The Skinny-Fat Solution - Soldier 3.0 - (3) Quick Reference Guide [2014]

July 25, 2017 | Author: John Hislop | Category: Breads, Cakes, Carbohydrates, Potato, Oatmeal
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SOLDIER 3.0 (3)

TRAINING + NUTRITION QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE A piece of The Skinny-Fat Solution by and © anthony mychal of anthonymychal.com

And now it’s time for the part where I cover my legal behind All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of Anthony Mychal. And let’s get serious: this book is not a substitute for medical or professional health and/or fitness advice. Please consult a qualified health professional prior to engaging in any exercise. The content here is intended for informational and entertainment purposes only. Talk to the old health care professionals that can better direct the application of the materials to your specific circumstances. Never disregard their expertise regardless of what you read in this text or through my website. The author, any contributors, publisher and copyright holder(s) are not responsible for intestinal spillage, vomiting, asthma, banana crusades, adventures in sadomasochism, or any other adverse effects associated with any use of this work. In other words, there is no possible way you can sue me from reading or putting into practice anything within these pages or on any of the websites associated with Anthony Mychal. Affiliate disclaimer: Throughout this resource, I may make use of affiliate links. Affiliate links have a unique tracking code that identifies me as a referrer, so I make crumbs of money any time you click through and purchase. Someone’s gotta’ pay for the big guy’s coffee, right? If you aren’t a fan of this, feel free to search for the products listed and buy with the original link. But I appreciate the token of support and appreciation if you buy through my link. Fonts used: homestead, bebas neue, triforce, carroserie, saiyan sans

Edited by: Lander M. Kerbey

WARM-UP BASIC WARM-UP Think: head to toe, joint to limb, gentle to strong.

JOINT: • Neck rotations • Shoulder shrug rotations • Elbow bends and beaters • Wrist rotations • Trunk rotations and twists • Hip rotations • Knee bends and beaters • Ankle rotations

LIMB: • Shoulder and chest swings x 10 per position • Front, back, and side leg swings x 10 per position SKIPS: • • • •

Butt kicks x 10 s A-skips x 10 s High knees x 10 s B-skips x 10 s

Notes: Run through the joint work once. Do as many as needed until you feel good. Run through the limb and skipping work two or three times.

POSTURE INTO THE WARM-UP POSTURE PROGRAM: 5-10 quality Y raises, holding the top for 3-5 seconds 30 second thoracic extension stretch 30 second pec minor stretch (each side) Repeat the above 3-5 times

Moving Into a Specific Warm-up After the joint rotations, limb swings, and skipping sequence, you’re off into a more specific warm-up. Unless you want to do extra to get loose. If you have your own warm-up that you enjoy (maybe riding the bicycle for a few minutes) that’s fine. What you should always do is, after your main warm-up, move into a specific warm-up for your next exercise. So if you’re doing squats with 135 pounds (60kg), you wouldn’t just throw 135 pounds on the barbell and start squatting. You’d hit a specific warm-up first. Maybe 10 bodyweight squats, 10 squats with the empty barbell (20kg), and them some squats with 95 pounds (43kg). Doing heavy pressing? Maybe do a few sets of push-ups before moving to the empty bar before moving to some warm-up sets. The full gist of the warm-up should be ingrained within you by now, but this is my feeble reminder.

THE TRAINING PROGRAM

DAY A A) Money hinge: Conventional deadlift – [4 x 5] 1 x 3-5 •

Work up to a max set of 3-5 reps

A2) Graceful BW: Perfect push-up •

Do an easy amount of reps in between each set of the money hinge

B1) Smooth squat: Front squat – [1 x 5] 3 x 6-8 •

Work up to three sets of 6-8 reps, keeping the workload lower than a max level

B2) Graceful BW: Perfect chin-up •

Do one or two reps in between each set of squats. If you can’t yet do one rep, go for a rocket wing hold for five seconds. (Rocket wings are explained in the Fundamental Movement Guide.)

