of learning Final Task Pedagogy: Final task is the part of the module that addresses the performance standard. Since this is the final task of Lesson 1, the task is referred to as “enabling task” or “enabling activity. This enabling activity forms a scaffold to the succeeding activities to

Emphasize to the learners that they have been informed about their final task for this quarter a short but persuasive text. A concise Oral Report on the Causes/ Effects of Cyber Bullying, would help you prepare for such performance at the end of the quarter Present the rubrics. Ask them if there are needed clarifications. Allow the students to craft their own rubrics as part of assessment of learning.

17

Individual work

equip the learners with Allow the students to present their skills in performing the outputs in the class. culminating activity or the Provide feedback. performance standard for the first quarter. Teachers should bear in mind that this phase: •





serves as enabling task for the main product/ performance at the end of each module; includes tasks that are essential for learners’ development; is based on real life situations (if the teacher wishes to do modifications or improvisations)

Assessment: •

GRASPS-based assessment criteria

My Treasure

Ask the students to read the lines below:

This part of the module sums up all the essential “Personal challenges help one become understandings one a better person.Recognizing that these must draw out of this challenges are inevitable would help one become better prepared for life.” lesson. It is important that answers are authentic Using the lines as stimulus, provide inasmuch as the word them with enough time to revisit all the “MY” implies that this part activities they have done in the lesson of the lesson is where the before completing the open –ended students develop a sense questions. of ownership.

18

Individual work

Materials: 1. Instructional aids (photos, rubrics) 2. Technology Aids (computer, internet, television, movies DVD) References: Inspiration to Life. Motivational Video of a Young Boy: An Inspiration to Millions http:// thanasis.com/icarus02.html Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines Imagine. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_YXSHkAahE

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Module 1 Lesson 2 Sub-theme: Building Up Defenses Matrix of Essentials Reading / Literary Text THE GORGON’S HEAD from ancient Greece by Anne Terry White

Language/Grammar Focus

Enabling Tasks (leading to Culminating Task)

Intensive pronouns

Brochure on Building Defenses Against Discrimination

Instructional/Learning Plan Phase of the lesson Your Journey This part of the lesson is composed of two paragraphs. The first paragraph provides a short and vivid introduction of the lesson and the discussion of the subtheme which is “Building Up Defenses”. The second paragraph provides an overview of the lesson and the enduring question that sums up the enduring understanding one should draw out of this lesson.

Activities/Tasks

Invite the students to read the introduction (Module 1 Lesson Whole class 2) for them to get an overview of where they are headed to and to be aware of the desired result; that is, for them to demonstrate understanding of how to deal with personal challenges.

Your Objectives This part of the module provides the competencies. Remember that the objectives: •

WIPS Provision

Allow the students to go over the Individual work following objectives for them to focus more on the target concepts, language communication and literary skills: are taken from the • determine the effect Curriculum Guide of textual on the (CG) understanding of the text; 20





address the enabling knowledge and skills to be developed to achieve the content and performance standard clarify expectations in terms of what the students should know, understand and be able to do

This part of the lesson also informs the learners of the enabling activity.

• •



• • •

get information from various text types that can be used in everyday life; determine how connected events contribute to the totality of a material viewed; explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to a theme of a particular literary selection; express appreciation for sensory images used; describe and interpret the ethics of public speaking week; and use intensive pronouns.

Remind them that the expected output in this lesson is a quality Brochure on Building Defenses Against Discrimination and the criteria for assessment will organization, graphics, ideas and conventions. Ask the students if they have questions and/or clarifications about the rubrics. Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment of learning. Your Initial Tasks Pedagogy:

Task 1. What am I? Ask the students to read each Whole class statement closely, and identify In presenting this part of what is suggested by each the module, the teacher statement: should be able to: 1. I am a vitamin you need if • diagnose and you have colds. What am activate prior I? knowledge; 2. I am what you hold on to • hook and engage when it’s raining. What learner’s interest; am I? 21







ask questions; encourage student questions; welcome tentative responses as guide to further exploration; and clarify the learners’ expectations and how learning shall be assessed by presenting the enabling activity and the rubrics.

Assessment: •



All the activities in this phase are diagnostic in nature. Scores must be recorded to help the teacher plan the succeeding lessons and not to grade the students since teachers have no inputs in this phase. All answers are tentative and must be written on their notebooks for reference.

3. I am a game you play in a court and all you is to shoot. What am I? 4. I am what you wear when things get blur. What am I? 5. I once protected China from invaders, now I am a wonder for visitors. What am I? •

Put all your answers together to come up with the answer to this riddle. What “D” is built for protection?



The first one to give the correct answer wins.

Use this activity to build schema Task 2. Discrimination Check Ask the students if they have already experienced discrimination at home, in school, among your peers etc. Have them prepare a list of all of their responses using the table (refer Pair to LM). Allow them to: • Share and compare their lists with a partner. • Add items from others’ lists to one’s own list. Use this activity to elicit prior knowledge Task 3. Mirror, Mirror Allow the students to share strategies on how they have combated discrimination. Ask them to pair up, and reflect on these questions:

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- Who do you consider as a person who inspires you because he/she has successfully combated discrimination? - What do you think are the defences he/she has built to overcome discrimination? Write your answers in the balloon. • Allow them to share answers with their classmates. Task 4. Reflection Let the students watch the video or listen to the song “reflection” and answer the questions that follow. After listening, process the activity by using the following questions: 1. What is the song all about? 2. What type of discrimination has been underscored in the song? 3. How is this discrimination related to your life (if there’s any)? 4. Pick out your favorite lines from the song and explain why. Let them share their answers with a partner. Then ask them to sing the song aloud. Task 5. Enduring and Essential Write the question on the board / or use charts for the said purpose: “How do I build the best defenses against challenges to acquire the best quality of life possible for me?”

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Individual work

Ask them to keep this question in mind as they work on the phases of this lesson. Allow them to list logical and temporary answers to the enduring question. Use the table in found in the LM for this purpose. Task 6. Learning Expectations Ask the students to write their targets on what they expect / need / hope to learn in this lesson. • As they explore this lesson, they can add / answer the question and consider how the tasks will help them become better prepared for life. Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment as learning. Task 7. Guide for Reading Whole class In this part of the module, Allow the students to read the the teachers must be able succeeding text carefully. to help the students: Discuss the chart found in the LM as the learners’ guide in reading • make sense the text. of information, Your Text





develop, reflect, rethink, validate, and revise understandings of the lesson; check for understanding; provide feedback; check against content standard (content to content); assess student’s skills (checking learner’s learning progress and interest);

Highlight the author:

Anne Terry White (1896), who was born in Russia, has worked as a teacher, a social worker, and a translator of Russian literature. Amongst her most-loved tale is the “Gorgon’s Head” Provide inputs on oral tradition:

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ask questions for them students to construct their own meanings and provide a variety of learning resources

Assessment: •



All the activities in this phase are formative in nature. Scores must be recorded for instructional decision not to grade the students since teachers have to give inputs in this phase. Refer the students back to the tentative answers they have written on their notebooks for them to validate whether their tentative answers are correct or not. This process is important in validating, rethinking and revising their understanding.

It is the manner in which Whole class information is passed from one generation to the next in the absence of writing or a recording medium. In the days before nearuniversal literacy, bards would sing or chant their people’s stories. They employed various (mnemonic) techniques to aid in their own memory and to help their listeners keep track of the story. This oral tradition was a way to keep the history or culture of the people alive, and since it was a form of story-telling, it was a popular entertainment. As they read the Myth, ask them to look for the heroic qualities of Perseus and the personal challenges he has to overcome to acquire “the gorgon’s head”. Let them accomplish the Story Anticipation Guide in the LM. The teacher must also emphasize the following: 1. Before reading, mark whether the students agree or disagree with the statement. 2. After reading, fill in the column with the page number where they found their answer in the statement. Then ask the following questions for processing: Where you correct? If not, what did you learn?

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Task 8. My Mystery Word Ask the students to unscramble Individual Work the letters to form the correct word in each item found in the LM. Then ask them to write the word in the box. Before reading the text, ask them to reflect on the question, “How do I build the best defenses against challenges to acquire the best quality of life possible for me?” Provide the learners with a copy of the texts. Allow them to write the questions and answers on the breakers (questions inside the boxes) to enrich their understanding of the text. Task 9. Dissecting the Text Test the students’ comprehension Individual Work of the text by asking the following questions: 1. What is “dreadful oracle” that is delivered to King Acrisius? 2. What adventure does Polydectes suggest that Perseus undertake? 3. List three perilous encounters Perseus experiences during his adventure. 4. Explain how the oracle given to King Acrisius is fulfilled. 5. What is Polydectes’s true motive in sending Perseus to kill Medusa? 6. Medusa is beheaded by Perseus, yet her head continues to have power. Explain how the evil gorgon’s head is beneficial to Perseus.

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7. What heroic characteristics does persues have? 8. What help does he get on Small Group his quest? 9. How does Perseus’s quest enable him to prove himself a hero? Task 10. Visualizing the Text Group the students into five (5), each of the group will be given a specific task to work on. Group 1: Create a timeline of events in the story. Group 2: Create a Venn Diagram that compares the characteristics of Perseus and Medusa. Group 3: Create a diagram that shows the challenges overcame by Perseus in his quest to acquire the gorgon’s head. Group 4: Using the gorgon’s head as a diagram, point out at least five utterances of Perseus that strike your group the most. Group 5: Create a diagram that shows the relationship of all the characters in the myth. Process the activity using the following questions: 1. How did you feel about the activity? 2. What diagram is assigned to you? 3. Do you find diagramming difficult? Why or why not? 4. What help would these textual aids provide? Give the students time to respond to the questions and interact with their classmates.

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Before doing the next task, ask the students to go back to their Anticipation-Reaction Guide found in the “Your Text” phase Task 11. Act and Counteract Let the students examine all the group’s outputs from the previous task. Let them note something about the outputs of the other groups. Remind them not to write anything about their own group’s output. Processing the activities using Individual Work the questions below. 1. What specific characteristics does each of the diagrams have you noticed? 2. Are there notable similarities or differences among the diagrams? 3. How would these diagrams help you in understanding the text as a whole? Task 12. My Coat of Arms Remind them that to be able to kill the gorgon, Perseus built an intelligent line of defenses. Then ask the students to identify what these defenses are using the coat of arm diagram found in the LM. Process the activity. Task 13. Make Sense to Me Have them pick out at least ten (10) sentences from the myth “The Gorgon’s Head” that shows sensory images. Let them identify the senses to which these statements appeal.

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Process the activity. Task 14. Triple Treat Present to the students paragraphs lifted from “The Gorgon’s Head”. Ask them to: Task 14A. Circle all the pronouns in the paragraph. That was the last Perseus ever used the horrible head. (1-2) He gave it most willingly to Athene, who kept it ever after. (3) Now that the Polydectes was dead, Danae yearned to go home again and be reconciled to her father. (4) So perseus made the fisherman Dictys King of island and sailed with his mother and Andromeda to Greece. (5-6) But it happened that when they came to Argos, King Acrisius was away from home. (7) Games were being held in Larissa, and Perseus, hearing of them, decided to go there and take part. (8) And there at the game it was that the oracle with Acrisius had received at Delphi was strangely fulfilled. (9) For when it came Perseus’ turn to throw the discus, (10-11) he threw it so that it swerved to one side. (12) It landed among the spectators and killed an old man. That old man was King Acrisius, who had gone to such cruel lengths to avoid the fate which the gods had ordained. Task 14B. Paraphrase at least five (5) sentences by transforming the circled pronouns into reflexive or intensive pronouns

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IF APPLICABLE. Write R on the blank before each item if the pronoun is Reflexive or I if Intensive. Task 14C. Using the previous examples of Reflexive and Intensive pronouns, compare and contrast the two. Task 15. A Hero in Me Let them read the stimulus “A hero saves the day. Saving people and saving lives could be in any form possible.” Then ask them to complete the chart and answer the questions found in the LM. Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment of learning. Your Discovery Tasks Pedagogy: Remember that the discovery tasks allow the students to enrich learning by contextualizing, localizing and differentiating instruction. Your main target in this phase is to provide them the understanding of content as applied to a variety of context. Here is where the teacher associates the theme to the lerners’ personal experience and it should therefore provide them the opportunity to answer the essential questions raised at the beginning of the lesson.