C1) Calves: Donkey calf raise (or any calf exercise) – 2 x 20 •

Do slow reps, focus more on feel

C2) Gymnastics Abs Circuit – 4 exercises, 10-20 reps each

DAY B A1) Vertical pull: Chin-ups – Ten consecutive reps or [2 x 5] 3 x 5-6 • •

If you can’t yet do five, work to ten consecutive repetitions If you can do five, add weight and work up to three sets of 5-6 reps

A2) Horizontal press: 30° incline press – [2 x 5] 3 x 5-6 •

Work up to three sets of 5-6 reps

B1) Smooth curl: Barbell curls – 3 x 8-10 •

Work up to three sets of 8-10 reps, keeping the workload lower than a max level

B2) Smooth press: Unilateral floor press – 3 x 6-8 •

Work up to three sets of 6-8 reps, keeping the workload lower than a max level

DAY C A1) Money squat: Back squat – [4 x 5] 1 x 5-8 •

Work up to a max set of 5-8 reps

A2) Graceful BW: Perfect chin-up •

Do one or two reps in between each set of squats. If you can’t yet do one rep, go for a rocket wing hold for five seconds.

B1) Smooth hinge: Romanian deadlift – [1 x 6] 3 x 6-8 •

Work up to three sets of 6-8 reps, keeping the workload lower than a max level

B2) Graceful BW: Perfect push-up •

Do an easy amount of reps in between each set of the money hinge

C1) Calves: Donkey calf raise (or any calf exercise) – 2 x 20 •

Do slow reps, focus more on feel

C2) Gymnastics Abs Circuit – 4 exercises, 10-20 reps each

DAY D A1) Vertical pull: Pull-ups – Ten consecutive reps or increase max reps • •

Work up to 10 consecutive repetitions Once you can do 10 consecutive repetitions, push for a higher one set max

A2) Vertical press: Overhead press – [2 x 5] 3 x 5-8 •

Work up to three sets of 5 to 8 reps

B1) Smooth pull: Inverted rows – 3 x 8-10 • •

Work up to three sets of 8-10 reps, keeping the workload lower than a max level Use more difficult variations when the workload gets easy

B2) Push-ups – 3 x 8-10 • •

Work up to three sets of 8-10 reps, keeping the workload lower than a max level Use more difficult variations when the workload gets easy

ADDING EXTRA FAT LOSS WORK ON TOP: Jump rope for ten-twenty minutes post training on upper body days, sprint for twenty minutes on lower-body training days. Walk on rest days. Walk to get fresh air as much as possible.

THE COOL DOWN You have three stretches to focus on. The dislocates are an all-at-once blitz, and rather fatiguing. Do them last, and do all thirty consecutively. For the bridge, I recommend getting twenty quality repetitions. For the super hip stretch, I recommend holding at least each leg for two minutes. Putting it all together, here’s what you can work with. • • • • •

Bridge push-ups x 10 Super hip stretch x 1-2 minutes per leg Bridge push-ups x 10 Super hip stretch x 1-2 minutes per leg Dislocates x 30-50

All in all, you’re looking at about fifteen minutes of work. Not bad. And you’ll feel like a new person when it’s all said and done. This will serve you throughout your adventure.

NUTRITION CLIFF NOTES 1. THE PROTEIN CORE • One pound of meat or fish (the leaner the better) • Two scoops of plain, unflavored whey protein • Two or three eggs • Bowl of cottage cheese

3A. FAT POTENTIAL • Less extra fats if you eat fattier meats • Little bit of extra fats (avocado, small portion of nuts) if you eat leaner meat 3B. THE HUNGER CURE

2. THE STARCH STEP • One piece of fruit • Two-three cups or “servings” of carbohydrate split among whatever sources

• As many non-starchy cruciferous veggies and berries as you need for satiety. Need more satiety, more lean protein on top.

JUST A TINY BIT MORE SPECIFIC A) Get one gram of protein per pound of bodyweight, and for you metric folk that’s 2.2 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight If you don’t know where to start, have a fist sized serving of protein at every meal—protein rich sources are usually meat, so you’re looking at a fistful of some kind of meat. Go leaner when possible. No meat? Make use of protein powder and eggs. One 70cc scoop of protein will deliver about 25 grams of protein, which is around the fistful of meat. One egg is usually 6-7 grams of protein, which is considerably less.

B) Use hunger voodoo I’m convinced that being overly hungry when losing fat is an idea that comes from people that do it wrong. Want to still feel rather full and be in fat loss mode?

Tank lean protein (like white chicken and turkey) and raw non-starchy vegetables. Few things will fill you up more, and few things will be better on the fat loss quest.

C) Have one “serving” of fruit This will likely be one “piece” if the fruit is nifty and handheld like an apple, banana, orange, mango, and you get the idea. If it’s not, ball park one cup of the fruit. In other words, cut the pineapple into one inch by one inch cubes, throw them into a measuring cup, when you get to one cup, that’s your serving.

D) Have 2 CUPS starchy CARBS The overall goal here is to have somewhere in the neighborhood of 60-80 grams of carbs. This most often will be two “cups” of starchy carbs. If you dice up a potato, one will likely fit into one cup. Using this logic, you can get around two potatoes. If this cup logic is funky, simply look at the nutrition facts. The less processed the better.

E) AS MANY VEGGIES AND BERRIES Hungry? Go wild on non-starchy vegetables and thin skinned berries. As many as you want.

If you aren’t losing fat, then... Critically evaluate how many ' secret' fats you’re eating. • Are you cooking in fat (oils, butter)? How is that adding up? • Are you eating fatty meats regularly? • Fatty protein extras regularly?

Critically evaluate how many carbohydrates you’re eating. • Are you eating highly processed carbohydrates that carry great caloric load (added sugar) or are easy to eat in abundance? Hint: Cereal and donuts are easier to eat than potatoes.

Critically evaluate how your body is responding to food. • If you’re tanking dairy, and feeling bloated every second of the day, you need to make adjustments. (More on this in chapter _ tk.)

Critically evaluate your beverages. • The only things you should be drinking are water, black coffee, and unsweetened teas. Ditch artificially sweetened junk.

GLYCEMIC LOAD OF FOODS A glycemic load below ten is considered small. Keep in mind that you have to consider the ingredients. Lots of food on this chart have undisclosed ingredients. Also keep in mind, pairing food reduces glycemic load.

FOOD

Glycemic index (glucose = 100)

Glycemic load per serving

Serving size (grams)

BAKERY PRODUCTS AND BREADS Banana cake, made with sugar

47

60

14

Banana cake, made without sugar

55

60

12

Sponge cake, plain

46

63

17

Vanilla cake made from packet mix with vanilla frosting (Betty Crocker)

42

111

24

Apple, made with sugar

44

60

13

Apple, made without sugar

48

60

9

Waffles, Aunt Jemima (Quaker Oats)

76

35

10

Bagel, white, frozen

72

70

25

Baguette, white, plain

95

30

15

Coarse barley bread, 75-80%

34

30

7

kernels, average Hamburger bun

61

30

9

Kaiser roll

73

30

12

Pumpernickel bread

56

30

7

50% cracked wheat kernel bread

58

30

12

White wheat flour bread

71

30

10

Wonder™ bread, average

73

30

10

Whole wheat bread, average

71

30

9

100% Whole Grain™ bread (Natural Ovens)

51

30

7

Pita bread, white

68

30

10

Corn tortilla

52

50

12

Wheat tortilla

30

50

8

Coca Cola®, average

63

250 mL

16

Fanta®, orange soft drink

68

250 mL

23

Lucozade®, original (sparkling glucose drink)

95±10

250 mL

40

Apple juice, unsweetened, average

44

250 mL

30

Cranberry juice cocktail (Ocean Spray®)

68

250 mL

24

Gatorade

78

250 mL

12

Orange juice, unsweetened

50

250 mL

12

Tomato juice, canned

38

250 mL

4

BEVERAGES

BREAKFAST CEREALS AND

RELATED PRODUCTS All-Bran™, average

55

30

12

Coco Pops™, average

77

30

20

Cornflakes™, average

93

30

23

Cream of Wheat™ (Nabisco)