Provide inputs on Discrimination: Discrimination is the unequal treatment provided to one or more parties on the basis of a mutual accord or some other logical or illogical reason. Task 16. Award in the Ward Examine the editorial cartoon Whole class found in the LM. Ask them to share responses. Processing the activity using the following questions: 1. What is the cartoon all about? 2. What kind of discrimination is shown in the cartoon? 3. What would you do if you are in the show of the one discriminated? 4. What would you do if you have the power to change this scenario 30

Assessment: All the activities in this phase are formative in nature and must be recorded but not graded as bases for instructional decision whether to proceed to the next activity depending on the needs of your learners. Refer the students back to the tentative answers they have written on their notebooks to validate whether their tentative answers are correct or not. This process is important in validating, rethinking and revising their understanding. At the end of this phase, just before doing the final task, the teacher may provide a summative test (pen-and-paper or authentic task) which sums up the content standards. Remember that the phase operate in the premise that performance standards are done only if the content standards are addressed and fully understood. This summative test is recorded and graded.

Task 17. Different and Singled Individual work Out Ask the students to work in groups. As a group, they will identify specific scenarios where discrimination is happening. Accomplish the chart found in the LM. Process the activity Task 18. Caps Locked There are situations that would Small Group challenge the students to make use of their specific strength. Each cap below represents a strength one need to use in deciding how to go about the situation described in the LM. Examine the situation and complete the colored caps chart that follow. White Cap – is the optimistic cap that sees all the positive and bright sides of the situation. Black Cap – is the pessimist cap and sees nothing but the disadvantages of the situation. Yellow Cap – is the creative cap and sees the creative and out-ofthis-world side of the situation. Red Cap – is the emotional cap and expresses nothing but feelings about an issue Blue Cap – is the rational cap and judges situations based on facts and obvious evidences.

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Task 19. Creating a Goal Invite the students to stimulus “Building up is like creating a goal. Each defence is achieving success.”

Personal read the Individual work defences personal critical in

Using the organizer found in the LM, ask the students to create a personal goal for the next five years. To process the activity, invite the students to go back to the motive question before reading “The Gorgon’s Head”. Now is the time to answer the question: How do I build the best defences against challenges to acquire the best quality of life possible for me? Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment of learning. Provide a short summative test that sums up the content standard and must be recorded and graded as part of assessment of learning. Task 20. Your Brochure Remind them that they have Individual work been informed at the beginning Final task is the part of the of the lesson that they are to module that addresses the create a quality brochure that performance standard. would feature their own defenses Since this is the final task against discrimination. of Lesson 2, the task is referred to as “enabling Ask them that they can now start crafting their brochure. You can task” or “enabling activity. make use of internet sources for This enabling activity forms important information to make a scaffold to the succeeding their work substantial. activities to equip the Final Task Pedagogy:

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learners with skills in Their brochure will be graded performing the culminating using the rubrics found in the LM. activity or the performance standard for the first quarter. Teachers should bear in mind that this phase: • serves as enabling task for the main product/ performance at the end of each module; • includes tasks that are essential for learners’ development; • is based on real life situations (if the teacher wishes to do modifications or improvisations) Assessment: •

GRASPS-based assessment criteria

My Treasure This part of the module sums up all the essential understandings one must draw out of this lesson. It is important that answers are authentic inasmuch as the word “MY” implies that this part of the lesson is where the students develop a sense of ownership.

When you build defenses, you are minimizing the risk of encountering future problems. Individual work Through these defenses, you learn how to cope with the changing time and turn each challenge into something beneficial.

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Materials: 1.Instructional aids (photos, rubrics) 2.Technology Aids (computer, internet, television, movies DVD) References: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWooGBya_nk www.rubrics4teachers.com

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Module 1: Lesson 3 Sub-theme: Capitalizing on Strengths and Weaknesses Matrix of Essentials Reading / Literary Text

Language / Grammar Focus

Enabling Tasks (leading to Culminating Task)

Modals

Information Ad (TV, radio or print) that would campaign on capitalizing strengths and weaknesses

ORPHEUS by Alice Low

Instructional/Learning Plan Phase of the lesson

Activities/Tasks

WIPS Provision

Your Journey This part of the lesson is composed of two paragraphs. The first paragraph provides a short and vivid introduction of the lesson and the discussion of the subtheme which is “Capitalizing on One’s Strengths and Weaknesses”. The second paragraph provides an overview of the lesson and the enduring question that sums up the enduring understanding one should draw out of this lesson.

Invite the students to read the Whole class introduction (Module 1 Lesson 3) for them to get an overview of where they are headed to and to be aware of the desired result; that is, for them to demonstrate understanding of how to deal with personal challenges.

Your Objectives This part of the module provides the competencies. Remember that the objectives:

Allow the students to go over the following objectives for them to focus more on the target concepts, language communication and literary skills. 35

• •



are taken from the Curriculum Guide (CG) address the enabling knowledge and skills to be developed to achieve the desired content and performance standard clarify expectations in terms of what the students should know, understand and be able to do

This part of the lesson also informs the learners of the enabling activity.





• • •

• • •

determine the effect of textual aids like advance organizers on the Individual work understanding of a text determine the implicit and explicit signals, verbal, as well as non-verbal, used by the speaker to highlight significant express insights based on ideas presented in the material viewed differentiate formal from informal definitions of words explain how the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of a particular literary selection formulate a statement of opinion or assertion describe techniques in public speaking use words and expressions that emphasize a point

Remind them that the expected output in this lesson is a quality Information Ad (TV, radio or print) that would campaign on capitalizing strengths and weaknesses and the criteria for assessment will be concept, design and visuals and copy quality. Ask the students if they have questions and/or clarifications about the rubrics. Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment of learning

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Invite the students to work on the pre-requisites to check their background knowledge, and to In presenting this part of the prepare them for the development module, the teacher should of their skills on the target through the following tasks/activities: be able to:

Your Initial Tasks Pedagogy:

• • •



diagnose and activate prior knowledge; hook and engage learner’s interest; ask questions; encourage student questions; welcome tentative responses as guide to further exploration; and clarify the learners’ expectations and how learning shall be assessed by presenting the enabling activity and the rubrics.

Assessment: •



All the activities in this phase are diagnostic in nature. Scores must be recorded to help the teacher plan the succeeding lessons and not to grade the students since teachers have no inputs in this phase. All answers are tentative and must be written on their notebooks for reference.

Task 1. Boy-Girl Power Make them visualize the strengths of a boy and a girl and how can they make use of these strengths to solve the problem which is to successfully come out of the box. Relate it to the theme capitalizing on one’s strengths and weaknesses. Ask the following processing questions: 1. What qualities of Joaquin have you identified? How about Cristina? 2. In what way could these qualities help them escape from the box? 3. How does the web help you sort boys’ characteristics from the girls? Could you think of other organizers that would best fit the purpose? 4. Do you think we could interchange the qualities of Joaquin and Cristina? What would interchanging their qualities imply? Gender Advocacy and Development is integrated in this activity, and the teacher may also ask other questions relating the topic to the activity. Interchange the names of Joaquin and Cristina and ask students for reactions. Use this activity to motivate.

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Small group discussion

Small group discussion

Task 2. Let it Go! Ask the students to view or listen to the song entitled “Let it Go” from the movie FROZEN.

Small group discussion

Before listening to the song, present a concept map of the words Implicit and explicit on the board to clarify them of what they are expected to do in the activity.

Small group discussion

Ask them to determine implicit and explicit signals from the lyrics that are used by the singer to highlight significant points. Ask the following questions:

Individual work

1. What is the song all about? 2. What explicit and implicit signals used by the singer to highlight significant points have you indentified? 3. How do these signals help add value to the lyrics and over all meaning of the song? Remember that all the students’ responses in the initial tasks are tentative/initial answers and the teacher must, therefore, accept all the answers. Task 3. What are you made of? Ask the students to revisit the objectives. The objectives will tell the students what topics are to be expected for discussion. Considering the goals of the module. Ask them to etch everything that they know about the topic on the stone tablet, all that they are not sure in the quill and all that they still want to know in the pencil.

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Use this activity to build schema and diagnose prior knowledge Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment of learning. Pre-reading:

Your Text In this part of the module, the teachers must be able Task 4. Mystery Words Present the task using a chart to help the students: and ask the students to answer • make sense the following questions: of information, 1. What can you notice with develop, reflect, the way these words were rethink, validate defined? ,and revise 2. How do you differentiate understandings of definition A from B? the lesson; 3. Which of the two is the • check for better way to define a understanding; word? provide feedback; check against Task 5. From Page to Page content standard Discuss with the students what (content to myth is. Provide additional inputs content); if possible. • standard (content to Before reading the text, ask the content); • assess student’s guide question: “To what extent skills (checking would you use your strength to learner’s learning save a person you love?” progress and Have them read Orpheus by interest); Alice Low. Inform them that • ask questions for while reading, there are breakers them to construct (questions enclosed in a box) their own meanings that they ought to answer / think and about. • provide a variety of Here are different reading learning resources techniques you can use: - (Reading aloud) Throw a ball to a student who is going to read the story. The student holds the ball while reading. On your signal, the student then stops reading and pass the ball on somebody whom he wants to continue reading. 39

Whole class

Assessment: • All the activities in this phase are formative in nature. Scores must be recorded for instructional decision not to grade the students since teachers have to inputs in this phase. • Refer the students back to the tentative answers they have written on their notebooks to validate whether their tentative answers are correct or not. This process is important in validating, rethinking and revising their understanding.

Repeat the process until everyone is done reading. - (Silent Reading) Ask the student to read the story silently. Ask them to pause every two minutes to organize the sequence of the story in their minds. You may use the breakers (questions inside the box) for these purpose. After reading, they may answer the following questions 1. What is the greatest strength of Orpheus? How about his weakness? 2. What effect does Orpheu’s music have on people and gods? Cite two examples in the text. 3. Why does Orpheus decide to rescue his wife from the underworld? 4. Why does Orpheus look back to see if Eurydice is following him? 5. What reasons might the gods have for allowing Orpheus and Eurydice to be reunited? 6. Explain why the gods put a condition on permitting Orpheus and his bride to return to earth. 7. What main characteristic of this text makes it a myth? 8. To whom does Orpheus owe his talent? Why was he able to win the sympathy of the gods? 9. In what situations were the gods willing to help humans?

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Whole class

10. Does the story reveal certain realities about Greeks? What are these? 11. Do these realities influence the way you think and live? How? Task 6. Element-Array Ask the students to form five (5) groups. Each group will draw their own bulb puzzle and answer the field required by each piece of the puzzle. Give them about five or ten minutes to do the task. Ask a representative from each group to report the group’s output. It is also important that you give the other groups to comment on the output presented by the other groups to make the discussion interactive. After all the group representatives are done with the presentation, ask them the following questions: 1. How do the elements help you understand the flow of the story? 2. In what way do the elements contribute to your understanding of the selection’s over-all theme? 3. How is a puzzle related with understanding elements to make up a whole? Task 7. Alice Low Provide inputs or recall previous discussions on tone, mood, technique, and purpose of the author in writing a text.

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After your short discussion, ask them to recall the story of Orpheus. Present to them the chart found in task 6 of this lesson and ask them to fill out the bubbles with the corresponding answers. Ask someone to present the output in class and allow everyone to have a free discussion about each other’s responses. Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment of learning. Your Discovery Tasks Pedagogy: Remember that the discovery tasks allow the students to enrich learning by contextualizing, localizing and differentiating instruction. Your main target in this phase is to provide them the understanding of content as applied to a variety of context. Here is where the teacher associates the theme to the learners’ personal experience and it should therefore provide them the opportunity to answer the essential questions raised at the beginning of the lesson.

To begin with this phase, provide the students with inputs on movie adaptations. Please refer to the learner’s module for this purpose. The teacher may add inputs if necessary. Task 8. Piece of Pi Ask the students to view the 2012 film adaptation of Life of Pi by Yann Martel. While watching, ask them to take note of the important details in the movie. Ask them to answer the following questions: 1. In his introductory note Yann Martel says, “This book was born as I was hungry.” What sort of emotional nourishment might Life of Pi have fed to its author? 2. Pondicherry is described as an anomaly, the former capital of what was once French India. In terms of storytelling, what makes this town an appropriate choice for Pi’s upbringing? 42

Whole class

Assessment: All the activities in this phase are formative in nature and must be recorded but not graded as bases for instructional decision whether to proceed to the next activity depending on the needs of your learners. Refer the students back to the tentative answers they have written on their notebooks to validate whether their tentative answers are correct or not. This process is important in validating, rethinking and revising their understanding. At the end of this phase, just before doing the final task, the teacher may provide a summative test (pen-and-paper or authentic task) which sums up the content standards. Remember that the phase operate in the premise that performance standards are done only if the content standards are addressed and fully understood. This summative test is recorded and graded.

3. Yann Martel recalls that many Pondicherry residents provided him with stories, but he was most intrigued by this tale because Mr. Adirubasamy said it would make him believe in God. Did Pi’s tale alter your beliefs about God? 4. Early in the novel, we discover that the narrator majored in religious studies and zoology, with particular interests in a sixteenthcentury Kabbalist and the admirable three-toed sloth. In subsequent chapters, he explains the ways in which religions and zoos are both steeped in illusion. Discuss some of the other ways in which these two fields find unlikely compatibility. 5. Pi’s full name, Piscine Molitor Patel, was inspired by a Parisian swimming pool that “the gods would have delighted to swim in.” The shortened form refers to the ratio of a circle’s circumference divided by its diameter. Explore the significance of Pi’s unusual name. 6. How would the novel’s flavor be changed if Pi’s sole surviving animal were the zebra or Orange Juice? (We assume that if the hyena had been the only surviving animal, Pi would not have lived to tell us his story.)

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7. Pi sparks a lively debate when all three of his spiritual advisors try to claim him. At the heart of this confrontation is Pi’s insistence that he cannot accept an exclusively Hindu, Christian, or Muslim faith; he can only be content with all three. What is Pi seeking that can solely be attained by this apparent contradiction? 8. What do you make of Pi’s assertion that we are all “in limbo, without religion, until some figure introduces us to God”? Do you believe that Pi’s piousness was a response to his father’s atheism? 9. Among Yann Martel’s gifts is a rich descriptive palette. Regarding religion, he observes the green elements that represent Islam and the orange tones of Hinduism. What color would Christianity be, according to Pi’s perspective? 10. How do the human beings in your world reflect the animal behavior observed by Pi? What do Pi’s strategies for dealing with Richard Parker teach us about confronting the fearsome creatures in our lives? 11. Besides the loss of his family and possessions, what else did Pi lose

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when the Tsimtsum sank? What did he gain? 12. Nearly everyone experiences a turning point that represents the transition from youth to adulthood, albeit seldom as traumatic as Pi’s. What event marks your coming of age? 13. How does Mr. Patel’s zoo keeping abilities compare to his parenting skills? Discuss the scene in which his tries to to teach his children a lesson in survival by arranging for them to watch a tiger devour a goat. Did this in any way prepare Pi for the most dangerous experience of his life? 14. Why did Pi at first try so hard to save Richard Parker? 15. Pi imagines that his brother would have teasingly called him Noah. How does Pi’s voyage compare to the biblical story of Noah, who was spared from the flood while God washed away the sinners? Before asking the students to accomplish Task 8, the teacher must provide inputs on strategies in public speaking. After the discussion, provide them with a copy of the selected dialogues from Life of Pi and ask them to deliver the lines using the techniques.

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After doing the task, have the students answer the following questions: 1. Describe the public speaking techniques used by your partner in each of the quotations above. 2. How do these techniques help you in persuading your partner? Task 8.1 Thin Line Ask the students to create sentences opposite each picture using modals expressing probability. The teacher might provide inputs on modals that express probability before doing the activity. Task 8.2 A Quote on Quote Present the stimulus found in the learning material. The situation is about surviving a shipwreck by being accurate in all the movements and actions. Ask them to put themselves in the shoes of Mr. Patel, to internalize the situation. As they do the activity, ask them to use appropriate modals that express “ability”. Task 8.3 Classifying Things Require the students to picture the Patel’s zoo in their minds. Ask them to classify the animals using modals that express “possibility”. Task 8. 4 Market! Market! Ask the students to establish the relationship of each of the paired marketing concepts in the learner’s material. Ask them to use modals expressing probability in their answers.

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Task 9. Modal Modes Have the students imagine Orpheus, Pi Patel, and Queen Elsa sitting together in a conference about how they capitalized on their strengths and weakness to overcome their individual challenges. 1. Ask them what would be their response? 2. Which of these strategies would you adopt and why? Task 10. A Gift of Change Ask the students to remember the gifts of Orpheus, Pi and Queen Elsa. Ask them If they possess all the gifts the three characters have, how would they use them in improving/resolving each of the social issues presented in the learner’s material. Task 11. A Letter Later Ask the students to write a letter to themselves that they have to open 20 years from now. Have them highlight in their letters they were able to capitalize their strengths and weaknesses to be a better person that they have become 20 years ahead of time. Encourage them to use statements expressing opinions or strong assertions in their letter. Task 12. Best Magic Ever Allow the students to read the stimulus: “Overcoming individual challenges is a difficult task but not that difficult to require magic and dissolve them at a snap of our fingers. The best way to address them is to have the willingness to change. The best magic ever is the recognition of your strengths

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and admission of weaknesses these will make you a better person.” Ask them to contemplate on the stimulus. Ask the students if they are ready to proceed to the next phase of the lesson as part of assessment of learning. Provide a short summative test that sums up the content standard and must be recorded and graded as part of assessment of learning. Final Task Pedagogy: Final task is the part of the module that addresses the performance standard. But since this is the final task of Lesson 3, the task is referred to as “enabling task” or “enabling activity. This enabling activity forms a scaffold to the succeeding activities to equip the learners with skills in performing the culminating activity or the performance standard for the first quarter. Teachers should bear in mind that this phase: •





serves as enabling task for the main product/ performance at the end of each module; includes tasks that are essential for learners’ development; is based on real life situations (if the teacher wishes to do modifications or improvisations)

Remind the students that at the end of the quarter, they are to compose a short persuasive text using a variety of persuasive techniques and devices. Remind them also that in this particular module, the enabling activity would be an Information Ad Campaign. Tell them that the succeeding tasks will walk them through the process of making the Info Ad Campaign. Task 13. Ad Type Cast Ask the students to recall as many TV commercials as they can. Then analyze the commercials using the following questions: 1. Do only boys play with action toys? 2. Do only girls use kitchen appliances? 3. Do only women cook food? 4. Is one gender depicted in a superior role? After the presentation, process the activity using the following questions.

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Individual work

Assessment: •

GRASPS-based assessment criteria

1. Which ad is the most sexist? Least sexist? 2. What implication does it make on capitalizing one’s strength and weaknesses? 3. How would this help you in crafting your own information ad campaign? Task 14. Ask a Professional Ask them to speak to the school nurse/doctor/dentist about some advertising claims. Example questions could be: Is one medicine better than another? Does some toothpaste make your teeth whiter? Ask the students to present some of their works to the class. Process the activity using the following questions: 1. What do these claims tell about advertising? 2. How would this information help you in crafting your own information ad campaign? Task 15. Past Forward Ask the students to make a research about a person or group of people whose advocacies are to make people self-reliant (strengths and weaknesses). Be sure to include responses to the following questions: • What was this person or group fighting for? • What were some of the efforts they used for achieving social justice?

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• • •

Were these efforts successful? Why or why not? How was this success measured? Are they still pursuing these ideals? If not, has someone else or another organization continued to pursue their work?

Task 16. Thanks for the Ad! Allow the students to draw inspiration from Task 14. Ask them to make their own Information Ad (TV, radio or print) that would campaign on capitalizing strengths and weaknesses. Present the rubrics. Ask them if there are needed clarifications. Allow the students to craft their own rubrics as part of assessment of learning. Allow the students to present their outputs in the class. Provide feedback. My Treasure This part of the module sums up all the essential understandings one must draw out of this lesson. It is important that answers are authentic inasmuch as the word “MY” implies that this part of the lesson is where the students develop a sense of ownership.

Ask the students to read the lines below: “In order to capitalize your strength, you first have to know what your strengths are and for what purpose are you intending to use them. Recognizing yourweaknesses will give more meaning to your strengths. If you can transform your weaknesses into strengths and opportunities, you can never go wrong.” Using the lines as stimulus, provide them with enough time to revisit all the activities they have done in the lesson before completing the open–ended questions. 50

Materials: 1. Instructional aids (photos, rubrics) 2.Technology Aids (computer, internet, television, movies DVD) References: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEKLFS-aKcw. Published December 13

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Module 1 Lesson 4 Sub-theme: Dealing with Personal Challenges Matrix of Essentials Enabling Tasks (leading to Culminating Task) Compose an ARACHNE translated by Special expressions emphasizing impressive photo Olivia Coolidge a point essay Reading / Literary Text

Language / Grammar Focus

Instructional / Learning Plan Phase of the lesson Your Journey This part of the lesson is composed of two paragraphs. The first paragraph provides a short and vivid introduction of the lesson and the discussion of the subtheme which is “Discovering Personal Challenges”. The second paragraph provides an overview of the lesson and the enduring question that sums up the enduring understanding one should draw out of this lesson.

Your Objectives This part of the module provides the competencies. Remember that the objectives: • are taken from the Curriculum Guide (CG)

Activities/ Tasks

Invite the students to read the introduction (Module 1 Lesson 4) for them to get an overview of where they are headed to and be aware of the desired result; that is, for them to demonstrate understanding of how to deal with personal challenges. 1. Emphasize to them that they will have a lot of opportunities to improve in the target concepts, language communication and literary skills. They will find the need to deal with personal challenges. 2. Motivate them to answer the BIG Question: How do I deal with personal challenges? (Accept tentative answers.)

For the learners to focus on the target concepts, language communication and literary skills, set time for them to read the following objectives: • draw generalizations and conclusions based on the material viewed (EN10VC1h-1.5/2.5)

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WIPS Provision

Whole class

Individual work





address the enabling knowledge and skills to develop/achieve the desired content and performance standard clarify expectations in terms of what students should know, understand and be able to do

This part of the lesson also informs the learners of the enabling activity.

• • • • • •

• •



compare new insights with previous learnings (EN10RC1g-21) make generalization (EN10LC1g-8.7) give meanings of words through using dictionary and/ or context clues (EN10V-1d-13.9) explain how tone and mood contribute to the theme of the myth (EN10LT-1f-2.2.3) use special words / expressions that emphasize points (EN10G-1e-26) use factual and opinion based statements as supports in persuasive writing (EN10WC1d-12.2) employ examples as supports in public speaking (EN10OL1e-3.16.1) select, organize, produce visuals and graphics to complement and extend the meaning of a photo essay (EN10WC-1e-12.3) compose a short persuasive text expressing one’s stand on an issue. (EN10WC-1e.12.3)

Remind them that they are expected to present an impressive photo essay emphasizing how they can deal with personal challenges. The rating of the photo essay will be based on the following criteria: visuals /graphics, text representations/captions, organization and impact.

Your Initial Tasks Pedagogy: In presenting this part of the module, the teacher should be able to: • diagnose and activate prior knowledge;

Invite the students to work on the prerequisites to check their background knowledge, and to prepare them for the development of their skills on the target concepts through the following tasks/ activities:

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Individual work

Individual work



hook and engage Task 1. Picture Perfect learner’s interest; 1. Create interest by asking them • ask questions; to look closely at the drawing of encourage student (a grade 10 student grappling questions; welcome up the steps leading to the tentative responses entrance of the dark, cold, as guide to further slippery and gloomy cave), and exploration; and relate it to the theme: dealing • clarify expectations with personal challenges. and how learning 2. Instruct them to answer the shall be assessed guide questions (refer to Module by presenting the 1 Lesson 4) (Accept varied enabling activity answers). and the rubrics. 3. Make them read the quotation and relate the picture’s message before they will form groups of Assessment: five, and talk about what they • All the activities have in common. (Responses in this phase are may vary.) diagnostic in nature. Scores must be recorded to help Task 2. A Puzzling Trial 1. Ask them to form dyads and the teacher plan the think about a problem, a trial or a succeeding lessons challenge they have experienced and not to grade the that really puzzled them. students. 2. Remind them to follow the directions in their LM. (Responses may vary) All answers are tentative and must be written Task 3. Three Controls on theirnotebooks for 1. Let them form triads, and list reference. at least three questions about personal challenges that they hope to answer in this lesson. 2. Make them take turns in sharing these questions, in finding what they have in common, and then check them against this essential question: How do I deal with personal challenges? (Accept tentative answers.)