66

250

17

Cream of Wheat™, Instant (Nabisco)

74

250

22

Grapenuts™, average

75

30

16

Muesli, average

66

30

16

Oatmeal, average

55

250

13

Instant oatmeal, average

83

250

30

Puffed wheat, average

80

30

17

Raisin Bran™ (Kellogg's)

61

30

12

Special K™ (Kellogg's)

69

30

14

Pearled barley, average

28

150

12

Sweet corn on the cob, average

60

150

20

Couscous, average

65

150

9

Quinoa

53

150

13

White rice, average

89

150

43

Quick cooking white basmati

67

150

28

Brown rice, average

50

150

16

Converted, white rice (Uncle Ben's®)

38

150

14

Whole wheat kernels, average

30

50

11

Bulgur, average

48

150

12

74

25

14

GRAINS

COOKIES AND CRACKERS Graham crackers

Vanilla wafers

77

25

14

Shortbread

64

25

10

Rice cakes, average

82

25

17

Rye crisps, average

64

25

11

Soda crackers

74

25

12

Ice cream, regular

57

50

6

Ice cream, premium

38

50

3

Milk, full fat

41

250mL

5

Milk, skim

32

250 mL

4

Reduced-fat yogurt with fruit, average

33

200

11

Apple, average

39

120

6

Banana, ripe

62

120

16

Dates, dried

42

60

18

Grapefruit

25

120

3

Grapes, average

59

120

11

Orange, average

40

120

4

Peach, average

42

120

5

Peach, canned in light syrup

40

120

5

Pear, average

38

120

4

Pear, canned in pear juice

43

120

5

Prunes, pitted

29

60

10

Raisins

64

60

28

Watermelon

72

120

4

DAIRY PRODUCTS AND ALTERNATIVES

FRUITS

BEANS AND NUTS

Baked beans, average

40

150

6

Blackeye peas, average

33

150

10

Black beans

30

150

7

Chickpeas, average

10

150

3

Chickpeas, canned in brine

38

150

9

Navy beans, average

31

150

9

Kidney beans, average

29

150

7

Lentils, average

29

150

5

Soy beans, average

15

150

1

Cashews, salted

27

50

3

Peanuts, average

7

50

0

Fettucini, average

32

180

15

Macaroni, average

47

180

23

Macaroni and Cheese (Kraft)

64

180

32

Spaghetti, white, boiled, average

46

180

22

Spaghetti, white, boiled 20 min, average

58

180

26

Spaghetti, wholemeal, boiled, average

42

180

17

Corn chips, plain, salted, average

42

50

11

Fruit Roll-Ups®

99

30

24

M & M's®, peanut

33

30

6

Microwave popcorn, plain, average

55

20

6

Potato chips, average

51

50

12

Pretzels, oven-baked

83

30

16

PASTA and NOODLES

SNACK FOODS

Snickers Bar®

51

60

18

Green peas, average

51

80

4

Carrots, average

35

80

2

Parsnips

52

80

4

Baked russet potato, average

111

150

33

Boiled white potato, average

82

150

21

Instant mashed potato, average

87

150

17

Sweet potato, average

70

150

22

Yam, average

54

150

20

Hummus (chickpea salad dip)

6

30

0

Honey, average

61

25

12

VEGETABLES

MISCELLANEOUS

SOURCE: http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/Glycemic_index_and_glycemic_load_for_100 _foods.htm The complete list of the glycemic index and glycemic load for more than 1,000 foods can be found in the article "International tables of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2008" by Fiona S. Atkinson, Kaye Foster-Powell, and Jennie C. Brand-Miller in the December 2008 issue of Diabetes Care, Vol. 31, number 12, pages 2281-2283. An earlier version of this table appeared here: "International tables of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2002," by Kaye Foster-Powell, Susanna H.A. Holt, and Janette C. Brand-Miller in the July 2002 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 62, pages 5– 56.

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