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Individual work

Small group

Pair work

Triads

Task 4. Setting Expectations Remind them to use the essential question as a focal point, to project and to write their answers to this question: What do I expect or hope to learn? (Responses may vary)

Your Text In this part of the module, the teacher must be able to help the students: • make sense of information, develop, reflect, rethink, validate, and revise understandings of the lesson; • check for understanding; provide feedback; check against content standard (content to content); • assess student’s skills (checking learner’s learning progress and interest); • ask questions to enable the students to construct their own meanings/ understandings and • provide a variety of learning resources

Lead the students to explore, process, illustrate, and crystallize their knowledge to get a deeper understanding of the target concepts, language communication and literary skills. Let them do the following differentiated, integrated and interactive activities/ tasks. Task 5. SGDA (Small Group Differentiated Activities) The Golden Door 1. Instruct them to form small groups of eight, and to read “ARACHNE” a myth from Ancient Greece, as translated by Olivia Coolidge. 2. Remind them to work on their assigned task and to share their ideas, thoughts, and experiences with the class. Group 1: Word Finders 1. Ask the learners to look for difficult/unfamiliar words in the selection, and clarify the meaning of each through using a dictionary or context clues. 2. Process the learners’ answers. Expected/possible answers eg. 1.) obstinacy – stubbornness 2.)gorgeous – beautiful 3.)strive – do your best 4.) descend – originate 5.) etc. 3. Give feedback

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Small group work

Small group work

Assessment: • All the activities Group 2: Image Makers 1. Give the learners a set of in this phase questions for them to identify are formative in the tone and the mood of the nature. Scores selection. must be recorded 2. Make them read “Arachne” for instructional translated by Olivia Coolidge decision not to then discuss the answers to the grade the students. questions (See Module 1 Lesson • Refer the students 4). back to the tentative 3. Process the learners’ answers. answers they Expected/possible answers: have written on 1.) Her being reckless and too their notebooks to proud of her skill validate whether 2.) She tried to hang herself. their tentative 3.) She’s too proud of her skill. answers are correct 4.) The prevailing mood in or not. This process Arachne is being weary on is important in one’s stubbornness (the validating, rethinking state of being difficult or and revising their unreasonable or persistent). understanding. “I would challenge her in a contest but she would not come.” 5.) Tone used – didactic or moralistic (teaching a lesson, enlightening) 6.) Posing and giving in to the challenge clearly conveys the moral lesson of the story.

Small group work

Group 3: Justifiers 1. Provide the learners a set of questions for them to focus on character traits, conflict and how it is resolved, and the message of the selection. 2. Let them discuss the answers to the questions (see Module 1 Lesson 4). 3. Process the learners’ answers. Expected answers to question number

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1.) Arachne’s pride 2.) She dared/ challenged even the gods to match her skill. 3.) She paid a high price for her pride obstinacy when she failed in matching Athena’s skill; then she came to her downfall 4.) skillful but too proud/ obstinate 5.) “I will not live under this insult.” And she hanged herself. 6.) (Accept varied answers) Group 4: Theme Builders 1. Let them discuss the answers to the questions (see Module 1 Lesson 4). 2. Accept varied answers for question number 1. 3. Let them find out how poetic justice is manifested in the selection and how to connect the meaning of the selection to real life situation. They can also assess the effectiveness of the literary devices used by the author. Emphasize to them that poetic justice is employed in the selection if it has happy ending where a virtue is rewarded and the wrong doing is punished. Possible answer for question number 2: The use of poetic justice is effective because it gives us hope and inspiration to promote, “good always triumphs at the end”. 4. Ask the students to recall other literary devices that help in clarifying the theme like:

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Small group work



fantastic details (magic becomes realistic) • verisimilitude (life like quality) • illusion of reality (fictional or fantastic world is habituated by people of human condition with unquestionable moral values). 5. Discuss with them how they help bring out the meaning of life. Make them cite passages from the selections for proofs. 6. Clarify the generalization or statement about human experience (theme) the story makes. Make them explain how the title “Arachne” relates to the theme of the selection and how it is used as a symbol to clarify the theme. Possible answers to question number 3: 1.) I believe the old woman would not punish Arachne. Remember she advised her not to claim to be equal to the immortal gods, to be contented with her fame of being the best spinner and weaver. 2.) Accept varied answers. 3.) At the end, wrongdoing is punished and good triumphs over evil. 4.) Yes, Arachne represents/ suggests the ugliness and evilness of pride. 7. Give feedback.

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Whole class

Task 6. Language Watch A. Which is Which 1. Ask the students to classify each of the words inside the box (see Module 1 Lesson 4 ). 2. Allow them to tell which is a conjunction, parenthetical expression, or adverb/ conjunctive adverb. 3. Process the learners’ responses. Individual Possible responses: work Conjunctions: however, as Parenthetical Expressions: to illustrate, on the contrary, in most cases, in like manner, provided that, on the condition that, supposing, to reiterate; adverb/conjunctive adverb: exactly, apparently, still, differently, most importantly, in my opinion, as such, as long Small Group 4. Lead them to revisit/review work how to use conjunctions, parenthetical expressions, or adverb/conjunctive adverbs. B. Giving Emphasis 1. Let the students read the sentences lifted from “Arachne”, and ask them to focus on the italicized words/ phrases. Let them find out how each expression is used. 2. Let them work in small groups of five, and answer the questions (refer to Module 1 Lesson 4). Expected answers for question: 1.) Each of them emphasizes a point and helps in clarifying the stand of the speaker 2.) Yes, they stress the importance of the action.

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3. Process the learners’ answers and review with them other examples of these special expressions that signal emphasis (especially, finally, consequently, immediately, apparently, the important point is, luckily, immensely, fortunately, similarly, unfortunately, etc.) 4. Make them revisit the box entries in Task 6A, and check the words/expressions in their list against the special words and expressions (that emphasize points) inside the box.

Small group work

Here are some commonly used expressions emphasizing points persuasively: In my opinion, in most cases, I believe, I suppose, As far as I’m concerned, Speaking for myself, etc. C. Blissful 1. Ask them to pair up and take turns in answering the questions (see Module 1 Lesson 4). 2. Process the learners’ answers. for nos. #1–3 (answers may vary). 3. Give feedback

Pair work

D. Comfort Zone 1. Invite them to reflect on this question: Do you believe in sticking to your comfort zone instead of taking yourself out of it when you face a challenge? 2. Let them write the reasons why they say so. 3. Request them to give examples to prove their point and to use special expressions to emphasize and to clarify their stand. (Responses may vary.) 4. Process the students’ output and give comments as well as suggestions.

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Your Discovery Tasks Pedagogy: Remember that your discovery tasks allow the students to enrich learning by contextualizing, localizing and differentiating instruction. Your main target in this phase to provide them the understanding of content as applied to a variety of context.

Invite the students to reinforce, prove, extend, enriched and enhance their understanding of the target language communication and literary skills and of dealing with personal challenges by getting involved in meaningful, challenging and real - life tasks. Activity Ideas Task 7. SGDA for Beyond Text - Real Life Extension. Invite the students to form four groups and draw lots.for a task to work on. Remind them to share their ideas, thoughts, and experiences with the class.

Here is where the teacher associates the theme to Group 1: Thematic Funny Home Movies the personal experience or Videos of the learner and should 1. Ask them to recall examples therefore provide them of funny or exciting movies the opportunity to answer or videos they have watched. the essential questions Relate the theme of “Arachne”to established at the beginning the movies or videos in focus or of the lesson. watch “Never Give Up in Life” (a truly inspirational video). 2. Invite them to talk about the similarities and effects of the movies/videos on their lives. Focus on dealing with personal challenges. 3. Require them to report back to class and share thoughts with other groups. (Responses may vary.) 4. Give comments and suggestions. Group 2: The Best Advice 1. Let them list down problems that young people meet in dealing with challenges. One of them will pose as guidance counsellor and the rest as troubled young people.

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Small group work

Assessment: All the activities in this phase are formative in nature and must not be graded but 2. Then, make them present The must be recorded as bases Best Advice from a guidance for instructional decision counsellor in the form of a skit. whether to proceed to to (Responses may vary) the next activity or insert 3. Give comments and suggestions. another activity depending on the needs of your Group 3: Power Play learners. 1. Make them identify and talk about Refer the students back a controversial issue (subject in to the tentative answers the news or in personal life) that they have written on their is related to a personal challenge notebooks to validate they feel strongly about, or one whether their tentative that they want to ignore and answers are correct how they would help others see or not. This process is their point of view. 2. Have them share and consolidate important in validating, their ideas.(Responses may rethinking and revising their vary) understanding. 3. Give comments and suggestions. At the end of this phase, just before doing the final Group 4: Fact + Opinion = The Best task, the teacher may Way to Deal with Challenges provide a summative 1. Invite them to write a journal on test (pen-and-paper or the effects of life’s challenges authentic task) to sum up on them, and identify which of the content standards. these challenges they are facing Remember that the phase now. 2. Make them present them with operates in the premise factual recounts of incidents as that performance standards supports. are done only if the content 3. Remind them to explain what standards are addressed challenge they expect to find and and fully understood. This will try to resolve successfully. summative test is recorded Then, share and consolidate and graded. their ideas. (Responses may vary). 4. Give comments and suggestions.

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Small group work

Invite the students and guide them in demonstrating and making independent applications of their understanding Final task is the part of the of the target concepts, language module that addresses the communication and literary skills by performance standard. composing an impressive photo essay. This is the evidence or transfer of their But since this is the final learning. task of Lesson 4, the task 1. Prepare your students on their is referred to as “enabling major task for this lesson, which task” or “enabling activity”. is to produce an impressive photo essay. This enabling activity forms a scaffold to the succeeding 2. Remind them to use graphics or activities to equip the visuals and text representation learners with skills in since this is another concept performing the culminating that uses the comic book format activity or the performance to present information in new standard of the first quarter. ways and to make learning fun. For them to make it as best as Teachers should bear in they can, they must follow some mind that this phase: steps. 3. Advise them to bear in mind some • serves as enabling grand ideas for the production of task for the their photo essay by following main product/ the guideposts (refer to Module performance at 1 Lesson 4) before they engage the end of each themselves in composing an module; impressive photo essay. Make • includes tasks them keep these points in mind that are essential as they go through the process. for learners’ development; Task 8. For A VIP (Very Impressive • is based on real Photo) Essay life situations (if the Let them form small groups of five and teacher wishes to do the following tasks: do modifications or A. Connect and Decide improvisations). 1. Instruct the learners to think about and list the five most Assessment: important things they would • GRASPS-based want to do in facing or dealing assessment criteria with personal challenges.

Final Task Pedagogy:

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Whole class

Small group work

2. Make them tell whether they are based on fact or opinion. 3. Discuss the choices and decide on the top three. 4. Help them come up with the photo essay’s main idea by letting them choose one literary selection (from those they have explored in class/read) that presents ways of dealing with challenges and make them consider these points as well: • Which is most liked? • Which do you feel a close connection with? • Which do you want to read more in public? 5. Guide them to come up with an introduction by using a surprising incident, interesting question, and characters from their chosen selections. B. Scout for Remarkable / Influential Figures 1. Lead them to come up with supports and evidences by choosing at least three characters (e.g., Athena, Orpheus) who have made a great impression on them in dealing/resolving personal conflicts. Choose also the characters who have influenced their outlook in life. 2. Ask them to rank these characters according to their preference and do a character inventory by considering their qualities, attitudes, or traits.

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Small group work

Remarkable/Influential Character Inventory

Rank Character Qualities Attitude Athena Orpheres

Small group work

3. Make them highlight three outstanding or dominant character traits that help them resolve personal conflict and let them consider their differences and similarities. Outstanding/Dominant Character Traits

Character 1. 2.

Similarities Differences

3. C. Unlimited 1. Invite them to take a closer look at the samples of photo essay using this link—http://education. nationalgeographic.com/media/ file/GAW_photo_912edited922. pdf and find out how each establishes the tone, mood and theme of the essay through visuals and text. 2. Help your students to establish the tone, mood, and theme of the essay through visuals and text. Require them to collect photos, pictures, drawings, and video segment (if possible) illustrations that show and relate to the theme or the message of your chosen literary selections. Use them as supports and evidences to support their stand.

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3. Remind them to provide a catchy and meaningful title to the photo essay, explain its significance. Make the text serious and straightforward, and express opinion (personal feelings or beliefs) about the characters and the incidents that support them. 4. Organize the visuals and text. Establish the connection between and among the visuals the texts, and the main idea. 5. Let them edit, refine, and polish their work as they use the following rubrics as guide. 5 4 3 2 Creativity (presents original or unique style to make it interesting) Visual, Graphics (uses sound color, content of photos and garaphics represent the argument and convey persuasive messages) Text Representation Captions (uses words and phrases that call up strong feeling; uses logical and emotional appeal; examples, statistics to prove one’s stand; has convincing tone) Organization (presents reasons, arguments, facts that are logically organized around a particular point)

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1 Total

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Small group work

5

4

3

2

1

Total

Impact (convinces the audience to accept the ideas and moves them to action) Total

Legend: Rating – Description 5 4 3 2 1

-

Excellent Very Impressive Impressive Needs Revision Inadequate

Formula: C+VG+TC+O+I= Total ÷ 5 = 5 6. Evaluate their output and check it against the criteria set in rubrics.

My Treasure This part of the module sums up all the essential understandings one must draw out of this lesson. It is important that answers are authentic inasmuch as the word “MY” implies that this part of the lesson is where the students develop a sense of ownership.

1. Invite the students to summarize, reflect and focus on the essential points of the lesson that they enjoyed, found helpful, and would like to work further on. 2. Let them keep a record of all of these, then add their answers to the questions (refer to Module 1 Lesson 4). 3. Finally, make them write their responses in their journal.

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Materials: 1. Instructional aids (graphic aids, rubrics) 2. Technology aids (computer, internet, television, movies, DVD) References: 1. Balu, Sheridan., et al. Writers Craft. Illinois: McDougal-Littell A Houghton MIfflin Company, 1998 2. Berliner, Lawrence E., et al. Prentice Hall LITERATURE Copper ed. 1991. New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1991. 3. Davidson, Jeff. The Complete Guide to Public Speaking. 4. Probst, Robert., et al. Elements of Literature Fourth Course with Readings in World Literature. Austin: Holt Rinehart and Winston, 2000.

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Module 1 Lesson 5 Sub-theme: Winning Over Individual Challenges Matrix of Essentials Reading/Literary Text 1. How Odin Lost His Eye retold by Catherine F. Sellew 2. Comfort from The Koran translated by N.J. Dawood

Language/Grammar Focus

Enabling Tasks (leading to Culminating Task)

Modals indicating obligation and necessity

Participate in a short but meaningful panel discussion on winning over personal challenges

Instructional/Learning Plan Phase of the lesson

Your Journey This part of the lesson is composed of two paragraphs. The first paragraph provides a short and vivid introduction of the lesson and the discussion of the subtheme which is “Discovering Personal Challenges”. The second paragraph provides an overview of the lesson and asks the enduring question that sums up the enduring understanding one should draw out of this lesson.

Activities/Tasks

1. Motivate the students to read the introduction (refer to Module 1 Lesson 5 ) in order to get an overview of where they are headed to and be aware of the desired result as they explore the theme of winning over the challenges for a more fulfilling life. 2. Emphasize to them that they will have a lot of opportunities to improve the target concepts, language communication, and literary skills as they can find ways in facing these challenges squarely. 3. Invite them to give tentative answer to the BIG Questions:

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WIPS Provision

Whole class

How important is winning over your challenges? In what ways can winning over these challenges prepare you for a more fulfilling life? (Accept tentative answers) Your Objectives This part of the module provides the competencies. Remember that the objectives: • are taken from the Curriculum Guide (CG) • address the enabling knowledge and skills to develop/ achieve the desired content and performance standard; • clarify expectations in terms of what the students should know, understand and should be able to do. This part of the lesson also informs the learners of the enabling activity.

Guide the learners to focus more on the target concepts, language communication and literary skills by asking them to read and reflect on the following objectives: • compare new insights to previous learning (EN10RC-1f-21) • show appreciation for songshighlighting how to win over challenges (EN10LC-1h-14.3) • draw conclusions based on the material viewed (EN10VC1g-1.5/2.5) • use formal and informal definition to clarify the meaning of words (EN10V-1g-13.9) • compose a persuasive text expressing one’s stand on an issue (EN10WC-1g-12.3) • use modals indicating obligation and necessity (EN10G-1g-3.6) • analyse how characterization contribute to the effective development of the theme (EN10LT-1e-2.2) • stress the importance of winning over challenges (EN10WC1d-12.2) Remind them that they are expected to participate in a short but meaningful panel discussion on winning over personal challenges. It will be based on the following criteria: focus, clarity of ideas, persuasive techniques used, response to questions asked, and language convention. 70

Whole class

Individual work

Individual work

Your Initial Tasks

Invite the learners to work on the prerequisites to check their prior knowledge Pedagogy: and to prepare them for the development of their skills on the target concepts In presenting this part through the following tasks/activities of the module, the teacher should be able Task 1. Connect to the Past to: 1. Let them form groups of five. • diagnose and For three minutes, they will think activate prior back and list down personal knowledge; challenges they have experienced • hook and or encountered in their readings. engage 2. Make them check their responses learner’s against the box entries about interest; Challenges Affecting Me (see • ask questions; Module 1 Lesson 5) before they encourage will consider the positive attitudes: student enthusiasm, perseverance and questions; strong will power as listed in the welcome figure (see Module 1 Lesson 5). tentative 3. Let them decide on which of these responses as positive attitudes is especially guide to further important for young people to exploration; practise in order to win over a and difficult challenge. • clarify 4. Invite them to share their thoughts expectations with the rest of the class. and how learning shall Task 2. Outlook Turn Up be assessed 1. Let them form a triad, and view by presenting the drawing showing a young the enabling and determined looking cyclist activity and the imagining a victory/success on rubrics. the race. He is facing an endless road ahead of him deciding to Assessment: overcome great odds. All the activities in this 2. Let them use picture clues to phase are diagnostic predict content and see how it in nature. Scores must relates to their idea about winning be recorded to help over challenges. Invite them to the teacher plan the answer the questions (refer to succeeding lessons Module 1 Lesson 5). and not to grade the students.

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Triad

All answers are tentative and must be written on their notebooks for reference.

3. Make them list down questions about winning over personal challenges that they still have. Remind them to check each against this essential question: Considering today’s context, what can we possibly do to win over challenges? 4. Invite them to give tentative answers to the essential question. Task 3. Tune In 1. Invite the learners to listen to “Roar” by Katy Perry, and find out what it says about challenges. 2. Ask them to list down words and expressions that relate to ways they deal with challenges and share with partner what the invitation of the song is all about.

Individual work

Individual work

Task 4. Looking forward Invite them to use the essential question as a focal point, project and jot down what they believe are necessary to learn. ( Accept tentative answers). Your Text In this part of the module, the teachers must be able to help the students: • make sense of information, develop, reflect, rethink, validate, and revise understandings of the lesson; • check of understanding; provide feedback; check against content standard (content to content);

Lead the students to explore, process, illustrate,and crystallize their knowledge to get a deeper understanding of the target concepts, language communication and literary skills through the following differentiated, integrated and interactive activities/ tasks. Task 5. SGDA - Understanding the Text 1. Invite them to read, “How Odin Lost His Eye” as retold by Catherine F. Sellewand form small groups of six to work on the assigned tasks. 2. Remind them to share ideas, thoughts, and experiences with the class. Process the learners’ answers.

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assess student’s skills (checking learner’s learning progress and interest); ask questions to enable the students to construct their own meanings/ understandings and; provide a variety of learning resources.

Assessment: • All the activities in this phase are formative in nature. Scores must be recorded for instructional decision not to grade the students. • Refer the students back to the tentative answers they have written on their notebooks to validate whether their tentative answers are correct or not. This process is important in validating, rethinking and revising their understanding.

Group 1: Vocabulary Hunt 1. Instruct the learners to look for difficult words found in the selection “How Odin Lost His Eye” and to use a dictionary to find their denotative meaning, then give their own understanding of each (connotative meaning). 2. Make them follow the instructions in their Learning Module 1 Lesson 5 and remember to process the learners’ answers. (Possible answers: 1. snarl –dirty look, 2. forge-imitate, 3. roar- yell, 4.raven- black bird, etc.) 3. Give feedback. Group 2: The Power of C2 (Conflict and Character) 1. Make the learners focus on conflict and character in “How Odin Lost His Eye” through discussing the answers to the questions (see Module 1 Lesson 5) and write these conflicts on the chart. 2. Guide them during the discussion and clarification of these possible answers for the question. 1.) Which to prioritize, duty to his family (his son) or duty to his people? Entries in the conflict chart: phrases or sentences that express his Duty to his family (particularly to his son)

Duty to his people

a.“To give in his son would be like giving up life and all that was wonderful around him”.

a.“One eye was a small sacrifice to win knowledge of how to help them”.

etc.___________

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etc.__________

Small group work

Small group work

Small group work

For questions nos. 2 & 3 (accept varied responses). 2.) Yes, it does because it shows how strong-willed he has been. 3.) Courageously, he sacrificed his eye to help his people. 4.) Answers may vary. 5.) He has seen sorrow and death as well as joy at the glorious end. 6.) He has remained the epitome of a great leader until the end.

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3. Give feedback. Group 3: Lasting Virtue 1. Provide the learners with questions for them to focus on how the ending prove the importance of positive attitudes to win over challenges. 2. Guide them during the discussion and clarification of these answers for question number: 1.) Even today, there are still people like Odin who can do great sacrifices for significant others. 2.) Featured behaviors a. Admirable behavior - allfather attitude, being wise, doing sacrifices for others b. behavior condemned by gods- evil actions and hatred of the elves 3.) Answers may vary 4.) Odin, of course, since he promoted an enduring virtue that has been necessary until now. 5.) & 6.) Answers may vary. 7.) Odin/the gods 8.) Answers may vary 3. Give feedback.

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Small group work

Group 4: Thinking it Through 1. Provide the learners with questions for them to clarify the meaning or the essence of the selection. 2. Process the learners’ responses. (Responses may vary). 3. Give feedback. Group 5: Theme connection 1. Ask them to point out which of these ways (refer to Module 1 Lesson 5) are easy, difficult or not very important choice to make to win over a difficult challenge and explain why it is important to hear/ to read/ to talk about myths, tales, legends or other stories. 2. Make them clarify how they will convince or persuade others to agree with or to believe them. 3. Make them explain why it is important to practice and to uphold them. (Responses may vary). 4. Give comments and suggestions. Group 6: Winning Appeal 1. Make them recall how the myths, legends, tales and other stories they have encountered in class appeal to them. 2. Emphasize to them the possible persuasive techniques in myth (her appeal, basic humanity appeal, and promise appeal). 3. Make them explain which techniques are still used in today’s persuasive writing and speaking. (Answers may vary). 4. Give comments and suggestions. Task 6. Language Line Ask the students to do the following activities/tasks: A. Sense of Value 1. Ask them to form a triad and read

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Small group work

Small group work



the sentences from “How Odin Lost His Eye” (refer to Module 1 Lesson 5) 2. Let them answer the questions (refer toLM) 3. Process the learners’ answers. Possible answers to the question number 1.) All of them are auxiliary verbs with specific functions. 2.) They are positioned before the main verbs. 3.) a) must, b) need to, c) ought to, d) ought not to 4.) Modals 5.)They specifically clarify the action. 4. Give feedback. B. Saving Grace 1. Ask them to pair up, and take turns in answering the questions (refer to LM). Answers may vary. 2. Remind them to use the modals that express obligation like: must, should and ought to; need to for necessity and ought not to that indicates prohibition, disapproval of something that was done in the past. (Answers may vary). Give comments and suggestions. C. Rewarding 1. At this his point, ask them to write at least five desirable traits or habits they need to develop , and five undesirable traits or habits they ought to weed out. 2. Invite them to write a short paragraph persuading others how important it is to develop these desirable attitudes and to weed out these undesirable habits as well for them to win over challenges. They will clarify their stand on

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Triad

Pair work

how to win over challenges, and use appeal to reason or emotion they have learned. 3. Remind them to use modals. (Answers may vary). 4. Give feedback. Your Discovery Tasks Invite the students to crystallize, prove, Pedagogy: extend, enrich, and enhance their understanding of the target language Remember that your communication and literary skills. They discovery tasks have to show how to deal with personal allow the students challenges positively, through getting to enrich learning involved in meaningful, challenging and by contextualizing, real-life tasks. localizing and differentiating Task 7. instruction. Group 1: Striking Lines Your main target in this 1. Ask the learners to form six phase to provide them groups, and work on their the understanding of assigned task. content as applied to a 2. Remind them to share ideas, variety of context. thoughts, and experiences with the class. Here is where the 3. Invite the learners to reread teacher associates the “How Odin Lost His Eye”, and theme to the personal choose memory lines (strong experience of the lines or language that are striking learner and should /memorable) therefore provide them a. Remind them to explain how the opportunity to these lines can help them answer the essential win over challenges in life. questions established (Responses may vary.) at the beginning of the b. Give feedback. lesson.

Group 2: Follow up 1. Ask the group members to think of a story they read, TV program, and movie they’ve viewed/ watched, or real-life experience which portrayed a lesson about winning over challenges. 2. Have them explain how it is similar to “How Odin Lost His Eye”. (Responses may vary.) Give feedback. 77

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Assessment: All the activities in this phase are formative in nature and must not be graded but must be recorded as bases for instructional decision whether to proceed to the next activity or insert another activity depending on the needs of your learners.

Group 3: The Gift 1. Invite them to imagine that their best friend or loved one will celebrate a birthday and they will think of a gift for him/her. This can be in the form of an advice on how to win over a challenge. 2. Let them explain how it values winning over challenges and how it gives inspiration to people. 3. Finally, request them to sing it before the class. (Responses may vary). 4. Give comments and suggestions.

Refer the students back to the tentative answers they have written on Group 4: The Power of A Song 1. Group members will think of and their notebooks to share how a simple tune (rap validatewhether their tentative answers are song) or a folk song highlights the correct or not. This value of winning over challenges. process is important in 2. Let them explain how it values validating, rethinking winning over challenges and how and revising their it gives inspiration to people. understanding. 3. Finally, request them to sing it before the class. (Responses At the end of this phase, may vary). just before doing the final 4. Give comments and suggestions. task, the teacher may provide a summative Group 5: What Always Worked test (pen-and-paper 1. Ask the group members to or authentic task) to find, and present persuasive sum up the content techniques in ads or commercials standards. Remember 2. Make them explain the effect of that the phase operate these persuasive techniques in in the premise that ads or commercials (Responses performance standards may vary). are done only if the 3. Give comments and suggestions. content standards are addressed and Group 6: Thoughts for Today 1. Ask the group members to fully understood. This write whatever is in their wildest summative test is imagination about the following: recorded and graded. • kind of challenge you don’t want to meet or do when you leave this room.

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2. 3. 4.

5. Final Task Pedagogy: Final task is the part of the module that addresses the performance standard.

the challenge you (more than anything else in the world) prefer to meet, or have when you walk out of this room. Instruct them to give reasons to support their responses. (Responses may vary). Instruct them to give reasons to support their responses. (Responses may vary). Remind them to use modals in sharing ideas, thoughts, and experiences about winning over individual challenges. Give comments and suggestions.

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Invite the students and guide them in demonstrating and making independent applications of their understanding of the target concepts, language communication and literary skills by participating in a short but meaningful panel discussion on winning over personal challenges. This is the evidence or transfer of their learning.

But since this is the final task of Lesson 5, Task 8. Life Skills Connection the task is referred to 1. Invite the, learners to read the as “enabling task” or excerpt from “The Koran” as “enabling activity”. translated by N.J. Dawood (refer to Module 1 Lesson 5). This enabling activity forms a scaffold to the Let them find out what it says succeeding activities about challenges in life and what to equip the learners must be their goal as well as their with skills in performing attitudes to challenges. the culminating activity 2. Ask them to recall literary or the performance characters who serve as models standard of the first of moral values that are shared, quarter. preserved, and survived. Invite Teachers should bear in them to answer the guide mind that this phase: questions (refer to Module 1 • serves as Lesson 5). enabling Possible answers to the question: task for the 1.) The persona believes that main product/ God, the compassionate and performance at merciful, has always been the end of each lifting up our hearts to Him and module; relieves us from our burdens.

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includes tasks that are essential for learners’ development; is based on real life situations (if the teacher wishes to do modifications or improvisations)

Assessment: •

GRASPS-based assessment criteria

2.) Every hardship is followed by ease. 3.) Continue to hurdle/ overcome these challenges. 4.) Emotion and reason 5.) (Answers may vary). 6.) (Answers may vary). Sample answer: Lines No. 1-4 are specially convincing because they emphasized that God always gives us comfort and relief whenever we are burdened. 3. Invite the learners to give examples of catchy hook (words that strongly appeal to emotion) used in the excerpt. Let them talk about how these words or lines help persuade them to win over challenges. Task 9. Giving your Best 1. Invite them to participate actively in a panel discussion and remind them to use the skills they have learned. 2. Let them do the following for an effective panel discussion. (Refer to Module 1 Lesson 5). • Form a panel of 5 to 6 members (1 chairman to act as the facilitator, initiator to start up the discussion and 5 panelists or discussants). • Prepare for a panel discussion by choosing the best way to win over challenges. Refer them to the guide questions (see Module 1 Lesson 5). • Remember the preliminaries for the panel discussion from developing set of guide questions to planning on the points to be covered to outlining. (see Module1 Lesson 5) • Revisit the features of and the required format for the panel

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discussion (refer to Module1 Lesson 5). • Recall also the steps on how to apply the conventions and strategies in group speaking (refer to Module 1 Lesson 5). • End the discussion by summarizing the panel’s views and have an evaluation of the participants’ performance. 3. Invite them to use the following rubrics as guide. 5 Focus (concentrate on a specific topic that is clear, significant and supportable) Teamwork (manifest coordination and collaboration among the panelists to clarify the topic at hand) Persuasive techniques (use logical and emotional appeals; avoids fallacies) Clarity of ideas (clearly present reasons, facts and opinion as supports are clearly presented) Response to questions asked (think before speaking; present relevant ideas; especially evidences are clearly used; give reasons) Language Convention (use simple, direct, concise and clear expressions free from errors are used; articulate responses clearly) Total

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Legend: Rating – Description 5 4 3 2 1

- Excellent - Very Impressive - Impressive - Convincing - Beginning

Formula = F+T+PT+C+R+L = Total / 6 = 5 4. Evaluate their output and check it against the criteria set in rubrics. My Treasure This part of the module sums up all the essential understandings one must draw out of this lesson. It is important that answers are authentic inasmuch as the word “MY” implies that this part of the lesson is where the students develop a sense of ownership.

Invite them to summarize, think back, reflect and focus on the essential points of the lesson that they enjoyed, found helpful, would like to work further on, and consider essential in life. They can use them as guide for self-improvement. The Magic Five. 1. Invite them to reflect on how they performed on this lesson, and make a plan on how to improve their language communication skills. 2. Request them to use the sentence starters (see Module 1 Lesson 5 ). 3. Invite them to write on these essential points. 4. Let them keep a record of all of these for them to be reminded clearly of their learning progress. They must present possibilities and plan for improvement. Invite/ suggest to them that they can post their journal via any social networking site these essential points. They can also encourage others to make comments on the posted material for words of encouragement.

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Materials: 1. Instructional aids (graphic aids, rubrics) 2. Technology aids (computer, internet, television) References: 1. Balu, Sheridan., et al. Writers Craft. Illinois: McDougal-Littell A Houghton MIfflin Company, 1998. 2. Berliner, Lawrence E., et al. Prentice Hall LITERATURE Copper ed. 1991. New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc. 3. Constel English ( ATelecourse For Teachers of English) Speaking SegmentVol.II. 1999. Quezon City: People’s Television, Inc. 4. Davidson, Jeff. The Complete Guide to Public Speaking. 5. Probst, Robert., et al. Elements of Literature Fourth Course with Readings in World Literature. Austin: Holt Rinehart and Winston, 2000. 6. Strong, William and Mark Lester. Writers Choice. Ohio: Glencoe / McGraw-Hill, 1996.

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Module 1 Lesson 6 Sub-theme: Turning Challenges to Opportunities Matrix of Essentials Reading/Literary Texts 1. The Analects of Confucius translated by Arthur Waley 2. The Thief who Became a Disciple - Zen Parables translated byPaul Reps 3. Practice and Uphold Positive Attitude by: Lee Emm

Language/Grammar Focus

Enabling Tasks (leading to Culminating Task

Modals expressing simple futurity and willingness

Phase of the lesson Your Journey This part of the lesson is composed of two paragraphs. The first paragraph provides a short and vivid introduction of the lesson and the discussion of the subtheme which is “Discovering Personal Challenges”. The second paragraph provides an overview of the lesson and asks the enduring question that sums up the enduring understanding one should draw out of this lesson.

Instructional / Learning Plan Activities/ Tasks 1. Invite the students to read the introduction (Module 1 Lesson 6) for them to get an overview of where they are headed to and be aware of the desired result; that is, for them to demonstrate understanding of how challenges can be turned to opportunities. Let them discover more about themselves, others and the world. 2. Emphasize to them that they will have a lot of opportunities to improve in the target concepts, language communication and literary skills as they prove that 84

Compose a short but powerful persuasive essay

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challenges can be frightening, but can be transformed into opportunities. 3. Motivate them to answer the BIG Question: How do challenges affect you? (Accept tentative answers.) Your Objectives This part of the module provides the competencies. Remember that the objectives:

Set time for the students to read the following objectives for them to focus more on the target concepts, language communication and literary skills. • compare new insights with previous learning (EN10RC• are taken from the 1f-21) Curriculum Guide • draw generalizations and (CG) conclusions from the materials • address the viewed (EN10VC-1g-1.5/2.5) enabling • use denotation and connotation knowledge and to clarify meanings of words skills to develop/ (EN10V-1h-13.9) achieve the • appraise literature as a way of desired content expressing and resolving one’s and performance personal conflicts (EN10LTstandard 1i-18) • clarify expectations • state the effect of a literary in terms of what piece in one’s value system students should (EN10LT-1g-3) know, understand • use appropriate modals to and be able to do express simple futurity and willingness (EN10G-1g-3.6) This part of the lesson also • •determine the effectiveness informs the learners of the of argument, supports and enabling activity. stand of the speaker (EN10OF1g-12.3) • employ the techniques in public speaking to convey ideas (EN10 OL-1g-3.16.1) • write a short persuasive text using persuasive techniques (EN10WC-1g-3.16.1)

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Remind them that they are expected to composea short but powerful persuasive essay on turning challenges to opportunities. It will be based on the following criteria: focus/ content, persuasive techniques used, development /organization, clarity of ideas , emphasis, language mechanics and convention. Invite the students to work on the pre requisites to check their background knowledge, and to prepare them for the development of their skills on the In presenting this part of target concepts through the following the module, the teacher tasks/activities : should be able to: Your Initial Tasks Pedagogy:

Task 1. I Always Connect Game diagnose and 1. Let them form three groups, activate prior and think about ways to win knowledge; over challenges. • hook and engage 2. In two minutes, ask them to learner’s interest; list all the possible ways that • ask questions; they know in order to win over encourage challenges. student questions; 3. Let them do the listing in the welcome tentative form of a game by following responses as the mechanics. (See Module guide to further 1 Lesson 6) Answers may vary. exploration; and 4. Check items on their lists • clarify expectations against the ways to win over and how learning challenges (refer to Module 1 shall be assessed Lesson 6 [See entries inside by presenting the the box]). enabling activity 5. Ask them to rank these ways in and the rubrics. their order of importance before answering the questions. Assessment: (Answers may vary). • All the activities 6. Let them share their responses. in this phase 7. Give feedback. are diagnostic in •

nature. Scores must be

Task 2. View and Make Judgment / Generalization 1. Let them view the drawing, or present the video clip of “She without arm, he without leg-

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recorded to help the teacher plan the succeeding lessons and not to grade the students. All answers are tentative and must be written on their notebooks for reference.

2.

3.

4.

5.

ballet-Hand in Hand” (a very unique and unequalled ballet performance) and see how it relates to challenges and opportunities. Make them use the details of the drawing or the video clip’s clues to predict how one can turn challenges to opportunities. Invite them to look closely at the drawing and reflect on what it implies, then make them read the quotation “Embrace each challenge in your life as an opportunity for selftransformation” by Bernie S. Siegel and relate its message to what the drawing depicts. Let them answer the guide questions (refer to Module 1 Lesson 6). Possible answers: • We can face our challenges in life and turn them to opportunities. • The awed audience appreciating the ballet performance of the two disabled dancers. • ( Answers may vary). Give feedback.

Task 3. Three in Control 1. Let them form triads, and list down at least three questions about challenges and opportunities that they hope to be answered in this lesson. 2. Let them take turns in sharing these questions, and find what they have in common. 3. Check them against this essential question: How do I turn challenges to opportunities?

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Triads

Task 4. Mapping the Targets Allow them to use the essential question as a focal point to make a map of what they expect or hope to learn in this lesson. Make them copy the chart (Module 1: Lesson 6) and fill it out with the necessary entries. Your Text In this part of the module, the teachers must be able to help the students: • make sense of information, develop, reflect, rethink, validate, and revise understandings of the lesson; • check for understanding; provide feedback; check against content standard (content to content); • assess student’s skills (checking learner’s learning progress and interest); • ask questions to enable the students to construct their own meanings/ understandings and • provide a variety of learning resources

Lead the learners to explore, process, illustrate, crystallize their knowledge and get a deeper understanding of the target concepts, language communication and literary skills through the following differentiated, integrated, and interactive activities/ tasks. Instruct them to read, “from The Analects” by Confucius, as translated by Arthur Waley. Let them find out how the given questions are answered. SGDA for the Stakes. Let them form small groups of eight, and work on their assigned task. Remind them to share their ideas, thoughts and experiences. Group 1: Meaningful Search 1. Make them find words from the selection which are rich in meaning. These can be in the form of denotation and connotation. 2. Process the learners’ expected/ possible answers

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D i f f i c u l t Denotative C o n n o - Word of word Meaning t a t i v e strong Meaning connotation unsoured

Sweetened

have sugary good intention

spare

Unused

extra

emergency

chastisement

Scold

tell off

punishment

reverence

Admiration

worship

amazement

disgrace

Shame

not to give honor

scandal

etc.

Group 2: Theme connection 1. Words/Groups of words that suggest challenges and those that suggest opportunities Possible answers: Challenges (to remain unsoured, one’s merit not recognized, anxiety, lost of self-respect, govern people by regulation, etc.) Opportunities (behave well to parents, be cautious in giving promises, have kind feelings to everyone, study the polite arts, etc.) 2. Make them point out which of them you have practiced already, then share their effects in your life. 3. Assign one member of the group to pose as a speaker persuading others to agree with their ideas.

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4. Have them be open for comments and suggestions on how to enhance persuasive speech. Group 3: Taking a Stand - For or Against 1. Let them consider the argument presented in the selection “from the Analects” by Confucius and use the questions as guide. Possible answers to the question. 1.) to display positive attitude toward challenges (turn them to opportunities) 2.) He uses examples/supports and he uses ETHOS (appeal to morality), PATHOS (appeal to emotion) and LOGOS (appeal to reason). 3.) Passages from “The Analects” that argue FOR Passage No.

AGAINST Passage No.

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10, 11,13,15,17

12, 14, 16

4.) Definitely, they can help one to persuade others on the importance of promoting moral virtues to change challenges to opportunities. 2. Let one pose as a speaker persuading others to agree. 3. Give comments and suggestions on how to enhance a persuasive speech. 4. Review with the learners the salient points in the kinds of appeal like: • Appeal to reason (LOGOS)logical arguments based on verifiable evidence like facts, statistics, or expert testimony.

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Appeal to emotion (PATHOS) – statements intended to affect the readers’/ listeners’ feelings about the subject like - Charged or loaded words (words with strong positive or negative associations). - Bandwagon appeal suggests that you will be odd if you don’t do what everyone else is doing. -Testimonialrecommendations made by celebrities who are paid to praise the product. - Plain folks – ordinary looking man shown using the product

Group 4: Thinking it through 1. Let them answer the guide questions (see Module 1 Lesson 6) Possible answers for the question 1.) How to respect/treat others (be they good or bad) 2.) both 3). Highlighted values: appreciate and practise the good ideas you learn, be trusting, be cautious, good, righteous, humble, prompt, contented, have strong will power, etc. 4. & 5). Responses may vary. 2. Assign one member of the group to pose as a speaker persuading others to agree with their ideas. 3. Give comments and suggestions on how to enhance persuasive speech.

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Group 5: Taking Challenges as Opportunities 1. Ask them to look for interesting words or group of words that express the possibility of turning challenges to opportunities (Refer to Module 1 Lesson 6) Sample answers: • “To demand much from oneself and little from others is the way (for a ruler) to banish discontent.” • “To remain unsoured even though one’s merits are unrecognized by others is that not after what is expected of a gentleman?” 2. Let them answer the guide questions. (Refer to Module 1 Lesson 6.) Possible answers for the question 1) passage # 3, 6, 11, 2, 3, & 4 (Responses may vary). Group 6: Enduring Experiences 1. Let them discuss their answer to the questions.(See Module 1 Lesson 6 and accept varied responses) 2. Assign one member of the group to pose as a speaker persuading others to agree with their ideas. 3. Give comments and suggestions on how to enhance persuasive speech.

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Group 7: Additional Attention to Make Personal Adjustments 1. Make them focus on the entries in the box, and discuss the answer to the questions after it. Possible answers 1.) All 2.) Yes it is possible. 2. Invite them to talk about how each of these suggested ways can help solve today’s problems. 3. Assign one member of the group to pose as a speaker persuading others to agree with your ideas. 4. Give comments and suggestions on how to enhance persuasive speech. Task 5. Small Group Differentiated Activities for the Stakes A. Like A Disciple 1. Make them read the short parable (see Module 1 Lesson 6) and answer the questions after it. Expected answers: 1.) The thief and Shichiri 2.) The challenge of •

the thief – to be grateful to Shichiri and to follow his footsteps. • Shichiri treated the thief/intruder well in spite of what the thief did to him

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2. The thief became good and turned from the crooked or evil path to a straight one following Shichiri. 3. It is effectively used. 4. It is effectively used. 5. Good triumphs over evil. 6. Both are seldom practice nowadays. What did he/she learn from the experience? 7. (Answers may vary) B. Looking Ahead 1. Ask them to reread the statements lifted “from Analects” and “Zen Parables”. (Module 1 Lesson 6) then consider how the underlined words are used. 2. Let them form triads to discuss answers to the questions (Refer to Module 1 Lesson 6). 1.) They are all auxiliary or helping verbs. 2.) They are positioned before the main verbs. 3.) a. shall b. will c. would d. may / might 4.) modals 5.) They help clarify the intention of the speaker/ writer. 3. Emphasize to them that modals are used as auxiliary or helping verbs with special functions like: • Shall indicates simple futurity and obligation. • Should expresses past obligation.

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• • • •

Will expresses simple futurity and willingness. Would expresses invitation or past possibility. Might is used in reported speech for past time. May expresses future possibilities mixed with doubt and uncertainty.

C. Using Modals 1. Let them pair up and take turns in answering the questions. (Refer to Module 1 Lesson 6.) Possible answers for question number 1.) All the parts of “The Analects” and “Zen Parables” respond to the needs of the time. 2. to 4.) Answers may vary. D. Alter ego 1. Ask each of the learners to pretend as Henry Sy or a literary figure or anybody whom they believe is a very successful person. 2. Remind them to share their views on the possibility of directing challenges to opportunities. 3. Let them inspire their audience by citing true-tolife experiences and to use logical and emotional appeal as persuasive strategies. 4. Instruct them to use modals whenever necessary.

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5. Remind them to avoid fallacies or errors like: • attacking the personattacking the person’s character and not the issue. • circular reasoning – the reasons presented are just restatement of the writer’s opinion. • false cause-and- effecttwo unrelated events are considered related; claim one event 1 cause event 2. • hasty generalizationmaking generalization about everyone or everything based only on one or two cases. • Responses may vary. 6. Give comments and suggestions.

Your Discovery Tasks Pedagogy: Remember that your discovery tasks allow the students to enrich learning by contextualizing, localizing and differentiating instruction. Your main target in this phase to provide them the understanding of content as applied to a variety of context.

Invite the students to reinforce, prove, extend, enrich, enhance their understanding of the target language communication and literary skills and of dealing with personal challenges through getting involved in meaningful, challenging and real-life tasks. Make them focus on their target to become healthy and developed young adult who capitalize on their strengths and capabilities through directing challenges to opportunities at all costs. With these in mind, they have to form four (4) big groups and complete their tasks.

Here is where the teacher associates the theme to the personal experience Task 6. SGDA Leading to Completion of the learner and should therefore provide them Group 1: In Another Dimension the opportunity to answer the essential questions 1. Invite the students to imagine established at the that Confucius was with them beginning of the lesson. and he advised them to

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Assessment: All the activities in this phase are formative in nature and must not be graded but must be recorded as bases for instructional decision whether to proceed to the next activity or insert another activity depending on the needs of your learners.

change the course of their lives. From what they learned, they will explain how their perceptions have changed and what they plan to do. 2. Remind them to use logical and emotional appeal as their persuasive strategies and to use modals whenever necessary. 3. Assign one member of the group to play the role of a speaker persuading others to agree with his/her ideas. (Responses may vary). 4. Give comments and suggestions on how to enhance a persuasive speech.

Refer the students back to the tentative answers they have written on their notebooks to validate whether their tentative answers are correct or not. This process is Group 2: Spotlight to Follow up important in validating, 1. Make them think of someone rethinking and revising who really inspired them to turn their understanding. challenges to opportunities and explain how she/he influenced At the end of this phase, their way of thinking, decision, just before doing the final and philosophy in life. task, the teacher may 2. Let them relate him/her to an provide a summative object/plant/animal and explain test (pen-and-paper or what could symbolize him/her. authentic task) to sum up 3. Assign one member of the the content standards. group to play the role of as a Remember that the phase speaker persuading others to operate in the premise that agree with the group’s ideas. performance standards (Responses may vary) are done only if the content 4. Give comments and standards are addressed suggestions on how to and fully understood. This enhance a persuasive speech. summative test is recorded and graded.

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Group 3: Connecting to 2day 1. Invite them to recall a selection that highlights the importance of turning challenges to opportunities in order to preserve honor, humility and other positive attitudes. 2. Ask them to read and follow the rest of the instructions in their Module 1 Lesson 6 and role play how the character might respond to the pressing news. (Responses may vary.) 3. Give comments and suggestions on how to enhance the persuasive speech. Group 4: Inner Speech 1. Make them think of a problem they have and consider turning challenges to opportunities. 2. Let them read and follow the rest of the instructions in their Module 1 Lesson 6 before they talk about the importance of turning challenges to opportunities. 3. Let them: • give examples to support their argument and use logical or emotional appeal for their audience to believe them. • end up their speech with a strong position that restates their stand and calls their audience to action. • assign one member of the group to pose as a speake persuading others to agree with them. 4. Give comments and suggestions on how to enhance a persuasive speech.

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Help the learners to demonstrate their understanding of the target concepts and English language communication presenting a short but Final task is the part of the skills by powerful persuasive essay on turning module that addresses the challenges to opportunities. performance standard. Final Task Pedagogy:

But since this is the final Task 7. Life Skills Connection task of Lesson 6, the task Task 7A. Preparation for My Target is referred to as “enabling 1. Invite them to read the sample task” or “enabling activity”. persuasive essay, “Practice This enabling activity and Uphold Positive Attitude” forms a scaffold to the by: Lee Emm. succeeding activities to 2. Guide them to come up with equip the learners with the answers to the questions skills in performing the (Refer to Module 1 Lesson 6) culminating activity or the Expected answers for question performance standard of number: the first quarter. 1.) Introduction, body, and Teachers should bear in conclusion mind that this phase: 2.) Logically arranged/ organized • serves as enabling 3.) For introduction: task for the subject/ topic, stand/ main product/ position, quotation performance at for body: supports, the end of each examples, reasons, module; persuasivetechniques, • includes tasks appeal to reason, emotion that are essential and morale for conclusion: for learners’ summary, restating the development; stand/belief/position, call to • is based on real action life situations (if the 4.) Yes teacher wishes to 5.) To practice and uphold do modifications or healthy positive attitude improvisations) whatever the situation, anytime, anywhere

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Assessment: •

GRASPS-based assessment criteria

6. Yes the evidences are strong based on true to life situations. 7. Definitely, the purpose is very clear from the statement of the subject/ stand (first paragraph) to the body (reasons, examples and evidences) to conclusion (restatement of the stand and call to action). 8. Yes. To exemplify: • “I strongly believe that we must come together to practice and uphold positive attitudes toward work, life and challenges.” • “This should be done from initial impulse to completion like what we observe in a myth....” • “Remember the saying, The best measure of a man is not what he says he can do but what he does.” • “This is absolutely true.” • “This is a healthy positive attitude that we must put into action....” 9. appeal to moral, emotion and reason 10. Yes, the argument s are well reasoned and logical. 11. Yes. 12. Quotation, examples, trueto-life situations 13. Persuasive essay Task 7B. A Call Up for Order Box Game 1. Let them form three big groups, and assign at least three representatives for each before

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they read the nine entries in the box. (See Module 1 Lesson 6.) 2. Make them read and follow the instructions (Refer to Module Lesson 6) before they will check their responses against the basic steps to follow in writing a persuasive essay (refer to Module 1 Lesson 6). Task 7C. Steps in Writing a Persuasive Essay 1. Let them follow the steps in choosing a subject. (See Module 1 Lesson 6) 2. Ask them to begin writing the thesis statement/issue/point of concern. 3. Make them begin this way: I believe we should_________ or Have you ever thought of____________ or strongly believe we will ______________. 4. Let them write nonstop (for 10 minutes) the first draft of their persuasive essay. 5. Remind them to use special expressions or opinion signals. 6. Let them add an interesting question, quotation or an anecdote. 7. Make them give reasons, add examples and use them as supports. 8. Have them summarize their main reasons. 9. Let them do the Sharing through the EQS (Encourage, Question and Suggest) Refer to Module 1 Lesson 6. 10. Invite them to praise, give comments, ask questions and make suggestions.

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11. Make them suggest ways on how to make others agree on what they believe on. 12. Let them use the following rubrics as their guide. 5

4

3

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1 Total

Focus/Content (states a clear position at the beginning until the end of thework; topic captures the reader’s attention) Persuasive Techniques (uses strong and effective persuasive techniques and details support the thesis and the stand of the writer)

Pair work

Development / Organization (has strong organizational plan; has logically arranged statements from the most important tothe least important or vice versa; develops the topic thoroughly with examples and supports) Clarity of ideas (presents clear and sound arguments and evidences)

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5

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2

1 Total

Emphasis has interesting and attention grabbing introduction, strong conclusion that includes a call to action Language Mechanics and Convention (displays minor error in spelling, punctuation, grammar and are they varied in structure?

Total Legend: Rating - Description 5 4 3 2 1

-

Excellent Very Impressive Convincing Developing/Acceptable Beginning

Task 7D. Revising and Polishing Let them revise and rewrite their essay by incorporating the changes based on comments and suggestions made. Task 7E. Publishing Make them present a final clean copy and/or read the persuasive essay to the class. Evaluate their output and check it against the criteria set in the rubric.

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My Treasure This part of the module sums up all the essential understandings one must draw out of this lesson. It is important that answers are authentic in as much as the word “MY” implies that this part of the lesson is where the students develop a sense of ownership.

1. Invite the students to summarize, reflect and focus on the essential points of the lesson that they enjoyed, found helpful, and would like to work further on. 2. Let them keep a record of all of these, then, add their answers to the questions (Refer to Module 1 Lesson 6). Remind them of their learning progress and the possible plan for improvement.

Individual work

Materials:

1. Instructional aids (graphic aids, sample persuasive essays, rubrics) 2. Technology aids (computer, internet, television, movies, DVD) References: 1. Balu, Sheridan., et al. Writers Craft. Illinois: McDougal-Littell A Houghton MIfflin Company, 1998 2. Berliner, Lawrence E., et al. Prentice Hall LITERATURE Copper ed. 1991. New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1991. 3. Davidson, Jeff. The Complete Guide to Public Speaking. 4. Probst, Robert.,et al. Elements of Literature Fourth Course with Readings in World Literature. Austin: Holt Rinehart and Winston, 2000.

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Post Test in Grade 10 ENGLISH Module 1 Directions: Read each item carefully and follow directions as indicated. Write the letter of the most appropriate answer on your answer sheet. Part 1 Knowledge A. Most Important Elements in Persuasve Writing Directions: Copy the letter of the word/phrase that is best described by each numbered item. A.central claim B. evidences C. conclusion D. technique 1. restates the argument and expresses a call to action 2. the statement that asserts what the writer/speaker wants the reader/ listener to believe on or to do 3. contains the reasons, examples,statistics, opinions used to support a point of view or stand

B. Special Terms Directions: Match each term in column B with the most appropriate description in column A. A B ___4. Catchy hook A. traditional story that is rooted in a ___5. Fallacy particular culture, is basically religious and ___6. Myth serves to explain a belief, a mysterious natural phenomenon or a ritual ___7. Persuasive essay B. the statement experiencing the preposition ___8. Thesis statement argument or view C. words that strongly appeal to emotion D. erroneous appeal to emotion used as persuasive technique E. tries to convince readers to do something or to accept the writer’s point of view C. Grammar Modals Directions: Choose from the pool of answers the writer’s/speaker’s intention as hinted by each underlined expression.

A. ability

B. necessity C. obligation D. willingness

__9. Mav: Is this a challenge I must face? __10. Sol: Of course, you need to accept that as part of the bargain. __11. Mav: I don’t believe I will do it now. After all I’m not yet ready for it. __12. Sol: I believe you can do it if you try

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Intensive and Reflexive Pronouns Directions: Determine whether each underlines word is used as an intensive or reflexive promoun. Write In if it is intensive and Re if it is reflexive pronoun. 13. The Greeks themselves felt at home with human Gods. 14. They knew how they amused themselves even in banquets. 15. Even Hera, the jealous wife herself could be feared. Part II. Understanding A. Reading and Literature Directions: Read the following passage carefully, and copy the letter of the word or phrase that best completes each numbered item. 1.) It’s true! At certain points in our lives, we stop and ask this question: How do we turn challenges to opportunities? 2.) Yes, it’s not easy, but that doesn’t mean it is impossible to do. 3.) This means that we need to remember the important ways to put into action. 4.) Of course, the first thing to do is to reflect not in thoughtlessness but we need to start to focus and analyze the competition taking place between the positive and negative limits of our emotions. 5.) Eventually we ask, “How do we feel about the challenge? 6.) Do we feel hopeless, angry, jealous, worried, inadequate, insecure, fearful or do we feel their negative counterparts? 7.) It’s silly to allow them to overrule our outlook in life. 9.) We must envision always that progress and success come to those who adhere to practice hard work, determination, courage, perseverance, humility, consciousness, justice, self-confidence, trust, respect, love and other potent secrets of inner strength and success. 10.) We need to be realistic that we need some if not all of them to turn challenges to opportunities; thereby this will make us all contented and happy. 16. The main point of the article is best expressed in sentence no.___. A. 1 B. 2 C. 5 D.10 17. The generalization or statement about life or human experience the passage make is to __________. A. bring out the best in you C. struggle against the odds B. stand up for one’s belief D. take strength to bear up the odds 18. To “predict” is a/an _____ of the word “envision” in Sentence no. 9. A. connotation B. denotation C. opposite D. symbol 19. This article/passage would most probably interest a/an ____. A. adolescent B. biography C. personal essay D. persuasive essay 106

20. The passage is an example of a/an _______. A. anecdote B. opinion C. reasons D. statistics 21. The writer’s comment/reaction about challenges and opportunities is best supported by ___. A. facts B. opinion C. reasons D. statistics 22. The strongest evidence used by the writer to support his opinion about turning challenges to opportunities is stated in Sentence no. ___. A. 3 B. 6 C. 7 D. 9 23. An effective persuasive technique used by the author to emphasize his point is through appealing to _____. A. emotion B. moral C. reason D. both A and C 24. The fallacy committed in Sentence no. 7 is _____. A. attacking the person C. hasty generalization B. bandwagon D. plain folks If I were a man, a young man, and knew what I know today, I would look into the eyes of Life undaunted By any fate that might threaten me, I would give to the world what the world most wanted-- Manhood that knows it can do and be; Courage that dares, and faith that can see Clear into the depths of the human soul, And find God there, and ultimate goal… --from: If I Were A Man, A Young Man by Ella Wheeler Wilcox 25. The passage appeals more to the sense of ____________. A. feelings B. sight C. sound D. taste 26. The writer’s attitude toward inner strength is best describe as _____. A. admiration B. criticism C. inspiration D. support 27. Most probably, the writer’s purpose in this passage is to ______. A. express a feeling C. reveal the truth B. give an advice D. win other’s approval 28. The last five lines of the poem express more of a/an ______. A. call to validation C. inspiration B. humility D. invitation

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Directions: Read the following passage carefully, and copy the letter of the word or phrase that best completes each numbered item. THE BOTTOM LINE Anonymous 1 FACE IT, nobody owes you a living. What you achieve, or fail to achieve in your lifetime Is directly related to what you do or fail to do. No one chooses his parent or childhood, 5 but you can choose your own direction. Everyone has problems and obstacles to overcome, But that too is relative to each individual. NOTHING IS CARVED IN STONE! 9. You can change anything in your life If you want to badly enough. Excuses are for losers! Those who take Responsibility for their actions 13 Are the real winners in life. Winners meet life challenges head on Knowing there are guarantees, and give it all they’ve got 17 And never think it’s too late or too early to begin.

From: attributionhttp://www.citehr.com/29581-poem-bottom-line. html#ixzz2uatLUztr

29. The word in the poem which is the opposite of “help” is ______. A. direction C. overcome B. obstacles D. relative 30. Line no.9 suggests that everything is subject to ______. A. begin B. change C. meet D. overcome 31. As hinted in the poem, the author has a/an _________ attitude in life. A. come what may C. negative B. indifferent D. positive 32. The tone of the poem is more of _________. A. admiration B. criticism C. inspirational D. pride 33. The feeling that the writer intends us to have toward life is __________. A. contentment B. courage C. hope D. joy 34. The word in the poem that gives the best hint to the mood it evokes is ________. A. carved B. changed C. guarantee D. overcome 35. The predominant poetic device used in the poem is __________. A. alliteration B. metaphor C. paradox D. personification

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Part III Process Logical Organization Directions: Arrange the following sentences logically to form a coherent paragraph. ___36. A. Because we started it all, only we can correct it by having humility and discipline. ___37. B. We must do real work, and show to the world what we are made of. ___38. C. We really deserve the kind of leaders we have. ___39. D. If we are unhappy with the entire situation, we have ourselves to look into. Composition Writing (Nos. 41-50) Directions: Choose a position on a current issue relating to your school, city or country about which you have strong feeling, opinion or stand. Imagine you are invited to speak before the leaders of your city or municipality as well as their constituents. Develop a persuasive paragraph for your speech manuscript that gives your opinion about your chosen topic in which you take a stand. Take note that your purpose is to get others to argue with your view. Remember to use effective supports like examples, facts, personal experiences, observations or statistics as evidence and persuasive techniques to persuade them on the validity of your claim or stand. See if it can alter your audience’s perspective about the issue. You will be given ten (10) points for this task.

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POST TEST IN GRADE 10 ENGLISH Levels of Assessment KNOWLEDGE

ITEM

SKILLS to be Assessed Writing/Speaking •



1. restates the argument and expresses a call to action 2. the statement that asserts what the writer/speaker wants the reader/listener to believe on or to do 3. contains the reasons, examples, statistics, opinions used to support a point of view or stand 4. catchy hook 5. fallacy 6. myth 7. persuasive essay 8. thesis statement 9. Mav: Is this a challenge I must face? 10. Sol: Of course, you need to accept that as part of the bargain. 11. Mav: I don’t believe I will do it now. After all I’m not yet ready for it. 12. Sol: I believe you can do it if you try 13. The Greeks themselves felt at home with human Gods. 14. They knew how they amused themselves even in banquets. 15. Even Hera, the jealous wife herself could be feared.

Identifying the most important elements in persuasive writing/ speaking Identifying special terms in persuasive writing

Grammar • •

MODULE 1

Identifying modals Identifying intensive and reflexive pronouns

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Correct answer 1. C 2. A

3. B

4. C 5. D 6. A 7. E 8. B 9. C 10. B

11.D

12.A 13. I

14.R 15.I

UNDERSTANDING

Reading and Literature • I n f e r r i n g the main point of the passage

Vocabulary • Giving denotative and connotative meaning of words

16. The main point of 16.D the article is best expressed in Sentence no. __ A. 1 B. 2 C.5 D. 10 17. The generalization or 17.D statement about life or human experience the passage make is to _____. A. bring out the best in you B. stand up for one’s belief C. struggle against the odds D. take strength to bear up the odds 18. To“ predict” is a/ an _______ of the word “envision” in Sentence no.9. A. connotation B. denotation C. opposite D. symbol 19. The word in the poem which is the opposite of “help” is _________. A. direction B. obstacles C. overcome D. relative 20. Line no. 9 suggests that everything is subject to _______. A. begin B. change C. meet D.overcome

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18. B

19.C

20.B



Determining the audience



Drawing conclusions



21. This article/passage would most probably interest a/an __________. A. adolescent B. adult C. child D. old man

21.A

22. The passage is an 22.D example of a/an __________. A. anecdote B. biography C. personal essay D. persuasive essay 23.D 23. The last five lines of the poem express more of a/an _________. A.call to action B. humility C. inspiration D. invitation

Analyzing elements and techniques in persuasion

24. The writer’s comment/reaction about challenges and opportunities is best supported by_________. A. facts B. opinion C. reasons D. statistics 25. The strongest evidence used by the writer to support his opinion about turning challenges to opportunities is stated in Sentence no.____. A.3 B.6 C.7 D.9

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24.C

25.D



26. An effective persuasive technique used by the author to emphasize his point is through appealing to ______. A. emotion B. moral C. reason D. both A and C 27. The fallacy committed in Sentence no.7 is _______. A.attacking the person B. bandwagon C. hasty generalization D. plain folks •

Inferring sensory impressions

28. The passage appeals more to the sense of _____. A. feeling B. sight C. sound D. taste

26. C

27. A

28.A

29.A

29. Lines no. 5 to 8 appeal more to the sense of _________. A. feeling B sight C. sound D. taste •

Analyzing poetic devices, tone, mood, and purpose of the author

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30. As hinted in the poem, the author has a/an ____attitude in life . A. come what may B. indifferent C. negative D. positive

30.D



31. The tone of the poem 31. C is more of _______. A. admiration B. criticism C. inspirational D. pride 32. The feeling that the 32. C writer intends us to have toward life is _________. A.contentment B. courage C. hope D. joy 33. The word in the poem that gives the 33.C best hint to the mood it evokes is _____. A. carved B. changed C. guarantee D. overcome 34. The predominant 34.C poetic device used in the poem is ___________. A. alliteration B. metaphor C. paradox D. personification PROCESS

Writing •

A. Because we started 35. C it all, only we can correct it by having humility and discipline

Logical organization of ideas in a persuasive paragraph

B. We must do real work, and show to 36. D the world what we are made of.

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Paragraph composition employing basic elements and techniques in persuasion

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C. We really deserve 37. A the kind of leaders we have. 38. B D. If we are unhappy with the entire situation, we have ourselves to look 41-50 into. 10 pts

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